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At sports stadiums


Project MERCCURI! Microbes in Space!

Update: Microbes collected for this project, by citizen scientists, will blast off to the International Space Station on March 30!

Project MERCCURI: Space Station Microbiome and Microbes in Space

Project MERCCURI is a collaboration of UC Davis/microBEnet with the Science Cheerleaders, Space Florida, Nanoracks, NASA, and SciStarter.com. There are three components to the project:

1) Space Station Microbiome. Collecting microbial swab samples from the International Space Station (ISS) and examining the microbial communities therein (via 16S sequencing)

2) Swabbing Sports and Space Events. Collecting swab samples around the country at sporting and other public events from cell phones, shoes, and various surfaces (e.g. keyboards, screens, railings etc.) These will be used for comparison to the ISS samples and for a look at microbial biogeography across a national scale. In collaboration with Jack Gilbert at the Earth Microbiome Project and the Science Cheerleaders who will be organizing and leading the sampling events.

3) Microbial Playoffs. A microbial growth competition on the ISS. A subset of samples collected at public events will be cultured at UC Davis and the “best” microbe from each environment will be sent to the ISS for a “microbial playoffs” competition via Space X on March 16th! Watch the live launch of Space X on NASA TV: http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv A duplicate of this experiment will be conducted on earth and the results compared.




$79 Dental Genome Kit

Why do some people get cavities and not others? What causes bad breath?
NO ONE KNOWS! Let's find out together!

We send you a collection KIT which includes everything you need to sample your dental microbiome! Instruction card, swab/interdental brush, and a collection tube. Sampling never looked so fun and easy!

Find out what bacteria you have and in what proportions. Also see how you compare to others in our data set!

WHAT IS THE MICROBIOME AND WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?

We are all covered in trillions of bacteria on and in our bodies. These microbes are collectively called the microbiome. Like the rainforest, the healthy human microbiome is a balanced ecosystem. The correct balance of microbes keeps potential pathogens in check and regulates our immune system.

The dental microbiome has been linked to dental diseases such as periodontal disease, gingivitis, dental caries, and can even indicate more systemic ailments indirectly.

WHAT STUDIES HAVE ALREADY BEEN DONE?

Cavities develop as a direct result of an imbalance in an otherwise-stable, oral microbiome (Struzycka, 2014).
Oral health is therefore associated with low diversity and richness within the microbial community. (Costalonga & Herzberg, 2014).
The oral microbiome has also been linked to many diseases including neurodegeneration in glaucoma (Astafurov et al., 2014), pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (Docktor et al., 2011), and Alzheimer's Disease through inflammatory processes related to periodontal disease (Kramer et al., 2007).
Some studies have been done, but they haven't been done with YOUR data yet!

(Please note, that purchasing a kit does not mean you must partake in the study. You may opt out of our data set at any time and still receive information about which microbes inhabit your chosen dental site.
Remember, uBiome is not a diagnostic test and the results should not be used to cure, treat, or diagnose any disease.)




The Microverse

Join in cutting-edge scientific research to uncover the diversity of microscopic life in urban environments across the UK! The Microverse project will discover which species are living on UK buildings and what factors affect their diversity. While there's a lot of research exploring microbes inside our homes and on our bodies, little research has looked at the microbes living on the outside of our buildings. Although invisible, microorganisms provide many ecosystem services: recycling nutrients, producing oxygen and digesting pollutants. Investigating which microorganisms are present in our built environments will help us better understand how they support and interact within our ecosystem.
You can sign up for a free participation pack before 29th April 2015. The pack includes all the instructions and equipment you need to take part, plus supporting resources for teachers.

What does it cost to take part?
Taking part in The Microverse project is completely free for secondary schools in the
UK, but requires a definite commitment to collecting the data and returning the
samples to us.

What will the packs include?
Packs will include enough equipment to allow a group of 30 students to take part and
send the samples back. They will also include teachers’ resources such as a sample
risk assessment, guidance on obtaining permission for sampling buildings,
instructions for completing the field work, background information on microorganisms
and DNA sequencing, and sample lesson plans to assist in pre- and post-field work
teaching.

