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At night


Loss of the Night

How many stars can you see where you live? The Loss of the Night App (available for Android devices) challenges citizen scientists to identify as many stars as they can in order to measure light pollution. The app is fun and easy to use, and helps users learn constellations as they contribute to a global real-time map of light pollution.

Stargazing is a fantastic way to engage young scientists, but this ancient past time has become increasingly difficult in growing urban areas. Help scientists understand the effects of light pollution and learn about your night sky!

You don't need to leave the city to take part, in fact, the app is designed specifically for use in very polluted areas.

The more stars you observe, and the more often you run the app, the more precise the data for your location will become. As the seasons change so do the stars in the sky, and since there aren't so many very bright stars it is extremely helpful if urban users do measurements in each season.




ZomBeeWatch

ZomBee Watch is a citizen science project sponsored by the San Francisco State University Department of Biology, the San Francisco State University Center for Computing for Life Sciences and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. ZomBee Watch was initiated as a follow-up to the discovery that the Zombie Fly Apocephalus borealis is parasitizing honey bees in California and possibly other areas of North America.

ZomBee Watch has three main goals.

1. To determine where in North America the Zombie Fly Apocephalus borealis is parasitizing honey bees.

2. To determine how often honey bees leave their hives at night, even if they are not parasitized by the Zombie Fly.

3. To engage citizen scientists in making a significant contribution to knowledge about honey bees and to become better observers of nature.

You can help in finding out where honey bees are being parasitized by the Zombie Fly and how big a threat the fly is to honey bees. So far, the Zombie Fly has been found parasitizing honey bees in California, Oregon, South Dakota, Vermont and Washington. We are teaming up with citizen scientists (like you!) to determine if the fly has spread to honey bees across all of North America.




Project NOAH

Noah is a mobile phone app that allows nature lovers to document local wildlife and add their observations to a growing database for use by ongoing citizen-science projects.

Using the Noah mobile application, users take a photograph of an interesting organism, select the appropriate category, add descriptive tags, and click submit. The application captures the location details along with the submitted information and stores all of it in the species database for use by efforts such as Project Squirrel and the Lost Ladybug Project.

In addition, users can see what kinds of organisms are nearby by searching through a list or exploring a map of their area, all on a mobile phone.

Noah is all about discovering and documenting local wildlife. We work with research groups and organizations to help gather important data and we want you to help by logging recent spottings on your mobile phone. Missions can range from photographing specific frogs or flowers to tracking migrating birds or invasive species or logging the effects of the oil spill.




Play to Cure: Genes in Space

Help researchers cure cancer.

The problem:

We know that faults in our genes can lead to cancer cells forming. This can be linked to the amount of genes in our cells - sometimes we have more and sometimes we have less.

It can take years for scientists to analyze all of their genetic data, but with thousands of citizen scientists playing Genes in Space, the process is greatly accelerated.

How it works:

First, you plot a galactic route. In the context of the game, you're choosing your flight path, but these “space coordinates” are actually a visualization of DNA data, and you're showing our scientists where the genetic variations are which may lead to cancer.

Then you collect Element Alpha, a mist like substance that can be traded for ship upgrades. It actually represents the same DNA data that has just been mapped – which means our scientists have two perspectives on the same sample, from one player.

And we’ve added an asteroid field. This makes the gameplay more engaging and challenging. You need to dodge or shoot a multitude of asteroids to complete a stage.

Each data sample is analyzed multiple times for accuracy. Don’t worry about making mistakes - the more people who use Genes in Space, the more accurate the results will be and the faster data can be translated into new ways to beat cancer.




Natural North Carolina

North Carolina is a beautiful place! With the huge variation in habitat types - from the mountains to the piedmont to the coastal plain - our state boasts a grand diversity of plants, animals, and fungi. Just look around. You likely encounter hundreds of species in your daily life, and many just beyond your front door!

Scientists at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences document the species in our great state and share the things we learn with you in our Museum exhibits. But, we can't be everywhere at once! We need YOUR help. By photographing and reporting the wildlife you see in your everyday life to Natural North Carolina, you can help us learn more about the species that call North Carolina home. You will also help us create an atlas of North Carolina's flora and fauna that you can use to identify the natural things you see in your local area. And all you have to do to help is snap a photo of something in nature and tell us where and when you took it. Easy!

So, get outside! Snap a few photos. Become a citizen scientist by submitting your photos to Natural North Carolina. Together, we can discover the wonders of North Carolina and learn more about our amazing state.




Bat Watch

Bat Watch is a citizen science initiative to monitor bat populations over the long-term. Given the spread of White Nose Syndrome (WNS), a devastating disease that is killing bats during hibernation, monitoring bat populations is more important than ever. Since WNS has not yet reached British Columbia, assessing populations annually will allow biologists to detect drastic changes in populations providing an early detection of WNS. Anyone in British Columbia can participate in the BC Bat Count if they know of a roost sites of bats. This might be an attic, barn, shed, bat-house, cave or mine.




