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In oceans, streams, rivers, lakes

GLOBE: El Nino

Join professional and community scientists in collecting and sharing important data and learn more about your local environment in the process. There are two ways to participate: 1) sign up and contribute as an individual; 2) join as a host-site ambassador to facilitate participation through your community-based organization.

Four Protocols to Collect Data for the El Nino campaign.

To support GLOBE in this long-term campaign, we are recruiting, training, and equipping participants for four separate but related protocols representing a range of commitments from a light touch to an in-depth experience ,based on the needs and interests of you and your community.

The four protocols range from atmosphere to pedosphere observations; from very simple to more complex:

The cloud protocol: a quick assessment of the type and density of cloud cover as viewed from the collection site.
The surface temperature protocol: uses a simple tool to capture 9 measurements that are averaged to submit a reading to GLOBE.
The precipitation protocol: documents rainfall from day to day or more frequently on a rainy day to provide data about rainfall volumes and rates
The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) protocol: provides data about soil moisture temperature that can be used to ground truth a NASA satellite that is in orbit.
All of these protocols help us to understand how climate change affects the global water cycle. Changes in the water cycle, such as increased periods of drought and increases in rain or snowfall, significantly impact people’s lives, biodiversity, food production and more. Some regions will see the impact of climate change long before others, but all of us will be affected by changing water patterns in our lifetime. The more granular data we have from citizen scientists, the more we can understand the changes and how to mitigate them.


The Smartfin is a surfboard fin with sensors that measure multiple ocean parameters including salinity, temperature, location, wave characteristics, and pH (in development). The data surfers acquire while in the water will become accessible in near real-time to the world-wide scientific community. But Smartfin is not only about the data. It is also an effort to connect surfers and their communities to larger issues affecting ocean health. Using the data collected with Smartfin, we can better understand trends in ocean warming and acidification and mobilize our communities to take action to combat these problems caused by climate change.

Surfrider Foundation's Blue Water Task Force Kaua'i

The Blue Water Task Force (BWTF) is the Surfrider Foundation’s citizen science program which provides valuable water quality information to beach communities, raises awareness of local water pollution problems and works collaboratively with local stakeholders to implement solutions.

Surfrider’s network of 30+ volunteer-run BWTF labs measure bacteria levels at ocean and bay beaches and in freshwater sources, and compare them to the national water quality standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency to protect public health in recreational waters.

Surfrider started its water testing program on Kaua’i nine years ago to provide more information to beachgoers on where it is safe to swim and surf. The Hawaii Department of Health monitors water quality at life-guarded beaches, while the Kaua’i Surfrider Chapter tests nearly 30 surf breaks, estuaries, and popular freshwater recreational sites on a monthly basis.

All BWTF water quality data are posted online and available to the public at ( http://www.surfrider.org/blue-water-task-force). The Kaua’i Chapter also publishes an annual water quality report in their local paper and gives frequent talks in the community to build public awareness of local water quality issues.

The Kaua’i Chapter uses its volunteer-generated data to advocate for better public health protection at the beach and to motivate government agencies to investigate and fix the sources of pollution.

Surfrider Foundation's Blue Water Task Force Santa Cruz

The Blue Water Task Force (BWTF) is the Surfrider Foundation’s citizen science program which provides valuable water quality information to beach communities, raises awareness of local water pollution problems and works collaboratively with local stakeholders to implement solutions.

Surfrider’s network of 30+ volunteer-run BWTF labs measure bacteria levels at ocean and bay beaches and in freshwater sources, and compare them to the national water quality standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency to protect public health in recreational waters.

The Santa Cruz Chapter established its BWTF water testing program over 20 years ago, in 1993, and has since been building a historical record of water quality at area beaches and freshwater outlets from Natural Bridges State Park in Santa Cruz down to Manresa State Beach in Watsonville, CA. There are currently twelve BWTF volunteers in Santa Cruz that collect water samples from 17 local beaches every week. Samples are processed at the chapter’s lab located at the Santa Cruz Yacht Harbor. A map of sampling sites and all water quality results can be viewed at Surfrider.org . ( http://www.surfrider.org/blue-water-task-force)

The Surfrider Chapter also shares its data via social media and gives educational presentations in local schools to build community awareness of local water quality conditions.

The Santa Cruz Chapter has also used their citizen science program to provide comprehensive water quality information from the surf zone between Main Beach and Steamer’s Lane in Santa Cruz to support the Cowell Beach Working Group’s investigation of local sources of pollution. Partnering with the City, County and other local NGOs, the Surfrider Chapter participates in this Working Group to develop management recommendations to improve local water quality conditions at Cowell’s Beach.

Surfrider Foundation's Blue Water Task Force South Sound

The Blue Water Task Force (BWTF) is the Surfrider Foundation’s citizen science program which provides valuable water quality information to beach communities, raises awareness of local water pollution problems, and works collaboratively with local stakeholders to implement solutions.

Surfrider’s network of 30+ volunteer-run BWTF labs measure bacteria levels at ocean and bay beaches and in freshwater sources, and compare them to the national water quality standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency to protect public health in recreational waters.

The South Sound Chapter tests eight recreational beaches and public waterways in Puget Sound near Tacoma, Washington. Surfrider volunteers collect the water samples and deliver them to the Tacoma Public School's Science and Math Institute (SAMi), where a high school science teacher and his students analyze them in the lab and record the results. All BWTF water quality data are posted online and available to the public at Surfrider.org. (http://www.surfrider.org/blue-water-task-force/chapter/37)

The Chapter coordinates with the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department's Swimming Beaches program and the Washington State Department of Ecology's BEACH Program to ensure that their sampling protocols align with the agency programs. During the summer recreation season, the County Health Department monitors high-use beaches. The Chapter’s sampling schedule from September to May helps to extend the County’s regular beach testing program into the colder months when recreational users such as divers and paddlers are still very active.

The chapter alerts the State and County when the BWTF program detects high bacteria levels at their sampling sites, and the County goes back out, retests, and issues swimming advisories and beach closures if the results still exceed health standards. The program provides a great collaborative opportunity for an educational institution, Surfrider volunteers, and local health agencies to work together to provide better protection for beachgoers and water recreational enthusiasts in Tacoma.

Surfrider Foundation's Blue Water Task Force Eastern Long Island

The Blue Water Task Force (BWTF) is the Surfrider Foundation’s citizen science program which provides valuable water quality information to beach communities, raises awareness of local water pollution problems and works collaboratively with local stakeholders to implement solutions.

Surfrider’s network of 30+ volunteer-run BWTF labs measure bacteria levels at ocean and bay beaches and in freshwater sources, and compare them to the national water quality standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency to protect public health in recreational waters.

Surfrider began monitoring water quality on Eastern Long Island in 2013 in partnership with the Concerned Citizens of Montauk, another local environmental NGO. Testing is performed weekly at ocean and bay beaches, freshwater ponds and creeks during the summer beach season and monthly during the colder winter months at over 30 sampling sites.

This joint water testing program augments the seasonal beach water quality monitoring program conducted by the Suffolk County Department of Health, providing Enterococcus bacteria results at recreational beaches and coastal waterways year-round. All BWTF water quality data are posted online and available to the public at www.surfrider.org/blue-water-task-force/chapter/37

Water quality updates are also shared with the local community through social media, weekly press releases, and public presentations and educational talks. As a community-fueled program, the Blue Water Task Force strives to identify problems with beach and coastal water pollution and work towards solutions.

Tookany Creek Streamkeepers

TTF Streamkeepers are volunteers who monitor a creek near them each month to collect data about changes in water quality, erosion, and creekside vegetation. This citizen science effort is funded by the William Penn Foundation‘s Delaware River Watershed Initiative, which supports organizations implementing stream restoration and green infrastructure projects, and informs municipal stormwater permits and public investments, using monitoring data gathered through aligned, science-based efforts.
The Academy of Natural Sciences and Stroud Water Research Center lead this watershed effort and guide us as we train and mobilize citizen scientists.

Part of an initiative across the Delaware!


This project involves the use of smartphones to evaluate the aquatic habitat quality, including the river banks, riparian zone and the main channel itself. The used is required to answer a short questionnaire based on the site they want to evaluate (rivers, streams, lakes or estuaries), and to take up to four photographs of the site with the smartphone's camera. The data is sent to the scientists throught via web, directly from the phone. The user wins points and awards for their help!

International Sea Turtle Observation Registry (iSTOR)

The International Sea Turtle Observation Registry is a database of sea turtle sightings to help sea turtle biologists and conservations track and understand the distribution of sea turtles around the world. You can help!

When you see a live turtle, please report it to the registry. Data will be made available to scientists and managers to improve the understanding of our marine environment.

Stream Stewards

Stream Stewards is a Citizen Science program designed to engage committed volunteers in monitoring the water quality of streams that flow through First State National Historical Park to Brandywine Creek. Volunteers will learn how to collect scientific data that will be used make recommendations for restoration projects aimed at improving the health of the watershed.

Turtle Observer Program

The western pond turtle, Actinemys marmorata, is a federally listed vulnerable species. These are the only fresh water turtles native to California, and they can be found around Phoenix, Lagunitas, and Alpine Lakes in the Mt. Tamalpais Watershed.

MMWD has enlisted the help of volunteers to protect this vulnerable animal by monitoring habitat conditions, recording their behavior, and educating the public during the spring when they are most vulnerable. Volunteers have collected valuable data on native and non-native turtles that is helping to direct the management of these species.

Wisconsin Turtle Conservation Program

The main goals of the WTCP are to catalog species' statewide distributions more thoroughly and to document high turtle mortality locations along roads in order to promote effective management and conservation of Wisconsin’s 11 turtle species.

The WTCP was initiated in response to the increasing trend in highway collisions of migrating turtles and vehicles. Our ever-expanding dedicated volunteer base makes projects like these possible and allows for more efficient ways in which WDNR employees can productively manage turtle numbers.

Volunteering is easy! When you see a live turtle or a turtle that has been hit on the road, use our online or paper form to report it. Photographs are also welcome.

Earth Force’s Keep It Clean – Neighborhood Environmental Trios (KIC-NET)

KIC-NET (Keep It Clean – Neighborhood Environmental Trios) engages youth in improving urban waterways. Through partnerships with government agencies, businesses, schools, and local parks, students explore stormwater runoff in their neighborhoods and take action to improve stormwater management.
Students participating in KIC-NET use science, technology, engineering, and math skills to solve real-world environmental challenges.

Using monitoring tools and processes, students test local water quality to gather data. They are testing factors like dissolved oxygen, pH and phosphate levels, temperature, and turbidity. They then work with city engineers and STEM professionals to learn what their data indicates, how stormwater management works, and how human activity contributes to runoff.

From this investigation, students assess the most pressing environmental issue affecting their community’s resiliency, research that issue, and engineer and execute a sustainable plan.

Midwinter Bald Eagle Survey

The Midwinter Bald Eagle Survey takes place during the first two weeks of January each year. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) coordinates the Midwinter Bald Eagle Survey, in which several hundred individuals count eagles along standard, non-overlapping survey routes. Nationwide counts of eagles were coordinated by the National Wildlife Federation from 1979 until 1992, when the Bureau of Land Management's Raptor Research and Technical Assistance Center assumed responsibility for overseeing the count. Responsibility for count coordination shifted to the National Biological Survey (1993-1996) and later to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, Snake River Field Station. In April 2007, the USGS established a partnership with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to maintain the long-term, national coordination of the survey, data analysis, and reporting. USACE will assume responsibility for coordinating the national survey, organizing the results, maintaining the long-term database, and jointly compiling, analyzing, and reporting survey data gathered with USGS following previously used methods (Steenhof et al. 2002) in 2010 and 2015.

Long-term Monitoring Program and Experiential Training for Students (LiMPETS)

LiMPETS (Long-term Monitoring Program and Experiential Training for Students) is a citizen science program designed to monitor the coastal ecosystems of California and help youth develop a scientific understanding of the ocean. LiMPETS monitors the biology in rocky intertidal and sandy beach ecosystems and aims to provide publicly accessible, scientifically sound, long-term data to inform marine resource management and the scientific community.

The LiMPETS network provides authentic, hands-on coastal monitoring experiences that empower teachers, students and the community to conduct real science and serve as ocean stewards.

LiMPETS has always operated in three regions, so if there is a way to reflect that, it would be great. Santa Barbara, San Francisco and Monterey Bay.

Mapping Application for Penguin Populations and Projected Dynamics (MAPPPD)

MAPPPD is a one-stop shop for information on penguin abundance and distribution in the Antarctic that integrates citizen science, expert biological field surveys, and satellite imagery to provide data required for Antarctic decision support and conservation assessment. Tens of thousands of tourists go to Antarctica each year; their observations on the presence and absence of wildlife is critical to informing models of biogeography and our understanding of species range shifts through time. Antarctic stakeholders can use MAPPPD to search and select sites of interest, get estimates of abundance in areas of interest, and explore how these abundance estimates are predicted to change with time.

Marine Mammal Sightings Data - Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

Specially trained citizen scientists with NOAA Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and National Park - volunteers use sightings forms and the Spotter Pro app to record and upload current marine mammal sightings in the Santa Barbara Channel and in sanctuary and park waters. observations include weather, behavior and presence absence information for sightings. Serves as an important resource for the West Coast Region Sanctuaries Whale Aware collaborative that works to track whales near shipping lanes where they are at risk of ship strikes and provides long-term photo-ID of blue and humpback whales as well as general patterns of cetacean distribution in this part of the Southern CA Bight.

IHO Crowd Sourced Bathymetry Pilot Project

The International Hydrographic Office (IHO) is coordinating a Crowd-Sourced Bathymetry (CSB) data gathering proof of concept project using a trusted partner model for collecting data. The IHO Data Center for Digital Bathymetry (DCDB) has teamed with Rose Point Navigation Systems to automatically log and submit bathymetric data (longitude, latitude, depth, and time) acquired from vessels operated by professional mariners and recreational boaters. Operators now have the option to enable the crowd-sourced bathymetry collection in their existing Rose Point electronic charting and navigation software.

The assembled data are sent to the IHO DCDB hosted at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information in Boulder, Colorado, where it will be made available to the public via an interactive web map service. This data pathway is currently being developed so that automated data input (and data exports) into a standard database is established.

The ultimate objective of this CSB project is to make it easy for every mariner to contribute to the global IHO DCDB bathymetric database and to make these data readily accessible for a range of uses, including nautical charting and global digital datasets such as the General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO).

The Great Backyard Bird Count

The next count is being held February 17-20, 2017

The Great Backyard Bird Count is an annual four-day event during which bird watchers count birds to create a real-time snapshot of where birds are located around the world.

Scientists and bird enthusiasts can learn a lot by knowing where birds are. Unfortunately, no single scientist or team of scientists could hope to document the complex distribution and movements of so many species in such a short time.

Anyone, from beginning bird watchers to experts, can participate in the The Great Backyard Bird Count. It takes as little as 15 minutes on one day, or you can count for as long as you like during each day of the event. It’s free, fun, and easy, and it helps the birds. In addition, yearly data collection makes the information more meaningful and allows scientists to investigate far-reaching questions.

Hosted by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, National Audubon Society, and Bird Studies Canada.


Based in Australia, Seagrass-Watch recruits volunteers around the world to assess and monitor this ocean plant, which is an important indicator of the health of coastal environments. The project has participants at some 259 sites across 17 countries.

Working with a local coordinator, participants collect quantitative data on seagrasses and their associated fauna by means of simple, yet scientifically rigorous monitoring techniques. At least one participant at each monitoring event must have passed a Seagrass-Watch training course or have a degree (or similar) in environmental/marine science and be able to demonstrate competency in Seagrass-Watch methods and protocols. The information collected is used to assist the management of coastal environments and to prevent significant areas and species being lost.

Seagrasses, the only flowering plants that can live underwater, are the main diet of dugongs and green turtles, and provide a habitat for many, smaller marine animals, some of which, like prawns and fish, are commercially important. They also absorb nutrients from coastal run-off and stabilize sediment, helping to keep the water clear.

The Seagrass-Watch program has a simple philosophy of involving those who are concerned, and includes collaboration/partnerships between community, qualified scientists, and data users, such as environment management agencies.


MySwan is a citizen science project for people who love swans. Just record your black swan sighting on the interactive map, and you can make a valuable contribution to research on the behavior and movement of swans.

After you submit your sighting, you'll get an instant report about the swan, with interesting information about its history and recent movements.

Marine Debris Tracker

The Marine Debris Tracker mobile application allows you to help make a difference by checking in when you find trash on our coastlines and waterways. Data you submit is available to download online and you also have access to mapping all data, worldwide. Marine Debris Tracker is a joint partnership of the NOAA Marine Debris Division and the Southeast Atlantic Marine Debris Initiative (SEA-MDI), located within the College of Engineering at the University of Georgia.


CyberTracker Conservation is a non-profit organisation that promotes the vision of a Worldwide Environmental Monitoring Network. Our ultimate vision is that smart phone users worldwide will use CyberTracker to capture observations on a daily basis.

CyberTracker is the most efficient method of gps field data collection. You can use CyberTracker on a Smartphone or handheld computer to record any type of observation. CyberTracker, which requires no programming skills, allows you to customize an Application for your own data collection needs.