You need a group of people to take part in The Microverse, so get your school, community group, or a bunch of friends involved.




FreshWater Watch

FreshWater Watch is Earthwatch's global research project which aims to involve at least 100,000 people in a program to research and learn about fresh water. The purpose of FreshWater Watch is to safeguard the quality and supply of fresh water, our planet's most precious and vital resource.

Participants have the opportunity to become citizen scientists and take an active role in scientific data gathering. As a citizen scientist, you will join a global community working together to promote freshwater sustainability.




Fastest lift

The aim of this project is to identify the lift with the top speed in your area. To take part in this mission, you will need an Android device (phone or tablet) and the Sense-it app.




Play to Cure: Genes in Space

Help researchers cure cancer.

The problem:

We know that faults in our genes can lead to cancer cells forming. This can be linked to the amount of genes in our cells - sometimes we have more and sometimes we have less.

It can take years for scientists to analyze all of their genetic data, but with thousands of citizen scientists playing Genes in Space, the process is greatly accelerated.

How it works:

First, you plot a galactic route. In the context of the game, you're choosing your flight path, but these “space coordinates” are actually a visualization of DNA data, and you're showing our scientists where the genetic variations are which may lead to cancer.

Then you collect Element Alpha, a mist like substance that can be traded for ship upgrades. It actually represents the same DNA data that has just been mapped – which means our scientists have two perspectives on the same sample, from one player.

And we’ve added an asteroid field. This makes the gameplay more engaging and challenging. You need to dodge or shoot a multitude of asteroids to complete a stage.

Each data sample is analyzed multiple times for accuracy. Don’t worry about making mistakes - the more people who use Genes in Space, the more accurate the results will be and the faster data can be translated into new ways to beat cancer.




PressureNet

PressureNet is a network of crowdsourced weather sensors. We automatically collect atmospheric pressure measurements using barometers in new Android devices. We're sharing this live data with scientists and researchers to improve weather forecasting. Soon we'll provide you with a weather forecast based on everyone's live, shared data!

We're going to make new weather models using the data that PressureNet automatically collects - these models should produce forecasts that are significantly more accurate than any other method! Since the data is collected using smartphones, we can gather way more data about the atmosphere than ever before.

Until we make forecasts, PressureNet shows you the raw data. The pressure data is displayed in graphs so that you can see both your own data as well as other regions' graphed over time. We've just added animations as well, so you can watch storms moving across a region. Furthermore, you can now report what the weather is where you are! Current weather conditions automatically refresh every twenty minutes to keep it accurate.

PressureNet has been featured on BBC World Service, Wired Science, and MIT Technology Review.




L.A. Nature Map

The L.A. Nature Map hosted by the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles is an interactive map that displays local plant and wildlife observations.

Our Southern California region is a hotspot for urban biodiversity. With your help, we can show Angelenos and the world the diversity of nature all around us. You can contribute to this citizen science project by sending photos of plants and animals.

The L.A. Nature Map is created in collaboration with iNaturalist.




RASCals (Reptiles and Amphibians of Southern California)

RASCals is designed to improve our knowledge of native and non-native reptiles and amphibians in southern California. This region is home to 22.5 million people and has experienced dramatic urbanization and habitat modification. We need your help in documenting reptiles and amphibians throughout the region so that we can examine how various species have responded to these habitat changes. We are interested in native and non-native species and in observations in all types of habitats, from relatively pristine habitats to heavily modified, urban habitats, such as backyards, schoolyards, and urban parks. This project is conducted in collaboration with iNaturalist.




Citizen Science at the 76ers

NBA 76ers game to feature interactive science exhibits on the concourse, halftime performance by the Science Cheerleaders, in-game citizen science project for research on the International Space Station.