Lookit

If you've ever wondered what your child is thinking or what it's like inside your newborn's mind, you're not alone.
The single most amazing computational engine known to mankind is your child's mind.

We're hoping to learn more about how babies and children learn by enlisting the help of their most dedicated and curious observers: their own parents!

By participating in a quick online activity with your child and submitting a webcam recording of his/her responses, you can contribute to our collective understanding of the fascinating phenomenon of children's learning.

In some experiments you'll step into the role of a researcher, asking your child questions or controlling the experiment based on what he or she does.

Traditionally, developmental studies happen in a quiet room in a university lab. Why complement these in-lab studies with online ones? We're hoping to...

...Make it easier for you to take part in research, especially for families without a stay-at-home parent

...Work with more kids when needed--right now a limiting factor in designing studies is the time it takes to recruit participants

...Draw conclusions from a more representative population of families--not just those who live near a university and are able to visit the lab during the day

...Make it easier for families to continue participating in longitudinal studies, which may involve multiple testing sessions separated by months or years

...Observe more natural behavior because children are at home rather than in an unfamiliar place

...Create a system for learning about special populations--for instance, children with specific developmental disorders

...Make the procedures we use in doing research more transparent, and make it easier to replicate our findings

...Communicate with families about the research we're doing and what we can learn from it




A.T. Seasons

Tracking the Seasons

The A.T. Seasons project brings together different parks and organizations that are actively monitoring seasonal changes in plants and animals (phenology) along the Appalachian Trail. Using Nature’s Notebook or our customized mobile app observers at all levels will be contributing to a comprehensive dataset with the goal of understanding the relationship between phenology and climate change along the Appalachian Trail. Get Involved today!

A.T. Seasons is your opportunity to help track the unfolding of important life cycle events each year along the iconic Appalachian Trail, linking your observations with others from Georgia to Maine. By observing and reporting seasonal changes of plants and animals you will help build the foundation to understanding and protecting the scenic & natural beauty of the trail corridor.




National Moth Week

Like moths to a flame? Did you know the US is home to over 11,000 moth species? Head outside during National Moth Week July 19-27, 2014 and find a few. Join existing teams or organize a count in your area! Photograph or record moths spotted in parks, environmental education centers, or fluttering around your porchlight.

Why study moths?
 Moths are among the most diverse and successful organisms on earth.
 Scientists estimate there are 150,000 to more than 500,000 moth species.
 Their colors and patterns are either dazzling or so cryptic that they define camouflage. Shapes and sizes span the gamut from as small as a pinhead to as large as an adult’s hand.
 Most moths are nocturnal, and need to be sought at night to be seen – others fly like butterflies during the day.
 Finding moths can be as simple as leaving a porch light on and checking it after dark. Serious moth aficionados use special lights and baits to attract them.




RASCals (Reptiles and Amphibians of Southern California)

RASCals is designed to improve our knowledge of native and non-native reptiles and amphibians in southern California. This region is home to 22.5 million people and has experienced dramatic urbanization and habitat modification. We need your help in documenting reptiles and amphibians throughout the region so that we can examine how various species have responded to these habitat changes. We are interested in native and non-native species and in observations in all types of habitats, from relatively pristine habitats to heavily modified, urban habitats, such as backyards, schoolyards, and urban parks. This project is conducted in collaboration with iNaturalist.




American Meteor Society - Meteor observing

Join the American Meteor Society community and contribute valuable and precise data relating to meteor shower and fireball observations. The AMS App allows witnesses of fireball meteors to log details about their observation using the mobile device. Sensors in the phone provide an accurate means to record the location of the observation as well as the azimuth and elevation values for the start and end points of the meteor. Using this data the AMS can accurately triangulate fireball meteors and plot their orbits to determine their celestial origins. The APP also provides a means to log observations from meteor showers. Simply start your observing session and then each time you see a meteor point to that place in the sky and swipe your finger on the screen in the direction the meteor traveled. Observation data is uploaded to the AMS website, available under your profile there and shared with the scientific community. The AMS App also provides a useful meteor shower calendar with star charts and moon conditions for all major and minor showers throughout the year.




Birdeez

Birdeez is the easiest way to identify, collect and share bird sightings. The goal of this project is to educate you about the birds in your area while you contribute sightings that will be used for scientific understanding of bird migration, bird populations and climate change.

Currently Birdeez is available as an iPhone application at www.GetBirdeez.com/ but soon we we will be online and on different phone platforms as well.

Every bird counts, so help us help them by collecting and sharing sightings.




