header green line bottom border

Exclusively online


Fidget Widgets

Goof Off While You Work? You Might Be Doing Way More Than You Think.

Ever notice how people play with a thing — pen, paperclip, stress ball, magnets, marker, etc. — while lost in thought as they work? Maybe you do it too. There’s a powerful link between the hand and the brain. Research shows that our feelings, thoughts, and body are very much interconnected.

Our Fidget Widgets project is exploring this behavior and the opportunity for small, tangible, digital interactions to tap into what happens while people fiddle with objects as they work. Think of a Fidget Widget as a new kind of productivity tool aiming to subtly enhance your creativity, or give you focus, or decrease stress just when you need it.

Our study requires lots and lots of participation.

What we’ve learned so far is that people strongly desire surprisingly specific experiences in their hands. We're using a tumblr page to collect examples of items and materials and ways in which people fiddle with objects while at work. Only with many submissions will patterns emerge. These patterns will provide valuable insights into how people use objects to self-regulate their internal state as they work and will inform just where we go next.




Project ScumScan

Our citizen science group in LA has been measuring water quality along the river as well as capturing water samples. We're trying to measure the base biodiversity of the river system by getting a census of all of the species we've been sampling. This will help indicate the overall health and diversity of the river system.




Risk Factors for Low-Appeal Shelter Dogs

This project is part of a a year-long research project on behalf of PetRescue – investigating the risk factors associated with low appeal animals on their website. A part of the project is this web-based scoring system to assess photographic attributes of the four most common breeds within the data (Australian Cattle Dog, Jack Russell Terrier, Staffordshire Bull-Terrier and Labrador Retriever). These data in addition to other results will be correlated with the length of stay (time) to determine whether certain phenotypic characteristics enhance adoptability of dogs.




C-BARQ

The C-BARQ (or Canine Behavioral Assessment and Research Questionnaire) is designed to provide dog owners and professionals with standardized evaluations of canine temperament and behavior. The C-BARQ was developed by researchers at the Center for the Interaction of Animals and Society of the University of Pennsylvania, and is currently the only behavioral assessment instrument of its kind to be extensively tested for reliability and validity on large samples of dogs of many breeds. The current version consists of 101 questions describing the different ways in which dogs typically respond to common events, situations, and stimuli in their environment. The C-BARQ is simple to use, and can be completed by anyone who is reasonably familiar with a dog's typical, day-to-day behavior. On average, it takes from 10-15 minutes to complete.

The C-BARQ is available to veterinarians, behavioral consultants, researchers, shelters, breeders, and working dog organizations with an interest in screening dogs for the presence and severity of behavioral problems. For a limited period, it is also open to pet-owners interested in comparing their dogs to others in the C-BARQ database.




Emotional Load of Calls

Assist in research investigating the evolutionary and ethological foundations of dog-human relationship. Dogs, like other animals, communicate through vocalization. They communicate their needs and desires, and they can also communicate their emotions.

The Emotional load of calls is a 30 minute survey, with two optional pauses after 10-minute intervals. You will hear human and dog calls, and your task is to mark the sound sample based on the emotional state and intensity of the caller.




Canid Howl Project

Come listen to the enchanting, haunting sounds of wolves, coyotes, and dogs, and help us better understand and conserve these species.

Analysing these recordings is difficult and time consuming. It's easy to make mistakes, and mistakes can change the conclusions that we draw. But here's where you can help! By having hundreds, even thousands of volunteers giving their own analysis of the canid howls, we can investigate the role of these sounds, and understand more about the social behaviour of the whole range of canid species and breeds.

You can also donate your dog's howl for the project.




Night Cities

Since 2003, the astronauts have been taking photos from the International Space Station. Many of these images have been published on the websites of participating agencies or the Twitter accounts of the astronauts. However, most of the images taken by astronauts have not been published remaining on archive without being shown to the world. We have added a section to this gallery dedicated to displaying more than a thousand examples of images of cities at night. However, there are still hundreds of thousands of images on file to discover. You can help.

Light pollution causes serious problems. Its effects can be measured from the inside of our bedroom to hundreds of kilometers away. The light destroys the essence of the evening darkness. Humans have an ancestral fear of the dark, but too much light produces very negative effects on the ecosystem and our health.

Satellite images help us measure and compare large illuminate areas. With the colors of the images taken by astronauts on the International Space Station, we can measure the efficiency of lighting in many cities on the planet.

We need volunteers to help us sort the pictures and identify the locations of the images to create maps of light pollution. It will help governments and local authorities to make the right decisions to reduce light pollution.




Transparency Life Sciences

Transparency Life Sciences is an open innovation drug company that crowd sources improvements to clinical trial protocols. Join TLS's network and improve drug development research by contributing your expertise or experience. Researchers, clinicians can help by making recommendations to clinical trial protocols or suggesting alternate uses for pharmaceuticals. Patients and families can help by making recommendations for protocols that fit their needs.

Featured tools:

1) The Protocol Builder is a crowdsourcing survey tool. By answering a few questions you can help improve clinical trial protocols.

2) Indication Finder for researchers only, users can help identify potential new applications for stalled pharmaceuticals.




The NOVA RNA Lab

Nature’s best kept secret is a wonder molecule called RNA. It is central to the origin of life, evolution, and the cellular machinery that keeps us alive.

In this Lab you’ll play the role of a molecular engineer by solving RNA folding puzzles. Then take your skills to Eterna, where you can design RNAs that could be at the heart of future life-saving therapies.

This project is part of the NOVA Labs platform




WeCureALZ

One symptom of Alzheimer’s that has been known since the discovery of the disease is reduced blood flow to the brain, but until now, nobody knew why. That is why this aspect of the disease, which likely contributes to cognitive problems and accelerates injury to brain cells, has remained untreated.

New specialized imaging techniques have allowed Cornell University Researchers to discover a potential causal mechanism underlying the reduced blood flow. So for the first time, we have an explanation for this aspect of Alzheimer’s Disease. This explanation points to new treatments that could substantially slow progression of the disease and delay, or even prevent, the onset of symptoms.

However, homing in on the specific pharmaceutical targets using current methods would take about 60 years, limited primarily by the need for extensive manual image analysis. By crowdsourcing the blood flow analysis to citizen scientists, we expect to reduce that time to less than two years.




Informing NASA's Asteroid Initiative

This is a Citizens Forum for NASA’s Asteroid Initiative.

In its history, the Earth has been repeatedly struck by asteroids, large chunks of rock from space that can cause considerable damage in a collision. Can we—or should we—try to protect Earth from potentially hazardous asteroids? How about harvesting asteroids for potential economic benefits? Could asteroid exploration be used to boost our capabilities and help clear a pathway to Mars? How should we balance costs, risks, and benefits of human exploration in space?

Sounds like stuff just for rocket scientists. But how would you like to be part of this discussion?

An innovative project between NASA, the US government’s space agency, and a group led by Arizona
State University called ECAST—Expert and Citizen Assessment of Science and Technology—is planning to do just that: allow anyone, anywhere, to have a say in decisions about the future of space exploration.

The project held three forums in November and is now recruiting participants for the online discussion scheduled to take place between January and February. Participants in this phase will assign pros and cons to recommendations and statements generated at the three forums. Discussions cover topics from how to detect
threatening asteroids and how to defend against them to strategies for human exploration of asteroids and the space beyond the moon.

The goal is to enable participants to learn about such issues, develop their own questions, and make recommendations based on their own values and interests.

ECAST is a network of different institutions, launched in 2010 to provide a 21st technology assessment. It combines the research strengths of universities like Arizona State University with the skills of nonpartisan policy research organizations and the education and outreach capabilities of science museums and citizen science programs.

The report and assessments from the forums will provide input to guide the initiative’s direction and
related public engagement activities.




Exploring a Culture of Health:Signal Detection

How can we harness data signals generated by our technology to improve health? US Davis in partnership with Ginger.io is tracking how smartphone apps might help patients with mental health disorders. LinkAges Connect is using smart meters to help seniors live interdependently, safely.

What are some ways you track your health? Does it affect your day to day choices? Do you have ideas for using existing technology or infrastructure to monitor or measure health? Leave a comment below.




Exploring a Culture of Health: Visualizing Health

Health data can be confusing. Designing visuals for health data and risk information is a useful tool for communicating this information. But how best to design these visuals? Visualizing Health examines different ways to visualize data.




UNITAR Disaster Mapping

Transfer your skills in health and medicine to help develop a crowdsourcing application for processing disaster images in the media.

Volunteers can help in identifying information that can be extracted from photos. Contribute feedback on the design of the photo analysis application.

***This project will be come active in August. Please check back then for more information on how to volunteer.***




Nanocrafter

Nanocrafter aims to increase the number of people working in the field by orders of magnitude. Players learn how to build devices with DNA through a series of engaging levels that teach how to craft strand displacement-based reaction networks. Players can compete in challenge levels meant to foster creative solutions to open-ended scientific problems, giving the opportunity for players to improve upon published results. With social elements including peer review of solutions and forming groups to solve difficult problems, Nanocrafter’s players will team up with scientists to advance both the breadth and depth of synthetic biology research far faster than the scientists could alone.