Indigo V Expeditions

Are you a sailor looking to do something good for the ocean? Consider becoming a citizen oceanographer! Participants collect and filter plankton from seawater, record pH, temperature and salinity of the water sample in question. The data is part of our large, robust ocean health monitoring program called The Indigo Project.

We are putting reliable and sustainable data collection into the hands of the blue water cruiser, transforming ordinary yachts into in situ ocean health monitoring platforms that will allow for the scientific preservation of our oceans and seas.

Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) Program

The Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) Program provides a central repository for spatially referenced biogeographic accounts of nonindigenous aquatic species in the USA. It includes verified occurrences, distribution maps, and species profiles for freshwater nonindigenous aquatic animal and plant species. Citizens can report a nonnative species through an online reporting form.

Biodiversity of Alabama

This project serves to record observations of all organisms found in Alabama, one of the most biologically diverse states in the United States. This diversity is a product of Alabama's warm, moist climate, its great geologic diversity, and its rich evolutionary past. With more than 4,533 documented species, Alabama ranks fifth among states in terms of overall species diversity, and is first among states east of the Mississippi River. The large western states of California, Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico lead the nation, and fellow southeastern states Georgia (sixth) and Florida (seventh) trail Alabama. Alabama harbors 64 types of terrestrial ecosystems, including 25 forests and woodlands, 11 wetlands, and 7 glades and prairies. The state also supports 77,000 miles of rivers and streams and several dozen marine ecosystems.

Bleach Patrol

The world’s coral reefs are threatened by the increased frequency of wide-spread bleaching events. Corals that experience thermal stress sometimes “bleach,” turning white as they expel symbiotic algae living in their tissue. In order to better understand coral bleaching, scientists need to know when and where corals are bleached and where reefs appear stressed.

The “Bleach Patrol” are citizen scientists, surfers, divers, and general enthusiasts working together to map out the extent of global coral bleaching. Anyone with a smartphone or internet access and enthusiasm for being part of a global scientific campaign can help!

The project is a collaboration between the World Surf League, the social networking app goFlow, and scientists at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. Our goal is to compile a global, constantly updated data set of coral bleaching and reef health.

The Biodiversity Group

We are currently seeking research assistants to join our field team in Ecuador studying the conservation ecology of reptiles and amphibians.

While Ecuador is a relatively small country—it’s roughly the size of Arizona—it stands as the third most diverse country in the world for amphibians (510 species) and is seventh for reptiles (430 species), making it a herpetologically mega-diverse region. Due to the severe deforestation taking place in addition to many other pressures on Ecuador’s fauna, TBG research program aims to study, document, and preserve these rich and unique communities of reptiles and amphibians found within the country’s diverse array of ecosystems.

As we are now in our 8th year working in Ecuador, we have study sites encompassing both the coastal forests in western Ecuador and the Amazon rainforest on the eastern side of the Andes Mountains. The work that research participants will be involved with will primarily consist of conducting night surveys for reptiles and amphibians (however other taxa such as invertebrates are also of interest), animal data collection, and lab work. Lab work consists of more detailed information such as scale counts (for reptiles) and other morphological information, animal measurements, screening for chytrid disease (amphibians), preservation (only when necessary), and acquisition of DNA samples. Diagnostic photographs of all animals will be taken. Other tasks include animal handling and general note taking and data organization

Volunteer participants will gain valuable research experience, contribute towards our mission in conservation ecology, and will have an unforgettable experience that provides the opportunity to study the most biologically diverse region of reptiles and amphibians in the world. For 2013 we now have expeditions scheduled in Western Ecuador for February 2-13 and FeBruary 16-27 and in Amazonian Ecuador for June 2-13.

Global Whale Tracking with Happywhale

With your help, Happywhale tracks individual whales throughout our world's oceans. We believe that whale watching guides, naturalists and passengers are vital to our understanding of whales. Scientists can only be in one place at one time; by harnessing the power of millions of whale watching enthusiasts, we can expand our scientific knowledge exponentially.

Our platform empowers whale watchers to photograph whales and tell their stories.

First, review our instructions on how to take whale ID photos. Next, get out there and photograph whales. Last, submit your whale photos at happywhale.com. We'll run your images through our ID system built in collaboration with scientists at Cascadia Research Collective and Allied Whale. If we find a match, we'll tell you what we know about your whale. If you are the first Happywhale contributor to see a whale, congratulations! We'll let you know that too.

We welcome you to submit images from past whale sightings. Submitting older photos is a great way to start building your account and will give us valuable historical data on whales.

As each of your whales is spotted around the world, we'll send you updates. You can track your whales on your personal Happywhale page. As our site and functionality grows, you'll be able to stay in touch with team members around the globe. You'll also discover how your data is being used by scientists.

What stories will your photos tell?


**NEWS- We have android and iOS app for "CyanoTracker". Please install it for easy posting the reports".
We are looking for citizen scientists to report Algal Blooms in their neighborhood pond/lake.
CyanoTRACKER will address a significant environmental issue important to inland waters, namely, Harmful Algal Blooms or popularly referred by other names "Toxic Algae", "Algal Bloom ", "Red Tide", "Cyanobacteria" and "Blue Green Algae".
Studies have shown that the cyanobacteria produce neurotoxins which has resulted in large amount of fish kills, pets and cattle death and gastro-intenstinal problems in human beings. Further studies are linking the cyanotoxins to dementia, alzheimer's and ALS.
These cyanobacteria look like green scum and can form on any open water which are rich in nitrogen, phosphorus via pollution with appropriate warm temperature.

Follow us on Twitter - https://twitter.com/CyanoTracker or Facebook - http://on.fb.me/2508NDJ or
visit http://cyanotracker.uga.edu/services.htm for more details.


When a vessel accidentally discharges cargo at sea, or when oil spills occur, or when plastics or any floating marine debris is cast adrift on the ocean, it will eventually arrive on shore. In most cases affected landowners, neighborhoods, small communities, or municipalities will be the first to notice the accumulation of flotsam and jetsam on local beaches. We have developed a mobile phone application to simplify the recording, mapping, and networking of observations. The app works anywhere but is tailored for wildlife and objects found on shore or near the coast. The main objectives of the project are to:
1) Promote citizen science,
2) Develop baseline data,
3) Analyze change over time,
by facilitating the recording, sharing, and networking of credible shoreline observations including wildlife, beach cast animals, and marine debris with geo-tagged observations and photos. The browser based app is available at www.beachobserver.com and is also available for download from iTunes.

Cosumnes River Water Quality Monitoring

El Dorado Trout Unlimited (EDTU) is continuing its State Water Resources approved monitoring program for the Cosumnes River in 2016. The Surface Water Ambient Monitoring Program has used volunteer citizen scientists to gather high quality data since 2000. The program is successful because it adheres to strict quality control/quality assurance procedures, provides training, and has guidance from a Technical Advisory Committee. The data gathered is stored in the Water Resources Database CEDEN, accessible on line.

In 2016 we will continue to monitor key parameters of the river and take structured observations of habitat and species present. Information gathered is part of a watershed assessment, in preparation for restoration work. Trout Unlimited is known for collaborating with partners to create innovative, win/win solutions that support communities and river health.

Participants do river monitoring, photography, data analysis/management, outreach and program materials development. You may see our volunteers working near the river once a month; they're the ones with the Trout Unlimited T-shirts and clipboards!

Butterflies of Kyrgyzstan

Kyrgyzstan’s Butterflies at Your Fingertips!

Central Asia is internationally known as a biodiversity hotspot, and perhaps no other country here symbolises that more than Kyrgyzstan. This application has been designed to introduce you to the world of butterflies while encouraging you to submit new information through citizen science. Every identification you make gives local scientists in Kyrgyzstan more data that helps them make informed decisions about conservation measures.


▪ Photographs of more than 60 species of butterflies. This number continues to climb as users submit new information!

▪ A section on the natural history of each species will give you information on when and where you might find them, as well as a better understanding of their life cycle.

▪ The “My Collections” feature allows you to build a virtual collection of the butterflies you have seen.

▪ The “Citizen Science” feature lets you help scientists determine if identifications by other users are accurate.

▪ An included map gives accurate location data for each species and is searchable by species and date.

▪ Frequent app updates add user submitted content like new images, map locations, and new species.

OK Amphibian Disease Testing

The Herpetology Department of the Sam Noble Museum seeks Oklahoma K-12 teachers and students (or homeschoolers) to participate in a new initiative to sample for the amphibian infectious disease, chytrid, in Oklahoma. The word chytrid is short for chytridiomycosis, a fungal disease that infects the keratinized structures on amphibians, such as skin and tadpole mouthparts (keratin is also present in your hair, skin, and nails). There are two forms of virulent chytrid: Batrachochytrium dendrobatis (Bd) infects frogs and salamanders and Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bs or Bsal) infects only salamanders. This study will focus on frogs, because Bs has not yet been found in the US. Bd however, is found in every state in the US, but very little is known about how common the disease is among frogs in Oklahoma. This is where you all come in! Request a FREE kit today and receive the necessary field supplies, plus a teacher packet containing worksheets, lesson plans, and background information.

ELMO | South African Elasmobranch Monitoring

The Southern African coastline is known for its outstanding diversity in marine wildlife. 204 out of 1188 known Chondrichthyans (sharks, rays, skates & chimaera) occur in Southern Africa, making it the 4th most diverse hotspot for these species.

Although the conservation of Elasmobranchs is gaining rising public concern, smaller sharks and rays are often in the shadow of widely 'adulated' charismatic sharks. Several species of catsharks, rays and skates - many of which are endemic to Southern Africa - make up a large portion of the bycatch in South African commercial fisheries. Many Elasmobranchs are also targeted directly for products like shark cartilage, liver oil, leather, teeth, jaws as well as ray wings and shark fins.

Monitoring Elasmobranch populations can be difficult and costly. There are however, a number of people, who encounter sharks, skates and rays on a regular basis: Anglers, divers, snorkellers, skippers, the occasional beach visitor and basically anyone, who reads the news or surfs the internet. And they can deliver two different types of data:


Some sharks and all skates lay leathery eggcases either directly into the sand or they attach them to tough underwater surfaces such as rocks, corals or kelp. Storms, currents or predators can loosen these eggcases and wash them ashore. These mermaids' purses have characteristic shapes that differ in each species and their abundance and distributions can be used for long-term monitorings.


People who spend time in or close to the water regularly encounter sharks, skates or rays. These direct observations can help with the identification of species-distributions and important habitats. Sightings do not always have to be recorded first-hand, but can be extracted from photographs or news articles. Historic photographs are of specifically high value as they can be an indication of changes in size and abundance of species.

ELMO serves as an interactive database that can be accessed and utilized by everyone. All data is illustrated in an interactive map that can be used to explore our Elasmobranch populations. Furthermore we administer the original information in datasheets, which can be obtained directly from us for projects that promote Elasmobranch conservation and awareness campaigns. We are working closely together with other citizen science projects and data bases to make sure your contributions reach out as far as possible.

We also provide a number of resources, which can be used privately or for educational purposes. Please feel free to download our Eggcase ID guide or visit our Resources page to access more information material on South African Elasmobranchs.


NatureWatch is a community that engages all Canadians in collecting scientific information on nature to understand our changing environment.

NatureWatch hosts the following nature monitoring programs in Canada, with more to come in the future:

FrogWatch: Learn about Canada’s favourite amphibians while helping researchers and zoos monitor the health of frogs population and frog habitat.

Ice Watch: Do you live near a pond, lake, or river that freezes over each winter? The dates when ice appears and disappears provide important information about patterns in Canada’s climate. Join our network of citizen scientists who have been tracking changes in winter ice conditions over many years.

PlantWatch: The blooming times of Canada’s most easily-recognized plant species help scientists to track changing climate trends and their impacts. If you love to garden or have an eye for flowers, please help PlantWatch and its network of volunteer provincial coordinators monitor Canada’s changing natural environment.

WormWatch: Worms might gross some people out, but at
WormWatch, we think worms provide an exciting way to teach kids about the importance of soil and the organisms that live in it. And the kids agree with us. If you’re a teacher, guide or scout leader, or someone with a bunch of kids to amuse on a sunny afternoon, get out your shovel and your smartphone and give WormWatch a try.


In CrowdMag project, NOAA explore whether digital magnetometers built in modern mobile smartphones can be used as scientific instruments. With CrowdMag mobile apps, phones all around the world send magnetometer data to NOAA. At NOAA, we check quality of the magnetic data and make data available to the public as aggregate maps and charts. We have two long-term goals: 1) Create near-real-time models of Earth's time changing magnetic field by combining crowdsourced magnetic data with real-time solar wind data. and 2) Map local magnetic noise sources (for e.g. power transformer and iron pipes) to improve accuracy of the magnetic navigation systems.

FLOW Program

FLOW, which stands for Follow and Learn about the Ocean and Wetland, is Amigos de Bolsa Chica’s Citizen Science Monitoring Program. This is an exciting opportunity for members of the community to learn more about coastal ecology, to participate in the collection of scientific data and to get involved in environmental quality monitoring efforts. Anyone interested in participating of this program is encouraged to sign up for training to become a volunteer!

Biodiversity PEEK

Biodiversity PEEK (Photography Engaging and Educating Kids) is a citizen science program designed to actively engage local, disadvantaged, public school children with their local overlooked habitats and wildlife through site-adaptable, hands-on, outdoor exploration, digital photography, and the contribution of real scientific data on an online database. Ask us about our new Biodiversity PEEK preK-8 STEAM curriculum that is inquiry-based and project based learning formed around the Next Generation Science Standards.

Whale mAPP

Whale mAPP is a collection of GIS-based web and mobile tools used by researchers and citizen scientists to contribute observations for scientists studying and mapping human impact on marine mammals.

Record and visualize ocean-based trips.

Track marine mammal sightings.

Choose from a list of species in your region and submit photos of your observations.

Visualize and explore your contributions through Whale mAPP web.

Manage and visualize your collected data.

Explore what other citizen scientists have contributed.
Download your data – for research or for fun!

The WQI Project

The WQI (Water Quality Index) Project is a guided citizen science curriculum. It encourages learners to investigate water quality in their community, consider water challenges around the world, and share their findings with other students around the country. The WQI Project is ideal for a classroom or group setting.

Each WQI Project kit provides everything learners need to investigate water quality issues, and everything facilitators need to lead a successful investigation. In purchasing the kit you will receive login information for thewqiproject.org where you will have access to the exclusive student data map and online resources. The curriculum includes 5 lessons and assessment mechanisms built by certified science educators. The WQI Project aligns to Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core State Standards.

Cape Citizen Science

Cape Citizen Science is a project to engage the public in a survey of plant pathogens in the Fynbos of the Cape Floral Region in South Africa.


HerpMapper is a cooperative project, designed to gather and share information about reptile and amphibian observations across the planet. Using HerpMapper, you can create records of your herp observations and keep them all in one place. In turn, your data is made available to HerpMapper Partners – groups who use your recorded observations for research, conservation, and preservation purposes. Your observations can make valuable contributions on the behalf of amphibians and reptiles.

Wildbook for Whale Sharks

The Wildbook for Whale Sharks citizen science program allows any member of the community to be involved in collecting important identification data on whale sharks. Citizen scientists across the world can take a photo of the spot patterns on the skin of a whale shark and enter the photo into this Wildbook. Wild Me (http://www.wildme.org) and the global whale shark research community will then use this photo as a way to identify the whale shark, determine their movements and if they have been seen in the same area before.

Wildbook for Whale Sharks is available for people to access around the world, so any shark sighting can be reported into the Library as an encounter. We have actively set up partnerships for this citizen science program in Indonesia, Mexico, Mozambique, Seychelles, Maldives, Galapagos, Belize, Honduras and Philippines, with many other countries interested in being involved. The Library currently holds over 50,000 photos and has received submissions from 4800+ people and 100+ researchers who have photographed whale sharks in 46 different countries.

Our citizen science project provides huge potential to increase the interest in science and conservation among community members using the unique combination of a flagship species (whale sharks) and the latest technology (the on-line data collection system used within Wildbook). It also provides the opportunity and skills for community to be involved in the natural resource management of their local area. Wild Me believes that the combination of awareness raising and capacity building among our community and, in particular, youth is a vital part of our marine environment’s future.

South Texas Wintering Birds

Contribute your observations to a database for the state of Texas. Whether you are on a large private ranch, small yard in the city, or public nature area -- if you go birding, we need your sightings. Help us better understand the richness, abundance and changes in bird life in Texas!

Public Laboratory Oil Testing Kit Beta Program

Public Lab has officially launched the new Oil Testing Kit Public Beta Program, and now we need your help to take our new Kit to the next level. This is an exciting opportunity to help improve our prototype DIY methods for classifying unknown petroleum samples by weight. Our eventual goal is for this kit to be usable to test and compare oil spill residues - that's where you come in!

Public Lab is offering the new 3.0 version of our Desktop Spectrometry Kit, plus a prototype version of the new Oil Testing Kit attachment, free of charge for 20 people who can commit to test and offer feedback on the kit.