Cropland Capture

By 2050 we will need to feed more than 2 billion additional people on the Earth. By playing Cropland Capture, you will help us to improve basic information about where cropland is located on the Earth's surface. Using this information, we will be better equipped at tackling problems of future food security and the effects of climate change on future food supply. Get involved and contribute to a good cause! Help us to identify cropland area!

Each week (starting Nov. 15th 2013) the top three players with the highest score at the end of each week will be added to our weekly winners list. After 25 weeks, three people will be drawn randomly from this list to become our overall winners. Prizes will include an Amazon Kindle, a brand new smartphone and a tablet.

Thank you very much for helping science and solving the hunger problem!




LepiMAP

LepiMAP is the African butterfly and moth mapping project. LepiMAP is a joint project of the Animal Demography Unit and Lepidopterists' Society of Africa.

LepiMAP is a project aimed at determining the distribution and conservation priorities of butterflies and moths on the African continent. This project is building the 21st century distribution maps for Africa's butterflies and moths. LepiMAP is the continuation of SABCA (the Southern African Butterfly Conservation Assessment)

Anybody, anywhere in Africa can contribute to this awesome Citizen Science project! And we need YOUR help!!




SENSR

SENSR is a tool to create, share and manage a citizen science project running on mobile devices to harness the power of citizen scientists.

SENSR provides a simple and easy way to obtain a custom data collection application running on mobile devices for your project.

If you are running a grassroots project for science, education, environmental conservation, community monitoring, or other reason, and are seeking ways to expand citizen scientists' participation in contributing data, SENR can help you create a mobile data collection tool for your project.

It is part of a research project at Carnegie Mellon University. Please try out if you are seeking ways to harness citizens' power of data collection.




Songs From the Science Frontier

A citizen science project for a song about citizen science! Musician Monty Harper has written an original song about citizen science and needs your help. Send him your photos of you or others doing citizen science! These photos will be compiled into a slideshow-style music video that will accompany the song.

*Your photo will not become the property of anybody but you.

Click "join in" or "get started" to learn more and to hear the song!




NatureWatch NZ

NatureWatch NZ is a citizen science project dedicated to exploring and discovery New Zealand's biodiversity. If you see an unusual or interesting bug, plant, or any other species, take a photo of it, upload the photo to NatureWatch NZ, and learn all about it. The NatureWatch NZ online community will ID your species for you. You can also help others to ID their photos, and you can join (or create!) projects about the species and places you're most interested in.

Together, we're documenting what's living in NZ so we can understand NZ nature better, and have fun while we do it.

(NatureWatch NZ is a website and online community of New Zealand nature watchers powered by the international iNaturalist.org system. Thanks iNat!)




Mothing

Moths are incredibly diverse, are ecologically important as plant eaters, pollinators, and food for songbirds. How will climate and other large-scale ecological factors affect moths? Take photographs of moths at your porch light and upload to Discover Life. You can identify them if you'd like, and we'll help. Students can compare moths at their own site with moths from other sites, to answer their own original questions and do real science. Interested participants may also wish to coordinate a study site.




Send us your skeletons

Send us your skeletons is a program running in Western Australia, which asks recreational fishers to donate fish skeletons to the Department of Fisheries Western Australia.

The skeletons (frames) are used to assess the status of our important demersal and nearshore fish stocks.

The assessment results are essential for the Department to be able to make science-based decisions to sustainably manage our fisheries.

http://www.fish.wa.gov.au/




Amphibian Conservation and Education Project

The Amphibian Conservation Education Project aims to empower educators, students, and individuals to become involved in amphibian conservation efforts.

Through this project, participants will become field scientists by analyzing water quality and testing amphibians for the disease, Chytrid Fungus. Collected data is then used by local herpetologists (scientists who study reptiles and amphibians) to gain a better understanding of the species of amphibians being affected by the disease and where Chytrid is being spread.




Meteor Counter

When you go out to watch a meteor shower, bring your iPhone with you. With Meteor Counter, you can easily capture meteor observations with an innovative "piano key" interface. As you tap the keys, Meteor Counter records critical data for each meteor: time, magnitude, latitude, and longitude, along with optional verbal annotations.

Afterward, these data are automatically uploaded to NASA researchers for analysis.




Caribbean Lionfish Response Program

The Caribbean Lionfish Response Program (CLRP) was developed using a bilateral marine management strategy. This two-fold program approach includes Information and Education (I&E) and Lionfish Location and Removal. This Program has been running successfully since October 2009.
The goals of the CLRP are:

Educate local divers, fishermen, local schools, tourists and the general-public on the urgent Lionfish crisis and how each can contribute to help resolve this rapid growing invasive issue.

Safely and efficiently search and remove Lionfish across the USVI territory by placing trained divers in the water.