Planet Mappers: Mercury Edition

Map the surface of Mercury by marking and measuring craters and linear surface features in images from NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft.

By mapping craters across the planet, we can start to piece together the global crater population and figure out what these new images are showing us about the solar system’s inner-most planet.




Asteroid Mappers: Vesta Edition

Help us map the surface of asteroid Vesta using images from NASA' Dawn spacecraft. Measure the sizes and positions of craters and other surface features.

Why do we care about craters? Craters can tell us a lot about what’s happening on a planetary surface. One of the main uses of craters is to tell ages. The age of Vesta’s surface is really important to know, because it was probably one of the very first objects to fully form in the solar system.




Lookit

If you've ever wondered what your child is thinking or what it's like inside your newborn's mind, you're not alone.
The single most amazing computational engine known to mankind is your child's mind.

We're hoping to learn more about how babies and children learn by enlisting the help of their most dedicated and curious observers: their own parents!

By participating in a quick online activity with your child and submitting a webcam recording of his/her responses, you can contribute to our collective understanding of the fascinating phenomenon of children's learning.

In some experiments you'll step into the role of a researcher, asking your child questions or controlling the experiment based on what he or she does.

Traditionally, developmental studies happen in a quiet room in a university lab. Why complement these in-lab studies with online ones? We're hoping to...

...Make it easier for you to take part in research, especially for families without a stay-at-home parent

...Work with more kids when needed--right now a limiting factor in designing studies is the time it takes to recruit participants

...Draw conclusions from a more representative population of families--not just those who live near a university and are able to visit the lab during the day

...Make it easier for families to continue participating in longitudinal studies, which may involve multiple testing sessions separated by months or years

...Observe more natural behavior because children are at home rather than in an unfamiliar place

...Create a system for learning about special populations--for instance, children with specific developmental disorders

...Make the procedures we use in doing research more transparent, and make it easier to replicate our findings

...Communicate with families about the research we're doing and what we can learn from it




Patients Like Me

Patients Like Me is an opportunity for patients and medical experts to communication and improve healthcare. Individuals and experts can share and compare experiences such as treatments or symptoms. Individuals track their health, learn more about different treatments, or connect with individuals with similar conditions.




Health eHeart Study

The Health eHeart Study is the first of its kind - an electronic clinical research study that will gather long-term information about participants' health and behaviors with the latest technologies.

The goal of this study is to hone in on more specific predictors of heart disease by taking into account each person's unique profile in relation to our constantly evolving world.

We need people of all ages and from all backgrounds to tease out the reasons behind heart disease. The only criteria is that the participants are 18 years and older. We are looking to enroll up to 1 million participants worldwide.




Which English?

One of the oldest findings in the study of the mind is that children are better at learning languages than adults. But when you bring children and adults into the lab, adults are better at any language-learning task you give them. So whatever is happening, it happens at a very different timescale than what we can study in the lab.

In this project, we are taking advantage of the fact that different people start learning English at different ages -- anything from birth to old age. We are using the Internet to get a very broad sample of people who started English and different ages and have different first languages -- a much, much more detailed survey than has ever been attempted before.

To help you get a sense of what we're learning as the project progresses, we've added some machine learning to the quiz that tries to guess your dialect. As we get more participants, the guesses will get more sophisticated, including guessing whether your native language is English.

We are also building interactive infographics to describe the data as it comes in. You can find them on our blog. The first one is available now at http://www.gameswithwords.org/WhichEnglish/dialect_results.html




RASCals (Reptiles and Amphibians of Southern California)

RASCals is designed to improve our knowledge of native and non-native reptiles and amphibians in southern California. This region is home to 22.5 million people and has experienced dramatic urbanization and habitat modification. We need your help in documenting reptiles and amphibians throughout the region so that we can examine how various species have responded to these habitat changes. We are interested in native and non-native species and in observations in all types of habitats, from relatively pristine habitats to heavily modified, urban habitats, such as backyards, schoolyards, and urban parks. This project is conducted in collaboration with iNaturalist.




Mind Paths

What is the perceived relation between words? This is still a complex issue for semantic specialists.

This experiment uses a video-game in order to create a semantic map where volunteers define the distances between words. Semantic analysis is a major challenge for science and innovation as it's a very complex task requiring advanced models and experts validations.

A common technique is to determine which words are very similar or have a related meaning. Related words can be considered as neighbors in a graphic map.




Calling all serial citizen scientists!

Help us make SciStarter better for you.

Are you involved in more than one project? If so, please consider taking this short 5-10 minute survey. Your answers will help us improve how SciStarter helps you find and keep track of projects. Added bonus, we will giving out free SciStarter t-shirts and space microbe swabbing kits to survey participants.

Thanks and stay curious!!




Cropland Capture

By 2050 we will need to feed more than 2 billion additional people on the Earth. By playing Cropland Capture, you will help us to improve basic information about where cropland is located on the Earth's surface. Using this information, we will be better equipped at tackling problems of future food security and the effects of climate change on future food supply. Get involved and contribute to a good cause! Help us to identify cropland area!

Each week (starting Nov. 15th 2013) the top three players with the highest score at the end of each week will be added to our weekly winners list. After 25 weeks, three people will be drawn randomly from this list to become our overall winners. Prizes will include an Amazon Kindle, a brand new smartphone and a tablet.

Thank you very much for helping science and solving the hunger problem!




SynBio4all

Discover and learn about synthetic biology on our platform.

Once inspired, participants will be able to submit their research ideas to our synthetic biology community forum.

The research ideas are next shaped into a testable hypothesis with the help of the SynBio4all community. Community members will then have the opportunity to join the research project and develop a research plan and potentially test the hypothesis in our scientific laboratory.

The community votes on the online forum to decide which research projects will be tested in our laboratory.

All results from the citizen science designed research plan will be posted on the SynBio4all online platform giving the community an opportunity to help analyze and interpret the data.




The NOVA Cloud Lab

Covering some 70 percent of Earth's surface, clouds play a key role in our planet's well-being. But how do they form, why are there so many types, and what clues can they give us about the weather and climate to come? Try your hand at classifying clouds and investigating the role they play in severe tropical storms. Featuring NOVA-produced videos and real feeds from NASA Earth Science satellites, this Lab challenges you to classify clouds and investigate the role they play in severe tropical storms.

This project is part of the larger NOVA Labs platform: www.pbs.org/nova/labs




Hour of Code

The Hour of Code is an opportunity for every student to try computer science for one hour. During Computer Science Education Week (Dec. 9-15), we're making history and recruiting 10 million to join in and do the Hour of Code.

You can also participate in the Hour of Code all year-round. Tutorials will work on browsers, tablets, smartphones, or "unplugged."




Quantum Moves

The Quantum Moves game was born out of the dilemmas and questions the quantum physics researchers at Aarhus University confronted with when they took the challenge of building a quantum computer in the basement lab of the university.

Confident that the human brain is able to do better than even the most advanced computational machines available in the world, the CODER team decided to create the "Quantum Moves" game and invite everyone to play and get the chance to do front-line quantum physics research.

The idea behind the game is simple: every time you play, your mouse movements are simulating the laser beams moves used in the real quantum lab to transport the atoms onto the right pathways.

Your goal is to achieve the best scores in "QComp" and "Beat AI" labs, which translate the most difficult scientific challenges, and thus help science make a step forward towards building a quantum computer.




Slooh

Since 2003 Slooh has connected land based telescopes to the internet for access by the broader public. Slooh members have taken 2.4m photos of over 40,000 celestial objects, and participated in numerous discoveries with leading astronomical institutions. Slooh’s automated observatories develop celestial images in real time for broadcast to the internet. Slooh’s technology is protected by patent 7,194,146 B2 which was awarded in 2006. Slooh’s flagship observatory is situated on Mt. Teide in the Canary Islands, in partnership with the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands (IAC). Slooh has also broadcast celestial events from partner observatories in Arizona, Japan, Hawaii, Cypress and Dubai. Slooh’s free live broadcasts of asteroids, comets, transits, eclipses, etc. feature narration by astronomy experts Bob Berman and Paul Cox and are syndicated to media outlets such as NBC, ABC, CNN, Fox News, National Geographic, Wired, The Weather Channel and more. Slooh’s live celestial events have been viewed over a billion times, the highlight of which was the 2011 lunar eclipse broadcast live on Google’s home page. Slooh’s iPad app launched in April of 2013 and makes it easy for beginners to watch live celestial event programming and take pictures from Slooh’s Canary Islands observatory.




#Hooked

Imagine listening to your favourite song. When do you nod your head and sing along? That’s the hook, the most memorable part of the song, crafted by songwriters to stick in your head and exploited by DJs to get people onto the dance floor. Everyone knows the hook when they hear it, but scientists don’t know why.




