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At a science center, zoo or aquarium


The Great Sunflower Project

The Great Sunflower Project has three programs. The Safe Gardens for Pollinators program which uses data collected on Lemon Queen sunflowers to examine the effects of pesticides on pollinators. The Pollinator Friendly Plants program which is designed to identify the key plants to support healthy pollinator communities. And, the Great Pollinator Habitat Challenge which allows citizen scientists to evaluate and improve gardens, parks and other green spaces for pollinators.

Some bee populations have experienced severe declines that may affect food production. However, nobody has ever measured how much pollination is happening over a region, much less a continent, so there is little information about how a decline in the bee population can influence gardens.

The Great Sunflower Project makes it easy to gather this information. Find a plant you know (or a Lemon Queen Sunflower), observe it for 5 or more minutes and record all pollinators that visit, and contribute data online. You can make as many observations as you want while your flowers are in bloom. Plant, Watch, Enter. Repeat. That's it. And, who doesn't like sunflowers?!




Caterpillars Count!

Caterpillars Count! is a project that relies on citizen scientists (you!) to help understand some of the most important organisms in our ecosystems—caterpillars and other insects—by conducting surveys of the plants and trees around them. These insects are an important food source for birds and other wildlife, and they have economic and environmental impacts on our forests and crops. You can help us understand how the abundance of these bugs varies from rural countrysides to major urban areas, and from coast to coast.

Your observations can also help us track how the abundance of caterpillars and other insects varies over the seasons. The seasonal timing of caterpillar availability is especially important for birds which try to time their spring migration so that there will be lots of insect food around (caterpillars are an especially tasty treat!) to successfully raise their young.

Finally, you can visually explore the data collected by yourself or others to reveal patterns that scientists haven't even yet discovered!




Wisconsin Turtle Conservation Program

The main goals of the WTCP are to catalog species' statewide distributions more thoroughly and to document high turtle mortality locations along roads in order to promote effective management and conservation of Wisconsin’s 11 turtle species.

The WTCP was initiated in response to the increasing trend in highway collisions of migrating turtles and vehicles. Our ever-expanding dedicated volunteer base makes projects like these possible and allows for more efficient ways in which WDNR employees can productively manage turtle numbers.

Volunteering is easy! When you see a live turtle or a turtle that has been hit on the road, use our online or paper form to report it. Photographs are also welcome.




Urban Buzz

At any given moment we’ve got animals living under our feet – some of them for 17 years at a time. An underground universe populated by mysterious creatures, digging… feeding… emerging.

Sometimes their underground homes get paved over, or flooded, or have a bucket of bright green toxic sludge poured on them. Scientists want to learn more about what happens to cicadas when they’re down there for so long – so they need your help. Go out with your students, parents, kids, grandparents, friends, dogs, friend’s dogs and collect some dead bugs and send them to us! (Yes, you heard that right.)

Cicadas are sensitive to changes in their environment, especially temperature and the availability of trees.

As more people populate the planet… we build cities and homes and those come with roads and sidewalks and pollution. Have you ever noticed that the sidewalk is hotter than the grass? The cicadas noticed that, too. These rising temperatures are sometimes called an “urban heat island” – which sounds like a lovely place to visit, right?

Researchers are studying how cicadas are responding to environmental changes associated with urbanization (humans building more buildings and paving more land) by measuring the wonkiness (“abnormalities and asymmetry”) in cicada wings and legs.




Aquatic Salamander Monitoring at Tremont Institute

Great Smoky Mountains National Park is the Salamander Capital of the World, with higher diversity of salamanders than anywhere else of similar size. To monitor the salamander populations of Walker Valley, where Tremont Institute is located, we have artificial salamander habitats, or Salamander Hotels, placed in six streams. Using a set protocol, citizen scientists check each hotel for salamanders and identify, measure, and release any salamanders found.




Phenology Monitoring at Tremont Institute

Phenology is the study of the timing of natural events – in particular, life cycle events such as leaf out, migration, flowering, or mating. Since many of these events are tied to temperature, phenology can be a powerful way to study the effects of climate change. While we expect to observe changes in the phenology of the trees, wildflowers and birds over time, we are specifically interested to see how these changes affect species interactions. We have 8 phenology plots that are visited weekly by citizen scientists. Volunteers and participants become deeply connected to these small plots of land and become conservation advocates, invested in the future of the project.




The Great Backyard Bird Count

The next count is being held February 17-20, 2017

The Great Backyard Bird Count is an annual four-day event during which bird watchers count birds to create a real-time snapshot of where birds are located around the world.

Scientists and bird enthusiasts can learn a lot by knowing where birds are. Unfortunately, no single scientist or team of scientists could hope to document the complex distribution and movements of so many species in such a short time.

Anyone, from beginning bird watchers to experts, can participate in the The Great Backyard Bird Count. It takes as little as 15 minutes on one day, or you can count for as long as you like during each day of the event. It’s free, fun, and easy, and it helps the birds. In addition, yearly data collection makes the information more meaningful and allows scientists to investigate far-reaching questions.

Hosted by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, National Audubon Society, and Bird Studies Canada.




CyberTracker

CyberTracker Conservation is a non-profit organisation that promotes the vision of a Worldwide Environmental Monitoring Network. Our ultimate vision is that smart phone users worldwide will use CyberTracker to capture observations on a daily basis.

CyberTracker is the most efficient method of gps field data collection. You can use CyberTracker on a Smartphone or handheld computer to record any type of observation. CyberTracker, which requires no programming skills, allows you to customize an Application for your own data collection needs.




Comparing the Behaviors of Wild and Captive Native Songbirds

This project gives participants a chance to observe bird behaviors of wild birds and compare with behaviors of birds in captive settings. Participants of this project will observe native songbirds at bird feeders. They will fill out an ethogram provided with the observations they have made. The next time the participant visits a zoo or nature center with native captive birds, they will fill out another ethogram. The directions on how to use each ethogram will be provided with it.

This project was designed with educators in mind as an assignment to go along with zoo field trips. T

It was also designed based off the native songbird aviary of the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium. However, it can be adapted for other facilities with captive songbirds.




Smithsonian Transcription Center

The Smithsonian Transcription Center engages the public in making our priceless collections more accessible. We work hand-in-hand with Digital Volunteers to transcribe historic documents and collection records to facilitate research and excite learning in audiences everywhere. Participants have the chance to transcribe a diverse array of collection materials drawn from Smithsonian holdings in science, history, art, and culture.




Spot A Ladybug

Did you ever wonder how ladybugs got their spots?

I am working with a extremely interesting type of ladybug called the Harlequin ladybug, or Harmonia axyridis. This ladybug can vary in the way they look with respect to both color (they can be red, orange, yellow, and black) and spot number (they can have anywhere from zero spots to twenty-two spots).

This projects uses citizens to understand what these ladybugs look like across continents! Knowing how the Harlequin ladybug's look varies will help determine, genetically, how so much variation exists.




Quake Catcher Network (QCN)

In this Citizen Seismology project named Quake Catcher Network (QCN), everyone can become a citizen seismologist and share data with the community in order to better understand the earthquakes and their effects.

Participants will improve their earthquake preparedness, increase the number of seismic sensors especially in urban areas, where risk is high and spatially heterogeneous.

Volunteers will not only contribute data, but will help to better understand the earthquake phenomenon.




BeachObserver

When a vessel accidentally discharges cargo at sea, or when oil spills occur, or when plastics or any floating marine debris is cast adrift on the ocean, it will eventually arrive on shore. In most cases affected landowners, neighborhoods, small communities, or municipalities will be the first to notice the accumulation of flotsam and jetsam on local beaches. We have developed a mobile phone application to simplify the recording, mapping, and networking of observations. The app works anywhere but is tailored for wildlife and objects found on shore or near the coast. The main objectives of the project are to:
1) Promote citizen science,
2) Develop baseline data,
3) Analyze change over time,
by facilitating the recording, sharing, and networking of credible shoreline observations including wildlife, beach cast animals, and marine debris with geo-tagged observations and photos. The browser based app is available at www.beachobserver.com and is also available for download from iTunes.




Butterflies of Kyrgyzstan

Kyrgyzstan’s Butterflies at Your Fingertips!

Central Asia is internationally known as a biodiversity hotspot, and perhaps no other country here symbolises that more than Kyrgyzstan. This application has been designed to introduce you to the world of butterflies while encouraging you to submit new information through citizen science. Every identification you make gives local scientists in Kyrgyzstan more data that helps them make informed decisions about conservation measures.

Features:

▪ Photographs of more than 60 species of butterflies. This number continues to climb as users submit new information!

▪ A section on the natural history of each species will give you information on when and where you might find them, as well as a better understanding of their life cycle.

▪ The “My Collections” feature allows you to build a virtual collection of the butterflies you have seen.

▪ The “Citizen Science” feature lets you help scientists determine if identifications by other users are accurate.

▪ An included map gives accurate location data for each species and is searchable by species and date.

▪ Frequent app updates add user submitted content like new images, map locations, and new species.




Mark My Bird

Our team of researchers, based at the University of Sheffield, are taking 3D scans of the bills of all of the world’s bird species from museum collections. The 3D scans are incredibly detailed but before we can use them they require a process called landmarking. Landmarking involves placing points on features of the bill that are common to all specimens. We can use the landmarks to mathematically describe the shape of bills so that we can compare and test how they differ among species. By landmarking our 3D images you can contribute to real science. The digitised data will help us to understand how and why the 10,000 species of birds diversified.