Project MERCCURI: Comparing Microbes from Philly to Those in Space

During the game, fans will have the opportunity to participate in Project MERCCURI, a citizen science research project to compare microbes on Earth to those on the International Space Station. Microbe collection kits wrapped in T-shirts will be shot into the stands during a time out. Fans will use the kits at the game to swab their shoes and cell phones to collect microbes. Those samples will be sent to Argonne National Laboratory to be sequenced and added to the Earth Microbiome Project.

Meanwhile, astronauts at the International Space Station will be conducting tests on 48 microbes collected previously from Earth, including EIGHT from Philadelphia: the Liberty Bell, The Franklin Institute, the Chemical Heritage Foundation, WHYY, St. Joseph’s Preparatory School, Phillies stadium, 76ers stadium, and the Academy of Natural Sciences where microbes were collected by St. Peter’s School students. Representatives from these organizations are scheduled to participate in the

Science on the Concourse Expo at the 76ers game on 2/18! Learn more about the significance of these Philly microbes here!

Scientists from UC Davis and NASA hope to gain insights into what is living at the ISS, how microbes vary from different places on Earth and in space, and to compare growth of microbes on Earth and in microgravity.




Cropland Capture

By 2050 we will need to feed more than 2 billion additional people on the Earth. By playing Cropland Capture, you will help us to improve basic information about where cropland is located on the Earth's surface. Using this information, we will be better equipped at tackling problems of future food security and the effects of climate change on future food supply. Get involved and contribute to a good cause! Help us to identify cropland area!

Thank you very much for helping science and solving the hunger problem!




SENSR

SENSR is a tool to create, share and manage a citizen science project running on mobile devices to harness the power of citizen scientists.

SENSR provides a simple and easy way to obtain a custom data collection application running on mobile devices for your project.

If you are running a grassroots project for science, education, environmental conservation, community monitoring, or other reason, and are seeking ways to expand citizen scientists' participation in contributing data, SENR can help you create a mobile data collection tool for your project.

It is part of a research project at Carnegie Mellon University. Please try out if you are seeking ways to harness citizens' power of data collection.




Songs From the Science Frontier

A citizen science project for a song about citizen science! Musician Monty Harper has written an original song about citizen science and needs your help. Send him your photos of you or others doing citizen science! These photos will be compiled into a slideshow-style music video that will accompany the song.

*Your photo will not become the property of anybody but you.

Click "join in" or "get started" to learn more and to hear the song!




National Cockroach Project

WHAT: High school students and other citizen scientists collecting and helping analyze American cockroaches using DNA barcoding.

WHY: Genetic diversity is a window into evolution and patterns of migration. American cockroaches originated in Africa and hitchhiked around the world on commercial goods. This project asks:

1. Do American cockroaches differ genetically between cities?

2. Do US genetic types match those in other parts of the world?

3. Are there genetic types that represent undiscovered look-alike species?




Kinsey Reporter

Kinsey Reporter is a global mobile survey platform to share, explore, and visualize anonymous data about sex.

Reports are submitted via smartphone, then explored at http://KinseyReporter.org or downloaded for off-line analysis.

The Kinsey Institute is exploring new ways to record and describe people's sexual experiences worldwide. We are also exploring new ways for people to be connected while protecting their privacy. We hope to reach people with all kinds of different ideas, beliefs, and experiences, and who might be willing to report on sexual behaviors, regardless of who is involved and where it is observed. By using Kinsey Reporter, you contribute to research on human sexual behavior. We ask you to act ethically, in the role of a good journalist or "citizen scientist." Submit what is true and accurate to the best of your ability.

Ideally, you would submit a report within 24 hours of the event you are reporting. The report can be about yourself or someone else. It is all anonymous. Kinsey Reporter includes surveys about various sexual activities and other intimate behaviors. These surveys cover sexual behaviors and events, sexual health issues, violence reports, public displays of affection, and other unique behaviors and experience. A 'survey' in this case is a report of information shared by many individuals on a topic of interest; it is not based on a random or representative sample of a community or population.

To ensure that reported data is strictly anonymous, you can only select among the provided tags when answering a question. However, contact us to suggest new surveys, questions, or tags.