Darwin for a Day

Darwin for a Day is a web application that allows you to explore the Galapagos Islands through Google Street View and document its unique plants and animals. When you see an animal or plant you’d like to catalogue, you can describe it by creating an observation. You can just enter your best guess at what it is (i.e. “bird”) or enter in the scientific name, if you know it!

All of your observations will be shared with the iNaturalist community & the Charles Darwin Foundation, and will contribute to research of the Galapagos Islands.




Penguins Marching Into Your Classroom

Be a field biologist by following daily pictures and collecting your own data!

Follow Adélie Penguins as they raise their chicks live from Antarctica! Starting around Nov 11 every season we follow 8 new penguin families during the breeding season at Cape Royds. Penguin Science is an NSF funded project engaging and educating classrooms and the public with Antarctic penguins as they raise their families and cope with global climate change. Adopt a penguin family, keep a field notebook recording foraging trips, egg hatching and chick rearing data.

Combine science, art and geography as students track their postcards mailed back to them from Antarctica.

Design and make a flag to fly at our research station.

Something for everyone about Antarctic!




Ignore That!

How distractable are you? How well can you ignore irrelevant information?

See your results at the end of this activity and help us learn more about the structure of language, meaning, and thought in the process.




NanoDoc

NanoDoc is an online game that allows bioengineers and the general public to design new nanoparticle strategies towards the treatment of cancer. You’ll learn about nanomedicine and explore how nanovehicles can cooperate with each other and their environment to kill tumors. Best strategies will be considered for validation in vitro or in robotico. Are you ready to become a NanoDoc?




Study Adélie Penguin breeding

From November to January, classrooms take part in a virtual field study of Adélie Penguins as they breed, brood and rear their chicks in Antarctica. Photos of selected penguin families from Cape Royds Antarctica are posted to the website for students to follow on a daily basis. Weather data, event journal and background information about penguins is also provided. Students keep a field notebook gathering and analyzing their own data about each penguin family using the same process of the field biologist. This real time, long term activity provides students a window into the harshness of Adélie penguin life and the work of field scientists. Predation, competition and environmental challenges all affect the penguin’s ability to raise chicks. Witnessing these events themselves helps students begin to understand the world around them and the remote location of Antarctica. This project offers a real time daily field experience with outcomes we cannot predict.




Fraxinus

Botanists in the UK have teamed up with game development company Team Cooper to design a social media game that uses real genetic data from the common ash tree, Fraxinus excelsior, and from the Chalara fraxinea fungus to find out what makes some trees less susceptible to it.

Fraxinus, which launched last Tuesday (August 13), presents players with multiple rows of colored leaves, where each color represents one of four DNA nucleotides and each row represents the genetic information from a different ash tree sample. Players are challenged to compare chunks of genetic code between the various ash samples, including around 100 Chalara-resistant trees from Denmark, as a means to search for genes that could be encode resistance. Players will also match genetic patterns from the Chalara fungus to learn more about how it spreads.




Explore the Sea Floor

Explore the Seafloor is an online citizen science project undertaken by ABC Science in conjunction with the Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS).

Throughout the month of August we’ll be asking for help with identifying kelp images of the seafloor. This job is normally done by research assistants and is time-consuming and laborious. In Explore the Seafloor we’ll be taking a crowd-sourcing approach to reduce this workload and ask regular folk to get involved and help the scientists with their research work.




Notes from Nature

Most natural history collections are housed in museum cabinets, where they are not easily available to citizens and researchers. The Notes from Nature transcription project addresses this problem by digitizing biological collections one record at a time! Help museum staff and scientists by transcribing the labels and ledgers that have been meticulously recorded and stored over the past century. In many cases these are the only historical records of species distribution available. Join us in unlocking this important information - take some notes from nature!




Socientize

Individuals and institutions interested and/or involved in Citizen Science are now invited to participate in the elaboration of the White Paper on Citizen Science.

In this document Socientize is compiling policy recommendations for the European Commission related with citizens' engagement in the excellence in science for Horizon 2020. We therefore collect experiences and suggestions from the divers stakeholders involved in citizen science, like volunteers, researchers, infrastructure providers, scientific organizations, communicators, innovators, journalists, educational experts and artists.

Note: Project is active until October 2014.

All the contributions will be grouped, analyzed and published anonymously. Your name and institution will appear in the contributors list.

A first draft of the White Paper (Green Paper) will be published in October 2013. The final version of the White Paper will be published in October 2014. Please contribute via this form until September 6th 2013.




Marblar - Super Biotin

Marblar unleashes collective creativity on unused inventions. We post cool science from around the world & let you come up with clever ways to use it. Earn rewards, meet inventors, join startups.

We have found a way to link biotin to a variety of compounds using a bond that is resistant to enzyme degradation, while maintaining biotin's ultra-high affinity to streptavidin.

We’d love to hear what you could come up with in terms of specific applications for it! Given how widely used biotin is in biology, there must be a myriad of other applications out there we haven’t considered yet – can’t wait to hear what you come up with!

A great idea would:
-Make use of the linker’s unique advantage, i.e. that it retains high specificity while being resistant to biotinidase;
-Have strong commercial potential (what’s the market?);
-Include some specifics on how to move the idea forward, i.e. technical details, potential industry partners etc.




Folding@home

Help Stanford University scientists studying Alzheimer's, Huntington's, Parkinson's, and many cancers by simply running a piece of software on your computer.

The problems we are trying to solve require so many calculations, we ask people to donate their unused computer power to crunch some of the numbers.




The VerbCorner Project

Dictionaries have existed for centuries, but scientists still haven't worked out the exact meanings for most words. This is a serious problem if you want to train computers to understand language. If we don't know what words mean, it's hard to teach computers what they mean. It is similarly hard to understand how children come learn the meanings of words, when we don't fully understand those meanings ourselves.

Rather than try to work out the definition of a word all at once, we have broken the problem into a series of separate tasks. Each task has a fanciful backstory -- which we hope you enjoy! -- but at its heart, each task is asking about a specific component of meaning that scientists suspect makes up one of the building blocks of meaning.

You can participate for as little as a few minutes or come back to the site over and over to help code the many thousands of words in English.




Ventus

Help map, collect, and correct information about power generation locations around the world. Through placing pins of power generation sources on a map or filling out and reviewing correcting information about these sources you will help make studying power generation impact on the global carbon cycle and climate change reach new levels.




The NOVA Sun Lab

Despite its apparently steady glow, the Sun is a churning mass of superhot plasma that regularly produces powerful flares and storms that can knock out power and communication systems here on Earth. In this lab, watch NOVA videos to explore what makes the Sun so volatile and get access to the same NASA data, images, and tools that scientists use to predict solar storms—so that you can predict them for yourself.




Astro Drone

The Astro Drone game is part of a scientific crowdsourcing project. People who possess a Parrot AR drone can play the game, in which they are challenged to perform different space missions in an augmented reality. Contribute to future space exploration by playing the free Astro Drone game!

The app is more than a game. Players can choose to contribute to a scientific crowdsourcing experiment that aims to improve autonomous capabilities of space probes, such as landing, obstacle avoidance, and docking. The app processes the images made by the AR drone's camera, extracting abstract mathematical image features. These features can neither be interpreted by humans, nor can the original image be reconstructed. However, the features can be used by robots to learn how to navigate in their environment. Players can join the experiment by going to the high score table. If they agree, the feature data is sent over the Internet.

The latest release contains two levels. In the first players learn to dock as well as possible to the International Space Station. In the second level players enact the Rosetta mission from ESA, by avoiding space debris and releasing the Philae lander onto a comet's surface. New levels will be added incrementally with new releases.

Astro Drone is a project performed by the Advanced Concepts Team of the European Space Agency.




Planet Four

Planet Four is a citizen science project in which volunteers help planetary scientists identify and measure features on the surface of Mars.

Scientists need your help to find and mark ‘fans’ and ‘blotches’ on the Martian surface, features that indicate wind direction and speed. By tracking these features, you can help planetary scientists better understand Mars’ climate.

All of the images you'll see depict the southern polar region, a little known area of Mars. The majority of these images have never been seen by humans until now.

This is your chance to explore the surface of Mars like never before!




Dognition

You’ll learn your dog’s cognitive style by playing fun, science-based games –- an experience that gives you the insight you need to make the most of your relationship with your best friend.

A key aspect of the Dognition methodology is our use of Citizen Science – research that can be conducted by everyone, not just people with Ph.D.s. By gathering this data we can begin to understand more about all dogs, much more quickly and on a broader scale than if scientists had to conduct this research themselves.




iSeeChange: The Almanac

The iSeeChange Almanac is a socially networked weather Almanac for communities to collectively journal their climate experiences -- their observations, feelings, questions, and decisions --- against near-real time climate information.