Hoyt Arboretum Terrestrial Orchids

Volunteers can help:

-Prevent local extirpation (removal) of historic population of uncommon orchids (Orchidacea Spiranthes).

-Research best restoration treatments for Spiranthes in Tualatin Mountains and create management protocol for the Hoyt Arboretum.

-Improve natural habitat for Spiranthes in Hoyt Arboretum population and increase population count of Spiranthes (total number of plants).

-Increase native prairie species and specific Spiranthes cohorts for ecosystem health.

-Decrease invasive species.




SquirrelMapper

Life has evolved over millions of years. Yet evolution can produce dramatic change quickly! The coat color of gray squirrels, which occur over much of eastern North America and are introduced around the globe, is a good example. Today most are indeed gray but two centuries ago most were apparently black. How could evolution change this species so profoundly and so quickly?

Help us explore this question at SquirrelMapper where you can: contribute observations of squirrels from your own neighborhood, test hypotheses about why squirrel color varies geographically, directly measure natural selection on squirrel coloration by participating in our "squirrel hunt" exercise, view the geographical pattern of morphs across the gray squirrel's range. Together we can crack this nut!




SLIME

Snails and slugs Living in Metropolitan Environments (SLIME) is a citizen science project that aims to catalogue the biodiversity of terrestrial gastropods (land snails and slugs) in Los Angeles County and throughout Southern California.

The Natural History Museum’s collection of land snails includes thousands of specimens from locations throughout the Los Angeles basin and spans the last 100 years. However, not much is known about this mollusk biodiversity today, especially within the cities of Southern California. That’s where citizen scientists come in!

We’d like you to help us complete the first citizen science snail survey focusing on urban Southern California by finding snails and slugs and, either
1) collecting them and bringing them to the Museum or,
2) taking photos and emailing them to us or uploading them to the SLIME iNaturalist page.

With this information we hope to identify the species that call the urban areas of Southern California home, those that are new to the area, and those that haven’t been able to survive the changes that urbanization has made to their homeland.




Southern California Squirrel Survey

The Southern California Squirrel Survey is a citizen-science based research program to catalog the occurrence of squirrels in the greater southern California region.

Although squirrels are well-known to people, they are often overlooked. Not many people realize that eastern fox squirrels are not native to California. Similarly, the decline of the native western gray squirrel has gone unnoticed.

The aim of the Southern California Squirrel Survey is to learn more about the distribution and behavior of these species, as well as the many other understudied species in our regions, such as the northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus), eastern gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis), lodgepole chipmunk (Tamias speciosus), and Merriam’s chipmunk (Tamias merriami).




Open Insulin Project

A team of biohackers is developing the first open source protocol to produce insulin simply and economically. Our work may serve as a basis for generic production of this life-saving drug and provide a firmer foundation for continued research into improved versions of insulin.

Some of the articles about us:

Popular Science - www.popsci.com/these-biohackers-are-making-open-source-insulin

Vice - motherboard.vice.com/en_ca/read/after-92-years-biohackers-want-to-finally-make-cheap-and-generic-insulin




Volunteer Science

Volunteer Science allows people from all over the world to play online games, take surveys, and donate their data to social scientists. By participating, you give scientific researchers the data they need to answer today's most important research questions.

Each game takes two to five minutes and you don't have to sign up to play. A short game can have a lasting impact.




FLOW Program

FLOW, which stands for Follow and Learn about the Ocean and Wetland, is Amigos de Bolsa Chica’s new Citizen Science Program. This is an exciting opportunity for members of the community to learn more about coastal ecology, to participate in the collection of scientific data and to get involved in environmental quality monitoring efforts. Anyone interested in participating of this program is encouraged to sign up for training to become a volunteer!




Landscape Watch

Landscape Watch is a new project to map landscape changes in Hampshire over the last eight years. The objective is to characterise the county’s landscape on two dates by analysing pairs of aerial photos, and thereby identify the changes that have taken place in the landscape between these dates. The project will produce the first detailed maps of landscape in the county, together with associated statistics.

Since citizen contributions are central to the production of our results, we will give the maps back to you, the citizens. That way, anyone with an interest in the changes will benefit. Following the completion of the Hampshire maps, the project aims to expand to other areas.




South Texas Wintering Birds

Contribute your observations to a database for the state of Texas. Whether you are on a large private ranch, small yard in the city, or public nature area -- if you go birding, we need your sightings. Help us better understand the richness, abundance and changes in bird life in Texas!




Public Laboratory Oil Testing Kit Beta Program

Public Lab has officially launched the new Oil Testing Kit Public Beta Program, and now we need your help to take our new Kit to the next level. This is an exciting opportunity to help improve our prototype DIY methods for classifying unknown petroleum samples by weight. Our eventual goal is for this kit to be usable to test and compare oil spill residues - that's where you come in!

Public Lab is offering the new 3.0 version of our Desktop Spectrometry Kit, plus a prototype version of the new Oil Testing Kit attachment, free of charge for 20 people who can commit to test and offer feedback on the kit.

In exchange for the free kits, Beta Program members will be required to:

- Post ‘unboxing’ and ‘finished assembly’ photos on Twitter.
- Post feedback on the kit and sample preparation methods in one or more research notes at PublicLab.org
- Create and post a set of spectra from the samples sent with the kit (detailed information on how to do this is on our website)
- Share and discuss input and suggestions on ways to improve the kit on Public Lab’s “plots-spectrometry” mailing list
- Attend two meetups with other Beta Kit Participants online (to be announced soon)




Chesapeake Bay Parasite Project

Scientists are studying sites all around the Chesapeake Bay to monitor the spread of an invasive parasitic barnacle that infects native white-fingered mud crabs. We are working to track their populations and need your help!




NASA's SMAP Satellite Mission

NASA recently launched the SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) satellite which is orbiting the globe every three days to measure soil moisture levels. This data will be used to improve weather forecasts, detail water/energy/carbon cycles, monitor droughts, predict floods, and assist crop productivity.

How accurate is the big data from the satellite? There's only one way to find out and it depends on you to report local data! SciStarter's citizen science community has been called on to help calibrate the accuracy of NASA's satellite mission and to learn more about your soil quality in the process.

Participants from every state will collect and analyze soil samples from September through June.
In this project, you will:

-register your location(s)
-receive alerts when the SMAP satellite is scheduled to fly over you
-scoop a handful of soil, a few times a month (when the satellite is flying over), weigh it, dry it for a day or two, and weigh it again. After some simple conversions, you'll send the data to NASA and be able to compare it to what NASA's SMAP satellite is reporting.

Sign up as an individual or team.




National Moth Week 2015

National Moth Week celebrates the beauty, life cycles, and habitats of moths. “Moth-ers” of all ages and abilities are encouraged to learn about, observe, and document moths in their backyards, parks, and Jacob3neighborhoods. National Moth Week is being held, worldwide, during the last full week of July. National Moth Week offers everyone, everywhere a unique opportunity to become a Citizen Scientist and contribute scientific data about moths. Through partnerships with major online biological data depositories, National Moth Week participants can help map moth distribution and provide needed information on other life history aspects around the globe.
This year, National Moth Week will spotlight the Sphingidae family of moths found throughout the world commonly called hawk moths, sphinx moths and hornworms.




CrowdHydrology

The CrowdHydrology mission is to create freely available data on stream stage in a simple and inexpensive way. We do this through the use of crowdsourcing, which means we gather information on stream stage or water levels from anyone willing to send us a text message of the water levels at their local stream to collect spatially distributed hydrologic data. These data are then available for anyone to then use, from Universities to Elementary schools, interested in studying hydrologic data.




Bugs In Our Backyard

Bugs In Our Backyard is an educational outreach and collaborative research program, providing project-based learning opportunities for K-12 students-- or anyone! The core activity for Bugs In Our Backyard takes advantage of the bugs in your own backyard, schoolyard or neighborhood. Students become citizen-scientists by surveying this diversity of insects and plants. How much insect diversity can you find? How does insect diversity vary over time? How does insect diversity vary across geographic and urban scales? These are some of the questions that can be asked. The survey targets are “true bugs” (what entomologists call Heteroptera) in the eastern US, but activities are designed to be open-ended. Everyone is welcome to get involved. Let’s expand what we know about about insect diversity across rural and urban landscapes!

BioB is part of an NSF-funded research program at Colby College, which will also provide students with insight into the practice of science. Our goal is to engage students with biology by making them citizen scientists. Get involved in ecological surveys of local bugs and their host plants! Produce data to contribute to a growing community database. Connect to the biological diversity in your own backyard!

A series of modular activities on different life science topics, such as biodiversity, growth and development, invasive species, genetics, insects, evolution, urban ecology and statistical analysis, are also being produced. These modules can be scaled to the needs of different classes and grade-levels or used over multiple grade-levels. For older students, survey data are available to be used in hypothesis-testing or exploratory analyses. Teachers are encouraged to modify the activities to their own needs and share success stories.




The Banished Beetle Project

The Banished Beetle Project is a citizen science initiative designed to increase awareness of burying beetles and their importance to the environment. Collecting data on burying beetle species is beneficial in order to determine the presence of the endangered American burying beetle (ABB). The American burying beetle only occurs in six states, including Oklahoma. There has never before been a chance to involve citizen scientists in this research effort until now! I have developed methods that enable teachers and young children to go outside and perform experiments that will add to larger pool of data that will significantly improve research efforts towards the conservation of this troubled species.