In exchange for the free kits, Beta Program members will be required to:

- Post ‘unboxing’ and ‘finished assembly’ photos on Twitter.
- Post feedback on the kit and sample preparation methods in one or more research notes at PublicLab.org
- Create and post a set of spectra from the samples sent with the kit (detailed information on how to do this is on our website)
- Share and discuss input and suggestions on ways to improve the kit on Public Lab’s “plots-spectrometry” mailing list
- Attend two meetups with other Beta Kit Participants online (to be announced soon)

Chesapeake Bay Parasite Project

Scientists are studying sites all around the Chesapeake Bay to monitor the spread of an invasive parasitic barnacle that infects native white-fingered mud crabs. We are working to track their populations and need your help!

Big Seaweed Search

Help us monitor the effects of environmental change on Britain's sealife by exploring the seashore and recording the living seaweeds you find there.

The Big Seaweed Search first launched in 2009. Hundreds of people took part and the data gathered, alongside other research, show that the distribution of seaweeds around the UK is changing.

Now we aim to scale up the survey to collect thousands of new observations and to focus on key environmental issues that need more research.

These issues are:

rising sea temperature rise
the arrival and spread of non-native species of seaweed
ocean acidification (the sea becoming more acidic as a result of absorbing carbon dioxide from the air)
Home to a particularly high diversity of species, the UK is a special place for seaweeds. Unfortunately, seaweeds are not as popular as flowers, butterflies or birds, so fewer people make and submit observations of them.

As a result, we know comparatively little about the abundance and distribution of seaweed species, and how this may change over time.

Understanding more about seaweeds is critical to protecting marine environments.

Anyone can take part and the survey is open all year round.


ClimateWatch was developed by Earthwatch Institute with the Bureau of Meteorology and the University of Melbourne to understand how changes in temperature and rainfall are affecting the seasonal behaviour of Australia's plants and animals. The first continental phenology project in the Southern Hemisphere, ClimateWatch enables every Australian to become a citizen scientist, collecting and recording data that will help shape the country's scientific response to climate change. You can record anywhere, anytime - from a jog around the block all the way to a camping trip.

Earthwatch has established almost 60 ClimateWatch trails in partnership with local governments, botanical gardens, environmental education centres and universities across the country. Walking a trail is a great way to involve your family, friends, students or colleagues in discovering your local environment while contributing to important research.

ClimateWatch is an authentic learning experience that can be incorporated into school excursions, corporate CSR strategies or local events.

The ClimateWatch system provides:
* An opportunity for educators to introduce their students to phenology, biodiversity, and climate change.
* A greater understanding, while raising public awareness, of the response of Australia's biodiversity to climate change;
* An online system for collecting, storing, interpreting and reporting indicators of biological responses to climate; and
* The ability to predict and monitor changes in native and pest species distributions and to test their sensitivity to climate.


Effective management of sharks starts with an understanding of their population status, which will ultimately instruct their future conservation.

Through SharkBase we are building a global network of shark observers collecting vital information about the abundance and distribution of sharks and rays worldwide.

(*Includes all sharks, rays, and chimaeras)

Report Florida Lionfish

Enter your lionfish sighting or removal data online at MyFWC.com/Lionfish or on our Report Florida Lionfish app.

Long term marine ecology project

Australia’s south eastern coastline is home to an array of unique and fascinating marine life. These organisms have adapted and acclimatised to temperate (cold water) conditions. However, climate change modelling predicts that Australia’s surrounding oceans will warm by 1–2 ⁰C by 2070, with the south east coast of Australia expected to feel the greatest effects due to increased strength and penetration of the East Australian Current (EAC).

– the EAC pushes warm water from the tropics, i.e. around the Great Barrier Reef, southward into the temperate waters found along the south eastern coast. This strength varies in season–

As a consequence to this predicted increase in ocean temperatures, there is mounting evidence suggesting that the geographic range of tropical and temperature coastal fish species will shift to higher latitudes (in this case further South), in response to warming trends. For example, ongoing studies around a coastal town called Merimbula (37°S) have recorded over 50 species of tropical fish which are aided by the warmer water and stronger EAC during Summer/Autumn. It is only when the warm water recedes and cold water replaces it, do these tropical fish die. With the predicted changes, these tropical fish are expected to survive through winter and compete with temperate fish species.
In addition to this, structurally important and unique macroalgae (e.g. bull kelp Durvillea potatorum) are predicted to have dramatic temperate fish range shifts. Preferring temperate conditions, increased ocean temperatures are predicted to radically move macroalgae distribution poleward. Warm ocean temperatures influence the health of macroalgae, often leaving large populations vulnerable to disease and wave action. Macroalgae provides important habitats for a number of temperate fish and invertebrate species throughout their life cycles, with predicted poleward shifts, species that require macroalgae habitats will either adapt or follow macroalgae range shifts.
Acknowledging these predicted changes, community members are establishing a long term monitoring program to record any annual and seasonal changes in fish diversity and macroalgae health. This would also include recording sea surface temperature.

Acknowledging these predicted changes, community members are establishing a long term monitoring program to record any annual and seasonal changes in species diversity and macroalgae health. This would also include recording sea surface temperature.


1.Establish a monitoring programme that will build valuable data, recording biodiversity and changes over time

2.Monitor annual and seasonal changes in fish and invertebrate diversity and macroalgae health

3.Create and maintain an ongoing training program that improves interested community members knowledge about local marine life and improve their identification skills

4.Create an identification/education guide of the target fish and invertebrate diversity and health indicators on macroalgae.

5.Establish frequent monitoring of nominated sites and expand the number of survey sites over time

6.Encourage university involvement and/or grants


1)Timed snorkel: using a recording template (that will have a list of key fish), participants will note down any fish/invertbrate species they observed and an estimated abundance. They will also note down any macroalgae discolouration.

2)Un-timed snorkel/SCUBA: using a slate and waterproof paper, particpants will note down/photograph as many species as they can during their recreational snorkel/SCUBA dive.

3)Video footage: working with local fisheries, underwater video footage of offshore habitats (e.g. urchin barrens, rocky reefs) has been made available to the community working group.

Can't get to the location to help out? Then maybe you can help answer some of our projects questions (if you can, please join the project and follow the contact prompts);

1) What data should we be aiming to record;

- Species wise: Should we aim to create a total species list and record as much of the biodiversity as possible OR create a targeted species list that aims to record indicator species of fish, invertebrates and macroalgae?

- Health: What is the best way to record the health of macroalgae?

- Abiotic parameters: we have access to temperature data loggers, but what other parameters should we look to record? E.g. depth, water clarity, tide, swell height etc

New to working with underwater video footage has created a few questions:

2) What would be the best way to utilise the video footage ? Footage shows macroalgae and fish species inhabiting habitats at different depths. (NOTE: original thoughts was to take snapshots of the footage and overlay randomised dots/points over the image. Dots/points that are over macroalgae would be highlighted and those that aren’t over macroalgae would be left alone)

3) Is there an online tool or free software to analyse video footage?

4) What would be the best way to standardise video analysis? Note: video footage will be from the same sites taken at different times of the year.

Columbia Basin Water

We are collecting rain and snow samples to develop a water balance for the region based on the isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen in the water molecule. This is part of a larger project that is evaluating the past, present, and future of water resources in the Columbia Basin.
More information on the project can be found here: http://janicebrahney.weebly.com/columbia-basin.html and here: https://www.instrumentl.com/campaigns/janicebrahney/

Truckee River Guide

Truckee River Guide is an interactive field guide to the plants and wildlife of the Truckee River, and a community wildlife mapping project.

Did you know that there is no complete species list for the Truckee River region of California and Nevada? The Truckee River is an important resource for the people that live in our community, and also an important resource for wildlife. With an ongoing drought and a changing climate, it is important to keep records of the species that live in our region, so that we can recognize and monitor change as it happens. You can help, by taking photos and submitting observations of plants and wildlife to Truckee River Guide.

The Truckee River Guide website is a free community resource intended to provide information to the public about the species that live in the Truckee River region of California and Nevada.

Gotham Whale

Gotham Whale monitors marine mammals in the waters around New York City. We work primarily on board the whale watching vessel, The American Princess. We enlist other on-the-water observers to report sightings of whales, dolphins, and seals in the area.

Bay Drift

Our project is poised to answer four research questions: Where do Miami’s currents move water? What are Miami’s marine debris sources? What are the most common types of trash found in Miami's waterways? How can we prevent trash from entering our waterways?

To accomplish this, we use social media to crowdsource hypotheses regarding our research questions. Then drift cards are cut and painted by community members. Once prepared, the drift cards are deployed from five coastal sites. Organized cleanups around the county, in conjunction with partners, are our primary means of collecting the cards. We also deploy GPS drifters to track debris paths. The analyzed data is used for targeting debris hotspots to install educational and interpretive signage. It also provides scientists with data useful for understanding current patterns.

This project was formally known as Trash Detectives.

Connecticut Turtle Atlas

With approximately 58 percent of the world’s 335 turtle species threatened with extinction, turtles are the most endangered vertebrate group in the world. The Bruce Museum in Greenwich invites people to help map the distribution of turtles with the Connecticut Turtle Atlas Citizen Science project.

The unassuming turtle is seldom on the mind of most people, but they are a top priority for many conservation biologists. Turtles can play key ecological roles, serving as both predators and prey, contributing to the cycling of nutrients, and acting as seed dispersers.

Anyone interested in turtles or the outdoors can participate, including families, children, individuals, and classrooms. Participants in this Bruce Museum Citizen Science initiative will collect data on all turtle species found throughout the state as they help scientists track turtle distribution and abundance. The project runs from April through November on an annual basis.

The state of Connecticut is home to twelve native turtle species that inhabit our woodlands, wetlands, and even the waters of Long Island Sound. The primary threats to turtles in the state include habitat loss and traffic-related highway mortality. Worldwide, turtles are negatively affected by threats such as collection for food and pets, disease, and changing climates, as well as habitat loss and fragmentation.

The goals of the Bruce Museum’s Connecticut Turtle Atlas include developing a public understanding of turtle ecology, promoting ways in which people can help turtles, and gathering research-quality data for use in publication and sharing with scientists.

Participants will learn about the wonderful diversity of turtles and their benefits to the ecology. No experience is required, all that is needed is access to a smart phone, camera, or a computer with the iNaturalist.org platform. Using the iNaturalist smartphone app, volunteer scientists can gather information that will be used to map distributions, identify important habitats, locate areas of nesting abundance, and detect roadways with high traffic-related mortality. In addition, the Bruce Museum will provide opportunities to assist with other aspects of turtle research and fieldwork.

Citizen Science harnesses the passion of the public to become amateur researchers, which helps not only with the gathering of important data on a wide scale but also with inspiring a new generation of future scientists. Citizen Science provides fun and interesting projects with real-world implications, breaks down barriers between society and scientist, opens discussion on STEM subjects and current events, shares research outcomes, and acknowledges participants’ important contributions.

UK Ladybird Survey

The Ladybird Survey aims to facilitate the recording of all the UK's ladybirds. Help us understand the ecology of native UK ladybirds by sending in your observations.

The invasion of the harlequin ladybird (Harmonia axyridis) threatens Britain's native populations. If you want to know more about this species in particular, or want to record sightings, please have a look at the Harlequin Ladybird Survey website.

Monitoring an Invasive Seaweed

We need your help to track the changes in abundance of an invasive seaweed, Gracilaria vermiculophylla. Native to Asia, G. vermiculophylla was introduced to the Southeast via the oyster trade back in the 1990's. Scientist studying G. vermiculophylla are trying to determine how the seaweed is changing southeastern estuaries where it is most prolific, and here is how you can help!

An informational sign is placed on the Jay Wolf Nature Trial Dock, a high-traffic area adjacent to a mudflat where G. vermiculophylla can be found. The sign, along with educating the public about the invasive seaweed, instructs passersby to take a photograph with a camera or phone and to then share the photograph with us using social media or email. A bracket is installed adjacent to the sign to designate where the camera or phone should be placed, allowing us to guarantee that all photographs are taken from the same location. The photographs will be compiled in a time lapse series, which will be used to better understand seasonal changes in G. vermiculophylla populations. The time lapses will be available for viewing by the public through the project’s blog.

Tracking Dolphins in the Adriatic Sea

Make it possible for these researchers to continue monitoring the dolphins they’ve come to know over the past decade. Help them learn which parts of the Adriatic sea are most important to the dolphins, so that they can provide key policy makers with the research necessary to draft laws that protect the waters and dolphins.

Identify the cloud

Share photos of unusual cloud types and formations, and help identify other people's cloud pictures.

FreshWater Watch

FreshWater Watch is Earthwatch's global research project which aims to involve at least 100,000 people in a program to research and learn about fresh water. The purpose of FreshWater Watch is to safeguard the quality and supply of fresh water, our planet's most precious and vital resource.

Participants have the opportunity to become citizen scientists and take an active role in scientific data gathering. As a citizen scientist, you will join a global community working together to promote freshwater sustainability.

Shark Conservation in Belize

To protect sharks and their habitat, we need to know where they spend their time. This study is the first of its kind—while we have evidence that sharks do better in marine reserves, we have no idea how long a decimated population will take to recover in a brand-new reserve. That’s one of the insights that will come out of this research. The scientists are also looking for insight into how well Belize's marine reserves foster sharks, so you'll help implant transmitters in sharks to track where they go. Essentially, researchers will know marine reserves are working if sharks spend more time inside their borders than outside.

Nina Valley EcoBlitz

High school students, scientists, teachers, and support crew working together to discover and document the biological diversity of the Nina Valley

South African Penguins

Ninety percent of the penguin population on Robben Island has disappeared over the past 100 years. You can help conserve their habitat and protect their population.

Exploring Rising Tides in South Carolina

Your work will help the scientists uncover what climate change could mean for the plants, animals, and people that depend on these wetlands. By understanding these changes, the scientists can recommend the best way to protect this critical wetland forest and others like it around the world.

Tracking Sea Turtles in the Bahamas

The green sea turtle and the hawksbill sea turtle are in trouble. Even though the Bahamian government has made it illegal to catch them in the country’s waters, to save these endangered species from further decline, researchers need to ensure their habitats are protected from coastal development and climate change.

Investigating Reefs and Marine Wildlife in the Bahamas

You’ll help biologists fill in knowledge gaps by surveying the mangroves and patch reefs of the Bahamas. They particularly want to know what increases the abundance of fish in these habitats. Abundant fishy life tells scientists that a coral reef is healthy: fish graze on algae that would otherwise stifle corals, so a strong fish population keeps algae in check, which helps coral reefs flourish.

Yukon Marine Life Survey

9-1-16 Update:

"Ocean Sanctuaries is pleased to report that the Yukon Marine Life Survey has identified and confirmed 11 genera of invertebrates using hi definition photography on the artificial reef Yukon, a 366 ft. long Canadian warship sunk off the coast of San Diego in 2000, to act as a marine life aggregator, a goal it has been extremely successful at in the intervening 15 years on the bottom.

See here for more info: http://oceanspaces.org/community-group/citizen-science-oceanspaces/news/yukon-marine-life-survey-progress-report

Ocean Sanctuaries now offers an opportunity for San Diego divers to contribute to a citizen science survey of the abundant marine life that has accumulated on the Canadian destroyer 'Yukon' since its sinking off the coast of San Diego to be an artificial reef in 2000.

15 years ago, in 2000, the City of San Diego in collaboration with the San Diego Oceans Foundation, purchased, cleaned and deliberately sank a 366 foot-long Canadian warship called the Yukon to act as an artificial reef and attract local marine life, a task at which it is been spectacularly successful.

In the 15 years that the Yukon has been sitting on the bottom off the coast of San Diego, it has attracted dozens of species of local marine life as well as a revenue-generating attraction for tourist divers from around the world.

The first scientific study of the marine life on the Yukon was undertaken in 2004 by Dr. Ed Parnell of Scripps Institution of Oceanography in collaboration with the San Diego Oceans Foundation. It utilized data gathered by local citizen science divers to generate an initial baseline study of the marine life species on the ship. 1

It too, will utilize local divers as citizen scientists to systematically gather data about the marine life species that have accumulated on the ship since 2004.

The Yukon lies in 100 ft of water and is considered an advanced dive and should not be attempted except by those who have the proper training.

Missouri Stream Team Volunteer Water Quality Monitoring

The Missouri Stream Team Volunteer Water Quality Monitoring program trains volunteers across the state to monitor streams and collect biological, physical, and chemical data.

There are four levels of training: Introductory Level, Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3. Each level needs to be taken sequentially since each class builds on the previous one. At the Introductory Level workshops you will learn about watersheds, how to measure stream discharge, and how to use the macroinvertebrates in the stream to assess the water quality. After you complete the Introductory Level Workshop and submit data at your chosen monitoring site, you will be eligible to attend the Level 1 Workshop. At this workshop, you will learn about water chemistry and get a review of macroinvertebrates. After the completion of this workshop you will get the chemical kits and other equipment to chemically monitor water quality. The Level 2 workshop is the Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QAQC) workshop. The Level 3 is an audit where Program Staff will come out to your monitoring site and verify techniques.