Photosynq-measure plant photosynthesis

We are building a low cost, handheld device which researchers, educators, and citizen scientists can use to build a global database of plant health.

The Photosynq platform starts with a Arduino compatible hand-held device which connects to your cell phone and measures fluorescence and absorbance of photosynthetic plants and algae in a non-destructive way.

These measurements provide a detailed picture of the health of the plant and are used for plant breeding, improving plant efficiency, and to identify novel photosynthetic pathways for energy and crop research. Existing field-portable fluorescence and absorbance devices cost thousands of dollars and are too expensive for plant breeders in the developing world. In addition, these devices use proprietary software and hardware, so each user experience and dataset is isolated.

We believe that phenomic plant data, like genomic data, is a critical global resource and must both be shared and agglomerated to be useful.

Therefore, the devices will automatically sync all user data to the cloud via users’ cell phones, where anyone can see and analyze it. In this way we can create a high quality, open set of photosynthesis data points taken from around the world. Most importantly, the data is taken using the same instrument and protocols, making it highly comparable and consistent.




National Cockroach Project

WHAT: High school students and other citizen scientists collecting and helping analyze American cockroaches using DNA barcoding.

WHY: Genetic diversity is a window into evolution and patterns of migration. American cockroaches originated in Africa and hitchhiked around the world on commercial goods. This project asks:

1. Do American cockroaches differ genetically between cities?

2. Do US genetic types match those in other parts of the world?

3. Are there genetic types that represent undiscovered look-alike species?




Folding@home

Help Stanford University scientists studying Alzheimer's, Huntington's, Parkinson's, and many cancers by simply running a piece of software on your computer.

The problems we are trying to solve require so many calculations, we ask people to donate their unused computer power to crunch some of the numbers.




Kinsey Reporter

Kinsey Reporter is a global mobile survey platform to share, explore, and visualize anonymous data about sex.

Reports are submitted via smartphone, then explored at http://KinseyReporter.org or downloaded for off-line analysis.

The Kinsey Institute is exploring new ways to record and describe people's sexual experiences worldwide. We are also exploring new ways for people to be connected while protecting their privacy. We hope to reach people with all kinds of different ideas, beliefs, and experiences, and who might be willing to report on sexual behaviors, regardless of who is involved and where it is observed. By using Kinsey Reporter, you contribute to research on human sexual behavior. We ask you to act ethically, in the role of a good journalist or "citizen scientist." Submit what is true and accurate to the best of your ability.

Ideally, you would submit a report within 24 hours of the event you are reporting. The report can be about yourself or someone else. It is all anonymous. Kinsey Reporter includes surveys about various sexual activities and other intimate behaviors. These surveys cover sexual behaviors and events, sexual health issues, violence reports, public displays of affection, and other unique behaviors and experience. A 'survey' in this case is a report of information shared by many individuals on a topic of interest; it is not based on a random or representative sample of a community or population.

To ensure that reported data is strictly anonymous, you can only select among the provided tags when answering a question. However, contact us to suggest new surveys, questions, or tags.

To protect the anonymity of the reports even in sparsely populated areas, we aggregate reports over time. A report is not published until a sufficient number of reports have been received from the same location, and then all of those reports are recorded with a randomized timestamp. The more sparsely populated your area and/or the higher the geographic resolution you select, the longer the delay until your report appears. Therefore, in a sparsely populated area, you might want to select a lower resolution (e.g., state/region or country), to minimize the delay until your report becomes public.

Interactive visualizations of the data are available on the KinseyReporter.org website. The anonymous data we collect is also publicly available to the community via an Application Programming Interface (API), documented on the KinseyReporter.org website. We welcome your feedback.

Kinsey Reporter is a joint project of the world-famous Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction (KI) and the Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research (CNetS), both at Indiana University, Bloomington.




Project Silkmoth

Project Silkmoth accepts sightings of giant silkmoths from northern New York State, defined as any part of the state north of Albany or Syracuse. Visit the website to see photos of the moths and information on where to find the moths and how to submit your sightings.

Help scientists learn more about silkmoth species.




Aurorasaurus

Aurorasaurus maps aurora-related Tweets and citizen science reports of the aurora during the first solar maximum (now!) with social media. The google maps contains predictions of the auroral oval based on space data, along with weather, and citizen scientist markers. When auroral activity really occurs this is the best place to go for accurate predictions of whether it can be seen in your area!




Dark Sky Meter

The Dark Sky Meter (available for iPhones) allows citizen scientists to contribute to a global map of nighttime light pollution.
Light pollution is a growing problem in urban environments, but now you can help scientists better understand its effects on the environment. The map is also a great help for (amateur) astronomers looking for dark skies.
By utilizing the camera built in to your iPhone, the Dark Sky Meter actually measures ‘skyglow’ and updates the data in real time.