DIYBio

Started in 2008, the mission of DIYBio is to encourage an active and safe community of do-it-youself biologists. At the core of our mission is to improve the public's understanding of biotechnology.

Our website maintains a list of global DIYBio events and local organizations, bio-safety practices, and more!




Counter Culture Labs

Come help us build a new community lab for the East Bay, focused on DIY biology and citizen science. A place to explore, learn, work on fun projects, tinker with biology and other sciences. Open to biotech professionals, scientists, and citizen scientists of all stripes. Be part of our community of creative thinkers, hackers and mad scientists!




BioCurious

Our Mission:
We believe that innovations in biology should be accessible, affordable, and open to everyone.
We’re building a community biology lab for amateurs, inventors, entrepreneurs, and anyone who wants to
experiment with friends.

What We Are:

- a complete working laboratory and technical library for entrepreneurs to cheaply access equipment, materials, and co-working space,

- a training center for biotechniques, with an emphasis on safety

- a meeting place for citizen scientists, hobbyists, activists, and students




The Microbiome and Oral Health

Help researchers learn more about the normal bacteria in the mouth!

You may Qualify if you:
• Are able to collect samples from yourself
• Have NO active dental disease
• Have NO chronic medical conditions

What is the Time Commitment?
• Six 2.5 hour office visits at UCSF
• Daily sample collection by you at your home (~30 minutes per day) for 28 days
Benefits?
• A free dental examination (no xrays) and a free dental cleaning
• A maximum of $245




The Dental Arcade Game

Are you fascinated by forensic science? This project is run by a real life forensic anthropologist, and is about teeth. It is designed to gather information about your age, ethnicity and the teeth you have in your mouth, to see if what we think we know about when teeth erupt is accurate.

At the moment, if an unknown body is found, forensic scientists (forensic anthropologists and forensic odontologists) examine the teeth and work out how old the person was when s/he died by noting which teeth have erupted, and comparing this to reference data. This data then gives the scientist an age range, which can help the police narrow down the list of possible people that the body could be. The problem is that this data is out of date, and there is lots of variation between populations.

That's where YOU come in. We can improve this data set by getting as many people as possible to complete our survey. That way, we can build up a mega-database of ages and tooth eruption and ethnicities, and build up a really useful bank of data for scientists to use in the future.




Monitoring an Invasive Seaweed

We need your help to track the changes in abundance of an invasive seaweed, Gracilaria vermiculophylla. Native to Asia, G. vermiculophylla was introduced to the Southeast via the oyster trade back in the 1990's. Scientist studying G. vermiculophylla are trying to determine how the seaweed is changing southeastern estuaries where it is most prolific, and here is how you can help!

An informational sign is placed on the Jay Wolf Nature Trial Dock, a high-traffic area adjacent to a mudflat where G. vermiculophylla can be found. The sign, along with educating the public about the invasive seaweed, instructs passersby to take a photograph with a camera or phone and to then share the photograph with us using social media or email. A bracket is installed adjacent to the sign to designate where the camera or phone should be placed, allowing us to guarantee that all photographs are taken from the same location. The photographs will be compiled in a time lapse series, which will be used to better understand seasonal changes in G. vermiculophylla populations. The time lapses will be available for viewing by the public through the project’s blog.




FreshWater Watch

FreshWater Watch is Earthwatch's global research project which aims to involve at least 100,000 people in a program to research and learn about fresh water. The purpose of FreshWater Watch is to safeguard the quality and supply of fresh water, our planet's most precious and vital resource.

Participants have the opportunity to become citizen scientists and take an active role in scientific data gathering. As a citizen scientist, you will join a global community working together to promote freshwater sustainability.




Fastest lift

The aim of this project is to identify the lift with the top speed in your area. To take part in this mission, you will need an Android device (phone or tablet) and the Sense-it app.




2015 Big Garden Milkweed Butterfly Count

Our gardens, backyards, parks, and meadows could be magical places filled with life if we could only slow down and pay attention for a while. This summer, you’re invited to go out to your garden or backyard, or else to a local park, forest, or meadow, to count milkweed butterflies for one hour. This project seeks to establish a tradition of bringing people together, relaying important information, and teaching the appreciation of nature that will continue for years to come.

Milkweed is a unique plant group that serves as a host to four butterflies species: the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), the queen butterfly (Danaus gilippus), the tropical milkweed butterfly (Lycorea cleobaea),and the soldier butterfly (Danaus eresimus). However, as milkweed slowly disappears, so do these butterflies. Currently, the monarch butterfly count is at a second-year low, indicating the threats that it and other similar species face.

By counting butterflies, we can survey their numbers in the United States and Canada, while having fun outside and learning more about butterflies and other wildlife. The event promises to be a fun, educational activity for children and families.

What is the 2015 Big Garden Milkweed Butterfly Count?

This year’s Big Garden Milkweed Butterfly Count is a fun, educational project with far-reaching implications. People will be invited to go outside for one hour during the weekend of July 25–26 to count the number of milkweed butterflies seen at one time. That way, we will avoid counting the same butterflies over and over again.

This project will have a specially designed website accessible via laptops, desktops, tablets, and smartphones.

The materials and website will include identifying information and illustrations that will help people to learn what milkweed butterfly species look like.

Participants can also use the website for counting that will have a 60-minute timer and where information can be entered right away. The website will also have a pop-up quiz with butterfly trivia questions and a list of games and fun activities for children.




International Drought Experiment

The goal of the International Drought Experiment (IDE) is to implement a highly coordinated, multi-site drought experiment requiring (in most cases) only a moderate investment of time and resources by investigators. This coordinated, distributed experiment will allow for the quantification of the impacts of four-year extreme drought across a wide range of terrestrial ecosystems based on a common experimental design and a comparable suite of measurements.

The primary goals of IDE are to: (1) assess patterns of differential terrestrial ecosystem sensitivity to drought, and (2) identify potential mechanisms underlying those patterns. IDE will significantly expand the scope of past drought experiments by including as broad a range of ecosystem types as possible, ensuring that these experiments are accessible to as many investigators as possible, and overcoming the limitations of past drought experiments (i.e., lack of coordination, differences in approaches and methodologies, etc.).




SCARAB (Scientific Collaboration for Accessible Research About Borers)

This is a citizen science project to help track the spread of invasive beetles, such as the polyphagus shothole borer (PSHB), to better understand factors leading to their spread and how to manage them.




Welsh Sea Watchers Project

The Sea Watch Foundation is looking to recruit enthusiastic individuals with a keen interest in Welsh whales, dolphins and porpoises to become part of the Welsh Sea Watchers project. The Welsh Sea Watches Project is a new initiative with that aims to develop a network of reliable volunteers throughout Wales to assist in data collection and further understanding and public awareness of the amazing cetacean species that can be seen off Welsh coasts. Volunteers will take part in a variety of tasks and gain experience in cetacean surveying and species identification, as well as public awareness work and social networking.
‘Sea Watchers’ will assist the Wales Development Officer and Sightings Officer in a number of tasks including but not limited to

• Organising and conducting regular land based watches for cetaceans

• Organising, attending and assisting during Sea Watch events

• Representing Sea Watch during public talks and school visits

The Welsh Sea Watchers project is an on-going project; volunteers may apply throughout the year. Due to the nature of the project, it is advisable that applicants are already resident in Wales, as accommodation cannot be provided.

Desirable skills/qualifications

• Background in education or marine biology

• Driving license and use of own car

Duration/minimum commitment
Welsh Sea Watcher volunteers should ideally be active all year around with a minimum commitment of 4 hours per month.

This is a flexible, part-time positions; volunteers are expected to organise their own time and work independently (with guidance from the Welsh Development Officer).




Play to Cure: Genes in Space

Help researchers cure cancer.

The problem:

We know that faults in our genes can lead to cancer cells forming. This can be linked to the amount of genes in our cells - sometimes we have more and sometimes we have less.

It can take years for scientists to analyze all of their genetic data, but with thousands of citizen scientists playing Genes in Space, the process is greatly accelerated.

How it works:

First, you plot a galactic route. In the context of the game, you're choosing your flight path, but these “space coordinates” are actually a visualization of DNA data, and you're showing our scientists where the genetic variations are which may lead to cancer.

Then you collect Element Alpha, a mist like substance that can be traded for ship upgrades. It actually represents the same DNA data that has just been mapped – which means our scientists have two perspectives on the same sample, from one player.

And we’ve added an asteroid field. This makes the gameplay more engaging and challenging. You need to dodge or shoot a multitude of asteroids to complete a stage.

Each data sample is analyzed multiple times for accuracy. Don’t worry about making mistakes - the more people who use Genes in Space, the more accurate the results will be and the faster data can be translated into new ways to beat cancer.




IDAH2O Master Water Stewards

The IDAH2O Master Water Steward program participants attend an 8-hour workshop which combines classroom instruction and hands-on field work.

A certified Master Water Steward then can adopt a stream location to conduct regular monitoring of habitat, biological, chemical and physical assessments. Stewards upload all data collected to an interactive HIS website that is publicly available. Another focus of the program is to educate citizens on the science behind water quality and to help them understand streams, rivers and lakes systems. Youth involvement and K-12 participation (formal and after-school enrichment) is also strongly supported.