Welsh Sea Watchers Project

The Sea Watch Foundation is looking to recruit enthusiastic individuals with a keen interest in Welsh whales, dolphins and porpoises to become part of the Welsh Sea Watchers project. The Welsh Sea Watches Project is a new initiative with that aims to develop a network of reliable volunteers throughout Wales to assist in data collection and further understanding and public awareness of the amazing cetacean species that can be seen off Welsh coasts. Volunteers will take part in a variety of tasks and gain experience in cetacean surveying and species identification, as well as public awareness work and social networking.
‘Sea Watchers’ will assist the Wales Development Officer and Sightings Officer in a number of tasks including but not limited to

• Organising and conducting regular land based watches for cetaceans

• Organising, attending and assisting during Sea Watch events

• Representing Sea Watch during public talks and school visits

The Welsh Sea Watchers project is an on-going project; volunteers may apply throughout the year. Due to the nature of the project, it is advisable that applicants are already resident in Wales, as accommodation cannot be provided.

Desirable skills/qualifications

• Background in education or marine biology

• Driving license and use of own car

Duration/minimum commitment
Welsh Sea Watcher volunteers should ideally be active all year around with a minimum commitment of 4 hours per month.

This is a flexible, part-time positions; volunteers are expected to organise their own time and work independently (with guidance from the Welsh Development Officer).

URI Watershed Watch

The URI Watershed Watch (URIWW) is a volunteer water quality monitoring program that works with local communities to assess water quality, identify sources of pollution in water and provide information about water leading to more effective management of critical water resources. Led by trained scientists, URI Watershed Watch helps citizen scientists gather detailed, quality assured monitoring data. We focus on long-term monitoring of RI's fresh and salt water resources including lakes, ponds, streams and coastal waters. We provide training, equipment, supplies and analytical services tailored to organizational needs to help communities use information locally.

River Instream Flow Stewards

The River Instream Flow Stewards program helps people to collect and use streamflow data in Massachusetts. RIFLS, as it is known, began in 2002 in response to concerns that many small streams were flow-stressed and that these impacts were not being documented. RIFLS staff work with partners to collect high quality streamflow data, to better understand the causes of unnatural streamflows, and to inform and support policy and actions that restore and maintain environmental flows.

Wisconsin's Water Action Volunteers

Water Action Volunteers (WAV) is a statewide program for Wisconsin citizens who want to learn about and improve the quality of Wisconsin’s streams and rivers. The program is coordinated through a partnership between the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and the University of Wisconsin – Cooperative Extension.

Volunteers collect data on water chemistry, water clarity, and other aspects of stream health.

Stream Team

The goals of Channelkeeper’s Stream Team Program are to collect and disseminate data to measure the health of local streams; identify and abate specific sources of pollution to these streams; measure trends or changes resulting from pollution prevention efforts; and foster environmental stewardship in our community by providing a rewarding outdoor volunteer opportunity for local citizens.

Stream Team is one of Channelkeeper’s longest running and most successful programs, which to date has educated and engaged more than 1,000 volunteers in helping us conduct monthly water quality sampling. Each month, Stream Team volunteers test common water quality parameters at at 47 stream sites in the watersheds of the Goleta Valley, Carpinteria Valley and Ventura River. Volunteers use portable meters to test in-stream parameters such as temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, and conductivity. In addition, samples are collected that are later analyzed in the laboratory for bacteria and nutrients. Visual observations such as weather conditions, algae coverage, water clarity, odors, and trash are also recorded on standardized datasheets. We follow rigorous Quality Assurance/Quality Control protocols that are based on a Quality Assurance Project Plan approved by the State Water Resources Control Board.

Our Stream Team data is used by government agencies to inform pollution prevention programs and water resource management decisions. We’ve identified numerous pollution hot spots and sources through Stream Team sampling and have worked cooperatively with the relevant government agencies to get these problems cleaned up. Our ultimate goal is cleaner, healthier water and a more environmentally responsible citizenry that is actively engaged in addressing the pollution problems plaguing our waterways.

Madison Stream Team

Since 2010, the Madison Stream Team has been collecting water quality data in the Madison Watershed to gain a better understanding of resource conditions, and to help direct future management decisions. To prepare for data collection, Stream Team members go through a one day technical training in early summer. Then, each member dedicates one day in July, August, and September to conduct monitoring on one of their assigned streams.

In all, the Madison Stream Team is responsible for collecting data on 7 streams in the Madison Watershed. This data is then used to inform the Madison Conservation District, and other local organizations, about the condition of the streams in the Madison. This helps these organizations to determine areas that may have room for improvement, and can help identify potential project sites for the future.

Butler County Stream Team

The Butler County Stream Team is a volunteer group that studies local water quality on the second Saturday of each month - March through November. We conduct two kinds of testing, chemical and biological.

Chemical- Volunteers collect water samples from set locations around the county from rivers and streams. The water samples are then tested by volunteers at our water quality lab for the following parameters: nitrates, total phosphorous, bacteria, conductivity, total dissolved solids, pH, turbidity. We are always interested in more interested citizen scientists helping with this lab work. It typically takes about 3 hours, on the 2nd Saturday each month.

Biological- In 2014 we started looking at benthic macroinvertebrates (AKA creek critters) to provide a fuller picture of the health of the water. This is conducted 2-3 times per year at specific sites within the county, although not on a set day.

Other happenings: We have numerous events both for education and of course for fun throughout the year. These include a data sharing potluck in February, kayak floats, trips to floating wetland projects and water treatment plants, and classes on macroinvertebrates and rain barrels.

Waccamaw River Volunteer Water Quality Monitoring

Water quality monitoring at multiple sites along the Waccamaw River in North and South Carolina. The project is a partnership between the Waccamaw Riverkeeper and the Waccamaw Watershed Academy. Multiple parameters including turbidity, nutrients, bacteria, DO, pH, conductivity, salinity, and temperature are measured at each site twice per month throughout the year.

The program is now entering its 10th year and we track all data online for a comprehensive look at changes and patterns. Data is also reported to local stakeholders and state regulators.

All sampling is completed by volunteers and the Waccamaw Watershed Academy helps to provide supplies and testing meters as well as volunteer training.

Volunteer Monthly Monitoring

At 6 am on the third Tuesday of the month, volunteers meet their partners at their assigned sampling locations along the Charles River. Volunteers collect a water sample in the sterile bottle provided and measure the water temperature and depth. Volunteers then deliver their sample and data sheet to the assigned drop-off location and collect materials for the next month's sampling event.

Check out the list and map of our sampling sites: http://www.crwa.org/field-science/monthly-monitoring/sampling-sites

IDAH₂O Master Water Stewards

The IDAH2O Master Water Steward program participants attend an 8-hour workshop which combines classroom instruction and hands-on field work.

A certified Master Water Steward then can adopt a stream location to conduct regular monitoring of habitat, biological, chemical and physical assessments. Stewards upload all data collected to an interactive HIS website that is publicly available. Another focus of the program is to educate citizens on the science behind water quality and to help them understand streams, rivers and lakes systems. Youth involvement and K-12 participation (formal and after-school enrichment) is also strongly supported.

Leaf Pack Network

What is the Leaf Pack Network®?

A Hands-On Stream Ecology Investigation Based on Real Science!

Science involves more than simply collecting data. Science is also the process of communicating and sharing results, initiated through inquiry.

The Leaf Pack Network® is an international network of teachers, students, and citizen monitors investigating their local stream ecosystem. Through the Leaf Pack Experiment, monitors use tree leaves and aquatic insects to determine the health of their stream and to understand its ecology.

Individuals participating in the Leaf Pack Experiment and Leaf Pack Network® engage in the full process of designing an experiment, conducting research and communicating their results. Leaf Pack can also easily be implemented into any curriculum and fulfills many state and national science standards. Watch your students become empowered and energized learning about their local watershed!

Wissahickon Creek Watch Program

The WVWA is looking for a dedicated group of volunteers to help monitor the health of the Wissahickon Creek and its tributaries! The Citizen Scientists will be trained in water quality monitoring, primarily using visual assessments. Each volunteer is assigned a 1-­2 mile section on public land from the headwaters in North Wales to Fairmount Park. They will submit data for algae cover, animal observations, erosion, percent shade and a myriad of other indicators of stream health. Additionally, there will sub-­group of Creek Watchers known as the “Wading Team” that will take samples from the stream to determine the amount of nutrients, dissolved oxygen and water temperature. The WVWA held training sessions in July and monitoring will begin in August. The dates of the next training sessions are to be determined.

Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center

Collecting samples of aquatic insects from the remote Grand Canyon segment of the Colorado River is challenging and extremely expensive. We seek citizen scientists to help us collect samples of the adult life stages of aquatic insects that are emerging from the Colorado River in Grand Canyon using simple light traps that are set out each night in camp. We will provide sampling gear and notebooks.

Natural North Carolina

North Carolina is a beautiful place! With the huge variation in habitat types - from the mountains to the piedmont to the coastal plain - our state boasts a grand diversity of plants, animals, and fungi. Just look around. You likely encounter hundreds of species in your daily life, and many just beyond your front door!

Scientists at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences document the species in our great state and share the things we learn with you in our Museum exhibits. But, we can't be everywhere at once! We need YOUR help. By photographing and reporting the wildlife you see in your everyday life to Natural North Carolina, you can help us learn more about the species that call North Carolina home. You will also help us create an atlas of North Carolina's flora and fauna that you can use to identify the natural things you see in your local area. And all you have to do to help is snap a photo of something in nature and tell us where and when you took it. Easy!

So, get outside! Snap a few photos. Become a citizen scientist by submitting your photos to Natural North Carolina. Together, we can discover the wonders of North Carolina and learn more about our amazing state.

BC Cetacean Sightings Network

Twenty-three species of cetaceans and sea turtles have been recorded in the waters of British Columbia, Canada. Many of these populations are 'at-risk' and under-studied.
The B.C. Cetacean Sightings Network (BCCSN) collects sightings of cetaceans and sea turtles in the waters surrounding British Columbia, Canada using a network of citizen scientist observers. Our observer base is diverse, from interested citizens to lighthouse keepers, ecotourism professionals, mariners and recreational boaters. Anyone can participate and reports are made via an on-line form, toll free number, email, or supplied logbook. Look for our smartphone app, WhaleReport, available now for free download from the iTunes and Google Play stores.

Global Change Research Wetland Annual Census

The Biogeochemistry Lab at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) is conducting their annual census of the Global Change Research Wetland, a marsh that SERC scientists have been studying for nearly 30 years to track the impacts of high carbon dioxide and nutrient levels on plant growth. We are looking for volunteer citizen scientists on weekdays from July 20 to July 30 from 8AM to 4PM. Volunteers are need for a minimum of one half-day, however it is best to have people come for a whole day, ideally for multiple days in a row. The work involves working in the tidal marsh (on boardwalks) at SERC to count and measure all of the plants in the experimental plots and working in the lab to sort samples and conduct analyses. Volunteers must be at least 16 years old to participate.

Blue Catfish Watch

Show us your blue catfish catch! Collaborate with scientists at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center to help us track the expanding range of the non-native blue catfish into the upper Chesapeake Bay and into Delaware Bay and the Delaware River.

Native to the Mississippi, Ohio and Missouri Rivers, blue catfish were introduced to Virginia for sport fishing beginning in 1974. Since introduction, these non-native top predators have expanded their range into many of Maryland’s tributaries, including the Nanticoke, Patuxent, Choptank, Susquehanna and Sassafras Rivers. Due to their large size and adult predatory feeding behavior, blue catfish are consuming many native fish species, such as white perch, largemouth bass, American shad, river herring and menhaden. Knowing where and when these catfish are being caught is an important part of understanding their rising impact on the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. Remember that it is illegal in Maryland, Virginia, and Delaware to transport and release live blue catfish.

Identifying Blue Catfish
Blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) have a bluish-gray body and a deeply forked tail. Unlike channel catfish, they do not have spots on their body. One feature that distinguishes blue catfish from other catfishes is the prominent straight edge on their anal fin; other catfishes, including the similarly colored white catfish, have a rounded anal fin (see pictures on website).

A.T. Seasons

The A.T. Seasons project brings together different parks and organizations that are actively monitoring seasonal changes in plants and animals (phenology) along the Appalachian Trail. Using Nature’s Notebook or our customized mobile app observers at all levels will be contributing to a comprehensive dataset with the goal of understanding the relationship between phenology and climate change along the Appalachian Trail. Get Involved today!

A.T. Seasons is your opportunity to help track the unfolding of important life cycle events each year along the iconic Appalachian Trail, linking your observations with others from Georgia to Maine. By observing and reporting seasonal changes of plants and animals you will help build the foundation to understanding and protecting the scenic & natural beauty of the trail corridor.

L.A. Nature Map

The L.A. Nature Map hosted by the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles is an interactive map that displays local plant and wildlife observations.

Our Southern California region is a hotspot for urban biodiversity. With your help, we can show Angelenos and the world the diversity of nature all around us. You can contribute to this citizen science project by sending photos of plants and animals.

The L.A. Nature Map is created in collaboration with iNaturalist.

RASCals (Reptiles and Amphibians of Southern California)

RASCals is designed to improve our knowledge of native and non-native reptiles and amphibians in southern California. This region is home to 22.5 million people and has experienced dramatic urbanization and habitat modification. We need your help in documenting reptiles and amphibians throughout the region so that we can examine how various species have responded to these habitat changes. We are interested in native and non-native species and in observations in all types of habitats, from relatively pristine habitats to heavily modified, urban habitats, such as backyards, schoolyards, and urban parks. This project is conducted in collaboration with iNaturalist.


Birdeez is the easiest way to identify, collect and share bird sightings. The goal of this project is to educate you about the birds in your area while you contribute sightings that will be used for scientific understanding of bird migration, bird populations and climate change.

Currently Birdeez is available as an iPhone application at www.GetBirdeez.com/ but soon we we will be online and on different phone platforms as well.

Every bird counts, so help us help them by collecting and sharing sightings.

Our Radioactive Ocean

It has now been 5 years since the release of radioactive contaminants from Fukushima and we are now seeing the evidence on the west coast of North America. Help scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution reveal the ongoing spread of radiation across the Pacific and its evolving impacts on the ocean.

Clarification for fundraising costs: shipping is about 20% of the cost, the other majority is for the cesium extraction steps in the lab, radioactivity detection and data processing, along with managing the web site and database.

There are 3 ways to support us:

1) Help us reach our goal by donating to sample an existing site. Simply click on "HELP FUND A LOCATION" and choose to support one of the many sites that are underway

2) Someone can propose a new sampling site. Click on "PROPOSE A LOCATION" and see what is involved. We are trying to get spread of locations up/down coast. With a donation or fundraising of $100 we'll set up a fundraising webpage, add that page to our website, and send you a sampling kit once your goal has been reached. Fundraising amounts are generally between $550 (WA, OR, CA) and $600 (BC, AK, HI). Differences reflect increased shipping charges to some areas.

3) We also seek funds for general capacity building and public education activities at CMER: http://ourradioactiveocean.org/support ($20 minimum donation)

Public Laboratory Remote Field Logger Electronics

Public Lab is working to make water quality information more accessible for communities everywhere. The Mystic River in Massachusetts flows from the Mystic Lakes in Winchester and Arlington, through Medford, Somerville, Everett, Charlestown and Chelsea, and into Boston Harbor, and has supported a long history of economic progress in one of the most densely populated urban areas of New England. Today, the Mystic faces serious water quality problems, shared by urban water bodies around the world: pollution from leaky sewer pipes, waste disposal sites; excessive nutrients and discharges of raw sewage; fuel hydrocarbons; and road salt. Portions of the watershed often fail to meet state bacteria standards for swimming and boating, and its Alewife Brook subwatershed is one of the most contaminated water bodies in Boston. The Mystic River watershed received a ‘D’ from the US EPA on its 2012 water quality report card.

Several organizations are engaged in water monitoring projects for the Mystic, but the high cost and ‘closed data’ nature of current technology severely limits the scope of current efforts, and makes data sharing difficult.

Our main focus at first is on developing open hardware alternatives to the current most common water quality monitoring sensors, which measure temperature, conductivity, and water depth.

Snapshots in Time

Snapshots in Time is a long-term Citizen Science project aimed at mobilizing people to monitor the timing of Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) and Wood Frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) breeding throughout the respective ranges of these species. The purpose of this project is to use the data collected by on-the-ground citizens year after year to investigate possible effects of climate change on the timing of reproduction. Determining changes in the timing of breeding is very important, not just for these species, but also for others that use the same habitat. The results of this project could allow us to inform land managers and development planners of important areas for conservation and to look deeper into what other species in these ecosystems may be negatively affected by climate change, including some endangered species.

This is what is commonly referred to as a phenology project. Phenology is the study of periodic events in a plant or animal's life cycle, such as breeding or migration, and how the timing of these events are influenced by changes in the climate. Phenology allows us to understand variations in breeding times, even in limited geographic areas or specific sites, to develop a range-wide picture of any shifts in the timing of breeding.

Our objective is to collect your data long-term, so those that choose to participate in this project are encouraged to do so at the same sites year after year when possible.

This effort will focus on populations found throughout their range in North America. Both of these amphibians breed following heavy rains during winter to spring that flood woodland depressions and various other types of ephemeral (short-lived) ponds or wetlands that lack fish. These can include areas such as lime-sink ponds in karst regions or pools in the floodplains of streams.