Founded in April 2012 in Western Colorado, iSeeChange is a public radio and media experiment that fosters multimedia conversations between citizens and scientists about how seasonal weather and climate extremes affect daily American life. From the earliest spring recorded in the history of the United States, a landmark wildfire season, nationwide droughts, and weather records breaking everyday, climate affects every citizen and binds communities together.

iSeeChange is produced by Julia Kumari Drapkin in Western Colorado at KVNF Mountain Grown Community Radio as a part of Localore, a nationwide production of AIR in collaboration with Zeega, with principal funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.




The People's Choice for Healthcare Delivery

Access to health care and the cost and safety of healthcare services are of critical interest to our country. Physicians and other professional care providers, and academic and community-based hospitals and clinics, are important partners in discovering the best methods to deliver care. Input from patients – the consumers of healthcare services – is also vital. Regenstrief Institute, Inc., an internationally recognized healthcare research organization affiliated with the Indiana University School of Medicine, is conducting an online contest, inviting submission of original ideas for improving the delivery of health care in the U.S. As an academic institution, we are particularly interested in the ideas of our next generation of young professionals and scientists. The winning idea will be selected by a panel of medical and community-based professionals and researchers, according to the following criteria: innovative idea with measurable impact for healthcare consumers; feasible to implement in the U.S. healthcare system within five years; and compatible with Regenstrief Institute’s mission to improve health through research that enhances the quality and cost-effectiveness of health care. The prize includes a trip for the winner to Indianapolis, Indiana for the idea kick-off at the Indiana University School of Medicine and Regenstrief Institute, Inc.




Transcribe Bleek & Lloyd

This is a transcription project that aims to transcribe the Digital Bleek and Lloyd Collection, written in the late 1870's. This collection contains scanned notebooks of |Xam and !Kun languages of the Hunter-Gatherer (Bushman) people of Southern Africa.




SubseaObservers

Help track the health and abundance of the mid-Atlantic scallop fishery!

Researchers at the University of Delaware have developed a new robot-based approach to surveying marine life the ocean floor. They use Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs), which can navigate underwater without direct human control, to take photos of marine life in its natural habitat.

By becoming a SubseaObserver you'll play a roll in ocean conservation by helping organizations such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) make better decisions about how to manage the scallop fishery now and for future generations.

As a SubseaObserver you can name your own virtual AUV and choose what part of the mid-Atlantic you'd like to explore.

SubseaObservers also includes information about scallop biology, how the fishery is managed, how AUVs work and where they're used.




Marblar

Marblar is unique and fun way to engage in citizen science and exchange ideas across disciplines. Marblar posts research projects in need of creative, real-world applications and they ask YOU to come up with those applications.

Singing up is easy and free and there are new projects added regularly. Projects are posted for three weeks. Through online collaboration, the final solutions are posted for users to vote on and further discuss. Top solutions are even awarded cash prizes!




Data Detectives

Beginning November 14 through the end of the year, students ages 13-18 around the globe are invited to participate in “Data Detectives”, an engaging web experience to learn about how Big Data will impact their lives and the world they will be inheriting.

Data Detectives is the student component of the Human Face of Big Data, a global crowdsourced project conceived by “Day in Life” series creator Rick Smolan. It aims to help people better visualize the ways big data is shaping our future on this planet, and includes a smartphone app, worldwide events, a large format illustrated book with an interactive iPad app, and a documentary.

The Data Detectives initiative invites students to answer questions, explore fascinating examples of how Big Data is changing their world, interact with real-time data and see how other students around the globe are impacted in similar and different ways.




OMEGA-LOCATE

Nonmarine ostracods, tiny crustaceans with an excellent fossil record, are common in aquatic ecosystems. The Ostracod Metadatabase of Environmental and Geographical Attributes (OMEGA) facilitates access to global geographical and environmental distributional data for nonmarine ostracods, supporting applications in biodiversity auditing, biogeography and the calibration of species as fossil proxies for past environmental and climatic change. Citizen Scientists can help improve accuracy and coverage of datasets by adding, correcting and validating the geographical coordinates of localities.




Panamath

Panamath is a free-standing software that can be used to assess number sense - your intuitive recognition of numbers and their relationship. Researchers in laboratories throughout the world have utilized this research tool in studies of number knowledge, mathematical acuity, and learning in general.

Curious? Use Panamath to test your own number sense, read more about the research being done or download the software and adapt it for your own research or educational purposes.




Old Weather

Help scientists recover Arctic and worldwide weather observations made by United States’ ships since the mid-19th century.

These transcriptions will contribute to climate model projections and will improve our knowledge of past environmental conditions. Historians will use your work to track past ship movements and tell the stories of the people on board.




Cell Slider

There are cures for cancers buried in our data. Help us find them.

Cell Slider is the world’s first online platform that harnesses the collective force of the public to help beat cancer sooner. By examining tumour tissue samples and spotting cancerous cells, citizen scientists from all over the world can help us understand how well a patient will respond to different treatments.

There is a massive amount of data produced by clinical trials and large backlogs build up that can take our scientists years to analyse.

The most effective tool for analysing this data is the human eye – computers simply aren’t good enough at understanding the level of detail involved. With scientists dedicated to developing new treatments, we need more eyes on the data to spot the cancer cells.




What's the Score at the Bodleian?

The Bodleian Libraries are enlisting the help of the public in order to improve access to their music collections. Over four thousand digitized scores, mostly piano music from the nineteenth century, many of which have illustrated covers, have now been made available online.

By describing these images, you will not only be helping to provide access to this valuable but hitherto 'hidden' collection, you will also be facilitating future research into popular music of the period and the wider social function which it performed during the Victorian age.




Citizen Sort

Video games have the potential to do more than entertain. Citizen Sort is taking advantage of this potential by designing video games that make doing science fun.

Citizen Sort is a research project at the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University in New York. Students from Syracuse University drew, colored, programmed and coded two unique citizen science video games. They are Forgotten Island and Happy Match.

Happy Match is a twist on the classic matching game. Players will classify photos of animal, plant and insect species that scientists took live in the field. Each round of the game has a different question and players will drag the animal, plant or insect photo into one of the photo answers along the bottom. Scientists wrote the questions in Happy Match based on information they want to know. By classifying the photos, you'll these help scientists as they study the natural world.

Forgotten Island is a point and click adventure game. Players take on the role of a lost adventurer with a secret past. As the player explores the island they meet a suspicious robot spouting orders to re-classify the falling photographs of plant, animal or insect species. The player will also solve puzzles and explore diverse locations from icy peaks to fiery volcanoes.The more classifications a player does, the more money they earn buy items and solve the mystery of Forgotten Island.

Citizen Sort is partially supported by the US National Science Foundation under grant SOCS 09-68470.




eCyberMission

eCYBERMISSION is a web-based Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) competition free for students in grades six through nine where teams can compete for State, Regional and National Awards while working to solve problems in their community. Deadline to sign up: January 15th

eCYBERMISSION challenges you to explore how Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics work in your world.




Bat Detective

Bat Detective is an online citizen science project which allows visitors to the website to take part in wildlife conservation by listening out for bat calls in recordings collected all over the world.

By sorting the sounds in the recordings into insect and bat calls, bat detectives will help biologists learn how to reliably distinguish bat 'tweets' to develop new automatic identification tools.

Bats use lots of different types of sounds, from singing to each other to find a mate, to using the echoes from their tweets to find their way around. Usually bat sounds are inaudible to humans as they are too high for us to hear, but special 'time expansion' ultrasonic detectors convert these sounds to a lower frequency, and visitors to the Bat Detective website can listen to these unique recordings and help distinguish different sounds.

One out of every five species of bats is threatened with extinction and better automatic identification tools are desperately needed to quickly process vast amounts of sound data collected by volunteers from the bat monitoring programme iBats who survey bat populations each year.

Bats are found all over the world from local parks to pristine rainforests and monitoring their population trends provides an important indicator of healthy ecosystems. Developing new tools that allow biologists to interpret population trends from sound will allow bats' tweets to act as a way to track environmental change.

Bat Detective was developed at University College London, Bat Conservation Trust, Bat Life Europe with the Citizen Science Alliance.




Biodiversity Volunteer Portal

Biodiversity Volunteer Portal

Helping to understand, manage and conserve Australia's biodiversity through community based capture of biodiversity data.

Help us capture the wealth of biodiversity information hidden in our natural history collections, field notebooks and survey sheets. This information will be used for better understanding, managing and conserving our precious biodiversity.




ZooTeach

ZooTeach is a website where teachers and educators can share high quality lesson plans and resources that complement the Zooniverse citizen science projects. Citizen science offers a unique opportunity for any person, of any age, of any background to get involved and make a contribution to cutting edge science. Here at Zooniverse headquarters we believe that getting students involved in citizen science offers educators a free, easily accesible and inspiring opportunity to bring real science into the classroom.




World Wide Views on Biodiversity

Join thousands of people around the world in a conversation about World Wide Views on Biodiversity. What do you think about the way biodiversity is managed? How do you think we should solve the problem of biodiversity loss? Tell us – and see what others are saying!