Natural North Carolina

North Carolina is a beautiful place! With the huge variation in habitat types - from the mountains to the piedmont to the coastal plain - our state boasts a grand diversity of plants, animals, and fungi. Just look around. You likely encounter hundreds of species in your daily life, and many just beyond your front door!

Scientists at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences document the species in our great state and share the things we learn with you in our Museum exhibits. But, we can't be everywhere at once! We need YOUR help. By photographing and reporting the wildlife you see in your everyday life to Natural North Carolina, you can help us learn more about the species that call North Carolina home. You will also help us create an atlas of North Carolina's flora and fauna that you can use to identify the natural things you see in your local area. And all you have to do to help is snap a photo of something in nature and tell us where and when you took it. Easy!

So, get outside! Snap a few photos. Become a citizen scientist by submitting your photos to Natural North Carolina. Together, we can discover the wonders of North Carolina and learn more about our amazing state.




Global Change Research Wetland Annual Census

The Biogeochemistry Lab at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) is conducting their annual census of the Global Change Research Wetland, a marsh that SERC scientists have been studying for nearly 30 years to track the impacts of high carbon dioxide and nutrient levels on plant growth. We are looking for volunteer citizen scientists on weekdays from July 20 to July 30 from 8AM to 4PM. Volunteers are need for a minimum of one half-day, however it is best to have people come for a whole day, ideally for multiple days in a row. The work involves working in the tidal marsh (on boardwalks) at SERC to count and measure all of the plants in the experimental plots and working in the lab to sort samples and conduct analyses. Volunteers must be at least 16 years old to participate.




Be A Smithsonian Archaeology Volunteer

Join the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) Archaeology Lab as we excavate two sites on SERC property this summer! Work with scientists and students to excavate sites, preserve artifacts, and collect environmental data to understand the ways that people change the land has changed (or not) over the past 200 years.

We request that volunteers serve at least one day, but more days are encouraged! No experience is necessary and training will be provided. This opportunity is suitable for families with older children (13+ directly supervised by a parent/guardian, 16+ may be able to work without having a parent/guardian present)and groups. Volunteers will be working outside and some bending and kneeling is required.

For people who wish to become more deeply involved with the program, we offer a research citizen science track, where volunteers will pursue semi-independent research and may even publish their findings in professional journals. This opportunity is only available to people aged 18+. Research Citizen Scientists must commit to a minimum of 10 hours per month for at least 4 months.

All volunteer activities occur on Wednesdays on the campus of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, MD.




BiodiversiTREE

BiodiversiTREE is an experimental forest on the campus of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, MD. In fall of 2013, staff and volunteers planted more than 20,000 trees in 75 plots. Some of the plots have one species, some have 4 species, and others have 12 species. Over the next 100 years, professional and citizen scientists will collect data to better understand the impacts of forest biodiversity on environmental factors such as tree growth, insect diversity, and soil quality.

We are seeking volunteers to help us maintain our forest and to help us collect data! No prior knowledge is required. This opportunity is suitable for people age 16 and over. Younger volunteers (under the supervision of a parent or guardian) will be considered on a case by case basis. Volunteers will be working outside and this work involves a lot of kneeling and bending. Volunteers must come to the SERC campus in Edgewater, MD to volunteer.




PressureNet

PressureNet is a network of crowdsourced weather sensors. We automatically collect atmospheric pressure measurements using barometers in new Android devices. We're sharing this live data with scientists and researchers to improve weather forecasting. Soon we'll provide you with a weather forecast based on everyone's live, shared data!

We're going to make new weather models using the data that PressureNet automatically collects - these models should produce forecasts that are significantly more accurate than any other method! Since the data is collected using smartphones, we can gather way more data about the atmosphere than ever before.

Until we make forecasts, PressureNet shows you the raw data. The pressure data is displayed in graphs so that you can see both your own data as well as other regions' graphed over time. We've just added animations as well, so you can watch storms moving across a region. Furthermore, you can now report what the weather is where you are! Current weather conditions automatically refresh every twenty minutes to keep it accurate.

PressureNet has been featured on BBC World Service, Wired Science, and MIT Technology Review.




L.A. Nature Map

The L.A. Nature Map hosted by the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles is an interactive map that displays local plant and wildlife observations.

Our Southern California region is a hotspot for urban biodiversity. With your help, we can show Angelenos and the world the diversity of nature all around us. You can contribute to this citizen science project by sending photos of plants and animals.

The L.A. Nature Map is created in collaboration with iNaturalist.




RASCals (Reptiles and Amphibians of Southern California)

RASCals is designed to improve our knowledge of native and non-native reptiles and amphibians in southern California. This region is home to 22.5 million people and has experienced dramatic urbanization and habitat modification. We need your help in documenting reptiles and amphibians throughout the region so that we can examine how various species have responded to these habitat changes. We are interested in native and non-native species and in observations in all types of habitats, from relatively pristine habitats to heavily modified, urban habitats, such as backyards, schoolyards, and urban parks. This project is conducted in collaboration with iNaturalist.




Birdeez

Birdeez is the easiest way to identify, collect and share bird sightings. The goal of this project is to educate you about the birds in your area while you contribute sightings that will be used for scientific understanding of bird migration, bird populations and climate change.

Currently Birdeez is available as an iPhone application at www.GetBirdeez.com/ but soon we we will be online and on different phone platforms as well.

Every bird counts, so help us help them by collecting and sharing sightings.




SENSR

SENSR is a tool to create, share and manage a citizen science project running on mobile devices to harness the power of citizen scientists.

SENSR provides a simple and easy way to obtain a custom data collection application running on mobile devices for your project.

If you are running a grassroots project for science, education, environmental conservation, community monitoring, or other reason, and are seeking ways to expand citizen scientists' participation in contributing data, SENR can help you create a mobile data collection tool for your project.

It is part of a research project at Carnegie Mellon University. Please try out if you are seeking ways to harness citizens' power of data collection.




Pennsylvania Senior Environment Corps

The Senior Environment Corps (SEC) program engages volunteers mostly aged 55 and over. SEC volunteers are engaged in numerous activities from water quality monitoring, stream habitat assessment, storm-drain stenciling, environmental education, community gardening, wildlife surveying, marking abandoned oil and gas wells, and cleaning up parks and trails.

Since 1997, SEC volunteers in Pennsylvania have contributed over 2,000,000 hours, and their contribution is estimated to be of value to the state at over $3 million per year. Coming into 2014, SEC volunteers are active in 20 counties across Pennsylvania, and will soon be expanding into to more areas.




Watch the Wild

Watch the Wild™ needs your help. As a Watch the Wild™ volunteer, you observe and report the "wild" in your community, from trees and plants to lakes and streams to weather and wildlife activity. In as little as ten minutes, your observations help us to understand how our eco-systems are changing and helps us to adapt for the future. Your observations will be entered into a database and shared with interested scientists.




Mothing

Moths are incredibly diverse, are ecologically important as plant eaters, pollinators, and food for songbirds. How will climate and other large-scale ecological factors affect moths?

Three components - choose any or all:

1) Moth Math - analyze over five years of moth phenology data, correlate with weather, find patterns. (Best for high school AP Bio or undergraduate intro bio, high school and undergraduate math).

2) Take photographs of moths at your porch light and upload to Discover Life, either our pre-selected "Dark Dozen" http://www.discoverlife.org/darkdozen and upload to Twitter or Instagram @darkdozenmoths (or if eager, photograph any other moths you find at your site and upload to an album on www.DiscoverLife.org).

3) Help us identify moths that you and others have uploaded, so that photographs become data. Participants can compare moths at their own site with moths from other sites, to answer their own original questions and do real science.




PhotosynQ

PhotosynQ is a platform allowing people to collaboratively solve difficult research questions, both at the locally and globally, using sensors which connect to your cell phone. The MultispeQ, our first sensor, measures important parameters of photosynthesis in plants and algae in a non-destructive way, quickly and inexpensively. These measurements provide a detailed picture of the health of the plant and are used for plant breeding, agricultural extension services, and plant scientists to improving plant efficiency and to identify novel photosynthetic pathways for energy and crop research.

Anyone can propose a project on the PhotosynQ website (www.photosynq.org), and anyone else can contribute data, ideas, analysis, and discussion to that project. There are researchers and citizen scientists around the world already running projects through PhotosynQ which you can contribute to. Once you join the platform, find an open project and contact the project lead to join, or design your own project!




Michigan Butterfly Network

The Michigan Butterfly Network (MiBN) is a citizen-science project that seeks to assess the changing population status of our state’s butterfly species, evaluate the quality of Michigan ecosystems, and engage the Michigan public in significant citizen science research. The project was started in 2011 by the Kalamazoo Nature Center, and has grown to include several collaborating institutions and over 30 monitoring sites across the state.

We are actively looking for new partnerships and volunteers across the state in order to expand and grow the network. We welcome engagement in the project - Please contact us!




MyEnvironment

The MyEnvironment mapping tools provides immediate access to a cross-section of environmental data for any geographical location in the U.S. Users of the official site can choose the location and environmental issue to examine.




Kinsey Reporter

Kinsey Reporter is a global mobile survey platform to share, explore, and visualize anonymous data about sex.

Reports are submitted via smartphone, then explored at http://KinseyReporter.org or downloaded for off-line analysis.

