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On a hike

Western Monarch Thanksgiving Count

The Western Monarch Thanksgiving Count (WMTC) is a citizen-science project designed to census the size of overwintering monarch colonies. As the name implies, it is conducted over a three-week period around the (American) Thanksgiving holiday in November and December by a large number of volunteers. The project is currently coordinated by Mia Monroe, Candace Fallon, and Emma Pelton with the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation.

Winter Wild Turkey Flock Survey

Harsh winter conditions significantly affect young turkeys. New York State Department of Environmental Conservation seeks wildlife lovers in every county to help them observe and count young male and female turkeys (also known as Jakes and Jennies), from January through March.


In CrowdMag project, we explore whether digital magnetometers built in modern mobile smartphones can be used as scientific instruments. With CrowdMag mobile apps, phones all around the world send magnetometer data to us. At our server, we check quality of the magnetic data and make data available to the public as aggregate maps and charts. We have two long-term goals: 1) Create near-real-time models of Earth's time changing magnetic field by combining crowdsourced magnetic data with real-time solar wind data. 2) Map local magnetic noise sources (for e.g. power transformer and iron pipes) to improve accuracy of the magnetic navigation systems.

Biodiversity PEEK

The Biodiversity PEEK (Photography Engaging and Educating Kids) program is a citizen science program designed to actively engage local, disadvantaged, public school children with their local overlooked habitats and wildlife through site-adaptable, hands-on, outdoor exploration, digital photography, and the contribution of real scientific data on an online database. Biodiversity PEEK is inquiry-based and project based learning designed to meet national science standards.

Seeking All Southern California Stinkbugs!

Help create a portrait of California stinkbug diversity and distribution by submitting your observations. Get help using a field guide to some of the stink bug taxa found in Southern California available at Smartphone users can use iNaturalist apps, or use the Riverside NatureSpotter app (available free online for iPhone and Android devices); or upload data and image files directly to the project site. Hosted by the City of Riverside's Metropolitan Museum, verification of observations will be carried out by Museum staff, UC-Riverside Entomology personnel, plus other entomologists and iNaturalist users.

Most stink bugs are large, easy to photograph, and their egg masses are conspicuous. As observations accumulate, iNaturalist creates a checklist of observed species for the project. These observations may also provide early detection of the spread of introduced pest species, such as the Brown Marmorated Stinkbug (Halyomorpha halys).

Drought Risk and You (DRY)

The DRY Project takes a pioneering approach to better understand drought by bringing together a unique blend of science and stories in drought risk decision-making across seven river catchments in England, Scotland and Wales. Led by the University of the West England (UWE) the DRY project, is a partnership made up of seven other universities, and is funded by the UK Research Councils.

Drought is a normal part of all climates and is likely to become more frequent and more severe in the future. However, many questions about ecosystem responses to climate change and the joint impact of climate, land management, and human activities remain unanswered.

The DRY project aims to better understand these processes by exploring the impacts of drought and climate change on grasslands and trees in the Frome River Catchment, Don and Eden Catchments (Visit: for delineations of the catchment boundaries).

Get involved

We want to work with members of the general public, to take part in our grassland surveys and tree studies.

Programme activities

Grassland Surveys

Frome River Catchment

Volunteer by undertaking grassland surveys close to the University of West England, Frenchay Campus, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol, BS16 1QY. Volunteers can help between 1-3 days from Monday-Wednesday (10.30am-4.30pm) depending on your availability until December 2017.

Upper Don Catchment

Volunteers can help undertake grassland surveys close to our field sites in High Bradfield and Ingbirchworth Reservoir. For further information about volunteering in the Don Catchment please email Natasha or Sarah on or ring: 0117 32 87024

Eden Catchment

Volunteers can also help to undertake grassland surveys and phenology observations at sites located close to Foxton in Cupar and Craig Meads Meadow. For further information about volunteering in the Don Catchment please email Natasha or Sarah on or ring: 0117 32 87024.