On Saturday, September 15, people in over 30 countries joined together for a day of deliberations about these issues. There is still time to add your voice – use the materials on the project's site to learn more about the issue of biodiversity, and then chime in with your ideas. Strike up a conversation with your friends to help inform your decision, or leave a comment to start a discussion with others.

Biodiversity is the species, genetic, and ecosystem diversity in an area, sometimes including associated components such as landscape features or climate. Still feel like you need to know more? You can dive deep into the issues with information from some of the National Research Council’s recent and historic work on the topic. Or skip ahead to the booklet, which all participants in the World Wide Views on Biodiversity deliberations received.
Charge:

Vote to add your voice to the conversation.




NASA JPL's Infographics

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) needs you to take complex scientific data and images and turn them into informative graphics to convey a simple and easy to understand messages! The JPL’s newest venture is called JPL Infographics, and they need your help to create and post your very own creations of scientific graphic art.

All of the resources are at your fingertips, including high-resolution images, 3-D models, fact sheets, and loads of other data build your very own Infographics. You can browse the numerous of other user creations to get inspired and then upload your creation online!

This is a really fun and challenging project and your work will be used to educate and inform others on the goings on of cutting-edge space exploration. So fire of both sides of your brain and create some educational space art!




The Royal Society's Laughter Project

Just listen to a few laughs and tell us whether they are real or posed.

The results will help scientists from University College London to understand the way we perceive and react to different sounds. The experiment should take about 10 minutes.




MeteoNetwork

The Meteon Network is an ambitious collaboration in Italy to make scientific data from over 400 weather nationwide stations available in an easy to understand visual interface. You can now join in this groundbreaking work and gain access to loads of real time data. You can even add your own data and share analysis among the many members of the network.

The Meteon Network also employs several newer, more human centric, data products including something they call ‘weatherness’, among others, that are normalized to an easy to understand scale. All of these, and several other more traditional weather related measurements, are all displayed in real time on the Network’s interactive mapping application.

This kind of nationwide effort to monitor, analyze, and give citizens a more complete picture of weather may serve as a model for others to follow. Now is your chance to get involved in a trailblazing project and get into weather today!




The National Map Corps

The US Geological Survey (USGS) is recruiting volunteers to collect and update USGS geographic data. Similar to how other online crowdsourcing cartographic applications allow anyone to collect, edit, and use geographic data through an online map editor, the USGS has developed an online editor customized to our data needs that allows volunteers to contribute data to The National Map.

We are looking for people like you to work with us to collect data for the USGS. The data you will collect during this project will be loaded into The National Map. If you have access to the Internet and are willing to dedicate some time editing map data we hope you will consider participating!

You do not need to live in any particular area to participate. Our editing guidelines explain how you can contribute data from anywhere.




AgeGuess

AgeGuess is a simple on-line citizen science project and game where people can guess your age based on the face photos you link/upload. You will also be guessing other people’s age and comparing your results with others. By participating in AgeGuess you will create a first of its kind research data set for the study of human aging.

AgeGuess investigates the differences between perceived age (how old you look to other people) and chronological age (how old you actually are) and their potential power as an aging biomarker. Some of the specific topic we would like to address include: 


- Perceived age as predictor (biomarker) for age at death. Are people who look older than they are more likely to die early?

- Is 60 the new 50? We know that nowadays the average 60 year old is capable of doing things that fewer people of the same age where able to do 50 years ago. Is this difference also reflected in how old they look?

Please visit the intro page of our website for more information about these and other topics, such as: are there times when one ages faster, is perceived age heritable, and at what age are you best at guessing. Don’t hesitate to contact us if you have other ideas that you would like to help us explore.




Snapshot Serengeti

At this very moment in Serengeti National Park, 200 cameras are flashing throughout the night, in corners of the park where tourists never go.

These are camera traps -- remote, automatic cameras that take pictures of passing wildlife - and the Serengeti Lion Project is conducting the largest-ever camera trap survey to better understand the Serengeti ecosystem. The camera traps capture over 1,000,000 images of wildlife each year, capturing the grandeur of the wildebeest migration and rarely seen species from aardvarks to zebras.

Help to transmit these photos by satellite from the Serengeti to the U.S., where they can be analyzed to advance science and conservation. Join this unprecedented initiative to bring cutting edge technology to the wilds of Serengeti, and you'll get first access to witness the Serengeti Live on your computer.




Clumpy

The chloroplasts inside plant cells appear to "clump" together during bacterial infection; this can be devastating for plants and seriously compromise crop yields. We need your help to classify plant cell images by their "clumpiness" in order to further this research.

Helping us to classify the images will give insights into the progression of bacterial infection in plant cells.




MIT Climate CoLab

In the Climate CoLab, you can work with people from all over the world to create proposals for what to do about climate change.

Inspired by systems like open source software and Wikipedia, MIT’s Climate CoLab relies on crowdsourcing to generate, and gain support for, creative new ideas to address global climate change. Activity in the CoLab is organized through a series of on-line contests, on a broad set of subproblems at the heart of the climate change challenge. Topics include increasing the efficiency of energy use, decarbonizing energy supply, changing social attitudes and behavior, adapting to climate change, and geoengineering.

The public is invited to participate by submitting, commenting, collaborating, supporting, and/or voting for proposals. Experts review the proposals and after a judging and public voting process, top proposals are connected with those who can help implement them.

Check out the SciStarter feature of the Climate CoLab: http://scistarter.com/blog/2013/08/stop-collaborate-and-vote-mit-climate-colab .




World Community Grid

Cutting-edge techniques allow scientists to conduct computer-based experiments that significantly accelerate research, allowing them to tackle ambitious projects that were previously unfeasible. But pioneering scientists often don’t have access to computers big enough to match their ambitions. World Community Grid harnesses spare power from your devices and donates it directly to these scientists.

Through the contribution of over 640,000 volunteers and 460 organizations, World Community Grid has enabled researchers complete the equivalent of thousands of years of work in just a few years and enabled important scientific advances in cancer treatment and solar energy. Without this support, a lot of this important science just wouldn't get done.

But there's still a lot more to do. We need your help! Join at http://www.worldcommunitygrid.org/index.jsp and start supporting critical humanitarian research today.




Petridish

Petridish allows citizens to support science by directly funding independent and small -scale research projects. While this is a somewhat non-traditional citizen science project, funding is an important part of science, and Petridish allows science lovers everywhere to truly make a difference and support innovative science.

Similar to other crowd funding style websites, Petridish lets you browse projects and donate online to the research projects of your choice. Each project has a variety of donation levels with enticing rewards for each level. Typical rewards included souvenirs from the field, acknowledgement in journal articles, chances to join researchers in the field, dinner with a famous researcher, and even naming rights to new species!

You can explore projects by both research subject and reward type. After you donate, share your involvement and information about the project through Facebook and Twitter and help projects gain momentum and reach their goals.




Environmental Behaviors Project

Calling all Citizen Scientists! We are conducting research related to environmental behaviors and need your help. Help us sort and rank various environmental stewardship activities. There are no right or wrong answers - we just want your opinions.

Your efforts will be used to inform a survey tool that is being developed to measure the effects of citizen science on stewardship behaviors. We are seeking contributions from citizen scientists involved in all types of projects, so the tool will be relevant to the widest possible audience.




2012 Hubble's Hidden Treasures Competition

You are invited to the Hubble Space Telescope's vast science archive to dig out the best unseen Hubble images -- and win prizes!

Over two decades in orbit, Hubble has made a huge number of observations. But hidden in Hubble’s huge data archives are still some truly breathtaking images that have never been seen in public. The archive is so vast that nobody really knows the full extent of what Hubble has observed.

This is where you come in. Researchers need you to find and tweak Hubble observations using a set of simple online tools. If you're feeling saucy, you can find Hubble observations and then process them using professional astronomical imaging software. You can win various Apple products and goodies.

Competition ends May 31, 2012.




North American Bird Phenology Program

The North American Bird Phenology Program, part of the USA-National Phenology Network, was a network of volunteer observers who recorded information on first arrival dates, maximum abundance, and departure dates of migratory birds across North America. Active between 1880 and 1970, the program was coordinated by the Federal government and sponsored by the American Ornithologists' Union. It exists now as a historic collection of six million migration card observations, illuminating almost a century of migration patterns and population status of birds. Today, in an innovative project to curate the data and make them publicly available, the records are being scanned and placed on the internet, where volunteers worldwide transcribe these records and add them into a database for analysis.




Ancient Lives

Ancient Lives allows citizen scientists to help transcribe ancient papyri texts from Greco-Roman Egypt. The data gathered will help scholars reveal new knowledge of the literature, culture, and lives of Greco-Romans in ancient Egypt.

The 1,0000 year old transcripts were originally found by researchers in 1896 in the city of Oxrhynchus, often called the ‘City of the Sharp-Nosed Fish’. Over the next decade, over 500,000 fragments of papyri were uncovered and the collections stands today as largely unstudied. That is why Ancient Lives needs your help to measure fragments and transcribe Ancient Greek characters.