The Kinsey Institute is exploring new ways to record and describe people's sexual experiences worldwide. We are also exploring new ways for people to be connected while protecting their privacy. We hope to reach people with all kinds of different ideas, beliefs, and experiences, and who might be willing to report on sexual behaviors, regardless of who is involved and where it is observed. By using Kinsey Reporter, you contribute to research on human sexual behavior. We ask you to act ethically, in the role of a good journalist or "citizen scientist." Submit what is true and accurate to the best of your ability.

Ideally, you would submit a report within 24 hours of the event you are reporting. The report can be about yourself or someone else. It is all anonymous. Kinsey Reporter includes surveys about various sexual activities and other intimate behaviors. These surveys cover sexual behaviors and events, sexual health issues, violence reports, public displays of affection, and other unique behaviors and experience. A 'survey' in this case is a report of information shared by many individuals on a topic of interest; it is not based on a random or representative sample of a community or population.

To ensure that reported data is strictly anonymous, you can only select among the provided tags when answering a question. However, contact us to suggest new surveys, questions, or tags.

To protect the anonymity of the reports even in sparsely populated areas, we aggregate reports over time. A report is not published until a sufficient number of reports have been received from the same location, and then all of those reports are recorded with a randomized timestamp. The more sparsely populated your area and/or the higher the geographic resolution you select, the longer the delay until your report appears. Therefore, in a sparsely populated area, you might want to select a lower resolution (e.g., state/region or country), to minimize the delay until your report becomes public.

Interactive visualizations of the data are available on the KinseyReporter.org website. The anonymous data we collect is also publicly available to the community via an Application Programming Interface (API), documented on the KinseyReporter.org website. We welcome your feedback.

Kinsey Reporter is a joint project of the world-famous Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction (KI) and the Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research (CNetS), both at Indiana University, Bloomington.




Dark Sky Meter

The Dark Sky Meter (available for iPhones) allows citizen scientists to contribute to a global map of nighttime light pollution.
Light pollution is a growing problem in urban environments, but now you can help scientists better understand its effects on the environment. The map is also a great help for (amateur) astronomers looking for dark skies.
By utilizing the camera built in to your iPhone, the Dark Sky Meter actually measures ‘skyglow’ and updates the data in real time.

The Dark Sky Meter International Year of Light version is free and gives you a rough estimate of the night sky brightness.

The Pro version of the app also charts weather conditions and cloud cover so you can take readings at optimal times. The app is as easy to use as taking a picture, and is a fun way to learn about your night sky.

The Results are live and visible for everyone on a global light pollution map generated by the app users. Visit darkskymeter.com to see the map.




The NOVA Sun Lab

Despite its apparently steady glow, the Sun is a churning mass of superhot plasma that regularly produces powerful flares and storms that can knock out power and communication systems here on Earth. In this lab, watch NOVA videos to explore what makes the Sun so volatile and get access to the same NASA data, images, and tools that scientists use to predict solar storms—so that you can predict them for yourself.




Atlas of Living Australia

The Atlas of Living Australia (Atlas) contains information on all the known species in Australia aggregated from a wide range of data providers: museums, herbaria, community groups, government departments, individuals and universities.

The Atlas was initiated by a group of 14 (now 17) organisations—our partners. The intent was to create a national database of all of Australia’s flora and fauna that could be accessed through a single, easy to use web site. Information on the site would be used to: improve our understanding of Australian biodiversity assist researchers to build a more detailed picture of Australia’s biodiversity assist environmental managers and policy makers develop more effective means of managing and sustaining Australia’s biodiversity.

You can participate by submitting a species record, joining an existing citizen science project, digitizing specimen labels, or starting your own citizen science endeavour!




DIY BioPrinter

Come join our ongoing BioPrinter community project!

Did you know you can print live cells from an inkjet printer? Companies like Organovo are developing ways to 3D print human tissues and organs. But the basic technologies are so accessible that we wanted to play around with them ourselves.

We've built our own functioning bioprinter from a couple of old CD drives, an inkjet cartridge, and an Arduino. We probably won't be printing human organs any time soon, but how about printing a leaf from plant cells? Or add a BlueRay laser to turn it into a miniature laser cutter to print "lab-on-a-chip" microfluidic devices. The possibilities are endless - it all depends where *you* want to take it!

Our community projects are open to anyone, and are driven entirely by whoever wants to show up and participate. This is a great opportunity to come check out BioCurious, and jump into some of the projects going on.

This project has something for everyone, whether it's hardware hacking. programming, Arduinos, microfluidics, synthetic biology, plant biology, cell culturing, tissue engineering - you name it! Everyone has something to learn, or something to teach.




Where is my spider?

By just taking photos and observing spiders, you can help the Explorit Science Center learn about which climates certain spiders live in and track the distribution of spiders over time.

Join the Explorit’s Community Science Project by finding and recording spiders in your home or neighborhood (as many as you can!). Use your camera or smart phone to take a photo of the spider and submit it online to add to our geographical database.

Spiders have long been thought of a useful natural method of pest control, but how will expected temperature changes or other environmental changes affect the spider’s usefulness as pest-killers and their distribution?

We don't yet know how climate change will impact spiders, and in turn impact agriculture such as crops and farms- but when we understand where spiders are living today, we will be better able to predict what may happen to spiders and agriculture in the future.




iSeeChange

The iSeeChange Almanac is a socially networked weather Almanac for communities to collectively journal their climate experiences -- their observations, feelings, questions, and decisions --- against near-real time climate information.

This groundbreaking environmental reporting project combines citizen science, participatory public media, and cutting-edge satellite monitoring of environmental conditions.

Incubated in 2012 by producer Julia Kumari Drapkin at Colorado public station KVNF Mountain Grown Community Radio via AIR’s Localore project, iSeeChange is poised to expand in 2015. The team will work with media and scientific partners across the country to help audiences document environmental shifts in their backyards and connect to the bigger-picture climate changes transforming all of our lives and livelihoods.

The project’s growing list of collaborators includes NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Berkeley BEACO2N project, Yale Climate Connections, the Allegheny Front in the Western Pennsylvania, KPCC in Pasadena, WWOZ in New Orleans, Delaware Public Media, KSJD and KVNF in Colorado, Developing Radio Partners, and more.

This spring, the iSeeChange team is expanding its crowdsourced reporting platform, the iSeeChange Almanac, coast to coast. In the coming months, the team will also develop a related app to help synchronize local citizen climate reports with satellite data on regional carbon levels. Combining these two perspectives—a global view of the earth from space and a granular view from individuals on the ground—offers an unprecedented opportunity to match big science with daily life, and surface hidden patterns and stories.

Stay tuned! iseechange.org.





Landmark Trees of India

Landmark Trees of India is a documentation, geography, and monitoring project with a focus on famous, remarkable, and heritage trees of India.
India is a country of superlative population, superlative biodiversity, and superlative environmental variety. These landmark trees can teach us about the landscapes, biodiversity, and people of India and the other nations of the world.




Librería Metagenómica del Ecuador

We are a group of scientists interested in exploring the potential applications of Ecuador’s unique biodiversity. As a first step, we are working to assemble and apply gene libraries collected from around the country.
You can join field trips in Ecuador to collect samples, work in a lab extracting and sequencing nucleic acids, or from home assembling and curating the electronic database.




Wading for Water Sticks

Prepare to get wet and muddy for science! We're looking for citizen scientists in North Carolina to help us learn more about the large, charismatic aquatic insects known as water sticks.

Simply find a body of water in your area, follow the protocol, and submit your data! We'll teach you how to identify the water sticks you find and how to cheaply build any equipment you don't already have (you'll have most of it). And if you don't find anything in the body of water you choose, no problem! Every bit of information helps and anything you can share is useful. With YOUR help, we can discover more about the seasonality, habitat preferences, and distribution of water sticks - together!




uBiome

uBiome is the world's first effort to map the human microbiome through citizen science.

What's the microbiome? The microbiome are the bacteria that live on and within us. It sounds kind of funny, but all of us are actually covered in helpful germs. Many conditions – from diabetes to depression, asthma to autism -- have been found to relate to the microbiome.

uBiome brings this cutting edge technology directly to consumers for the first time. The more data we collect, the more we can learn about this important area of research. We've been featured so far in Wired, Venture Beat, the Los Angeles Times, Scientific American, BoingBoing, and more.




AirCasting

AirCasting is an open-source, end-to-end solution for collecting, displaying, and sharing health and environmental data using your smartphone. The platform consists of wearable sensors that detect changes in your environment and physiology, including a palm-sized air quality monitor called the AirBeam, the AirCasting Android app, the AirCasting website, and wearable LED accessories. By documenting and leveraging health and environmental data to inform personal decision-making and public policy, the AirCasting platform empowers citizen scientists and changemakers.




SubseaObservers

Help track the health and abundance of the mid-Atlantic scallop fishery!

Researchers at the University of Delaware have developed a new robot-based approach to surveying marine life the ocean floor. They use Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs), which can navigate underwater without direct human control, to take photos of marine life in its natural habitat.

By becoming a SubseaObserver you'll play a roll in ocean conservation by helping organizations such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) make better decisions about how to manage the scallop fishery now and for future generations.

As a SubseaObserver you can name your own virtual AUV and choose what part of the mid-Atlantic you'd like to explore.

SubseaObservers also includes information about scallop biology, how the fishery is managed, how AUVs work and where they're used.