Both species migrate en mass to breeding sites when weather conditions are appropriate from winter to spring depending on where you are within their range. Spotted Salamanders and Wood Frogs often share the same breeding sites and breed simultaneously—with breeding typically occurring earlier for southern populations (i.e., winter) compared to more northerly populations (late winter–early spring). During most of the year (when not at breeding sites), Spotted Salamanders live in burrows and/or under large logs in forest habitats. Wood Frogs are terrestrial and reside in leaf litter-carpeted forests away from water where their coloration affords them excellent camouflage.

We request that you submit field observations for either species, including any information related to: 1) Migrations of adults to/from breeding pond sites; 2) Observations of adults at breeding ponds; 3) Observations of egg masses; 4) Observations of larvae (Spotted Salamander) or of tadpoles (Wood Frog), and 5) Whether metamorphs were observed leaving the wetland. We are betting the wetlands you monitor become spots (no pun intended!) that you regularly visit well into the future (or continue to visit if you are already doing so…).

We have prepared datasheets for the information we desire from your observations and also have an identification sheet for each species. One data sheet should be used for each observation. For example, if you heard Wood Frogs on one date, that is one observation. If you see tadpoles the next time you visit the wetland, you would use a separate data sheet. We request a photograph for each observation so that we can confirm identification.

Encountering Wood Frogs and Spotted Salamanders (or evidence of these species) in the field is always exciting. Rolling a pond-side log to see the bright orange spots of a plump Spotted Salamander or hearing the duck-like chuckling sounds of a sizeable Wood Frog chorus are always memorable natural history experiences. With this study, you can make your observations count toward a scientific review of these species’ breeding patterns. This will benefit our knowledge of these animals and also provide you an opportunity to better acquaint yourself with the amphibian life in your own backyard while doing your part for conservation.

Consider participating in Snapshots in Time... it will be a great experience for all ages!

Tangaroa Blue Foundation

Tangaroa Blue Foundation coordinates the Australian Marine Debris Initiative (AMDI), a network of volunteers, communities, schools, indigenous rangers, industry bodies and government organisations. The objectives of the AMDI are to remove marine debris from the environment, collect scientific data on what is removed, track to the source wherever possible, and engage stakeholders to find practical ways to stop those items from entering the environment in the first place.


SENSR is a tool to create, share and manage a citizen science project running on mobile devices to harness the power of citizen scientists.

SENSR provides a simple and easy way to obtain a custom data collection application running on mobile devices for your project.

If you are running a grassroots project for science, education, environmental conservation, community monitoring, or other reason, and are seeking ways to expand citizen scientists' participation in contributing data, SENR can help you create a mobile data collection tool for your project.

It is part of a research project at Carnegie Mellon University. Please try out if you are seeking ways to harness citizens' power of data collection.

Plate Watch

Volunteers hang settlement plates off docks in Alaska for three to nine months. Each plate is then surveyed for invasive species and redeployed. The survey involves photographing the fouling species attached to the plate and collecting specimens of new or target species. Training is available and settlement plates are provided.

IceWatch USA

As an IceWatch USA™ volunteer, you observe a water body in your area over the winter, and report on weather (snow, precipitation, ice cover, as well as wildlife activity. In as little as ten minutes, your observations help scientists analyze climate change and other environmental factors as well as how people can adapt to those changes. The IceWatching season begins every year on the day of fall and ends with your last ice coverage and/or last snowfall.

Pennsylvania Senior Environment Corps

The Senior Environment Corps (SEC) program engages volunteers mostly aged 55 and over. SEC volunteers are engaged in numerous activities from water quality monitoring, stream habitat assessment, storm-drain stenciling, environmental education, community gardening, wildlife surveying, marking abandoned oil and gas wells, and cleaning up parks and trails.

Since 1997, SEC volunteers in Pennsylvania have contributed over 2,000,000 hours, and their contribution is estimated to be of value to the state at over $3 million per year. Coming into 2014, SEC volunteers are active in 20 counties across Pennsylvania, and will soon be expanding into to more areas.

Watch the Wild

Watch the Wild™ needs your help. As a Watch the Wild™ volunteer, you observe and report the "wild" in your community, from trees and plants to lakes and streams to weather and wildlife activity. In as little as ten minutes, your observations help us to understand how our eco-systems are changing and helps us to adapt for the future. Your observations will be entered into a database and shared with interested scientists.

Field Photo Library

A photo taken in the field helps scientists and citizens to document changes in landscape, wildlife habitats, impacts of drought and flood and fire, and so on. This Geo-referenced Field Photo Library is a citizen science and community remote sensing data portal, where people can share, visualize and archive field photos in the world. Users can upload, edit, query and download geo-referenced field photos in the library. All photos are also linked with satellite image series images (MODIS), so that people can see the changes over time.

NatureWatch NZ

NatureWatch NZ is a citizen science project dedicated to exploring and discovery New Zealand's biodiversity. If you see an unusual or interesting bug, plant, or any other species, take a photo of it, upload the photo to NatureWatch NZ, and learn all about it. The NatureWatch NZ online community will ID your species for you. You can also help others to ID their photos, and you can join (or create!) projects about the species and places you're most interested in.

Together, we're documenting what's living in NZ so we can understand NZ nature better, and have fun while we do it.

NatureWatch NZ is the New Zealand part of the amazing global iNaturalist network. Thanks iNat!

Amphibian Conservation and Education Project

The Amphibian Conservation Education Project aims to empower educators, students, and individuals to become involved in amphibian conservation efforts.

Through this project, participants will become field scientists by analyzing water quality and testing amphibians for the disease, Chytrid Fungus. Collected data is then used by local herpetologists (scientists who study reptiles and amphibians) to gain a better understanding of the species of amphibians being affected by the disease and where Chytrid is being spread.

Lake Meade PA Environmetal Education Initiative

A community environmental education program focusing on incorporation of Best Management Practices (BMPs)for controlling lake pollution and storm water runoff. Funded by a PA DEP mini-grant 13-0026.

Reef Check Tropical EcoDiver Training

Become certified to conduct your own Reef Check surveys and take an active role in conserving your favorite coral reefs. This course is designed to teach you everything you need to know to conduct full scale Reef Check surveys. In this program you will learn all about the globally standardized Reef Check methodology as well as how to identify key indicator fish, invertebrates and substrates selected by Reef Check for global monitoring and conservation of coral reefs! This course will allow you to join the Reef Check monitoring team and assist in underwater surveys around the world.

Water Quality Monitoring

Dinoflagellates emitting bioluminescence make us happy.

It means San Diego’s water does not have harmful levels of toxic chemicals that can harm plants, fish and bugs. And it’s one of the tests we conduct during our monthly water quality monitoring events.

Coastkeeper has monitored San Diego’s waterbodies since 2000. We use the data collected by our volunteers to identify polluted waters and reduce sources of pollution. San Diego’s local government agencies have limited resources and they monitor infrequently, providing only a snapshot of water quality. Data collected by Coastkeeper volunteers increases the amount available so regulators can assess more comprehensive water resources data to make more effective decisions on how to reduce sources of pollution.

Coastkeeper staff and its crew of trained volunteers (we train more than 100 volunteers each year) currently collect and analyze water samples that are analyzed for basic chemistry, nutrients, bacteria, and toxicity from nine out of 11 watersheds in San Diego County on a monthly basis. To ensure that our data meets the highest quality standards possible, Coastkeeper follows a rigorous quality assurance and control plan and standard operating procedures that have been approved by our state regulatory agencies.

To our knowledge, we are the largest volunteer-based water quality monitoring program in the state. Through this program, we create community involvement and stewardship by educating the public on the importance of good water quality in our coastal and inland waters. It adds the scientific data component to Coastkeeper's work. We are tremendously grateful to the volunteers and partners who share our passion for keeping our waters clean and healthy.

MPA Watch

In 2012, San Diego's Marine Protected Area (MPA) network went into effect. To help assess the effectiveness and functions of our MPAs, the region will undergo a 5-year review in 2015, looking at ecological impacts and human use.

To collect a robust data source for human use of our protected areas, we are training up citizen scientists to conduct visual transects of our MPAs in San Diego County.

During training, all participants will learn how to take a transect during an MPA Watch assessment and receive the data sheets and information you need to participate. We are asking volunteers only to document human uses of our MPAs. Data collection is done following state-wide methods and protocols.

All information will be used in the future assessment of our MPAs in San Diego and helpful in understanding how human use has changed since their implementation.

The Secchi Dip-In

The Secchi Dip-In is a program of the North American Lake Management Society (NALMS). The purpose of the society is to foster the management and protection of lakes and reservoirs for today and tomorrow.

The Secchi Dip-In was created to enable volunteers to submit water clarity measurements to an online database and see how their data compare on a variety of scales- regional to international. The program has also been utilized for volunteers to begin monitoring efforts and to increase monitoring efforts within their communities.

The Dip-In is an ongoing experiment in using trained volunteers to gather data every year. Secchi Dip-In participants include trained monitoring volunteers and individuals who are interested in citizen science or enthusiastic about lakes. We encourage anyone interested in the health of their lake or watershed to get involved with the Secchi Dip-In.

Caribbean Lionfish Response Program

The Caribbean Lionfish Response Program (CLRP) was developed using a bilateral marine management strategy. This two-fold program approach includes Information and Education (I&E) and Lionfish Location and Removal. This Program has been running successfully since October 2009.
The goals of the CLRP are:

Educate local divers, fishermen, local schools, tourists and the general-public on the urgent Lionfish crisis and how each can contribute to help resolve this rapid growing invasive issue.

Safely and efficiently search and remove Lionfish across the USVI territory by placing trained divers in the water.


PhotosynQ is a platform allowing people to collaboratively solve difficult research questions, both at the locally and globally, using sensors which connect to your cell phone. The MultispeQ, our first sensor, measures important parameters of photosynthesis in plants and algae in a non-destructive way, quickly and inexpensively. These measurements provide a detailed picture of the health of the plant and are used for plant breeding, agricultural extension services, and plant scientists to improving plant efficiency and to identify novel photosynthetic pathways for energy and crop research.

Anyone can propose a project on the PhotosynQ website (www.photosynq.org), and anyone else can contribute data, ideas, analysis, and discussion to that project. There are researchers and citizen scientists around the world already running projects through PhotosynQ which you can contribute to. Once you join the platform, find an open project and contact the project lead to join, or design your own project!


The MyEnvironment mapping tools provides immediate access to a cross-section of environmental data for any geographical location in the U.S. Users of the official site can choose the location and environmental issue to examine.

Michigan Herp Atlas

The Michigan Herp Atlas began in 2004 with the goal of collecting observations of Michigan's amphibians and reptiles (herpetofauna) to better document their distribution and population changes. The data is to be used to best manage and conserve these important indicator species. The Herp Atlas project continues to grow in partners and collaborators demonstrating the effectiveness of this public-private partnership in helping conserve Michigan's herpetofauna. Contributing observations is now easier than ever with an updated online system and recently developed smart phone app.

Great Lakes Environmental Monitoring with Passive Samplers

Great Lakes Passive Sampling is a research project being conducted by the Lohmann Lab at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. Polyethylene passive samplers are essentially just pieces of plastic that can absorb hydrophobic contaminants from the air or water. To obtain data in many different areas, we depend on a network of volunteers to deploy, recover, and return these samplers to us.

Participating is simple: we can send samplers and other supplies necessary to set up the samplers. You record the date and location where you set up your sampler, and then leave it for 8 weeks. After 8 weeks, you take down the sampler and send it back to us, and we analyze it to see what's present in the air or water at your site.

By deploying polyethylene passive samplers in the water and air throughout the Lake Ontario and Lake Erie region, we can measure levels of persistent hydrophobic organic pollutants and analyze how the amounts of these chemicals change in different locations.

Kinsey Reporter

Kinsey Reporter is a global mobile survey platform to share, explore, and visualize anonymous data about sex.

Reports are submitted via smartphone, then explored at http://KinseyReporter.org or downloaded for off-line analysis.

The Kinsey Institute is exploring new ways to record and describe people's sexual experiences worldwide. We are also exploring new ways for people to be connected while protecting their privacy. We hope to reach people with all kinds of different ideas, beliefs, and experiences, and who might be willing to report on sexual behaviors, regardless of who is involved and where it is observed. By using Kinsey Reporter, you contribute to research on human sexual behavior. We ask you to act ethically, in the role of a good journalist or "citizen scientist." Submit what is true and accurate to the best of your ability.

Ideally, you would submit a report within 24 hours of the event you are reporting. The report can be about yourself or someone else. It is all anonymous. Kinsey Reporter includes surveys about various sexual activities and other intimate behaviors. These surveys cover sexual behaviors and events, sexual health issues, violence reports, public displays of affection, and other unique behaviors and experience. A 'survey' in this case is a report of information shared by many individuals on a topic of interest; it is not based on a random or representative sample of a community or population.

To ensure that reported data is strictly anonymous, you can only select among the provided tags when answering a question. However, contact us to suggest new surveys, questions, or tags.

To protect the anonymity of the reports even in sparsely populated areas, we aggregate reports over time. A report is not published until a sufficient number of reports have been received from the same location, and then all of those reports are recorded with a randomized timestamp. The more sparsely populated your area and/or the higher the geographic resolution you select, the longer the delay until your report appears. Therefore, in a sparsely populated area, you might want to select a lower resolution (e.g., state/region or country), to minimize the delay until your report becomes public.

Interactive visualizations of the data are available on the KinseyReporter.org website. The anonymous data we collect is also publicly available to the community via an Application Programming Interface (API), documented on the KinseyReporter.org website. We welcome your feedback.

Kinsey Reporter is a joint project of the world-famous Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction (KI) and the Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research (CNetS), both at Indiana University, Bloomington.

Atlas of Living Australia

The Atlas of Living Australia (Atlas) contains information on all the known species in Australia aggregated from a wide range of data providers: museums, herbaria, community groups, government departments, individuals and universities.

The Atlas was initiated by a group of 14 (now 17) organisations—our partners. The intent was to create a national database of all of Australia’s flora and fauna that could be accessed through a single, easy to use web site. Information on the site would be used to: improve our understanding of Australian biodiversity assist researchers to build a more detailed picture of Australia’s biodiversity assist environmental managers and policy makers develop more effective means of managing and sustaining Australia’s biodiversity.

You can participate by submitting a species record, joining an existing citizen science project, digitizing specimen labels, or starting your own citizen science endeavour!


Redmap (Range Extension Database and Mapping Project) is a citizen science project that invites members of the community to spot marine species that are outside of their usual range (or distribution) at various points around Australia. In collecting this information Redmap is generating a database of "out of range" sightings to assess which species are shifting their ranges and whether these shifts are consistent with warming waters. Redmap is hosted by the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (at the University of Tasmania in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.

Creek Freaks IWLA

Young people and adults collect information on stream health and post biological, chemical and physical data, photos and videos on an interactive map. This provides information to the public, to scientists and to conservation groups about local water quality. The Creek Freaks website includes data forms and activity guides to get started monitoring aquatic macroinvertebrates (stream insects and crustaceans), water chemistry, and to take visual observations and physical measurements of the stream and streamside vegetation.

Creek Freaks

Young people and adults collect information on stream health and post biological, chemical and physical data, photos and videos on an interactive map. This provides information to the public, to scientists and to conservation groups about local water quality. The Creek Freaks website includes data forms and activity guides to get started monitoring aquatic macroinvertebrates (stream insects and crustaceans), water chemistry, and to take visual observations and physical measurements of the stream and streamside vegetation.

Secchi App

Join seafarers in the global scientific experiment to study marine phytoplankton.

The phytoplankton underpin the marine food chain, so we need to know as much about them as possible. To participate in this project, you'll need to create a Secchi Disk, a tool that measures water turbidity, and use the free iPhone or Android ‘Secchi’ application.

You can take a Secchi Disk reading as often as you wish, every day, once a week, twice a month, or just occasionally. The data you collect will help scientists around the world to understand the phytoplankton.

Join in and help make this the world’s largest public marine biological study.

Tag A Tiny

Help the Large Pelagics Research Center improve scientific understanding of large pelagic species by catching, measuring and releasing juvenile bluefin with conventional “spaghetti”-ID tags.

The LPRC initiated its Tag A Tiny program in 2006 to study the annual migration paths and habitat use of juvenile Atlantic bluefin tuna.

As of 2012, 1258 recreational fishermen have helped LPRC to tag 1,645 bluefin, mostly juveniles from 1-4 years old, and some “medium” size fish, nearing 70 inches. All of the records are entered into the Billfish Foundation, NMFS, and ICCAT databases.

Vital Signs Maine

Where are the invasive species in Maine? Where aren’t they? Students, educators, citizens, and scientists are working together to find out.

As part of the Vital Signs community you can help steward the 32,000 miles of rivers and streams, 6,000 lakes and ponds, 5,000 miles of coastline, and 17 million acres of forest that are threatened by invasive species.

Together we are using scientific tools and habits of mind to look for native and invasive species in local habitats. We are sharing what we find and do not find online. We are contributing to a greater understanding of our shared environment.

Birding Aboard

Birding Aboard is a citizen science project organized by a volunteer group of long-distance birding sailors from around the world.

Our mission is to benefit seabird conservation by mobilizing the worldwide boating community to document ocean bird sightings, providing critical and seldom-recorded data on seabird abundance and distribution and on ocean migration routes.