To protect the anonymity of the reports even in sparsely populated areas, we aggregate reports over time. A report is not published until a sufficient number of reports have been received from the same location, and then all of those reports are recorded with a randomized timestamp. The more sparsely populated your area and/or the higher the geographic resolution you select, the longer the delay until your report appears. Therefore, in a sparsely populated area, you might want to select a lower resolution (e.g., state/region or country), to minimize the delay until your report becomes public.

Interactive visualizations of the data are available on the KinseyReporter.org website. The anonymous data we collect is also publicly available to the community via an Application Programming Interface (API), documented on the KinseyReporter.org website. We welcome your feedback.

Kinsey Reporter is a joint project of the world-famous Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction (KI) and the Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research (CNetS), both at Indiana University, Bloomington.




Brown marmorated stink bug locations

The brown marmorated stink bug is an invasive insect species that has become an damaging pest of a wide variety of fruit, vegetable, grain, and ornamental crops. This stink bug species also enters homes and can be a nuisance pest. Our webpage allows citizens to report the presence and severity of this stink bug species in their home, yard, farm, or commercial nursery.




Tracking ring-billed gulls

More than 9,000 ring-billed gulls have been marked near Montreal, Quebec with individually coded bands to track their movements throughout their annual cycle. We are more specifically interested by their post-breeding dispersal and their fidelity to their colony. Repeated observations of individuals also allow us to estimate annual survival. This is part of a larger study that aimed at understanding the behavior and population dynamics of these birds within an integrated management framework.




Temperature Blast

Temperature Blast is a Maryland Science Center C3 Citizen Science project designed to introduce participants to methods of studying climate. Citizen Scientists collect live and archive Weatherbug data from select stations in the Baltimore region to compare temperatures and log this data for scientists.

Scientists at the Baltimore Ecosystem Study then use this data to test models of temperature patterns across the city to aid in urban planning. This data illustrates the Urban Heat Island effect on the area, a phenomenon classified by temperature differences between a metropolitan area and more rural landscape nearby. An Urban Heat Island is not an effect of climate change, but rather of our activity shaping the environment around us.

Using either this website or our Smartphone application (available free of charge for both iPhone and Android) Citizen Scientists submit temperature data from six weather stations in the Baltimore region. The purpose of this is to collect a stream of simultaneous data from multiple sites in and around the metropolitan area. This data, along with first-hand location observations, will be used to understand the Urban Heat Island Effect in Baltimore.

Anyone with access to the Internet and/or a Smartphone can be a Citizen Scientist and participate in Temperature Blast!? While the data obtained from the program is relevant to the Baltimore metropolitan region, there is no geographic or age restriction for Citizen Scientists.




Bumble Bee Watch

Bumble Bee Watch (www.BumbleBeeWatch.org) is a collaborative effort to track and conserve North America’s bumble bees. This citizen science project allows individuals or groups to: 1) Upload photos of bumble bees to start a virtual bumble bee collection; 2) Identify the bumble bees in your photos and have your identifications verified by experts; 3) Help researchers determine the status and conservation needs of bumble bees; 4) Help locate rare or endangered populations of bumble bees; 5) Learn about bumble bees, their ecology, and ongoing conservation efforts; and 6) Connect with other citizen scientists.

Find out more at http://www.bumblebeewatch.org/contents/about/




Dragonfly Swarm Project

The Dragonfly Swarm Project uses the power of the internet to allow everyone to participate in a large-scale study of dragonfly swarming behavior. Participants observe dragonfly swarms wherever they occur, make observations of the composition and behavior of the swarm, then submit a report online.

Data is compiled from the reports by an aquatic entomologist with a passion for dragonflies. Her goal is to use the data collected from participants for two purposes: 1) to publish data from a massive number of dragonfly swarms in the scientific literature, making this information available to scientists, and 2) to provide information about this behavior to the public. Many people see dragonfly swarms and are curious about what they see. The creator of this project hopes to provide answers to the curious while simultaneously collecting information from eye-witnesses to improve our overall knowledge of this fascinating behavior.