Los Angeles Butterfly Survey

The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County is partnering with Butterflies and Moths of North America (BAMONA) to share data and learn more about L.A. butterflies and moths. Help us find and photograph them in Los Angeles.

We know there are 237 species recorded for L.A, County, but how many can you find?




Lost Ladybug Project

Partnering with Cornell's Lost Ladybug Project, the Museum hopes to census the ladybugs found in our region. We have historic data of ladybug species in Los Angeles County, but we don't know how much it has changed — we need your help to find out.




Community of Observers

Get to know the nature of YOUR world! The Fairbanks Community of Observers is to encourage greater public clarity around environmental indicators of climate change in Vermont and northern New Hampshire. Using the website developed by the Fairbanks Museum, we'll collect your quantitative data focused on the life cycles of specific birds, butterflies and wildflowers that are sensitive to environmental change as well as seasonal weather data that is characteristic to our region.

The Community of Observers is for individuals, families, clubs, groups and schools. It is designed to encourage citizen scientists to gain a deeper understanding of the cycles and patterns that characterize our region through the seasons, and how the habitats that depend on these cycles might be affected by global climate shifts.




Geo-Wiki Project

The Geo-Wiki Project is a citizen science network that hopes to improve the overall quality of land use and land cover maps across the globe. They host a variety of projects, all of which use their online Google Earth Application to enlist citizen scientists to improve spatial data. By comparing global land use and land cover data to the aerial photography that appears in Google Earth, you can help improve the validity of important data that is being used to solve important global problems.

Geo-Wiki supports a variety of projects that tackle issues that include climate change, the bio-diversity of plants, and the viability of changing agriculture.

They even have developed mobile apps that allow you to ‘ground truth’ data by adding your own photographs of what’s near you.




Brown marmorated stink bug locations

The brown marmorated stink bug is an invasive insect species that has become an damaging pest of a wide variety of fruit, vegetable, grain, and ornamental crops. This stink bug species also enters homes and can be a nuisance pest. Our webpage allows citizens to report the presence and severity of this stink bug species in their home, yard, farm, or commercial nursery.




Public Laboratory Balloon and Kite Mapping

This DIY mapping tool was the first developed by Public Lab, as part of the Grassroots Mapping project. Citizens use helium-filled balloons and digital cameras to generate high resolution “satellite” maps of areas such as in the Gulf Coast and Gowanus Canal. Although this tool has been in use for two years, components of the kit -- kite and balloon design, the rig, the camera -- continue to evolve as they are adopted in new places and adapted for new purposes. Besides the aerial mapping tools, Public Lab has also developed MapKnitter.org, an online tool for stitching aerial images into maps.




Public Laboratory Infrared Camera

Infrared photography can help in assessing plant health, and has been used on satellites and planes for agricultural and ecological assessment primarily by vineyards, large farms and large-scale (read: expensive) research projects. By creating and open-sourcing a low-cost near-infrared camera and working with wetlands advocates, farmers and environmental activists, the Public Lab community has begun to explore grassroots uses for this powerful analytic technique.




Big Butterfly Count

Counting butterflies for just fifteen minutes could help scientists better understand the environment. The Big Butterfly Count is a recently started national survey that hopes to engage citizen scientists by creating easy and engaging survey methods. Started by the charity group Butterfly Conservation in 2010, the program has grown to over 34,000 participants!

The big butterfly count takes place this year from Saturday 17th July - Sunday 9th August 2015. All you have to do is submit your butterfly counts for just fifteen minutes of observation. A colorful identification poster is available online and submission on the project website couldn’t be easier.

Butterflies are quite sensitive to changes in the environment and are excellent indicators of potential issues with other wildlife. By studying the trends in butterfly counts, scientists can better understand the relationships between wildlife and the environment.

This is an easy, fun, and meaningful way to engage in science. Print out an identification poster, get outside, and start counting!




eButterfly

eButterfly is a citizen science project that helps document butterflies in Canada. By creating a user profile and documenting observed butterflies, citizens can help scientists better understand butterfly distribution in Canada. Users can also track which butterflies they have observed on a dynamic map application, and share photos with the eButterfly community.

The 2,045 eButterfly records of over 170 species help the Canadian Facility for Ecoinformatics Research at the University of Ottawa's Department of Biology better understand how butterflies adapt to environmental change. Eventually, the data you collect will help contribute to the preservation of Canada’s great biodiversity.




UF Native Buzz

Solitary bees and wasps in your own backyard!!!

Native Buzz is a citizen science project created by the University of Florida (UF) Honey Bee Research and Extension Lab. Our goal is to learn more about the nesting preferences, diversity and distribution of our native solitary bees and wasps, share the information gained and provide a forum for those interested in participating in the science and art of native beekeeping (and wasp-keeping!).

Here at University of Florida Native Buzz you can keep track of your own native buzz nest site and see the results of other participant’s nest sites.




OspreyWatch

Osprey Watch is a project of the Center for Conservation Biology for birdwatchers across the nation to help identify osprey nests and observe osprey behavior. The project hopes to acquire data across a large enough spatial scale in order to address three pressing issues associated with aquatic ecosystems: climate change, depletion of fish stocks, and environmental contaminants. Ospreys are great indicators of the health of aquatic ecosystems as they are sensitive to small changes in fish populations and water quality.

OspreyWatch has almost 500 Osprey Watchers monitoring almost 800 nests across North America, Europe, and Australia. Ospreys are incredible birds of prey and viewing them in the wild can be an amazing experience. And it may be easier than you think. Many osprey nest in man made objects and might even be right outside your backdoor. There are also many nests viewable online through web cameras.

So grab a camera, some binoculars, and locate a nest near you to add photos and descriptions to OspreyWatch’s interactive map. You can even find other nests in your area and help monitor and add updates to nesting activity.




FieldScope

FieldScope is a community web-mapping tool that promotes student engagement as citizen scientists and involves them in learning through mapping. By combining easy data integration with powerful mapping visualization, FieldScope is on the cutting edge of community mapping.

The application is accessed online and is requires no installation. Students are able to upload field data photos and other media as well as collaborate with other students and scientists, and perform analysis on existing data. There are many rich projects to choose from, including mapping water quality in the Chesapeake Bay, investigating watershed dynamics, and mapping rivers and streams in the National Parks.

With students able to contribute and interact alongside scientists, meaningful science is sure to happen!




Temperature Blast

Temperature Blast is a Maryland Science Center C3 Citizen Science project designed to introduce participants to methods of studying climate. Citizen Scientists collect live and archive Weatherbug data from select stations in the Baltimore region to compare temperatures and log this data for scientists.

Scientists at the Baltimore Ecosystem Study then use this data to test models of temperature patterns across the city to aid in urban planning. This data illustrates the Urban Heat Island effect on the area, a phenomenon classified by temperature differences between a metropolitan area and more rural landscape nearby. An Urban Heat Island is not an effect of climate change, but rather of our activity shaping the environment around us.

Using either this website or our Smartphone application (available free of charge for both iPhone and Android) Citizen Scientists submit temperature data from six weather stations in the Baltimore region. The purpose of this is to collect a stream of simultaneous data from multiple sites in and around the metropolitan area. This data, along with first-hand location observations, will be used to understand the Urban Heat Island Effect in Baltimore.

Anyone with access to the Internet and/or a Smartphone can be a Citizen Scientist and participate in Temperature Blast!? While the data obtained from the program is relevant to the Baltimore metropolitan region, there is no geographic or age restriction for Citizen Scientists.




LA Spider Survey

In order to conduct a large-scale survey of urban spiders, we need the help of the public. We are asking people to collect spiders in their homes and gardens, fill out a simple data sheet about their collection, and send or bring the spiders and forms to the Natural History Museum.

In spite of their importance and abundance, we do not know much about the spiders in Los Angeles. There are no truly large collections of urban spiders from this area, as most collectors concentrate on studying natural areas.

As an important international port, new species of spiders from various parts of the world are always being accidentally introduced into the Los Angeles area, and some of these have established breeding populations. We need to know how widespread these introduced species have become, and how they have interacted with the native spiders. Also, we want to know how urbanization and the loss of natural habitat has affected populations and distributions of naturally occurring spiders.




Genetics of Taste Lab

Do mouth bacteria affect the way we taste sweetness?

Research suggests that humans range in their sensitivity to and liking of sweet-tasting molecules in our food. The Genetics of Taste Lab will take a novel look at genetics, both of the people who enroll and of the bacteria communities in their mouths (microbiome), to determine if the sensitivity and liking differences observed are due to both changes in the sweet genes AND the types of bacteria in our mouths.

Community Participation: Research & Educational Goals: The Genetics of Taste Lab is a unique venue for both citizen science AND crowdsourcing health data
-We connect our community to research that is relevant to their lives.
-We conduct research to answer real public health questions and publish in peer-reviewed scientific journals.

This study is led by Nicole Garneau, PhD (ngarneau@dmns.org) and Robin Tucker, PhD, RD (rtucker@bgsu.edu), and made possible by a partnership between the Health Science and Visitor Programs Departments at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science and the Department of Public and Allied Health at Bowling Green State University. To become a citizen scientist, contact our volunteer services office at 303.370.6419 or visit www.dmns.org/join/volunteering.