Seabird knowledge is described as a frontier science. For some species, breeding or wintering areas remain unknown. This lack of knowledge is troubling given that BirdLife International estimates that one-third of seabirds are vulnerable or globally endangered due to threats from predators on nesting grounds, some fisheries, and plastics.

Individual boaters can help by reporting and documenting their sightings, which are archived with the eBird global database for use by scientists and conservationists.


ISeeChange is a socially networked weather Almanac for communities to collectively journal their climate experiences -- their observations, feelings, questions, and decisions --- against near-real time climate information.

This groundbreaking environmental reporting project combines citizen science, participatory public media, and cutting-edge satellite monitoring of environmental conditions.

Incubated in 2012 by producer Julia Kumari Drapkin at Colorado public station KVNF Mountain Grown Community Radio via AIR’s Localore project, iSeeChange is poised to expand in 2015. The team will work with media and scientific partners across the country to help audiences document environmental shifts in their backyards and connect to the bigger-picture climate changes transforming all of our lives and livelihoods.

Landmark Trees of India

Landmark Trees of India is a documentation, geography, and monitoring project with a focus on famous, remarkable, and heritage trees of India.
India is a country of superlative population, superlative biodiversity, and superlative environmental variety. These landmark trees can teach us about the landscapes, biodiversity, and people of India and the other nations of the world.

Librería Metagenómica del Ecuador

We are a group of scientists interested in exploring the potential applications of Ecuador’s unique biodiversity. As a first step, we are working to assemble and apply gene libraries collected from around the country.
You can join field trips in Ecuador to collect samples, work in a lab extracting and sequencing nucleic acids, or from home assembling and curating the electronic database.

Alaska River Watch Program

The River Watch Program is a voluntary asks pilots to report observed river ice conditions. Pilots are asked for reports on what they see along their normal route of flight and at their standard flight level. The purpose of the program is to assist the National Weather Service in providing accurate forecasts, warnings, and navigation information.

The National Weather Service is responsible for monitoring the ice breakup process to identify the potential for flooding due to ice jams. Alaskan rivers are also heavily used for transportation and knowledge of the status of the breakup process is useful for knowing when it is safe to use boats. Reports from observers can significantly increase the information available for these purposes.

Utah Water Watch

Utah Water Watch (UWW) is a water quality education and data collection program that seeks to increase awareness about the importance of water quality and promote stewardship of Utah’s aquatic resources.

UWW is a partnership between USU Water Quality Extension and the Utah Division of Water Quality that creates a way for the public to help in monitoring Utah’s lakes and streams. This is a free program for volunteers of all ages to monitor water quality once a month and report the data to water managers.

UWW is a two tier program. Tier 1 collects monthly data for education and base line purposes avaliable to the public and water managers. Tier 2 volunteers have a higher level of training to assist watershed coordinators collect credible data for assessment and monitoring of nonpoint source BMP projects.

Public Laboratory Balloon and Kite Mapping

This DIY mapping tool was the first developed by Public Lab, as part of the Grassroots Mapping project. Citizens use helium-filled balloons and digital cameras to generate high resolution “satellite” maps of areas such as in the Gulf Coast and Gowanus Canal. Although this tool has been in use for two years, components of the kit -- kite and balloon design, the rig, the camera -- continue to evolve as they are adopted in new places and adapted for new purposes. Besides the aerial mapping tools, Public Lab has also developed MapKnitter.org, an online tool for stitching aerial images into maps.

Public Laboratory Infrared Camera

Infrared photography can help in assessing plant health, and has been used on satellites and planes for agricultural and ecological assessment primarily by vineyards, large farms and large-scale (read: expensive) research projects. By creating and open-sourcing a low-cost near-infrared camera and working with wetlands advocates, farmers and environmental activists, the Public Lab community has begun to explore grassroots uses for this powerful analytic technique.


This smartphone app will help you explore habitats in your area and easily monitor wildlife populations by logging locations, photos, and responding to form questions all with the ease of your smartphone.

New England Basking Shark and Ocean Sunfish Project

The New England Coastal Wildlife Alliance (NECWA) invites beach walkers, boaters, fishermen, and divers to report their sightings and send in their photographs of basking sharks and ocean sunfish seen in our New England waters. Your data will help scientists monitor the local populations and better understand their migration patterns.

Sevengill Shark Identification Project

Update: 2-15-16: This database is now accepting photographic documentation from citizen science divers in South Africa-- see link below for more information:


A citizen science project which allows local divers photo document encounters with Sevengill sharks (Notorynchus cepedianus). The Sevengill Shark Sightings is a portal through which data is entered into the 'Wildbook' pattern recognition algorithm program.

Two pattern recognition algorithms are used to analyze the freckling patterns of each shark to determine which animals are returning each year.

Sevengill Shark Zero Data Project:

Didn’t see any Sevengill sharks on your dive today at La Jolla Cove (or False Bay, Cape Town)? No problem – – we still need your data!

‘Zero data’ is an important concept in long-term population studies in a fixed location with a single species: it’s also called ‘Presence/Absence’ data, meaning, we still want to know when you did *not* see a certain species in a given location, because it tells us a lot about why that particular species may or may not be present at certain times of the year.

The portal can accessed through our main website at http://sevengillsharksightings.org/.

And, it goes without saying, of course, if you *did* see some sevengill sharks, we certainly accept your photographs!


Or go directly to the Zero Data portal here:


Dragonfly Migration

We need your help to better understand dragonfly migration in North America. Although it spans three countries and has been documented since the 1880s, North American dragonfly migration is still poorly understood, and much remains to be learned about migratory cues, flight pathways, and the southern limits of overwintering grounds. Become part of an international network of citizen scientists and help monitor the spring and fall movements of the 5 main migratory species in North America, or report on these species throughout the year at a pond or wetland of your choice.

Adventure Scientists

Adventure Scientists is a unique initiative that helps create working reationships between scientists and adventure athletes to perform some truly unique research. Projects have been created all over the world and by groups of all kinds. The project even provides training for adventurers to become adventure-scientists.

The exciting benefits from these projects are numerous. Adventurers benefit by contributing to meaningful conservation research in areas that they visit. Additionally, scientists benefit from attaining inexpensive data that would have been previously hard or impossible to acquire. By no means, however are these adventure research projects limited to avid adventurers and professional scientists. Programs can be created anywhere for any age group. The goal of the project is to train and inspire the next generation of citizen scientists. In short, Adventure Scientists will help you create a project, recruit participants, and start an Adventure Science project near you!

Shad watch

Invasive species are a growing global concern because of their negative impacts on ecosystem functions and biodiversity. American shad are an andaromous (ascend rivers from the ocean to spawn) fish native to the Atlantic coast of North America that were deliberately introduced to the Sacramento River, CA, in 1871. The species has now spread to additional Pacific coastal rivers, and have dramatically increased in abundance in the some systems like the Columbia River.

Despite their prevelance in the Pacific northwest, basic information about the ecological effects of shad on native species remain unknown. A first step towards gaining an understanding of the species impacts requires knowing where they continue to be found.

Brook Trout Pond Survey Project

The Brook Trout Pond Survey Project is an effort to recruit volunteers to identify previously-undocumented wild brook trout populations in remote Maine ponds.

Maine brook trout are a special resource, and we need to know where they are before we can protect and manage them appropriately. The information collected by volunteer anglers will help inform future fisheries management decisions.

The Brook Trout Pond Survey Project is a collaborative effort by the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, Maine Council of Trout Unlimited, and Maine Audubon.

Illinois RiverWatch

The Illinois RiverWatch program engages citizen science volunteers in stewardship, education, and science for Illinois rivers. By becoming a trained volunteer, you can help collect a variety of quality ensured data and help contribute to statewide biological monitoring efforts. There are over 1,500 volunteers already monitoring streams in the state, but there are still more streams waiting to be claimed!

The training process involves attending a workshop that will help train volunteers in data collection and give you all the tools you need to monitor a stream of your choice. Soon, you will be a true citizen scientist and take part in collaborative efforts to keep Illinois’ streams clean and beautiful, sharing your data with other organizations, state agencies, and private interests.

The River Otter Ecology Project

River otters are ideal ambassadors for habitat preservation and restoration since they are charismatic carnivores reliant on healthy watersheds to thrive. The River Otter Ecology Project strives to build understanding and shed light on the conservation status and ecology of the North American river otter and the ecosystems they inhabit in the San Francisco Bay Area. Our work will serve to fill key gaps in the biology and ecology of these elusive but important aquatic carnivores while also directly engaging the public in their conservation through field-research, environmental education and strategic restoration partnerships.


Osprey Watch is a project of the Center for Conservation Biology for birdwatchers across the nation to help identify osprey nests and observe osprey behavior. The project hopes to acquire data across a large enough spatial scale in order to address three pressing issues associated with aquatic ecosystems: climate change, depletion of fish stocks, and environmental contaminants. Ospreys are great indicators of the health of aquatic ecosystems as they are sensitive to small changes in fish populations and water quality.

OspreyWatch has almost 500 Osprey Watchers monitoring almost 800 nests across North America, Europe, and Australia. Ospreys are incredible birds of prey and viewing them in the wild can be an amazing experience. And it may be easier than you think. Many osprey nest in man made objects and might even be right outside your backdoor. There are also many nests viewable online through web cameras.

So grab a camera, some binoculars, and locate a nest near you to add photos and descriptions to OspreyWatch’s interactive map. You can even find other nests in your area and help monitor and add updates to nesting activity.

PHOWN, Photos of Weaver Nests

The aim of PHOWN is to study variation of colony sizes of weavers, to map their breeding distribution, and to study these aspects in relation to climate change. This is achieved with the help of citizen scientists submitting photos of weaver nests or colonies.

Some feral populations exist throughout the world, and may be included in PHOWN. Species include the true weavers, bishops and widows, queleas, social weavers, sparrow weavers, buffalo weavers, malimbes and fodies. Sparrows are not included.

Weavers are often common species, and often found near human habitation. This makes them easy to study. Some species are of conservation concern and for some the nest has not even been described yet!


FieldScope is a community web-mapping tool that promotes student engagement as citizen scientists and involves them in learning through mapping. By combining easy data integration with powerful mapping visualization, FieldScope is on the cutting edge of community mapping.

The application is accessed online and is requires no installation. Students are able to upload field data photos and other media as well as collaborate with other students and scientists, and perform analysis on existing data. There are many rich projects to choose from, including mapping water quality in the Chesapeake Bay, investigating watershed dynamics, and mapping rivers and streams in the National Parks.

With students able to contribute and interact alongside scientists, meaningful science is sure to happen!


Spy on nature, and contribute to science. Share photos and observations through SciSpy and you're contributing to research initiatives that rely on amateur participation. Created by Science Channel (Discovery), SciSpy enlists paticipants to document the natural world of their backyards, parks, cities, and towns. Photos and observation data are tagged and stamped with date, time and location information and will hopefully provide helpful information to track migrations, changes in the natural environment, seasonal trends and more.


THE BROAD PICTURE: The aim of MammalMAP is to update the distribution records of all African mammal species. Through collaborations with professional scientists, conservation organisations, wildlife authorities and citizen scientists across Africa, we consolidate all reliable and identifiable evidence (camera trap records, photographs) of current mammal locations into an open-access digital database. The database software automatically generates online distribution maps of all recorded species which are instantly visible and searchable. The information consolidated within MammalMAP will not only yield crucial information for species conservation policies and landscape conservation policies, but provides an excellent platform for educating the public about African mammals and their conservation challenges.

WHY MAMMALMAP IS NECESSARY: In Africa, our knowledge of mammal distribution patterns is based largely on historical records. However, the last three centuries have seen extensive human-modification of African landscapes with the associated conversion, compression and fragmentation of natural land. With further land development presenting a likely reality for the future, the effectiveness of mammal conservation efforts depends on ecological records being updated so that they accurately reflect mammal distribution patterns in the 21st Century. With MammalMAP we plan to conduct these ecological updates over the coming years, by mapping the current distribution of mammal species (including marine mammals and small mammals) across Africa.

HOW MAMMALMAP CONTRIBUTES TO CONSERVATION: The conservation benefits of this research are multiple. First, the comparison of these updated distribution records with both historical and future records will enable the detection of species’ distribution changes in response to human-related and climate-related habitat changes. These change detections will assist the guidance of continent-wide conservation policies and decision making processes. Second, the research will promote and facilitate interdisciplinary and international collaboration amongst scientists and conservation practitioners, with potential benefits to the advancement of conservation science. Finally, both the project input stage (data collection) and output stage (data dissemination) will offer interactive, dynamic and widely applicable education tools suitable for both formal and informal education sectors.

THE WHERE AND THE HOW OF MAMMALMAP: The area of interest for MammalMAP is the whole of Africa. To achieve this we collaborate with scientists, conservation organisations, wildlife authorities and citizen scientists across the continent. Our methods involve consolidating evidence of mammal occurrence in a given location (camera trap records, photographs and other reliable records) into a digital database hosted by the Animal Demography Unit (ADU) at the University of Cape Town. In time, we will use the records in the database to generate distribution maps for all recorded species, in the same way that the ADU has done for birds, reptiles, frogs and butterflies.

Trumpeter Swan Watch

By 1900, Trumpeter Swans were extirpated from their nesting and wintering areas in Central and Eastern North America. Their historic migrations to southerly wintering sites were totally destroyed. In recent decades wild nesting populations of Trumpeters have successfully recovered or have been restored. Many swans migrate to separate wintering areas, but others winter near their northern breeding areas. An unknown number are pioneering southward where they are beginning to establish use of more southerly wintering sites.

Little is known regarding the numbers and groupings of southward migrants east of the Rocky Mountains, the location and characteristics of the sites they are pioneering, the duration of use, or problems they may be encountering. By providing information through Trumpeter Watch, observers can help document the changing distribution of migrating and wintering Trumpeter Swans and help identify potential new southerly migration and wintering sites.

Caspian Tern Research

Caspian Tern is the world's largest tern and it also among the most naturally occurring cosmopolitan species of on the planet. We are interested in using crowd sourced photos and observational records of Caspian Terns in order to explore questions about their patterns of movement and distribution. All images and records are of interest, but we are especially interested photos of Caspian Terns that are carrying fish in their bill or photos of Caspian Terns in the company of other animal species. We especially prize photos or records of resighting Caspian Terns marked with bands, rings, or other types of field-readable tags.


WeSolver was created to define and address the most important problems that face human beings. It was made for everyone, a gift to the solvers in the world and anyone can help in any way they are willing to.

There will be many ways to participate in the site itself from creating, reading, promoting, linking, sharing and policing content. WeSolver will be open and transparent to everyone while respecting any individuals wish to remain anonymous should they so choose. Hopefully people will find new connections and relationships between seemingly different problems and solutions inspiring experimentation and innovative approaches.

How can we possibly solve the many problems that face us as a species without using every available asset to do so? How can we leave this work in the hands of experts or governments or any other organization to solve on their own? It would be foolish to ignore the potential solutions which come when everyone is invited to the table. Our common future depends on it.

Reef Watch

Reef Watch provides free training to community volunteers to monitor temperate marine environments using non-destructive, internationally recognised techniques.

Volunteers generate valuable scientific data that informs adaptive management for conservation of the marine environment.

Reef Watch engages and empowers the community through education, which raises awareness about the marine environment and fosters a sense of stewardship that is vital to the long-term health of marine environments.


If you are a SCUBA diver, we ask that you send us data logged by your dive computer, so we can put it to scientific use! Millions of divers dive all around the world everyday, with state-of-the-art dive computers that log temperature as a function of depth. As a citizen scientist scuba diver, you can help put this information to the use of oceanographers and marine scientists. Send us your dive site location & an export of your dive computer log; or just write up in an email the information you record in your logbook (like surface temperature, bottom temperature, date, time, location, dive computer brand)!

The goal of this project is to channel temperature & location data from divers to scientists. The data collected will be processed by graduate students and will be made available online on our website for anyone to download.

New York Horseshoe Crab Monitoring Network

The New York Horseshoe Crab Monitoring Network encourage participants to get involved with the annual horseshoe crab monitoring program on various reference beaches throughout New York’s Marine District. Participants assist with the collection of scientific data that is used to assess the status of horseshoe crabs in NY State, and will help determine the management and conservation of this important species throughout the region.

This data will be used by the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation to assess the status of horseshoe crabs in New York’s Marine District, and to assist with the regional management and conservation of this species through the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission.

If you participate in this educational survey you will be helping to collect data on horseshoe crab spawning abundance, size, sex and tag returns around full and new moon evenings from May to July.

Cornell University Cooperative Extension’s Marine Program is working with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation to develop and organize this project.

Wanted: Lionfish

Bonaire National Marine Park needs your help to control the invasion of Lionfish. Volunteers in the Netherlands Antilles gently attach a marker on dead coral in the immediate vicinity of the Lionfish.

The Indo Pacific Lionfish Pterois volitans/miles is a predatory, venomous fish which has been introduced as an invasive species in the Atlantic Basin. This invasive carnivore can significantly reduce biodiversity of a local habitat and can drive important fish species to extinction, negatively affecting coral reef ecosystems.

WARNING: This project is potentially dangerous. Most of the fish's spines are venomous and can cause extreme pain!

STE - Scuba Tourism for the Environment

STE - Scuba Tourism for the Environment is aimed at obtaining information on the Red Sea marine biodiversity state, by collaborating with volunteer dive tourists.