Because any given person has to be in the right place at the right time to see a dragonfly swarm, this project isn't possible for a single scientist to do alone. Collecting data from a large network of people is thus the best way to study dragonfly swarming behavior. Participation requires only curiosity and a few minutes of your time, so keep an eye out for dragonfly swarms in your area this summer and send in your reports!

Thanks in advance for your participation!




Black Hills Bee Project

Volunteers with the Black Hills Bee Project monitor and collect bees, record flower visitations, and provide insights on the activities of bees in the Black Hills ecoregion. The project depends upon a volunteer effort to provide essential data, specimens, records, and observations of these native bees.

Volunteers can also contribute photographs of bees from their gardens or elsewhere in the Black Hills. The project will post these photos and identify volunteers as the photographer.

There are four primary benefits of participating:

1. Volunteer bee and information contributions will be fully recognized on the project Web page and in any scientific publications.

2. Specimens with names of their collector will be permanently retained in the Severin‐McDaniel insect Research Collection at South Dakota State University, with duplicate specimens going to the US Department of Agriculture Bee Lab.

3. Bees and information provided will contribute to an understanding of the bee diversity of the Black Hills region.

4. The survey of the home and garden bees will allow a determination of which native species can survive in developed areas and be important garden pollinators.




Sound Around You Project

I am building a sound map of the world as part of a study into how sounds in our everyday environment make us feel. We need your help!

We’re asking people across the world to use our new iOS app on their iPhones or iPads (or any recorder) to record short clips from different sound environments, or "soundscapes"--anything from the inside of a family car to a busy shopping centre. Then we ask volunteers to comment on their soundscapes and upload them to our virtual soundscape map.

Recordings and responses will be analyzed by acoustic scientists, and significant findings will be reported on this website.

Sound Around You aims to raise awareness of how our soundscape influences us, and could have far reaching implications for professions and social groups ranging from urban planners to house buyers.




Celebrate Urban Birds

Celebrate Urban Birds provides an opportunity for everyone across the country to watch birds and participate in activities focused on birds and neighborhood habitat improvement.

Participants learn about 16 species of birds and watch an area about the size of half a basketball court for 10 minutes to see if they can find any of those birds. Celebrate Urban Birds provides all of the necessary materials to get you started.

An important part of the celebration is to help scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology collect information about the 16 key species of urban birds and the habitats they use. The scientists have created a project that will use data collected from participants to study these resident and migratory birds and their interaction with the urban habitat.

Participants can observe birds and collect data from urban, suburban, and rural locations.




Bay Area Ant Survey

The Bay Area Ant Survey is a citizen science program that gives the public a chance to participate in research by obtaining baseline data for ants living in local counties. The major goals of this scientific survey are to identify local species, chart native ant distributions, and provide baseline data to monitor the distribution of the invasive Argentine ant.

Participants collect ants and send their ant-filled vial and corresponding data sheet back to the Naturalist Center at the California Academy of Sciences. All specimens will be identified and entered in a database by an Academy entomologist. All results are then uploaded to AntWeb where the location and identification of the ants are made public. Your contribution becomes part of the scientific record!




Great World Wide Star Count

The Great World Wide Star Count is an international event that encourages learning in astronomy by inviting everyone to go outside, look skywards after dark, count the stars they see in certain constellations, and report what they see online. These observations are used to determine the amount and spread of light pollution worldwide.

Participating in the event is fun and easy! You can join thousands of other students, families and citizen scientists from around the world counting stars. Don't miss out!




Butterflies I've Seen

Butterflies I've Seen allows you to keep track of all of your butterfly sightings.

Once your sightings are logged in the database, you can retrieve them by location, by date, or by species. You can print out a list of all the butterfly species you've ever seen, a "Life List," or you can print out a list of all the butterfly species you've ever seen at a particular location. At the same time, the sightings you enter provide important information that the North American Butterfly Association, the major butterfly conservation organization in North America, will use to help answer scientists' questions about butterfly distributions, abundance, and conservation.

Enjoy the site and the fact that your efforts are increasing our knowledge and helping butterfly conservation!





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