Volunteers will work with university staff and in some case independently to carry out grassland surveys. Tasks include monitoring changes in grassland species, abundance of species, phenology of flowering grasses (the study of the timings of naturally re-occurring phenomena) and the number and species of pollinators and invertebrates. There will also be opportunities for volunteers to explore their own topics of interest.

Adopt and monitor a tree

We are looking for volunteers to adopt a tree or several trees in their local school, garden, street or park in urban and rural areas and to help us collect a range of measurements on that particular tree in 2015, 2016 and 2017. The aims of the project are to assess tree species responses to changes in rainfall and temperature in urban and rural environments across the river catchment.
The tree monitoring activities can take place at any time and for each tree we need to know: the location of the trees, the date sampled, tree species, trunk circumference, height, crown spread and crown depth.

We would also like to know additional information about the natural timing of life cycle events such as the flowering times of trees and how they change over the years. We are also interested in collecting information on temperature, relative humidity and rainfall in the environment where the tree measurements were taken. The tree survey manual and monitoring form can be downloaded online and the data inputted onto the DRY website by visiting (

Tree monitoring events

We will be hosting a number of tree monitoring events in winter 2015, spring 2016 and summer 2016 throughout the Frome River catchment that people can attend to learn more about trees in their local areas, undertake scientific experiments on trees and the impacts of a climate change on the environment. Check our website to keep updated on tree monitoring events in your area.

What will you gain?

This is an exciting opportunity to gain valuable experience on a large-scale scientific project, learn plant and tree identification skills, about grassland and tree ecology and more broadly about the impacts of drought and climate change on the environment. Volunteers will receive a certificate detailing the number of hours spent on the project and essential skills acquired, which are important for many ecological or conservation jobs.

Monarch SOS

Monarch SOS is a field guide created by Naturedigger, LLC in cooperation with the Monarch Joint Venture. It is the first monarch app developed by scientists which covers monarch identification in all life cycle stages, confusing look-alikes and numerous milkweed species (monarch's larval host plants), frequently encountered in North America.

This guide is great for everyone, but ideally should be used as a companion app for citizen scientists participating in monarch population and migration data collection programs. Veterans of monarch research and conservation of over twenty years have contributed their expertise and input to Monarch SOS to make it a useful tool for volunteers assisting in monarch conservation. With guidance from the Monarch Joint Venture and their citizen science partners, Monarch SOS will be a great tool for enhancing these programs and thus, the understanding of monarch butterflies through citizen science.

Cape Citizen Science

Cape Citizen Science is a project to engage the public in a survey of plant pathogens in the Fynbos of the Cape Floral Region in South Africa.


The PopClock is a citizen science project in which volunteers are helping University of Vermont and University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science scientists study how forest trees are responding to rapidly changing climatic conditions. PopClock volunteers are collecting ground-based observations of spring leaf emergence and fall color change of two poplar species—balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera) and quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides). They submit these observation to one of our partner organizations--National Phenology Network (NPN), Project Budburst, and Plant Watch. Scientists are using these observations to create maps of “green-up” and “green-down,” which they will combine with genetic information to identify areas where trees are most and least adapted to climate change. In fall 2015 and spring 2016, a small group of PopClock volunteers are also working with scientists to examine the use tiny remote sensors to measure forest phenology; this work includes an an all-expenses-paid trip to Vermont to learn about the sensors! PopClock is part of a larger research grant funded by National Science Fund. Please visit our website for more information; note our website includes a link for an application to join our special team of volunteer working with the remote sensors (due Sept 1 2015).


HerpMapper is a cooperative project, designed to gather and share information about reptile and amphibian observations across the planet. Using HerpMapper, you can create records of your herp observations and keep them all in one place. In turn, your data is made available to HerpMapper Partners – groups who use your recorded observations for research, conservation, and preservation purposes. Your observations can make valuable contributions on the behalf of amphibians and reptiles.

South Texas Wintering Birds

Contribute your observations to a database for the state of Texas. Whether you are on a large private ranch, small yard in the city, or public nature area -- if you go birding, we need your sightings. Help us better understand the richness, abundance and changes in bird life in Texas!