Bumble Bee Watch

Bumble Bee Watch (www.BumbleBeeWatch.org) is a collaborative effort to track and conserve North America’s bumble bees. This citizen science project allows individuals or groups to: 1) Upload photos of bumble bees to start a virtual bumble bee collection; 2) Identify the bumble bees in your photos and have your identifications verified by experts; 3) Help researchers determine the status and conservation needs of bumble bees; 4) Help locate rare or endangered populations of bumble bees; 5) Learn about bumble bees, their ecology, and ongoing conservation efforts; and 6) Connect with other citizen scientists.

Find out more at http://www.bumblebeewatch.org/contents/about/




British Trust for Ornithology

The BTO's Nest Record Scheme (NRS) gathers vital information on the breeding success of Britain's birds by asking volunteers to find and follow the progress of individual bird nests.

The data collected are used to produce trends in breeding performance, which help us to identify species that may be declining because of problems at the nesting stage. These trends are published on the BTO website and are updated every year. NRS data also allow us to measure the impacts of pressures such as climate change on bird productivity.

Anyone can be a nest recorder. Some people watch a single nest box in their back garden while others spend hundreds of hours finding and monitoring nests in the wider countryside.




American Kestrel Partnership

Now's the time to set up your American Kestrel nest box! This bird's population is experiencing long-term declines in North America, and existing data are insufficient for understanding the causes. The American Kestrel Partnership is an international research network designed to generate data, models, and conservation plans for kestrel habitat and populations at large spatial scales. The Partnership unites the data-generating capacity of citizen scientists with the data-analysis expertise of professional scientists by promoting research collaboration among citizen scientists, universities, government agencies, conservation organizations, schools, and businesses. The Partnership also fosters long-term conservation values and appreciation of science by engaging the public with hands-on research experiences.




Project MonarchHealth

MonarchHealth is a citizen science project in which volunteers sample wild monarch butterflies to help track the spread of a protozoan parasite across North America.

The project's mission is to achieve a broader understanding of host-parasite interactions in monarch butterflies and to enhance awareness of monarch biology and conservation through the coupling of citizens and scientists.

Participants either capture monarch butterflies as adults or raise the caterpillars in separate containers until they become adult butterflies. In either case, you will gently tape each butterfly’s abdomen with a sticker to collect the OE spores (helpful instructional videos). Next, you will send the sample, along with a simple data sheet for each butterfly, back to the scientists at the Altizer lab where they will analyze the sample. After the data are compiled, project coordinators will send you the results of your sampling contribution as well as post them on the project results page for the public to see.

Anyone interested in monarch butterflies can participate. MonarchHealth is conducted by people of all skills, ages, and backgrounds including families, retired persons, classrooms, monarch organizations, nature centers, and individuals.




Invaders of Texas

The Invaders of Texas Program is an innovative campaign whereby volunteer "citizen scientists" are trained to detect the arrival and dispersal of invasive species in their own local areas. That information is delivered into a statewide mapping database and to those who can do something about it. The premise is simple. The more trained eyes watching for invasive species, the better our chances of lessening or avoiding damage to our native landscape.

The Invaders of Texas Program supports the creation and perpetuation of a network of local citizen scientist teams who seek out and report outbreaks of selected environmentally and economically harmful invasive species. These teams, coordinated by the Wildflower Center contribute important data to local and national resource managers who will, in turn, coordinate appropriate responses to control the spread of unwanted invaders. The Invaders Program is designed to move the target audience beyond awareness to action on invasive species.

This is your chance to help slow down the spread of harmful invasive species and reduce their ecological and economic damage.




BeeSpotter

BeeSpotter needs volunteers to go outside with a camera and capture quality pictures of bees! Researchers at the University of Illinois are trying to better understand bee demographics in the states of Illinois, Missouri, and Ohio (added for the 2015 spotting season!) and they can't do it without your help. Your data will become part of a nationwide effort to gather baseline information on the population status of these insects.

BeeSpotter is a partnership between citizen scientists and the professional science community. The project is designed to educate the public about pollinators by engaging them in a data collection effort of importance to the nation.




FrogWatch USA™

FrogWatch USA Chapters are overseen by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums and are hosted and managed by zoos, aquariums, and like-minded organizations.

At training sessions hosted by a local chapter, volunteers learn to identify local frog and toad species by their calls during the breeding season and how to report their findings accurately. By mastering these skills, volunteers gain increased experience and control over asking and answering scientific questions which, in turn, augments science literacy, facilitates conservation action and stewardship, and increases knowledge of amphibians.




Dragonfly Swarm Project

The Dragonfly Swarm Project uses the power of the internet to allow everyone to participate in a large-scale study of dragonfly swarming behavior. Participants observe dragonfly swarms wherever they occur, make observations of the composition and behavior of the swarm, then submit a report online.

Data is compiled from the reports by an aquatic entomologist with a passion for dragonflies. Her goal is to use the data collected from participants for two purposes: 1) to publish data from a massive number of dragonfly swarms in the scientific literature, making this information available to scientists, and 2) to provide information about this behavior to the public. Many people see dragonfly swarms and are curious about what they see. The creator of this project hopes to provide answers to the curious while simultaneously collecting information from eye-witnesses to improve our overall knowledge of this fascinating behavior.

Because any given person has to be in the right place at the right time to see a dragonfly swarm, this project isn't possible for a single scientist to do alone. Collecting data from a large network of people is thus the best way to study dragonfly swarming behavior. Participation requires only curiosity and a few minutes of your time, so keep an eye out for dragonfly swarms in your area this summer and send in your reports!

Thanks in advance for your participation!




Colorado Spider Survey

The Colorado Spider Survey (CSS) is a means of gathering critical information about the ecology and distribution of this understudied taxonomic group. Researchers have documented the distribution and species diversity of several groups of insects in the Rocky Mountain region such as ants, grasshoppers, and butterflies. However, information about the distribution and diversity of other arthropod groups in this region is lacking. One group that is particularly understudied is the Order Araneae, or the spiders. Little is known about either the biodiversity of spiders in Colorado or the impact urbanization is having on species distribution in the state. No formal spider surveys have ever been conducted in Colorado.

The survey will be carried out through a series of Spider Identification and Collection Workshops that will be held throughout the state, but particularly in cooperation with the State Park system. These workshops, led by a team of professional and amateur arachnologists (or spider biologists), will train members of local communities in spider biology, morphology, taxonomy, and collection techniques. The specimens will be collected during the next several years by team leaders as well as workshop participants and will be sent to the Denver Museum of Nature & Science for identification and storage. Data from these specimens and from Colorado specimens housed at other collections throughout the country will be compiled and published in an electronic database.




Acoustic Bat Monitoring

Citizen Science Center volunteers assist the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources with their Acoustic Bat Monitoring Program. Volunteers attend a training workshop during the spring where they learn how to use an AnaBat detector, which records bat calls using a personal digital assistant that has a global positioning system to record the location and time. The bat detector translates the bat's call "on the fly" to a frequency that humans can hear. In this way, volunteers can actually hear what a bat call sounds like, while making sure the device is working correctly.

After training, bat volunteers borrow the AnaBat detection system, dubbed the “Bat Monitoring Kit,” for one to three nights to conduct bat surveys of local parks, neighborhoods, lakes and trails. Sometimes volunteers survey areas of their choice and sometimes they are asked to survey specific sites.

Once a volunteer selects a site to survey, they agree to survey that site three times during the season, once in April/May, once in June/July, and once in August/September. Each survey is between one to three hours (a minimum of 1 hour). Surveys begin a half-hour after sunset. Bat monitoring volunteers of all ages are welcome to participate. Volunteers younger than 16 must be accompanied by an adult.




Arizona Odonates

Arizona residents are needed to contribute to a photographic guide to dragonflies and damselflies in their state.

Interest in dragonfly watching and photography is growing across the country. Arizona is no exception, especially since dragonflies are an important indicator of water quality, a natural concern in the growing southwest. Although there are a number of Mexican species which reach the United States borders in Arizona, there remains a great deal of work to do in inventorying the species found in the state as well as better defining their ranges and flight seasons.

A number of people have studied the odonates of Arizona over the years, but readily available information has been sparse. This project provides a collection of odonate photos, many not well known within the United States.

This is your chance to contribute to the growing body of knowledge on Arizona dragonflies and damselflies.




citsci.org

CitSci.org is a platform that supports a variety of citizen science programs using a centralized database to store and deliver science data, with a focus on community based monitoring programs. This platform allows program coordinators to create their own projects and datasheets, manage members, define measurements, create analyses, and even write feedback forms.




Butterflies & Moths of N. America

Butterflies and Moths of North America (BAMONA) is seeking individuals to submit their sightings of butterflies, moths, and caterpillars. BAMONA is a user-friendly web site and database that shares butterfly and moth species information with the public via dynamic maps, checklists, and species pages. Data are updated in real time and come from a variety of sources, including citizen scientists. Individuals can get involved by documenting butterflies and moths in their neighborhoods and submitting photographs for review. Collaborating lepidopterists serve as coordinators and oversee quality control. Submitted data are verified, added to the database, and then made available through the web site.

BAMONA also provides free support to partners. Partner with BAMONA to build local or regional species checklists, to get secure data storage, or to set up a project-specific submission and review process. Or, let us know how we can work with you to create a customized solutions for browsing, searching, and visualizing your data. See http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/partner for details and links to partners.




Audubon of Florida EagleWatch

Audubon of Florida's EagleWatch Program seeks volunteers to monitor active Bald Eagle nest sites and help identify potential threats to nesting success.