The lite version is free and gives you a rough estimate of the night sky brightness.

The Pro version of the app also charts weather conditions and cloud cover so you can take readings at optimal times. The app is as easy to use as taking a picture, and is a fun way to learn about your night sky.

The Results are live and visible for everyone on a global light pollution map generated by the app users. Visit darkskymeter.com to see the map.




Yelkouan Shearwater Project - Turkey

Yelkouan Shearwater Project aims at determining the seasonal changes in the movements and numbers of globally threatened Puffinus yelkouan in the Marmara Sea.

It is the first research project focusing on the populations of this species passing through two important Turkish straits in the Marmara Sea. The project will provide more accurate information on the knowledge obtained by the previous research in the Bosphorus and the movement patterns of endemic Yelkouan Shearwaters will be identified through the extended study area to better understand the whole picture in the Mediterranean Basin and to take part in the global conservation of this species.

Yelkouan Shearwater Project is funded by Rufford Small Grants.




Hedgehog Hibernation Survey

A study was conducted 40 years ago which suggested a link between climate and when west-European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) come out of hibernation. Since the first year of this survey in 2012, over 90,000 hedgehog sightings have been recorded and we are starting to build up an invaluable picture of how British hedgehogs behave. This will inform our understanding of how hedgehog behaviour may change as the climate changes.

We need your help to collect hedgehog records from 1st February until 31st August 2014. Understanding patterns of hedgehog behaviour across the UK will enable us to target the conservation strategy for this charming animal, which is currently in severe decline.




Where is my spider?

By just taking photos and observing spiders, you can help the Explorit Science Center learn about which climates certain spiders live in and track the distribution of spiders over time.

Join the Explorit’s Community Science Project by finding and recording spiders in your home or neighborhood (as many as you can!). Use your camera or smart phone to take a photo of the spider and submit it online to add to our geographical database.

Spiders have long been thought of a useful natural method of pest control, but how will expected temperature changes or other environmental changes affect the spider’s usefulness as pest-killers and their distribution?

We don't yet know how climate change will impact spiders, and in turn impact agriculture such as crops and farms- but when we understand where spiders are living today, we will be better able to predict what may happen to spiders and agriculture in the future.




iSeeChange: The Almanac

The iSeeChange Almanac is a socially networked weather Almanac for communities to collectively journal their climate experiences -- their observations, feelings, questions, and decisions --- against near-real time climate information.

Founded in April 2012 in Western Colorado, iSeeChange is a public radio and media experiment that fosters multimedia conversations between citizens and scientists about how seasonal weather and climate extremes affect daily American life. From the earliest spring recorded in the history of the United States, a landmark wildfire season, nationwide droughts, and weather records breaking everyday, climate affects every citizen and binds communities together.

iSeeChange is produced by Julia Kumari Drapkin in Western Colorado at KVNF Mountain Grown Community Radio as a part of Localore, a nationwide production of AIR in collaboration with Zeega, with principal funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.




The People's Choice for Healthcare Delivery

Access to health care and the cost and safety of healthcare services are of critical interest to our country. Physicians and other professional care providers, and academic and community-based hospitals and clinics, are important partners in discovering the best methods to deliver care. Input from patients – the consumers of healthcare services – is also vital. Regenstrief Institute, Inc., an internationally recognized healthcare research organization affiliated with the Indiana University School of Medicine, is conducting an online contest, inviting submission of original ideas for improving the delivery of health care in the U.S. As an academic institution, we are particularly interested in the ideas of our next generation of young professionals and scientists. The winning idea will be selected by a panel of medical and community-based professionals and researchers, according to the following criteria: innovative idea with measurable impact for healthcare consumers; feasible to implement in the U.S. healthcare system within five years; and compatible with Regenstrief Institute’s mission to improve health through research that enhances the quality and cost-effectiveness of health care. The prize includes a trip for the winner to Indianapolis, Indiana for the idea kick-off at the Indiana University School of Medicine and Regenstrief Institute, Inc.




Librería Metagenómica del Ecuador

We are a group of scientists interested in exploring the potential applications of Ecuador’s unique biodiversity. As a first step, we are working to assemble and apply gene libraries collected from around the country.
You can join field trips in Ecuador to collect samples, work in a lab extracting and sequencing nucleic acids, or from home assembling and curating the electronic database.




Project: Play With Your Dog

The Horowitz Dog Cognition Lab in NYC is investigating the different ways people and dogs play together, and we need your help (well, you and your dog’s help). We are cataloguing all the ways people play with their dogs and asking dog owners to submit short videos of their own dog-human play.