In this way the research can provide the institutions with tools to implement conservation and preservation measures, and at the same time it contributes to the development of ecotourism in the area, providing the tourists with a discerning, active and useful way to increase their naturalistic awareness and recreational value of their holidays.


LiMPETS (Long-term Monitoring Program and Experiential Training for Students) is an environmental monitoring and education program for students, educators, and volunteer groups. This hands-on program was developed to monitor the ocean and coastal ecosystems of California’s National Marine Sanctuaries to increase awareness and stewardship of these important areas.

Two distinct monitoring programs make up the core of the LiMPETS network: the Rocky Intertidal Monitoring Program (grades 9-12) and the Sandy Beach Monitoring Program (grades 6-12). Both programs are designed to provide students with the opportunity to experience the scientific process firsthand. Through research-based monitoring and standardized protocols, students develop their problem solving skills, gain experience using tools and methods employed by field scientists, and learn to analyze data. The online data entry system allows our participants to archive their data electronically and to view and analyze their results over time.

Invaders of Texas

The Invaders of Texas Program is an innovative campaign whereby volunteer "citizen scientists" are trained to detect the arrival and dispersal of invasive species in their own local areas. That information is delivered into a statewide mapping database and to those who can do something about it. The premise is simple. The more trained eyes watching for invasive species, the better our chances of lessening or avoiding damage to our native landscape.

The Invaders of Texas Program supports the creation and perpetuation of a network of local citizen scientist teams who seek out and report outbreaks of selected environmentally and economically harmful invasive species. These teams, coordinated by the Wildflower Center contribute important data to local and national resource managers who will, in turn, coordinate appropriate responses to control the spread of unwanted invaders. The Invaders Program is designed to move the target audience beyond awareness to action on invasive species.

This is your chance to help slow down the spread of harmful invasive species and reduce their ecological and economic damage.


Invasive self-cloning crayfish are on their way to a stream or lake near you!

We need your help to monitor our waterways for the invasion of new species of crayfish. High on our priority list is Marmokrebs, a species that reproduces asexually – making it an extremely successful intruder in pristine ecosystems. Let’s make sure we know exactly where this and many other potentially invasive species are headed!

Take pictures of crayfish and tell us where and when you found it. The goal of this project is to help monitor waters for introduction of new and potentially invasive species of crayfish.

Invasive crayfish have had devastating effects in many freshwater ecosystems across the world, often driving local fish and invertebrate species to extinction. With your help, we can make sure to prevent this from happening here! Thanks in advance for helping us in this important project!

Changing Currents

EcoSpark's Changing Currents program introduces grade 8-12 students from across the Greater Toronto Area (Toronto, Peel, Durham, and York school boards) to their area's watersheds. Students get outside, put on hip waders, explore a local river stream, and learn about its importance and quality.

By participating in the program students will:

Use benthic macro-invertebrate bio-monitoring to examine the health of their local river or stream (it's easy!),
Contribute to a GTA-wide study of watersheds, and
Have the chance to take action around what they discover

Mitten CrabWATCH

The Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, working with many partner organizations, has established Mitten Crab Watch as a public reporting and information network to track the distribution, abundance, and status of this invasive species for the US Atlantic and Gulf coasts.

Boise Watershed Watch

Get a snapshot of the health of the Boise River watershed by monitoring water quality! Citizen groups, schools, families, and individuals are invited to participate in this fun event which takes place at numerous sites along the Boise River and tributaries from Lucky Peak to Star. No experience necessary! A knowledgeable trainer will meet you at your assigned location to assist with monitoring.

Mississippi River Nutrient Survey

This proposed nutrient survey of the Mississippi River watershed seeks to glean a better understanding of the distribution of inorganic nutrient sources into the Mississippi River.

By conducting this study, we seek to identify 'hot spots' within which to target follow-up research and engineering efforts aimed at decreasing the load of nutrients introduced into this river - and in so doing, successfully mitigate their consequent effect upon the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem.

The Wildlife Health Event Reporter

Wildlife Health Event Reporter (WHER) is publicly available to anyone to use to report their sightings of sick or dead wildlife.

Individual reports viewed together can lead to the detection and containment of wildlife disease outbreaks that may pose a health risk to people, domestic animals and other wildlife. WHER hopes to harness the power of the many eyes of the public to better detect wildlife disease phenomenon.

Additionally, WHER was developed by the Wildlife Data Integration Network (WDIN), a program of the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Master Watershed Steward

The Master Watershed Steward program trains citizens across the state of Arizona to serve as volunteers in the protection, restoration, monitoring, and conservation of their water and watersheds.

We all live in a watershed, also known as a drainage basin or catchment. Each watershed is defined by an area of land that drains water downhill into a common water body. The health of watersheds is especially impacted as our growing population, and thus our demand for natural resources, increases. Learning to look past political boundaries and view land as divided by natural boundaries helps us better manage resources as a complete, more sustainable system.

As a Master Watershed Steward you can help to improve the health of your watershed. The project's informative, research-based training will give you the knowledge to make better, more informed decisions related to your own land, community and watershed. Master Watershed Stewards are highly trained volunteers working closely with the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension and the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality. Stewards may come from a variety of backgrounds, but all have a passion for our environment! To become certified, Master Watershed Stewards participate in over 40 hours of course and field work to learn the basics of watershed science.

You work with community organizations including watershed partnerships and various state agencies to implement projects throughout Arizona to monitor, maintain and restore the health of our watersheds. Ongoing volunteer projects include: photopoint monitoring in the Tonto National Forest and Saguaro National Park, riparian assessments along urban and preserved corridors, outreach at Arizona Project WET Water Festivals, free private well testing and collaboration with NEMO to develop Watershed Based Plans.

The Master Watershed Steward Program is a partnership of the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension and the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality. Funding provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Clean Water Act and the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality's Water Quality Division.

FrogWatch USA™

FrogWatch USA Chapters are overseen by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums and are hosted and managed by zoos, aquariums, and like-minded organizations.

At training sessions hosted by a local chapter, volunteers learn to identify local frog and toad species by their calls during the breeding season and how to report their findings accurately. By mastering these skills, volunteers gain increased experience and control over asking and answering scientific questions which, in turn, augments science literacy, facilitates conservation action and stewardship, and increases knowledge of amphibians.

University of Florida Cuban Treefrog Citizen Science Project

Cuban Treefrogs are not native to Florida, but have become invasive throughout the peninsula and are causing the decline of native frogs--especially in urbanized areas. However, many people report that when they start to manage Cuban Treefrogs around their homes, they begin to see native species return. Participants in this project capture and remove invasive treefrogs around their homes, collect and submit data on these frogs, and monitor for native treefrogs.

North Carolina Sea Turtle Project

The North Carolina Sea Turtle Project trains volunteers to monitor sea turtle activity along the entire coast of North Carolina.

There are a number of ways that your citizen science efforts can help protect sea turtles in North Carolina. Volunteers are needed to:

- walk small sections of beach each morning from May to August to look for turtle tracks and nests
- help guard the nests as they become ready to hatch each evening from July to October
- respond to strandings
- transport injured turtles to rehabilitation centers

All the data collected by the project are organized and disseminated to the state and federal agencies that use the information to make management decisions.

The North Carolina Sea Turtle Project, run by the state Wildlife Resources Commission's Division of Wildlife Management, is committed to monitoring North Carolina's sea turtle population. The project would not be possible without the help of hundreds of volunteers!


CitSci.org is a platform that supports a variety of citizen science programs using a centralized database to store and deliver science data, with a focus on community based monitoring programs. This platform allows program coordinators to create their own projects and datasheets, manage members, define measurements, create analyses, and even write feedback forms.

Seabird Ecological Assessment Network (SEANET)

Seabird Ecological Assessment Network (SEANET) volunteers conduct beached bird surveys along the east coast of the United States in order to identify and record information about bird mortality. Volunteers examine the spatial pattern of bird carcass deposition and how it varies across time.

The project brings together interdisciplinary researchers and citizen scientists in a long-term collaborative effort to identify and mitigate threats to marine birds.

These surveys provide baseline information about bird mortality and help to detect mass mortality events such as oil spills, algal toxins, and disease outbreaks. Marine birds can serve as indicators of ecosystem and human health; monitoring the threats they face and their mortality patterns can teach us about the health of the marine environment.

This project relies heavily on a working partnership between concerned citizens with an incomparable understanding of local ecosystems and natural phenomena, and scientists with the training and knowledge to synthesize and verify the data generated by local residents. Through this synergistic relationship, scientists exponentially increase the amount and range of data they can access, and residents come to see the larger patterns and trends of which their local ecosystem is a part.

Colorado River Watch Network

The Colorado River Watch Network supports volunteers who monitor the water quality at strategically located sites across the Colorado River watershed from West Texas to the coast. The network serves as an early warning system that alerts the Lower Colorado River Authority to potential water quality threats.

The network's mission is to encourage and support community-based environmental stewardship by providing citizens, teachers, and students with the information, resources, and training necessary to monitor and protect the waterways of the lower Colorado River watershed.

Volunteer monitors submit data for approximately 120 sites each year, with an average annual total of roughly 1,000 monitoring events reported.

New Jersey Audubon Shorebird Survey

New Jersey Audubon Shorebird Survey needs volunteers to count shorebirds and record information about their behavior in the New Jersey meadowlands.

The survey is aimed at assessing status and changes in populations of shorebirds. The data collected by volunteers will be incorporated into the national database of the Program for Regional and International Shorebird Monitoring, whose overall goal is to monitor trends in shorebird populations.

In addition, the information will help identify areas important to southbound shorebirds, and define shorebird management goals for New Jersey.

New Jersey residents: don't miss this chance to make a difference!

Audubon of Florida EagleWatch

Audubon of Florida's EagleWatch Program seeks volunteers to monitor active Bald Eagle nest sites and help identify potential threats to nesting success.

As a result of Florida’s rapidly changing environment, Bald Eagles currently nest successfully in urban areas. This increased exposure to human activity and the pressure that exposure can put on the eagle population prompted the EagleWatch Program.

EagleWatch seeks information about Bald Eagles, active nest locations, and possible disturbances or threats to nesting activities. The program is designed to educate volunteers in general eagle nesting biology, applicable laws, the identification of nest threats, monitoring techniques, and the verification of previously unrecorded active eagle nests.

This data is compiled and used to assist Florida's Mid-winter Annual Bald Eagle Nesting Survey by documenting both urban and rural eagle nesting activity, successes, and failures. The U.S Fish and Wildlife Service also utilizes EagleWatch data to enhance their conservation and law enforcement efforts.

Sound Around You Project

I am building a sound map of the world as part of a study into how sounds in our everyday environment make us feel. We need your help!

We’re asking people across the world to use our new iOS app on their iPhones or iPads (or any recorder) to record short clips from different sound environments, or "soundscapes"--anything from the inside of a family car to a busy shopping centre. Then we ask volunteers to comment on their soundscapes and upload them to our virtual soundscape map.

Recordings and responses will be analyzed by acoustic scientists, and significant findings will be reported on this website.

Sound Around You aims to raise awareness of how our soundscape influences us, and could have far reaching implications for professions and social groups ranging from urban planners to house buyers.


Florida LAKEWATCH is a volunteer water-monitoring program that facilitates "hands-on" participation in the management of lakes, rivers, and coastal sites through monthly sampling activities. Participants work with researchers at the University of Florida to collect samples that, when analyzed, will contribute to the understanding of Florida’s water bodies.

All volunteers attend a two-hour training session on how to collect water samples and monitor lakes. As a trained LAKEWATCH volunteer, you will help develop a database of water chemistry for your particular lake, river, or coastal site. These data can then be used to establish trends and develop an overview of how your site fits into the overall picture of Florida water bodies.

Volunteers receive a free newsletter subscription and invitations to free Florida LAKEWATCH volunteer appreciation meetings. Don't miss out!

Project NOAH

Noah is a mobile phone app that allows nature lovers to document local wildlife and add their observations to a growing database for use by ongoing citizen-science projects.

Using the Noah mobile application, users take a photograph of an interesting organism, select the appropriate category, add descriptive tags, and click submit. The application captures the location details along with the submitted information and stores all of it in the species database for use by efforts such as Project Squirrel and the Lost Ladybug Project.

In addition, users can see what kinds of organisms are nearby by searching through a list or exploring a map of their area, all on a mobile phone.

Noah is all about discovering and documenting local wildlife. We work with research groups and organizations to help gather important data and we want you to help by logging recent spottings on your mobile phone. Missions can range from photographing specific frogs or flowers to tracking migrating birds or invasive species or logging the effects of the oil spill.

Bird Conservation Network Survey

The Bird Conservation Network Survey needs citizen scientists to record bird distribution and abundance information for birds in the Greater Chicago region.

Bird monitors can participate at different levels:

- If you have a special interest in a particular site, you can become a regular monitor at that site and keep a year-round watch on the birds that nest, winter, or migrate through that site.

- You may help track changes in nesting populations by conducting point count surveys during the breeding season.

- You may visit a site during the nesting season and record numbers and species of birds just as you would on a Christmas Count.

- If you do not have the time to become a regular site monitor, you can still contribute your sightings.

The Bird Conservation Network has created a set of standardized methods for studying the birds of the Chicago Wilderness region. These methods can serve a variety of research purposes while also allowing birders to participate at different levels of intensity. Participants commit to making five or more visits to the site each year with at least two of those visits coming during breeding season (June). Also, participants should be able to recognize Illinois birds by sight and sound. By general rule, a birder should have about at least three years of experience with field identification of birds in the Illinois area.

The goals of this study are to generate a general picture of bird distribution in the region, to collect data to assist land managers and conservation planners in decision making, and to create a database compatible with other types of habitat data being gathered in the region which can be used by researchers investigating specific ecosystem questions.

Wetland Bird Survey

The Wetland Bird Survey (WeBS) needs volunteer birdwatchers to monitor non-breeding waterbirds in the United Kingdom. The principal aims of the project are to measure population sizes, determine trends in numbers and distribution, and to identify important sites for waterbirds.

Counts are made at around 2,000 wetland sites, of all habitat types. Volunteers make monthly coordinated counts. The principal months of data collection are from September to March, though observations are increasingly submitting data throughout the year.

Volunteers use the so-called "look-see" methodology, whereby the observer, familiar with the species involved, surveys the whole of a predefined area. Data are widely used for a variety of purposes and are presented in the annual WeBS Report.

The Wetland Bird Survey is dependent upon the enthusiasm and dedication of the several thousand volunteer counters throughout the UK. New counters are always needed to cover new sites, particularly habitats such as rivers which are monitored less comprehensively, as well as to replace counters who retire.

Orca Project

Orca Project volunteers in Port Townsend, Washington document orca bones for an online bone atlas, assist in orca education with children's groups, take part in assembling a full-size skeleton for display, participate in the design of a new orca exhibit and conduct research on underwater sounds using a hydrophone.

The project’s goals are to improve public awareness of the challenges faced by killer whales--toxic contamination, underwater noise pollution, and diminishing food supplies in the Puget Sound--as well as develop an appreciation for the whales’ remarkable social bonds and communication abilities.

Funded by the Federal Institute of Museum and Library Services, other organizations, and matching funds, the Orca Project will focus on both the transient and resident killer whales seen in the Northwest United States.

The Orca Project will also offer public lectures, free science classes for Olympic Peninsula students, tours of articulated whale skeletons for school classes, hands-on activities for after-school groups, Bring Your Bones Day (a community event with resident experts helping identify and reveal the mysteries of bones), and focused outreach to the maritime and marine community of Port Townsend, Washington.

Jug Bay Macroinvertebrate Sampling

Maryland's Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary needs volunteers to collect, count, and identify macroinvertebrates (small animals without backbones) in its streams. The sanctuary is in southern Anne Arundel County, 20 miles east Washington, D.C., and 18 miles south of Annapolis, Maryland.

One indicator of good water quality is a diverse and abundant population of macroinvertebrates. A dip in oxygen levels or a plume of pesticide can make a stream inhospitable to more sensitive animals.

Benthic macroinvertebrates--ones that dwell on the bottom of streams--can reveal much about the health of their watery environment. Since these animals more or less stay put, they are reliable indicators of water quality at each sampling site.

If you like to hike and wade in shallow streams, this project is for you! Monitoring takes place several times a year, and each sampling takes about two hours in the field and another two hours of processing in the lab.

Yuba River Water Quality Monitoring

Volunteers are needed to help the South Yuba River Citizens League, based in Nevada City, California, collect monthly water quality data at 45 different sites in the Yuba Watershed.

We are the leading regional advocates for creating resilient human and natural communities throughout the greater Yuba River basin by restoring creeks and rivers, regenerating wild salmon populations, and inspiring and organizing people—from the Yuba’s source to the sea—to join in our movement for a more wild and scenic Yuba River.

We train participants to use pH and conductivity meters and to conduct dissolved oxygen titrations in the field in order to collect information on the health of their rivers and streams. We also offer volunteers the opportunity to be involved in other monitoring activities, including health assessments of meadows, sampling of benthic macroinvertebrate and algae, surveys of river vegetation, and temperature logging.