The project is a collaboration between researchers at Oxford University and several other international groups.




Planet Hunters

Planet Hunters is a project from Zooniverse where citizen scientists help astronomers identify new planets.

Through data taken from the Kepler Spacecraft, citizens are helping scientists identify stars with possible planets in the Cygnus constellation. The Spacecraft takes brightness data every thirty minutes from over 150,000 stars so there is a lot to look at.

When planets pass in front of stars, the brightness of that star dips, which shows up on the light curves taken from Kepler. These patterns are not always easily recognized by computer algorithms, and in many cases, the human brain is actually more capable of identifying brightness dips.




The Cell: An Image Library - CCDB

Submit your cellular images to The Cell: An Image Library - CCDB is a public and easily accessible resource database of images, videos, and animations of cells, capturing a wide diversity of organisms, cell types, and cellular processes. The purpose of this database is to advance research on cellular activity, with the ultimate goal of improving human health.

This Library is a repository for images and movies of cells from a variety of organisms. It demonstrates cellular architecture and functions with high quality images, videos, and animations. This comprehensive and easily accessible Library is designed as a public resource first and foremost for research, and secondarily as a tool for education. The long-term goal is the construction of a library of images that will serve as primary data for research.

The Library effort represents not only the creation of the electronic infrastructure, but also a systematic protocol for acquisition, evaluation, annotation, and uploading of images, videos, and animations.




Be a Martian

Help scientist improve maps of Mars and participate in other research tasks to help NASA manage the large amount of data from the Red Planet.

Users create Martian profiles and become "citizens" of the planet. In the map room, citizens can then earn Martian credits by helping place satellite photos on Mars’s surface, counting craters, and even helping the rovers Spirit and Opportunity by tagging photos with descriptions.

The highly interactive website is rich in content and contains other informational videos and mapping applications for citizens to tour Mars and get to know every nook and cranny of its rocky surface.

Become a Martian, explore Mars, have fun!




Moon Mappers

Help scientists with the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter better understand the structure and history of the lunar surface: identify, measure, and classify images of craters on the moon. Your efforts will help us define the places future missions will study closer - including perhaps even future human missions.




Zero Robotics Autonomous Space Capture Challenge

The Zero Robotics Autonomous Space Capture Challenge asks individuals and teams of programmers from around the world to develop a fuel-optimal control algorithm. The algorithm must enable a satellite to accomplish a feat that’s very difficult to do autonomously: capture a space object that’s tumbling, spinning or moving in the opposite direction.

From March 28 to April 25, 2012, challenge participants will collaborate via the Zero Robotics Website to create a computer algorithm that will be programmed into bowling-ball sized satellites called SPHERES (short for Synchronized Position, Hold, Engage, and Reorient Experimental Satellites) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). An object, simulating a Phoenix payload on-orbit delivery system, will be set in motion inside the ISS under varying conditions, such as tumbling or spinning. The algorithm developed will need to direct the SPHERES satellite to approach the moving object and orient itself to contact with the object via Velcro on the SPHERES satellites.

The winners of each round will be invited to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to view the finals via videolink from the ISS, where the four algorithms will be programmed into SPHERES and tested.

Zero Robotics is co-sponsored by NASA and is run by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Space Systems Laboratory to engage U.S. middle and high school students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).




Solar Storm Watch

You don’t have to be a science expert to be a brilliant solar stormwatcher. Help scientists spot explosions on the Sun and track them across space to Earth. Your work will give astronauts an early warning if dangerous solar radiation is headed their way. And you could make a new scientific discovery.

Explore interactive diagrams to learn out about the Sun and the spacecraft monitoring it. The STEREO spacecraft is scientists’ latest mission to study the Sun and space weather – not clouds and rain, but how solar storms change conditions in space and on Earth.

Solar Stormwatch isn't just about classifying data. You can talk to other members on our forum, sign up for our space weather forecast from Twitter, and learn about the latest discoveries on our blog. You can also see how solar storms affect Earth at our Flickr group Aurora chasers, featuring beautiful photos of aurora.

if you’d like to know more about what you’re looking at, then explore our beautiful and interactive zoomable diagrams to find out about the Sun and the STEREO spacecraft monitoring it. And check out our scientists’ profiles too.




Temperature Blast

Temperature Blast is a Maryland Science Center C3 Citizen Science project designed to introduce participants to methods of studying climate. Citizen Scientists collect live and archive Weatherbug data from select stations in the Baltimore region to compare temperatures and log this data for scientists.

Scientists at the Baltimore Ecosystem Study then use this data to test models of temperature patterns across the city to aid in urban planning. This data illustrates the Urban Heat Island effect on the area, a phenomenon classified by temperature differences between a metropolitan area and more rural landscape nearby. An Urban Heat Island is not an effect of climate change, but rather of our activity shaping the environment around us.

Using either this website or our Smartphone application (available free of charge for both iPhone and Android) Citizen Scientists submit temperature data from six weather stations in the Baltimore region. The purpose of this is to collect a stream of simultaneous data from multiple sites in and around the metropolitan area. This data, along with first-hand location observations, will be used to understand the Urban Heat Island Effect in Baltimore.

Anyone with access to the Internet and/or a Smartphone can be a Citizen Scientist and participate in Temperature Blast!? While the data obtained from the program is relevant to the Baltimore metropolitan region, there is no geographic or age restriction for Citizen Scientists.




SETILive

SETILive is an exciting new project in which volunteers try to detect extraterrestrial signals from space.

The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) uses images from the Allen Telescope Array and powerful computer algorithms to search for these signals automatically. However, the computer algorithms have a hard time distinguishing between signals that might be extraterrestrial and those that are from earth. This is where you come in!

Researchers need your help to find interesting signals in all that noise. Eventually, they want to learn whatever tricks you use to do your classifications, so they can teach their computer algorithms to do the same thing.




AlmereGrid

With AlmereGrid you can donate your unused computing time to science. We are located in the Netherlands and support Dutch - and other European universities. Currently we run medical applications from the Erasmus MC - an academic hospital in Rotterdam. We try to communicate in Dutch as much as possible with our volunteers.




EyeWire

EyeWire is a citizen science project aimed at mapping the neural connections of the retina. All you have to do is play a relaxing and absorbing game of coloring brain images!

In the game, participants reconstruct the tree-like shapes of the neurons in the retina. By tracing branches throughout images, you can help the computer develop 3-D reconstructions of the neurons.

Anyone can participate – you don’t need any specialized knowledge of neuroscience – and your contributions will help scientists understand how the brain functions. In addition, engineers will also use your input to improve the computational technology that powers the game. This will eventually lead to making software that can detect brain abnormalities that are related to disorders like autism and schizophrenia.




Citizen Science Academy

The first of its kind, the NEON Citizen Science Academy Online is intended to be a complete professional development resource for educators and will include online courses, modules, tutorials, and a virtual community of practice. Our initial efforts have focused on professional development courses for formal and informal educators. As of Winter 2014, we have five courses available to educators with more in development.

NEON Citizen Science Academy Online courses are 30-day, graded, self-paced, and semi-facilitated with 5 – 7 stand-alone units that have stated learning objectives, background content, readings, discussion forums, classroom learning activities, assignments, and self-assessments. They are offered using the Moodle course management system.

Through a collaboration with the Colorado School of Mines Teacher Enhancement Program, optional graduate level Continuing Education credits are available. There is a $35.00 registration fee for each online course.

In addition to online courses, we are developing online resources for educators to use for their own learning or in their teaching. The resources will include a combination of videos, tutorials, and downloadable instructional materials.




Digital Fishers

Got 60 seconds to help shape ocean science?

We’re looking for a few volunteers to help analyze deep-sea videos— seconds at a time. We invite you to participate in ocean science research (no experience required!) via Digital Fishers, a new “citizen science” website. By playing Digital Fishers you’ll help researchers gather data from video, and unveil the mechanisms shaping the animal communities inhabiting the deep.

Digital Fishers was developed by Ocean Networks Canada together with the University of Victoria’s Centre for Global Studies (CfGS) and funded by CANARIE. Co-investigator Dr. Rod Dobell leads the involvement of CfGS with additional support from eBriefings.ca.




Milky Way Project

The Milky Way Project aims to sort and measure our galaxy. We're asking you to help us find and draw bubbles in beautiful infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope.

Understanding the cold, dusty material that we see in these images, helps scientists to learn how stars form and how our galaxy changes and evolves with time.




Whale FM

Marine scientists need your help to categorize the complex calls of Killer Whales (Orcas) and Pilot Whales and to understand what the calls mean.

Whales and dolphins make sophisticated sounds that play a critical role in communicating, orienting in the ocean environment, and locating food. Scientists have already begun to categorize Killer Whale calls; however, Pilot Whale calls are much less studied.