By participating in Project: Play with Your Dog, citizen scientists are providing valuable information into the nuances and intricacies of our relationships with dogs.




uBiome

uBiome is the world's first effort to map the human microbiome through citizen science.

What's the microbiome? The microbiome are the bacteria that live on and within us. It sounds kind of funny, but all of us are actually covered in helpful germs. Many conditions – from diabetes to depression, asthma to autism -- have been found to relate to the microbiome.

uBiome brings this cutting edge technology directly to consumers for the first time. The more data we collect, the more we can learn about this important area of research. We've been featured so far in Wired, Venture Beat, the Los Angeles Times, Scientific American, BoingBoing, and more.




AirCasting

AirCasting is a platform for recording, mapping, and sharing health and environmental data using your smartphone. Each AirCasting session lets you capture real-world measurements, annotate the data to tell your story, and share it via the CrowdMap.

Using the AirCasting Android app, AirCasters can record, map, and share:
(o) sound levels recorded by their phone microphone;
(o) temperature, humidity, CO and NO2 gas concentrations recorded by the Arduino-powered AirCasting Air Monitor, and;
(o) heart rate measurements recorded by the Zephyr HxM.

Using AirCasting Luminescence, these sensor streams can also be represented using LED lights.




SubseaObservers

Help track the health and abundance of the mid-Atlantic scallop fishery!

Researchers at the University of Delaware have developed a new robot-based approach to surveying marine life the ocean floor. They use Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs), which can navigate underwater without direct human control, to take photos of marine life in its natural habitat.

By becoming a SubseaObserver you'll play a roll in ocean conservation by helping organizations such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) make better decisions about how to manage the scallop fishery now and for future generations.

As a SubseaObserver you can name your own virtual AUV and choose what part of the mid-Atlantic you'd like to explore.

SubseaObservers also includes information about scallop biology, how the fishery is managed, how AUVs work and where they're used.




Data Detectives

Beginning November 14 through the end of the year, students ages 13-18 around the globe are invited to participate in “Data Detectives”, an engaging web experience to learn about how Big Data will impact their lives and the world they will be inheriting.

Data Detectives is the student component of the Human Face of Big Data, a global crowdsourced project conceived by “Day in Life” series creator Rick Smolan. It aims to help people better visualize the ways big data is shaping our future on this planet, and includes a smartphone app, worldwide events, a large format illustrated book with an interactive iPad app, and a documentary.

The Data Detectives initiative invites students to answer questions, explore fascinating examples of how Big Data is changing their world, interact with real-time data and see how other students around the globe are impacted in similar and different ways.




Project Nighthawk

Most active at dusk and dawn, the “peent” call of the Common Nighthawk (Chordeiles minor) was once a familiar sound in cities and towns throughout New Hampshire, where they nest on flat, peastone gravel roofs and feed on insects attracted to city lights. In recent years, rubber and PVC have largely replaced peastone roofing, and nesting nighthawks have disappeared from many New Hampshire towns; in the few towns where they remain (including Keene!), their numbers have dramatically declined.

In partnership with New Hampshire Audubon and in efforts to conserve this state-threatened species, AVEO coordinates volunteer nighthawk surveys on summer evenings in Keene.




Salamander Crossing Brigades

As the earth thaws and spring rains drench New Hampshire, thousands of salamanders, frogs, and toads make their way to vernal pools to breed. Many are killed when their journeys take them across busy roads. Each spring, AVEO trains volunteers to serve as Salamander Crossing Guards at amphibian road crossings throughout the Monadnock Region. Volunteers count migrating amphibians and safely usher the animals across roads during one or more “Big Nights.”




Biodiversity Volunteer Portal

Biodiversity Volunteer Portal

Helping to understand, manage and conserve Australia's biodiversity through community based capture of biodiversity data.

Help us capture the wealth of biodiversity information hidden in our natural history collections, field notebooks and survey sheets. This information will be used for better understanding, managing and conserving our precious biodiversity.




SatCam

SatCam lets you capture observations of sky and ground conditions with a smart phone app at the same time that an Earth observation satellite is overhead.

When you capture a SatCam observation and submit it to our server, it helps us to check the quality of the cloud products that we create from the satellite data. In return, we send you the satellite image that was captured at your location, anywhere in the world! SatCam supports the Terra, Aqua, and Suomi NPP satellites.

SatCam was developed at the Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison .




Owl Citizen Science Project

The Owl Citizen Science Project is a great opportunity to better understand the owls of Tryon Creek and improve your knowledge of these amazing creatures. The Friends of Tryon Creek will host a lively kick-off lunch and information session for an exciting citizen science project dedicated to the owls of Tryon Creek. This lunch is intended for adults interested in participating in this year’s monitoring effort twice monthly, December through April, as we attempt to discover where Tryon’s owl species are nesting. This is a great opportunity to better understand the owls of Tryon Creek and improve your knowledge of these amazing creatures. Join us for lunch and learn more. Free. Preregistration required. On October 27th, Citizen Science Project – Owls of Tryon Creek Kick-off Lunch, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. –




WildlifeBlitzGarneau

This smartphone app will help you explore habitats in your area and easily monitor wildlife populations by logging locations, photos, and responding to form questions all with the ease of your smartphone.