Public Laboratory Oil Testing Kit Beta Program

Public Lab has officially launched the new Oil Testing Kit Public Beta Program, and now we need your help to take our new Kit to the next level. This is an exciting opportunity to help improve our prototype DIY methods for classifying unknown petroleum samples by weight. Our eventual goal is for this kit to be usable to test and compare oil spill residues - that's where you come in!

Public Lab is offering the new 3.0 version of our Desktop Spectrometry Kit, plus a prototype version of the new Oil Testing Kit attachment, free of charge for 20 people who can commit to test and offer feedback on the kit.

In exchange for the free kits, Beta Program members will be required to:

- Post ‘unboxing’ and ‘finished assembly’ photos on Twitter.
- Post feedback on the kit and sample preparation methods in one or more research notes at
- Create and post a set of spectra from the samples sent with the kit (detailed information on how to do this is on our website)
- Share and discuss input and suggestions on ways to improve the kit on Public Lab’s “plots-spectrometry” mailing list
- Attend two meetups with other Beta Kit Participants online (to be announced soon)

Chesapeake Bay Parasite Project

An introduced parasite is affecting native mud crabs in Chesapeake Bay. The parasite Loxothylacus panopaei (Loxo for short) is a type of barnacle that is exceptionally modified to take over the nervous system of the crab and make the crab care for the parasite and the parasite's larvae! Loxo are native to the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean. They were first discovered in Chesapeake Bay in 1964. The parasite is now common in the Bay, but its abundance and spread vary greatly from year to year. Scientists in SERC's Marine Invasions Lab have been tracking to abundance of Loxo from sites around Chesapeake Bay since 2003.

This year, we plan to expand the project to include intensive sampling of the Rhode River. Because of the focus on the Rhode River, many of our sampling opportunities will take place on the SERC campus (August 14, 16, and 21). Volunteers may sign up for morning and/or afternoon sessions. Currently, we are planning on August 23 as a rain make-up day, meaning that we may not end up going out.

Orchid Observers

Photograph wild orchids and extract data from three centuries of Museum specimens to help us examine the impact climate change may be having on the UK’s orchids.

Fifty-six native species of orchid grow wild in the UK, flowering from April to September.

Recent research indicates that climate change is affecting the flowering time of the early spider orchid, Ophrys sphegodes. We want to find out if this is true for other wild orchids and whether all species are responding in the same way, starting with 29 species.

To gather data from across the UK, we need as many people as possible to photograph orchids this summer, and to upload the images, together with the data and location, to the Orchid Observers website:

Alongside this, we have around 15,000 orchid specimens in the Museum's British and Irish herbarium. Collected over three centuries, they can tell us about flowering times in the past. Extracting data from so many specimens is a huge task, so we need your help.

See more at:

Big Seaweed Search

Help us to determine what impact climate change and invasive species are having on the distribution of seaweeds in the UK.

The UK has 650 species of seaweed along its shores, which is around 7% of the world's species. Seaweeds play an important role in the functioning of marine habitats. At the bottom of the food chain they provide food and shelter for many organisms. They are also used in a number of man-made products, such as cosmetics and medicines. With such an important role to play, it's important for us to understand how climate change and invasive species might be affecting their distribution.

We would like you to look out for 12 different species of seaweed. When you find one we'd like you to take a couple of photographs and record some information about the site you have visited, such as where you are and whether the shore is rocky or sandy. We also want to know how many limpets you can find in 1 minute.

Anyone can take part and the survey is open all year round.

NASA's SMAP Satellite Mission

NASA recently launched the SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) satellite which is orbiting the globe every three days to measure soil moisture levels. This data will be used to improve weather forecasts, detail water/energy/carbon cycles, monitor droughts, predict floods, and assist crop productivity.

How accurate is the big data from the satellite? There's only one way to find out and it depends on you to report local data! SciStarter's citizen science community has been called on to help calibrate the accuracy of NASA's satellite mission and to learn more about your soil quality in the process.