Project organizers have assembled recordings of two species from across the world's oceans and seas. Citizen scientists simply listen to individual whale calls and identify potential matching calls. Your contribution will help researchers understand what the whales are saying. You can also help discover whether certain calls are made by an individual, one group, or across broad areas.




New Horizons Icehunters

The goal of this project is to discover Kuiper Belt Objects with just the right orbit and just the right characteristics to make them eligible for a visit from the New Horizons mission. At this time, the space probe has enough fuel in reserve to allow up to two different objects to be visited.

This is where you come in. To find these icy KBO targets we need your help poring over thousands of ground based images, taken specially for this purpose using giant telescopes. Hiding within these images are undiscovered slow-moving Kuiper Belt Objects, asteroids zipping through the foreground, and millions of background stars.




Flusurvey

The Flusurvey is an online system for measuring influenza trends in the UK.

In contrast to traditional surveillance methods, the Flusurvey collects data directly from the general public, rather than via hospitals or GPs. This is particularly important because many people with flu don't visit a doctor so don't feature in traditional flu surveillance.

Each week, participants report any flu-like symptoms they have experienced since their last visit. If you have no symptoms, this only takes a few seconds. We provide participants with regular updates on the epidemic, all the latest news and advice about flu.

This year, for the first time, we are coordinating with similar surveys in 9 other European countries, letting us monitor flu as it spreads across the continent. You can find out more on the "Join in" tab.




MAPPER

Help NASA find life on Mars by exploring the bottom of the lakes of British Columbia, Canada.

The Pavilion Lake Research Project (PLRP) has been investigating the underwater environment with DeepWorker submersible vehicles since 2008. Now with MAPPER, you can work side-by-side with NASA scientists to explore the bottom of these lakes from the perspective of a DeepWorker pilot.

The PLRP team makes use of DeepWorker subs to explore and document freshwater carbonate formations known as microbialites that thrive in Pavilion and Kelly Lake. Many scientists believe that a better understanding of how and where these rare microbialite formations develop will lead to deeper insights into where signs of life may be found on Mars and beyond. To investigate microbialite formation in detail, terabytes of video footage and photos of the lake bottom are recorded by PLRP's DeepWorker sub pilots. This data must be analyzed to determine what types of features can be found in different parts of the lake. Ultimately, detailed maps can be generated to help answer questions like "how does microbialite texture and size vary with depth?" and "why do microbialites grow in certain parts of the lake but not in others?". But before these questions can be answered, all the data must be analyzed.




Constellation

Constellation is a platform for different aerospace related projects that need intensive computational power. The platform supports the efforts of participating projects by providing Distributed Computation capability using BOINC (Berkeley Open Interface for Network Computing).

Constellation will send work-units of attached projects to volunteering, idle PCs where the units are processed. The combined power of all volunteering users will help to solve important scientific tasks in fields from astronomy to aerospace-engineering beginning from student up to university projects. The bottom line is to benefit from the generosity of the volunteers and to benefit from the accumulation of different projects, like sharing programming knowledge in distributed computing and influencing the others' simulation by its own solutions.

The platform is an open space for anyone, who is an air and space enthusiast and wants to donate idle computing time or even skill for a sub-project on platform. Applications for sub-project are welcome!




GreenprintMaps

GreenprintMaps presents the urban forest of the Greenprint region – Sacramento, Yolo, Placer, El Dorado, Sutter, and Yuba Counties. Everyone is invited to join us in mapping all of our trees – in parks, on streets, at schools, in parking lots and at home. You can find trees, add trees, ask a question about a tree, and calculate the value of a tree. GreenprintMaps is fun and easy for everyone. Cities can better manage their trees, planners can protect trees, scientists can combat tree pests and diseases, and homeowners can share their tree stories. We hope you’ll help us grow the best regional urban forest in the nation.




theSkyNet

Play your part and help discover our Universe!
Have a computer? Want to help astronomers make awesome discoveries and understand our Universe? Then theSkyNet needs you!
Your computer is bored. It has spare computing power nearly all the time that could be used to do something cool. So why not let it?
By connecting 100s and 1000s of computers together through the Internet, it's possible to simulate a single machine capable of doing some pretty amazing stuff. That's what theSkyNet is all about - using your spare computing power to process radio astronomy data.




Sing About Science

SingAboutScience has a searchable database which teachers and others can use to find content-rich songs on specific scientific and mathematical topics. Finding and cataloguing all relevant songs is a challenge, however, and volunteers can be used to help with this. Other possible work might entail technical development of the website and assessment of its usability.




DARPA Anti-Submarine Warfare Simulator

Download and play the ACTUV Tactics Simulator and submit your results to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Your results will help develop the future of anti-submarine warfare.

Think you can best an enemy submarine commander so he can’t escape into the ocean depths?

If you think you can, you are invited to put yourself into the virtual driver’s seat of one of several Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) Continuous Trail Unmanned Vessel (ACTUV) configurations and show the world how you can use its capabilities to follow an enemy submarine.

DARPA’s ACTUV program is developing a fundamentally new tool for the Navy’s ASW toolkit and seeks your help to explore how best to use this tool to track quiet submarines. Before autonomous software is developed for ACTUV’s computers, DARPA needs to determine what approaches and methods are most effective. To gather information from a broad spectrum of users, ACTUV has been integrated into the Dangerous WatersTM game. DARPA is offering this new ACTUV Tactics Simulator for free public download.

This software has been written to simulate actual evasion techniques used by submarines, challenging each player to track them successfully. Your tracking vessel is not the only ship at sea, so you’ll need to safely navigate among commercial shipping traffic as you attempt to track the submarine, whose driver has some tricks up his sleeve.

Give it a try!




Phylo

Phylo is a game in which participants align sequences of DNA by shifting and moving puzzle pieces. Your score depends on how you arrange these pieces. You will be competing against a computer and other players in the community.

Though it may appear to be just a game, Phylo is actually a framework for harnessing the computing power of mankind to solve a common problem -- Multiple Sequence Alignments.

A sequence alignment is a way of arranging the sequences of DNA, RNA or protein to identify regions of similarity. These similarities may be consequences of functional, structural, or evolutionary relationships between the sequences. From such an alignment, biologists may infer shared evolutionary origins, identify functionally important sites, and illustrate mutation events. More importantly, biologists can trace the source of certain genetic diseases.

Traditionally, multiple sequence alignment algorithms use computationally complex heuristics to align the sequences. Unfortunately, the use of heuristics do not guarantee global optimization as it would be prohibitively computationally expensive to achieve an optimal alignment. This is due in part to the sheer size of the genome, which consists of roughly three billion base pairs, and the increasing computational complexity resulting from each additional sequence in an alignment.

Humans have evolved to recognize patterns and solve visual problems efficiently. By abstracting multiple sequence alignment to manipulating patterns consisting of coloured shapes, we have adapted the problem to benefit from human capabilities. By taking data which has already been aligned by a heuristic algorithm, we allow the user to optimize where the algorithm may have failed.

All alignments were generously made available through UCSC Genome Browser. In fact, all alignments contain sections of human DNA which have been speculated to be linked to various genetic disorders, such as breast cancer. Every alignment is received, analyzed, and stored in a database, where it will eventually be re-introduced back into the global alignment as an optimization.

Let's play!




OldWeather

Help scientists recover worldwide weather observations made by Royal Navy ships around the time of World War I. These transcriptions will contribute to climate model projections and improve a database of weather extremes. Historians will use your work to track past ship movements and the stories of the people on board.




EteRNA

EteRNA is the first-ever global laboratory where scientists, educators, students, online gamers, and any human being with a strong interest in unlocking the mystery of life will collectively help solve world's biggest scientific problems.

RNA, or ribonucleic acid, is a substance that our cells use to translate and express genetic information from our DNA. We now know that folding and shape-shifting allows RNA and its partners to control the cell in a predictable fashion. However, the full biological and medical implications of these discoveries are still being worked out.

By playing EteRNA, you will help extend and curate the first large scale library of synthetic RNA designs. You play by designing RNAs, tiny molecules at the heart of every cell. If you win the weekly competition your RNA is synthesized and scored by how well it folds. Your efforts will help us understand, dissect, and control the functional properties of real and designed RNAs from bacteria, viruses, and our own cells. Join the global laboratory!




citsci.org

CitSci.org is a platform that supports a variety of citizen science programs using a centralized database to store and deliver science data, with a focus on community based monitoring programs. This platform allows program coordinators to create their own projects and datasheets, manage members, define measurements, create analyses, and even write feedback forms.




SETI@home

SETI, or the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, is a scientific effort seeking to determine if there is intelligent life outside Earth. SETI researchers use many methods. One popular method, radio SETI, listens for artificial radio signals coming from other stars. SETI@home is a radio SETI project that lets anyone with a computer and an Internet connection participate.