World Community Grid

Cutting-edge techniques allow scientists to conduct computer-based experiments that significantly accelerate research, allowing them to tackle ambitious projects that were previously unfeasible. But pioneering scientists often don’t have access to computers big enough to match their ambitions. World Community Grid harnesses spare power from your devices and donates it directly to these scientists.

Through the contribution of over 640,000 volunteers and 460 organizations, World Community Grid has enabled researchers complete the equivalent of thousands of years of work in just a few years and enabled important scientific advances in cancer treatment and solar energy. Without this support, a lot of this important science just wouldn't get done.

But there's still a lot more to do. We need your help! Join at http://www.worldcommunitygrid.org/index.jsp and start supporting critical humanitarian research today.




Transit of Venus App

On June 5, 2012 at sunset on the East Coast of North America and earlier for other parts of the U.S., the planet Venus will make its final trek across the face of the sun as seen from Earth until the year 2117. The last time this event occurred was on June 8, 2004 when it was watched by millions of people across the world. Get prepared for this once in a lifetime event! Check your viewing times/locations here: http://venustransit.nasa.gov/2012/transit/viewing_locations.php

For over 100 years the main quest of astronomers was to pin down the distance between Earth and Sun (the Astronomical Unit), which would give them a key to the size of the solar system. Careful studies of the transit of Venus became the gold mine they would harvest to reveal this measure.
Editor's note: On 6/5, NASA will web cast the transit. Learn more here:http://venustransit.nasa.gov/2012/transit/

New technologies, like this VenusTransit phone app, will allow you to send observations of the 2012 Transit of Venus to a global experiment to measure the size of the solar system. The free phone app has been developed by Norbert Schmidt of DDQ in the Netherlands.

Prior to the transit, you can use the phone app to practice timing the interior contacts using a simulation of the transit. Additionally, you can see predicted times of contact for your location. During the transit, the phone app will assist you in measuring the time of the interior contacts. After the transit, you can access your data on a map on our website.

At the start and end of the transit, Venus will touch the limb of the sun on the inside. The exact times of these contacts vary according to your location on earth as a result of parallax. By combining the contact times measured all across the world, the distance to the sun can be determined.
To download the free app, click on the "Join In" tab, above, or the "Get Starter" button on the right!




Target Asteroids!

Attention amateur astronomers: it’s time to Target Asteroids!

Amateur astronomers everywhere now have a chance to contribute to NASA’s long-term research of Near Earth Objects (NEOs)! The project starts in April 2012 and continues for a whole decade, with data collected directly supporting the efforts of NASA’s OSIRIS-Rex mission.

The OSIRIS-Rex mission, Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security – Regolith Explorer mission, launches in 2016 and will reach the asteroid 1999 RQ36 in 2019, staying for over 500 days and then returning with 6 grams of material to earth in 2023.

By observing an established list of NEOs, you will have the unique opportunity to contribute to meaningful science and help direct future research and the goals of missions like OSIRIS-Rex. Amateur astronomers have a particularly valuable ability to make observations nightly, and in many cases, can make very good quality observations.

So, fire up your telescopes and start targeting some asteroids today!




Temperature Blast

Temperature Blast is a Maryland Science Center C3 Citizen Science project designed to introduce participants to methods of studying climate. Citizen Scientists collect live and archive Weatherbug data from select stations in the Baltimore region to compare temperatures and log this data for scientists.

Scientists at the Baltimore Ecosystem Study then use this data to test models of temperature patterns across the city to aid in urban planning. This data illustrates the Urban Heat Island effect on the area, a phenomenon classified by temperature differences between a metropolitan area and more rural landscape nearby. An Urban Heat Island is not an effect of climate change, but rather of our activity shaping the environment around us.

Using either this website or our Smartphone application (available free of charge for both iPhone and Android) Citizen Scientists submit temperature data from six weather stations in the Baltimore region. The purpose of this is to collect a stream of simultaneous data from multiple sites in and around the metropolitan area. This data, along with first-hand location observations, will be used to understand the Urban Heat Island Effect in Baltimore.

Anyone with access to the Internet and/or a Smartphone can be a Citizen Scientist and participate in Temperature Blast!? While the data obtained from the program is relevant to the Baltimore metropolitan region, there is no geographic or age restriction for Citizen Scientists.