Participants from every state will collect and analyze soil samples from September through June.
In this project, you will:

-register your location(s)
-receive alerts when the SMAP satellite is scheduled to fly over you
-scoop a handful of soil, a few times a month (when the satellite is flying over), weigh it, dry it for a day or two, and weigh it again. After some simple conversions, you'll send the data to NASA and be able to compare it to what NASA's SMAP satellite is reporting.

Sign up as an individual or team. One team in each state will receive equipment from NASA needed for this project including a heat lamp and graduated cylinder. SciStarter will sell and loan full kits including a heat lamp, graduated cylinder, and balance. A complete list of materials is available on the sign up form, here: .

Sign up to get trained!

Birds and Berries

We are seeking photographic observations of wild birds feeding on berries and other fruits. We prefer the bird in the act of consuming the fruit, but we also welcome the bird perched on or near the fruiting plant. The fruiting plants can be wild or cultivated, native or invasive. No feeders please. We prefer birds and plants within North America, especially California. If possible, please identify the bird or the plant or both (an additional identification can be included within the comments section). If multiple birds or plants are shown in the photograph, please specify which bird was eating which plant.

If you have no photographs to submit, please help us make others' submissions "Research Grade" by verifying identifications of the birds and plants in photographs.

Birds are around us every day. We encounter berry species in the fruits we buy, the plants in our yard, and when we're out in nature. We know there's a connection between them - many birds use berries as a food source, especially in the fall and winter months in North America and many of these plants rely on birds to disperse their seeds. Yet we do not know nearly enough about this relationship, particularly all of the species involved. Please help us collect this information!

National Moth Week 2015

National Moth Week celebrates the beauty, life cycles, and habitats of moths. “Moth-ers” of all ages and abilities are encouraged to learn about, observe, and document moths in their backyards, parks, and Jacob3neighborhoods. National Moth Week is being held, worldwide, during the last full week of July. National Moth Week offers everyone, everywhere a unique opportunity to become a Citizen Scientist and contribute scientific data about moths. Through partnerships with major online biological data depositories, National Moth Week participants can help map moth distribution and provide needed information on other life history aspects around the globe.
This year, National Moth Week will spotlight the Sphingidae family of moths found throughout the world commonly called hawk moths, sphinx moths and hornworms.


The CrowdHydrology mission is to create freely available data on stream stage in a simple and inexpensive way. We do this through the use of “crowd sourcing”, which means we gather information on stream stage (water levels) from anyone willing to send us a text message of the water levels at their local stream. These data are then available for anyone to then use from Universities to Elementary schools.

WSP Nature Finds (prototype)

World Science Festival 2015 culminates in Washington Square Park on Sunday, May 31. Washington Square Park (WSP) Eco Projects is collaborating with SciStarter to log the nature observations people make in the park on May 31. SciStarter has formally partnered with Discover Magazine and the Science Cheerleaders to help park visitors observe and share wildlife sightings with researchers. SciStarter was founded by Darlene Cavalier and is a platform to "find, join, and contribute to science through recreational activities and citizen science research projects."

Columbia Basin Water

We are collecting rain and snow samples to develop a water balance for the region based on the isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen in the water molecule. This is part of a larger project that is evaluating the past, present, and future of water resources in the Columbia Basin.
More information on the project can be found here: and here:

National Plant Monitoring Scheme

We are a habitat-based plant monitoring program that collects data to provide an annual assessment of plant abundance and diversity.

Our volunteers are assigned a random but convenient 1km area to monitor. Monitoring involves recording the plant species present in that plot of land.

What Do Birds Eat?

We (Douglas Tallamy's lab in the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware) are collecting photo contributions to an ongoing research project about avian diets-- in a nutshell, we are trying to figure out "what birds eat"!

If you have any photos of birds holding insects or other arthropods (spiders, etc.) in their bills, please consider submitting them on our site. Thanks to everyone who has already contributed!