Radio telescope signals consist primarily of noise (from celestial sources and the receiver's electronics) and man-made signals such as TV stations, radar, and satellites. Modern radio SETI projects analyze the data digitally. More computing power enables searches to cover greater frequency ranges with more sensitivity. Radio SETI, therefore, has an insatiable appetite for computing power.

Previous radio SETI projects have used special-purpose supercomputers, located at the telescope, to do the bulk of the data analysis. In 1995, David Gedye proposed doing radio SETI using a virtual supercomputer composed of large numbers of Internet-connected computers, and he organized the SETI@home project to explore this idea. SETI@home was originally launched in May 1999.

The SETI@home project hopes to convince you to allow us to borrow your computer when you aren't using it and to help us "…search out new life and new civilizations." We'll do this with a screen saver that can go get a chunk of data from us over the internet, analyze that data, and then report the results back to us. When you need your computer back, our screen saver instantly gets out of the way and only continues it's analysis when you are finished with your work.




RNA World

RNA World is a distributed supercomputer that uses Internet-connected computers to advance RNA research. This system is dedicated to identify, analyze, structurally predict, and design RNA molecules on the basis of established bioinformatics software in a high-performance, high-throughput fashion.

The RNA World project is based at the Rechenkraft research facility located in Germany.




ClimatePrediction.net

ClimatePrediction is a distributed computing project that aims to produce predictions of the Earth's climate up to the year 2300 and to test the accuracy of climate models. To do this, the project needs people around the world to volunteer time on their computers - time when their computers are on but not being used at full capacity.

The project needs you to run a climate model program on your computer. The model will run automatically in the background whenever you switch your computer on, and it should not affect any other tasks for which you use your computer. As the model runs, you can watch the weather patterns evolve on your unique version of the world. The results are sent back to project coordinators via the Internet, and you will be able to see a summary of your results on the website. ClimatePrediction uses the same underlying software, BOINC, as many other distributed computing projects and, if you like, you can participate in more than one project at a time.

Climate change, and our response to it, are issues of global importance, affecting food production, water resources, ecosystems, energy demand, insurance costs, and much else. Current research suggests that the Earth will probably warm over the coming century; Climateprediction should, for the first time, tell us what is most likely to happen.




Killer Whale Tracker

The Salish Sea Hydrophone Network needs volunteers to help monitor the critical habitat of endangered Pacific Northwest killer whales by detecting orca sounds and measuring ambient noise levels. Volunteers are especially needed to help notify researchers when orcas are in the Salish Sea, which encompasses the waters of Puget Sound and the surrounding area.

Sponsored by a coalition of organizations, including the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Whale Museum, and Beam Reach Marine Science, the network consists of five hydrophones, each hooked up to a computer to analyze the signal and stream it via the internet.

Even though software is used to distinguish animal from other underwater sound, human ears do a better job of detecting unusual sounds. So volunteers monitor the network from their home computers anywhere in the world, and alert the rest of the network when they hear whale sounds. Sometimes boats or onshore monitors are deployed to study the whales in other ways. Researchers hope to learn more about the uses of orca communications and whale migration patterns.




Stardust@home

Join us in the search for interstellar dust! On January 15, 2006, the Stardust spacecraft's sample return capsule parachuted gently onto the Utah desert. Nestled within the capsule were precious particles collected during Stardust's dramatic encounter with comet Wild 2 in January of 2004; and something else, even rarer and no less precious: tiny particles of interstellar dust that originated in distant stars, light-years away. They are the first such pristine particles ever collected in space, and scientists are eagerly waiting for their chance to "get their hands" on them.

Before they can be studied, though, these tiny interstellar grains will have to be found. This will not be easy. Unlike the thousand of particles of varying sizes collected from the comet, scientists estimate that Stardust collected only around 45 interstellar dust particles. They are tiny - only about a micron (a millionth of a meter) in size! These miniscule particles are embedded in an aerogel collector 1,000 square centimeters in size. To make things worse, the collector plates are interspersed with flaws, cracks, and an uneven surface. All this makes the interstellar dust particles extremely difficult to locate.

This is where you come in!

By asking for help from talented volunteers like you from all over the world, we can do this project in months instead of years. Of course, we can't invite hundreds of people to our lab to do this search-we only have two microscopes! To find the elusive particles , therefore, we are using an automated scanning microscope to automatically collect images of the entire Stardust interstellar collector at the Curatorial Facility at Johnson Space Center in Houston. We call these stacks of images focus movies. All in all there will be nearly a million such focus movies. These are available to Stardust@home users like you around the world. You can then view them with the aid of a special Virtual Microscope (VM) that works in your web browser.

Together, you and thousands of other Stardust@home participants will find the first pristine interstellar dust particles ever brought to Earth!

In recognition of the critical importance of the Stardust@home volunteers, the discoverer of an interstellar dust particle will appear as a co-author on any scientific paper by the Stardust@home team announcing the discovery of the particle. The discoverer will also have the privilege of naming the particle!




Physics Songs

Physics Songs aims to be the world's premier website devoted to collecting and organizing all songs about physics. It is managed by Walter F. Smith, Professor of Physics at Haverford College.

Songs about physics can help students to remember critical concepts and formulas, but perhaps more importantly they communicate the lesson that physics can be fun. They certainly help to establish an informal classroom atmosphere, in which even shy students are willing to ask questions.

The songs may also activate a different part of the students' brains.




Open Street Map

Open Street Map is a free, interactive map that allows anyone to view, edit, and use geographical data in a collaborative way from anywhere on Earth. The project was started because many maps available online have legal or technical restrictions on their use, holding back people from using them in creative, productive, or unexpected ways.

Contributors to Open Street Map take handheld global positioning system (GPS) devices with them on journeys or go out specially to record GPS tracks. They record street names, village names, and other features using notebooks, digital cameras, and voice-recorders. Back at the computer, contributors upload those GPS logs showing where they traveled and trace out the roads on Open Street Map's collaborative database. Using their notes, contributors add the street names, connections between roads, and other information such as the type of road or path. That data is then processed to produce detailed street-level maps, which can be published freely on sites such as Wikipedia, used to create handheld or in-car navigation devices, or printed and copied without restriction.




Perfect Pitch Test

The Perfect Pitch Test is a study to determine whether absolute pitch differs systematically for different timbres. Your participation involves a brief survey and a pitch-naming test and will make an important contribution to auditory research.

Do you have absolute pitch, the ability to identify or recreate a musical note without any reference? If so, researchers at the Perfect Pitch Test need your help.




LHC@home

LHC@home is a volunteer grid computing program that enables you to contribute idle time on your computer to help physicists develop and exploit particle accelerators, such as CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

LHC@home will leverage your computer's processing power, disk space, and network bandwidth, along with thousands of other computers over the Internet. Through this combined computing power, physics researchers around the world can better analyze and store massive amounts of critical scientific data.




Project Implicit

Project Implicit is an opportunity for citizens to assist psychological research on thoughts and feelings that exist either outside of conscious awareness or outside of conscious control. Participants assess their conscious and unconscious preferences for more than 90 different topics ranging from pets to political issues, ethnic groups to sports teams, and entertainers to styles of music. Participants report attitudes toward or beliefs about these topics and provide general information about themselves.

The primary goals of Project Implicit are to provide a safe, secure, and well-designed virtual environment to investigate psychological issues and, at the same time, provide visitors and participants with an experience that is both educational and engaging.




BOINC

BOINC is a program that lets you volunteer your idle computer time to science. BOINC uses the idle time on your computer (Windows, Mac, or Linux) to cure diseases, study global warming, discover pulsars, and do many other types of scientific research. It's safe, secure, and easy!

Volunteer computing supplies more computing power to science than does any other type of computing. This computing power enables scientific research that could not be done otherwise. Volunteer computing also encourages public interest in science, and provides the public with a voice in determining the directions of scientific research.




Stellar Classification Online Public Exploration (SCOPE)

Stellar Classification Online Public Exploration needs the help of citizen scientists to observe and classify stars never before classified. The goal is to mine data from photographic images of star spectra, which result from light absorption in the outer surface of a star. Star spectra are made available online where citizen scientists can compare them to stars with known spectra.

Don't wait--be the first to classify one of hundreds of thousands of stars that have never been seen before!




Foldit

Foldit is a revolutionary new computer game enabling you to contribute to important scientific research.

We’re collecting data to find out if humans' pattern-recognition and puzzle-solving abilities make them more efficient than existing computer programs at pattern-folding tasks. If this turns out to be true, we can then teach human strategies to computers and fold proteins faster than ever!

Knowing the structure of a protein is key to understanding how it works and to targeting it with drugs. A small protein can consist of 100 amino acids, while some human proteins can be huge (1000 amino acids). The number of different ways even a small protein can fold is astronomical because there are so many degrees of freedom. Figuring out which of the many, many possible structures is the best one is regarded as one of the hardest problems in biology today and current methods take a lot of money and time, even for computers.

Foldit attempts to predict the structure of a protein by taking advantage of humans' puzzle-solving intuitions and having people play competitively to fold the best proteins.





footer border shadow line