Coral Reef Monitoring Data Portal

The Coral Reef Monitoring Data Portal is a new tool designed to support, enhance, and widen the scope of existing monitoring efforts in Hawaii. The data portal was developed and is managed by the Coral Reef Alliance (CORAL). It was created in partnership with and in support of community-based monitoring programs coordinated by the State of Hawaii DLNR’s Division of Aquatic Resources, the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, Aquanimity Now, the Digital Bus, Project S.E.A.-Link, and other local organizations and agencies, through funding obtained from the Hawaii Tourism Authority (HTA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

According to CORAL’s Hawaii Field Manager Liz Foote, “We wanted to develop a 'one-stop-shop' for community based coral reef 
monitoring in Hawaii. This site was developed in support of current efforts such 
as the University of Hawaii Botany Department and Division of Aquatic Resources' herbivore grazing protocols, and the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National 
Marine Sanctuary's water quality monitoring program. This online data entry and 
reporting system will greatly expand the scope and impact of these monitoring 
efforts, and the associated resources provided on the site will empower and equip 
many more community members to get involved.”


Beach Environmental Assessment, Communication, Health (BEACH) volunteers monitor high-risk Washington state beaches for bacteria. Beaches are considered high-risk when they have a lot of recreational users and are located near potential bacteria sources.

Monitoring can indicate pollution from sewage treatment plant problems, boating waste, malfunctioning septic systems, animal waste, or other sources of fecal pollution. BEACH volunteers monitor for an indicator bacteria called "enterococci." The presence of this bacteria at elevated levels means there is a potential for disease-causing bacteria and viruses to also be present.

BEACH is intended to reduce the risk of disease for people who play in saltwater. The program strives to educate the public about the risks associated with polluted water and what each of us can do to reduce that risk.

State of the Oyster

State of the Oyster Study volunteers help monitor bacterial contamination levels in edible shellfish collected from privately owned Washington state beaches in Hood Canal and throughout Puget Sound

Volunteers collect oyster and clam samples from their beaches at specific times during summer months. Washington Sea Grant arranges for laboratory testing of these samples, which are analyzed for the presence of harmful bacteria or for bacterial indicators of fecal contamination. (Volunteers must cover the lab fees.) Washington Sea Grant then helps participants interpret their test results and, if needed, works closely with them to identify and remedy the sources of observed contamination.

Through the years, State of the Oyster has has helped waterfront residents on more than 300 Washington state beaches learn what makes for safer oysters and clams and how to minimize fecal contamination in their waters.


SoundCitizen is a community-based water sampling network in the Puget Sound area of Washington state. We’d love your help.

SoundCitizen focuses on scientific investigation and knowledge discovery of the chemical links between urban settings and aquatic systems. We study fun compounds (cooking spices) and serious ones (emerging pollutants).

We are staffed by undergraduate students at the University of Washington, whose individual research topics help define the overall scientific aims of the program.

SoundCitizen encourages involvement with citizen volunteers and school groups, who voluntarily collect water samples from aquatic systems, perform a series of simple chemical tests, and then mail samples to the lab to be analyzed for cooking spices and emerging pollutants. Our scientific findings illustrate strong seasonal links between household activities (cooking, cleaning etc.) and the subsequent release of chemical “fingerprints” of these activities in aquatic and marine environments.

Georgia Adopt-A-Stream

Georgia Adopt-A-Stream needs citizens to monitor and improve the state's streams, wetlands, lakes, and estuaries.

The project goals are to increase public awareness of Georgia's water pollution and water quality issues, provide citizens with the tools and training to evaluate and protect their local waterways, encourage partnerships between citizens and their local government, and collect baseline water quality data.

Georgia Adopt-A-Stream has teamed up with government and non-government groups to provide access to technical information and assistance for citizens interested in preserving and restoring the banks and vegetation along their waterways. This network will help local governments, educate citizens about the importance of protecting riparian corridors, and provide landowners with the information they need to reduce erosion, improve water quality, and provide wildlife habitat with native plantings.

Harbor Porpoise Monitoring Project

The Harbor Porpoise Monitoring Project needs volunteers for observations and surveys at locations near Anacortes, Whidbey Island, and San Juan Island, Washington.

The historic range of the harbor porpoise has diminished dramatically in the last 60 years. Surveys of the population are done infrequently and there is inadequate data on the current status of the population.

Participants will help in assessing the feasibility of using passive acoustic monitoring devices to track population status and trends of this species. This may include land-based animal observations and/or handling instruments from a boat.

Scenic Hudson: Volunteer Herring and Eel Monitoring

The Hudson River Estuary Program and Scenic Hudson are working with citizen scientists to monitor herring and American eel in Ulster County's Black Creek Preserve.

Herring volunteers will observe the creek to see if, where, and when spawning runs occur. Those interested in eels will use nets and trap devices to catch juvenile glass eels, which are counted, weighed, and released unharmed.

Data may help biologists discover why populations of these important fish are declining.

The Shark Trust: Great Eggcase Hunt

The Great Eggcase Hunt is a Shark Trust citizen science recording project, which encourages people to get out on the beach and look for mermaid's purses (the eggcases of sharks, skates and rays) and then record what they find!

An eggcase (or mermaid’s purse) is a tough leathery case that protects the embryo while developing. Each eggcase contains one embryo which will develop over several months into a miniature version of the adult. There are over ten species of skate and ray, and only a few species of shark in UK waters that reproduce by laying eggcases. Eggcases varies in shape, size and features - these differences allow us to identify which species they came from. Once the juvenile has emerged, the much lighter empty eggcases can wash ashore be found amongst the seaweed in the strandline. We’re also keen to hear about eggcases that are seen in-situ while snorkelling or diving!

In recent decades, several species of shark, skate and ray around the British coast have dramatically declined in numbers. The empty eggcases are an easily accessible source of information on the whereabouts of potential nursery grounds and will provide the Trust with a better understanding of species abundance and distribution.

Thanks to public recording, the Trust now has an extensive database of eggcase records, which continues to provide crucial information about the distribution of British sharks, skates and rays (elasmobranchs).

The Shark Trust is building upon the existing project, which represents one of the UK’s most popular marine volunteer recording programs, and encouraging more international records. The Trust is currently collaborating with the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) to establish the project in the USA, and will be developing identification resources for species found along the New York coastline.

The Great Eggcase Hunt ID guide is now also available at your fingertips as a smartphone app has been launched for Apple devices and is available in the app store now! This dedicated app offers tips on how to hunt, an encyclopedia of British egglaying sharks, skates and rays, full ID guide entries, a step-by-step identification tool, and a recording form with the capacity to upload photos and record the exact GPS location. An Android version is coming soon!

GSWA Stream Team

GSWA's Stream Team monitors the five streams in the Great Swamp watershed, a 55-square-mile region in New Jersey's Morris and Somerset Counties.

Monitoring includes both chemical and visual assessments. The primary goal of the chemical monitoring program is to measure the volume of water, nutrients, and sediments flowing into the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. The main purpose of the visual assessment program is to help gather data for the Watershed Association and the State on water bodies that are not currently being assessed by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. All of this data helps to generate a picture of the overall health of our streams and identify areas where where water quality improvements could be made.

The streams within the watershed are the Upper Passaic River, Black Brook, Great Brook, Loantaka Brook, and Primrose Brook, all of which flow into Great Swamp and exit as the Passaic River via Millington Gorge.

Cape Cod Osprey Project

The Cape Cod Osprey project seeks to map and track all of the Osprey nests on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Since 2008 we have mapped over 220 nest locations, many more than were thought to exist on the Cape. Using our network of volunteers we have collected productivity data (number of chicks fledged/pair) on up to 140 nests. We are looking for volunteers to help monitor nesting behavior of ospreys and help us map new nest locations.

Central Wisconsin Riverkeepers

Monitor the waters of six counties in Central Wisconsin: Fond du Lac, Green Lake, Marquette, Waushara, Waupaca, and Winnebago. We are a waders on, in-the-muck environmental group.

Performed monthly on local waters within these six counties, we test for dissolved oxygen, turbidity, temperature, and stream flow. At the beginning of summer we also perform a Biotic Index and habitat assessment. Information is entered into a state database for tracking purposes.


Have you seen a jellyfish on the beach? Report it to Jellywatch -- a global public database documenting ocean conditions. We are especially interested in jellyfish washing up, but we also track red tides, squid and mammal strandings, and other indicators of ocean health.

All the data and images that are submitted are freely and instantly available for bulk download, so students, teachers, and scientists can conduct their own research using information gathered from around the globe.

Contra Costa Volunteer Creek Monitoring

Volunteers wade through creeks in Contra Costa County (California), using the latest technology and scientific protocols to collect baseline data on our local watersheds. Our two primary programs are Bioassessment sampling and GPS Creek Surveys.

Bioassessment - Using aquatic insects as indicators of water quality, volunteers learn more about the health of their neighborhood creeks and identify potential problem areas. While water samples yield a detailed identification of the water at the time of sampling, the density and diversity of bugs in our creeks yield a watershed-level perspective of water quality and habitat viability over time.

GPS Creek Surveys - Using Global Positioning System (GPS) technology, volunteers map the physical attributes of the stream channel (substrate, canopy cover, bank characteristics, etc.), extent and type of native and invasive vegetation, and human influences (outfalls, dams, etc.).

Joining a data collection event is a fun way to explore parts of your urban environment most people never see, but they are more than just fun ... they’re science!

Volunteer Water Quality Monitoring Program

All Missourians rely on streams in one way or another and many of our streams could use a little help. They need teams of people who love clean water, good fishing and health habitat to take care of them, year after year. That's why the Missouri Department of Conservation, the Department of Natural Resources and the Conservation Federation of Missouri joined to develop the Stream Team Program in 1989.

Promoting citizen awareness and involvement, Stream Teams is a fun, hands-on program for people who want to learn about, care for and protect local waterways. If you are ready to tackle the fun of protecting Missouri's streams start a Stream Team.

Anyone can start a Stream Team:

Individuals and Families: If there is a stream in your community that you and your neighbors are concerned about, you can form a Stream Team to adopt it.

Schools and youth groups: Stream Team is a great way for schools, colleges and universities to teach students about stream ecology while restoring and protecting a local stream.

Community, church of service groups: What better way to serve your community than by adopting, cleaning up and maintaining the health and beauty of a neighborhood waterway?

REEF Volunteer Fish Survey Project

The Reef Volunteer Fish Survey Project allows volunteer SCUBA divers and snorkelers to collect and report information on marine fish populations. Keep track of the fish you see while scuba diving or snorkeling. Submit those to an online database.

REEF surveys can be done anywhere along coastal areas of North and Central America, Bahamas and Caribbean, tropical eastern Pacific islands, Hawaii, the South Pacific, Central Indo-Pacific, and Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean.

Nature's Notebook

Pay attention to the plants and animals in your yard, and you can contribute to scientific discovery! Observing life cycles of plants and animals with Nature's Notebook is easy and fun, and you will discover so much more about the plants and animals you see everyday.

Sign up to observe one or more species in your yard or another place that you frequent. Use the Nature's Notebook smartphone app to send your observations directly to the National Phenology Database, or fill out paper datasheets and submit them online.

Shermans Creek Watershed Monitoring Program

The Shermans Creek Watershed Monitoring Program calls on citizen scientists to conduct water quality sampling and to measure biological factors that indicate the health of the Pennsylvania creek and its response to pollution.

Volunteers measure nitrate, temperature, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, pH, and turbidity, and conduct regular bacteria monitoring and macroinvertebrate sampling at sites throughout the watershed. The data will be used to provide public education, target areas for restoration and protection projects, and help the county and municipalities with land development plans that protect Shermans Creek.

The Juvenile Lobster Monitoring Program

The Juvenile Lobster Monitoring Program is a community-based research program that aims to measure the health and productivity of lobster nursery habitats over space and time. The project measures the abundance and distribution of juvenile lobsters and uses marking and recapture techniques to investigate growth rates and survival.

Program scientists have developed a set of rigorous training tools to teach volunteers how to census lobsters at nursery grounds in the lower intertidal zone. The census data collected by volunteers are extremely valuable as indicators of lobster fishery health because the juvenile lobsters of today represent the catches of tomorrow.

Anyone with the time and inclination (and a good pair of boots!) can participate in this program. It's easy and it's fun. Involving volunteers of different age groups and backgrounds aids in community building and provides public access to scientific research and knowledge. This project can thereby help to bridge the gap between science and the public through hands-on training and accessible learning.

World Water Monitoring Challenge

World Water Monitoring Challenge is an international program that encourages citizen volunteers to monitor their local water bodies. An easy-to-use test kit enables everyone from children to adults to sample local water bodies for basic water quality parameters: temperature, acidity (pH), clarity (turbidity), and dissolved oxygen.

The results of current and past studies are shared with participating communities around the globe through the organization's online Data & Reports page.

The Lost Ladybug Project

Find and photograph ladybugs! Join us in finding out where all the ladybugs have gone, so we can try to prevent more native species from becoming so rare. NEW - Email us and check our website or Facebook page for new opportunities to help restore native ladybug species.

Across North America, ladybug species distribution is changing. Over the past twenty years, several native ladybugs that were once very common have become extremely rare. During this same time, ladybugs from other places have greatly increased both their numbers and range. Some ladybugs are simply found in new places.

This is happening very quickly and we don’t know how, or why, or what impact it will have on ladybug diversity or the role that ladybugs play in keeping plant-feeding insect populations low.

Free downloadable educational materials and activities. Ladybug song!

View 37,000+ ladybug photos submitted so far. See what species of ladybugs have been found near you!

The Lost Ladybug Project database of 37,000 plus ladybug (Coccinellid) photos and locations is located on our website and is open to the public for mapping, graphing, searching, downloading.

Christmas Bird Count

Known as the first and oldest Citizen Science project, at over 115 years, Audubon’s Christmas Bird Count is also one of the largest, with 70,000+ person-days of efforts and more than 64 million birds counted each year. The CBC has contributed greatly to the science of bird conservation with hundreds of publications, including many in important scientific journals. From December 14 through January 5 each year, tens of thousands of volunteers throughout the Americas take part in an adventure that has become a family tradition through the generations.

Count volunteers follow specified routes within a designated 15-mile diameter circle, counting every bird they see or hear all day, and submit data to each circle compiler. It’s not just a species tally—all birds are counted all day, giving an indication of the total number of birds in the circle that day. If observers live within a CBC circle, they may arrange in advance to count the birds at their feeders and submit those data to their compiler. All individual CBCs are conducted in the period from December 14 to January 5 (inclusive dates) each season, and each count is conducted in one calendar day (24-hour period).

Santa Fe National Forest Site Stewards

The Santa Fe National Forest Site Stewards are volunteers who monitor archaeological and historical sites for evidence of deterioration due to natural causes or vandalism. They also serve as spokespersons to the general public by fostering awareness of the importance of preserving these sites.

Site Stewards are selected in part for their commitment to preserving the cultural heritage of the Santa Fe National Forest through their actions as the "eyes" and "legs" of the Heritage Resources staff. Site Stewards are also committed to educating the public and supporting the efforts of others who share these goals. Other skills such as archaeological experience, photography, and leadership are also taken into consideration.


ReefBase gathers available knowledge about coral reefs into one information repository. It is intended to facilitate analysis and monitoring of coral reef health and the quality of life of reef-dependent people, and to support informed decisions about coral reef use and management.

A great part of the coral reef resources in the world are in danger of destruction due to over exploitation, degradation of habitat, and changes in global climate. Globally, the resulting loss of income from fisheries is estimated to be billions of dollars a year and affects many millions of people. With this in mind, ReefBase has the following goals:

- Improve sharing and use of data, information, and knowledge in support of research and management of coral reef resources.
- Be the first place where scientists, managers, other professionals, as well as the wider public go for relevant data, information, publications, literature, photos, and maps related to coral reefs.
- Provide free and easy access to data and information on the location, status, threats, monitoring, and management of coral reef resources in over 100 countries and territories.

Fish Watchers

FishBase is an information system with key data on the biology of all fishes. The information will be used to create up-to-date distribution maps to assist in monitoring trends in biodiversity.

Divers, anglers, aquarists, and researchers can create their personal or institutional databases of where and when they have seen, caught, or acquired a particular fish. Biodiversity managers can create national fish biodiversity databases to keep track of local regulations and uses. Anthropologists can create a database on local knowledge about fish.

Similar to an encyclopedia, FishBase offers different things for different people. Fishery managers, teachers and students, taxonomists, conservationists, policymakers, research scientists, funding agencies, zoologists and physiologists, ecologists, geneticists, and the fishing industry, anglers, and scholars will find more than 100,000 common names of fishes together with the language/culture in which they are used and comments on their etymology.


Earthdive is a global citizen science project that calls on recreational scuba divers and snorkelers to monitor the ocean for key indicator species.

When you participate in Earthdive, your observations are recorded in a special database known as the Global Dive Log and are accessible through a clever Google mapping interface. Over time, observations are aggregated to create a Global Snapshot of the state of the world’s oceans.

In addition to being an international research project, Earthdive is also an advocacy conduit for marine conservation. Each contributor's name is added to a petition demanding action from policymakers to help protect our oceans.

Earthdive is a revolutionary new concept in citizen science and a global research project for millions of recreational scuba divers who can help preserve the health and diversity of our oceans.

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