As a result of Florida’s rapidly changing environment, Bald Eagles currently nest successfully in urban areas. This increased exposure to human activity and the pressure that exposure can put on the eagle population prompted the EagleWatch Program.

EagleWatch seeks information about Bald Eagles, active nest locations, and possible disturbances or threats to nesting activities. The program is designed to educate volunteers in general eagle nesting biology, applicable laws, the identification of nest threats, monitoring techniques, and the verification of previously unrecorded active eagle nests.

This data is compiled and used to assist Florida's Mid-winter Annual Bald Eagle Nesting Survey by documenting both urban and rural eagle nesting activity, successes, and failures. The U.S Fish and Wildlife Service also utilizes EagleWatch data to enhance their conservation and law enforcement efforts.




Bee Hunt

Bee Hunt participants use digital photography to record and study the interactions between plants and pollinators, following rigorous protocols to ensure high-quality data. The data collected will help provide a better understanding of pollinators' importance in growing food and maintaining healthy natural ecosystems. Bee Hunt is open to anyone, anywhere, whenever pollinators are flying. In North America, depending upon your location, you can start as early as March and go as late as November.

There are four ways to participate in Bee Hunt:

1. Inventory pollinators at your site with photographs
2. Compare species in two patches
3. Provide nesting sites for mason bees and study when they are active
4. Use bowls and soapy water to collect insects for a more complete inventory of species

Bee Hunt is a great way to teach and learn about pollination ecology and other aspects of natural history. Bee Hunt is a participatory science project. It's your research. You are the scientists. By following the project’s methods, you will collect and contribute high-quality data.




Sound Around You Project

I am building a sound map of the world as part of a study into how sounds in our everyday environment make us feel. We need your help!

We’re asking people across the world to use our new iOS app on their iPhones or iPads (or any recorder) to record short clips from different sound environments, or "soundscapes"--anything from the inside of a family car to a busy shopping centre. Then we ask volunteers to comment on their soundscapes and upload them to our virtual soundscape map.

Recordings and responses will be analyzed by acoustic scientists, and significant findings will be reported on this website.

Sound Around You aims to raise awareness of how our soundscape influences us, and could have far reaching implications for professions and social groups ranging from urban planners to house buyers.




Project NOAH

Noah is a mobile phone app that allows nature lovers to document local wildlife and add their observations to a growing database for use by ongoing citizen-science projects.

Using the Noah mobile application, users take a photograph of an interesting organism, select the appropriate category, add descriptive tags, and click submit. The application captures the location details along with the submitted information and stores all of it in the species database for use by efforts such as Project Squirrel and the Lost Ladybug Project.

In addition, users can see what kinds of organisms are nearby by searching through a list or exploring a map of their area, all on a mobile phone.

Noah is all about discovering and documenting local wildlife. We work with research groups and organizations to help gather important data and we want you to help by logging recent spottings on your mobile phone. Missions can range from photographing specific frogs or flowers to tracking migrating birds or invasive species or logging the effects of the oil spill.




Bird Ringing at the British Trust for Ornithology

Bird Ringing at the British Trust for Ornithology is a network of more than 2,500 trained and licensed volunteers in the United Kingdom that ring--or tag--more than 900,000 birds every year.

Bird ringing involves the fitting of small, uniquely numbered metal rings on the legs of birds. By identifying these birds as individuals, researchers can start to understand changes in the survival and movements of bird populations.

Bird ringers come in many types, from individuals working in urban areas to large groups working in a wide geographic area, and can start at any age. Though you definitely don’t need to be a bird expert to ring, it does help if you have some prior bird knowledge. Anyone who wants to participate in the project will need to gain field experience with a qualified trainer.

You’ll no doubt find that ringing is a very satisfying activity. Not only will you be adding to 100 years of data used directly by conservationists, but you will also enjoy the experience of seeing birds close up. Whether you want to train to ring birds in nest boxes, gardens, or a local gravel pit, your contribution is vital to the project's success.




Monarch Larva Monitoring Project

The Monarch Larva Monitoring Project enlists citizen scientists to collect long-term data on larval monarch populations and milkweed habitat.

Developed by researchers at the University of Minnesota, the project aims to better understand how and why monarch populations vary in time and space, with a focus on monarch distribution and abundance during the breeding season in North America.

As a volunteer, you can participate in two ways: You can commit to regularly monitoring a specific patch of milkweed or you can submit anecdotal observations. If you commit to regular monitoring, you'll conduct weekly monarch and milkweed surveys, measuring per plant densities of monarch eggs and larvae. You'll also be able to participate in more detailed optional activities, such as measuring parasitism rates and milkweed quality. Your contributions will aid in conserving monarchs and their threatened migratory phenomenon, and will advance our understanding of butterfly ecology in general.

In addition to contributing to an understanding of monarch biology, you'll gain hands-on experience in scientific research. Through this experience, we hope that your appreciation and understanding of monarchs, monarch habitat, and the scientific process are enhanced.




Mastodon Matrix Project

With over 60,000 participants from 5 continents, we are happy - and sad - to say that the Mastodon Matrix Project has be discontinued. We were wildly successful in meeting our goals for introducing the public to how we know what we know about past life and climates, and the help to researchers was invaluable. We thank SciStarter.com hugely...

Mastodon Volumes of Thanks to SciStarter and All the Participants!




Quake-Catcher Network

The Quake-Catcher Network provides software so that individuals can join together to improve earthquake monitoring, earthquake awareness, and the science of earthquakes.

The Quake-Catcher Network links existing networked laptops and desktops in hopes to form the world’s largest and densest earthquake monitoring system. With your help, the Quake-Catcher Network can provide better understanding of earthquakes, give early warning to schools, emergency response systems, and others.

The Quake-Catcher Network also provides a natural way to engage students and the public in earthquake detection and research. This project places USB-connectable sensors in K-12 classrooms as an educational tool for teaching science and a scientific tool for studying and monitoring earthquakes. Through a variety of interactive experiments students can learn about earthquakes and the hazards that earthquakes pose.

Earthquake safety is a responsibility shared by billions worldwide. Let's get to work!




Project FeederWatch

Project FeederWatch is a winter-long survey of birds that visit feeders at backyards, nature centers, community areas, and other locales in North America. FeederWatchers periodically count the birds they see at their feeders from November through early April and send their counts to Project FeederWatch.

Anyone with an interest in birds can participate! FeederWatch is conducted by people of all skill levels and backgrounds, including children, families, individuals, classrooms, retired persons, youth groups, nature centers, and bird clubs.

FeederWatch data help scientists track broadscale movements of winter bird populations and long-term trends in bird distribution and abundance. FeederWatch results are regularly published in scientific journals and are shared with ornithologists and bird lovers nationwide. The counts you submit will make sure that your birds (or lack of birds) are represented in papers and in the results found in the Explore Data section of the FeederWatch website.




NestWatch

Whether in a shrub, a tree, or a nest box, bird nests are everywhere. Find one, and you can help scientists study the biology and monitor populations of North America’s birds by joining the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s NestWatch program. Every year, volunteers from across the country visit nests once or twice each week and monitor their progression from incubating eggs to fuzzy chicks to fully fledged young. They then submit this data to NestWatch where it is compiled and analyzed.

NestWatch helps people of all ages and backgrounds connect with nature. The information that NestWatchers collect allows us to understand the impact that various threats, such as environmental change and habitat destruction, have on breeding birds. Armed with this knowledge, we can take the necessary steps to help birds survive in this changing world.




Nature's Notebook

Nature's Notebook gathers information on plant and animal phenology across the U.S. to be used for decision-making on local, national and global scales to ensure the continued vitality of our environment. Scientists alone cannot collect enough data: They need your help. Join more than 6,000 other amateur naturalists across the nation in taking the pulse of our planet. Volunteers use scientifically-vetted observation guidelines, developed for over 1,000 species, to ensure data are useful to researchers and decision-makers.




Bay Area Ant Survey

The Bay Area Ant Survey is a citizen science program that gives the public a chance to participate in research by obtaining baseline data for ants living in local counties. The major goals of this scientific survey are to identify local species, chart native ant distributions, and provide baseline data to monitor the distribution of the invasive Argentine ant.

Participants collect ants and send their ant-filled vial and corresponding data sheet back to the Naturalist Center at the California Academy of Sciences. All specimens will be identified and entered in a database by an Academy entomologist. All results are then uploaded to AntWeb where the location and identification of the ants are made public. Your contribution becomes part of the scientific record!




Project BudBurst

Project BudBurst is a national network of citizen scientists monitoring plants as the seasons change. It was created in 2007 as a community engagement effort to bring about a better understanding of how plants respond to changes in climate locally, regionally, and nationally. Instructional materials are available to support implementation in a variety of educational settings.




Wildlife Watch

Wildlife Watch is a national, nature-watching program created for people of all ages. When you record your observations, National Wildlife Federation and Wildlife Watch partners collect and review your findings to track the health and behavior of wildlife and plant species. In return, the Wildlife Watch website keeps you up-to-date on wildlife news and facts, and they provide new ideas for attracting wildlife to your backyard and community.

Wildlife’s ability to survive the challenges of the 21st century is becoming outpaced by the events that are transforming our world. Global warming, the loss of habitat, and people becoming more disconnected from nature than past generations are converging on a dangerous path for our planet. The work of the National Wildlife Foundation provides answers to these challenges and will help ensure America's wildlife legacy continues for future generations.





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