EyeWire

EyeWire is a citizen science project aimed at mapping the neural connections of the retina. All you have to do is play a relaxing and absorbing game of coloring brain images!

In the game, participants reconstruct the tree-like shapes of the neurons in the retina. By tracing branches throughout images, you can help the computer develop 3-D reconstructions of the neurons.

Anyone can participate – you don’t need any specialized knowledge of neuroscience – and your contributions will help scientists understand how the brain functions. In addition, engineers will also use your input to improve the computational technology that powers the game. This will eventually lead to making software that can detect brain abnormalities that are related to disorders like autism and schizophrenia.




Butterflies & Moths of N. America

Butterflies and Moths of North America (BAMONA) is seeking individuals to submit their sightings of butterflies, moths, and caterpillars. BAMONA is a user-friendly web site and database that shares butterfly and moth species information with the public via dynamic maps, checklists, and species pages. Data are updated in real time and come from a variety of sources, including citizen scientists. Individuals can get involved by documenting butterflies and moths in their neighborhoods and submitting photographs for review. Collaborating lepidopterists serve as coordinators and oversee quality control. Submitted data are verified, added to the database, and then made available through the web site.

BAMONA also provides free support to partners. Partner with BAMONA to build local or regional species checklists, to get secure data storage, or to set up a project-specific submission and review process. Or, let us know how we can work with you to create a customized solutions for browsing, searching, and visualizing your data. See http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/partner for details and links to partners.




Sound Around You Project

I am building a sound map of the world as part of a study into how sounds in our everyday environment make us feel. We need your help!

We’re asking people across the world to use our new iOS app on their iPhones or iPads (or any recorder) to record short clips from different sound environments, or "soundscapes"--anything from the inside of a family car to a busy shopping centre. Then we ask volunteers to comment on their soundscapes and upload them to our virtual soundscape map.

Recordings and responses will be analyzed by acoustic scientists, and significant findings will be reported on this website.

Sound Around You aims to raise awareness of how our soundscape influences us, and could have far reaching implications for professions and social groups ranging from urban planners to house buyers.




GLOBE at Night

Six out of 10 people in the US have never seen our Milky Way Galaxy arch across their night sky from where they live. And the problem of light pollution is quickly getting worse. Within a couple of generations in the U.S., only the national parks will have dark enough skies to see the Milky Way.

Too much outdoor lighting not only affects being able to see the stars, but also wastes energy and money, about 2 to 10 billion dollars a year. And it has been shown to cause sleep disorders in people and to disrupt the habits of animals like newly hatched sea turtles that try to find their way back into the ocean but are disoriented by streetlights.

Light pollution may be a global problem, but the solutions are local. To help people “see the light”, an international star-hunting program for students, teachers, and the general public was created called GLOBE at Night. GLOBE at Night is now in its 6th year and is hosted by the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory.

For 2014 we are collecting your observations during all 12 months of the year! See the dates below and plan to get involved.

January 20-29
February 19-28
March 21-30

April 20-29
May 19-28
June 17-26

July 16-25
August 15-24
September 15-24

October 14-23
November 12-21
December 11-20

Through this program, children and adults are encouraged to reconnect with the night sky and learn about light pollution and in doing so, become citizen scientists inspired to protect this natural resource. Teachers like the GLOBE at Night program, because it lends itself to cross-curricular learning: astronomy, geography, history, literature, and writing. The possibilities are great.




REEF Volunteer Fish Survey Project

The Reef Volunteer Fish Survey Project allows volunteer SCUBA divers and snorkelers to collect and report information on marine fish populations. Keep track of the fish you see while scuba diving or snorkeling. Submit those to an online database.

REEF surveys can be done anywhere along coastal areas of North and Central America, Bahamas and Caribbean, tropical eastern Pacific islands, Hawaii, and the South Pacific.




Nature's Notebook

Observe seasonal changes in plants and animals to improve our understanding of climate change impacts.

Changes in climate are affecting plant and animal activity across the nation. These modifications impact our economy, human health, natural resources and agriculture. Join us-help document how things are changing!




Lunar Impact Monitoring

NASA needs your help to monitor the rates and sizes of large meteoroids striking the moon's dark side. By monitoring the moon for impacts, NASA can define the meteoroid environment and identify the risks that meteors pose to future lunar exploration. This data will help engineers design lunar spacecraft, habitats, vehicles, and extra-vehicular activity suits to protect human explorers from the stresses of the lunar environment.




Great World Wide Star Count

The Great World Wide Star Count is an international event that encourages learning in astronomy by inviting everyone to go outside, look skywards after dark, count the stars they see in certain constellations, and report what they see online. These observations are used to determine the amount and spread of light pollution worldwide.

Participating in the event is fun and easy! You can join thousands of other students, families and citizen scientists from around the world counting stars. Don't miss out!





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