Bugs In Our Backyard

Bugs In Our Backyard is an educational outreach and collaborative research program, providing project-based learning opportunities for K-12 students-- or anyone! The core activity for Bugs In Our Backyard takes advantage of the bugs in your own backyard, schoolyard or neighborhood. Students become citizen-scientists by surveying this diversity of insects and plants. How much insect diversity can you find? How does insect diversity vary over time? How does insect diversity vary across geographic and urban scales? These are some of the questions that can be asked. The survey targets are “true bugs” (what entomologists call Heteroptera) in the eastern US, but activities are designed to be open-ended. Everyone is welcome to get involved. Let’s expand what we know about about insect diversity across rural and urban landscapes!

BioB is part of an NSF-funded research program at Colby College, which will also provide students with insight into the practice of science. Our goal is to engage students with biology by making them citizen scientists. Get involved in ecological surveys of local bugs and their host plants! Produce data to contribute to a growing community database. Connect to the biological diversity in your own backyard!

A series of modular activities on different life science topics, such as biodiversity, growth and development, invasive species, genetics, insects, evolution, urban ecology and statistical analysis, are also being produced. These modules can be scaled to the needs of different classes and grade-levels or used over multiple grade-levels. For older students, survey data are available to be used in hypothesis-testing or exploratory analyses. Teachers are encouraged to modify the activities to their own needs and share success stories.

Truckee River Guide

Truckee River Guide is an interactive field guide to the plants and wildlife of the Truckee River, and a community wildlife mapping project.

Did you know that there is no complete species list for the Truckee River region of California and Nevada? The Truckee River is an important resource for the people that live in our community, and also an important resource for wildlife. With an ongoing drought and a changing climate, it is important to keep records of the species that live in our region, so that we can recognize and monitor change as it happens. You can help, by taking photos and submitting observations of plants and wildlife to Truckee River Guide.

The Truckee River Guide website is a free community resource intended to provide information to the public about the species that live in the Truckee River region of California and Nevada.

The Banished Beetle Project

The Banished Beetle Project is a citizen science initiative designed to increase awareness of burying beetles and their importance to the environment. Collecting data on burying beetle species is beneficial in order to determine the presence of the endangered American burying beetle (ABB). The American burying beetle only occurs in six states, including Oklahoma. There has never before been a chance to involve citizen scientists in this research effort until now! I have developed methods that enable teachers and young children to go outside and perform experiments that will add to larger pool of data that will significantly improve research efforts towards the conservation of this troubled species.

Mourning Warbler Song Mapper

The Mourning Warbler Song Mapper is a citizen science project that will map the songs of males during spring migration.

Connecticut Turtle Atlas

With approximately 58 percent of the world’s 335 turtle species threatened with extinction, turtles are the most endangered vertebrate group in the world. The Bruce Museum in Greenwich invites people to help turtles with the launch of the Connecticut Turtle Atlas Citizen Science project.

The unassuming turtle is seldom on the mind of most people, but they are a top priority for many conservation biologists. Turtles can play key ecological roles, serving as both predators and prey, contributing to the cycling of nutrients, and acting as seed dispersers.

Anyone interested in turtles or the outdoors can participate, including families, children, individuals, and classrooms. Participants in this new Bruce Museum Citizen Science initiative will collect data on all turtle species found throughout the state as they help scientists track turtle distribution and abundance. The project runs from April through November and will continue on an annual basis.

The state of Connecticut is home to twelve native turtle species that inhabit our woodlands, wetlands, and even the waters of Long Island Sound. The primary threats to turtles in the state include habitat loss and traffic-related highway mortality. Worldwide, turtles are negatively affected by threats such as collection for food and pets, disease, and changing climates, as well as habitat loss and fragmentation.

The goals of the Bruce Museum’s Connecticut Turtle Atlas include developing a public understanding of turtle ecology, promoting ways in which people can help turtles, and gathering research-quality data for use in publication and sharing with scientists.

Participants will learn about the wonderful diversity of turtles and their benefits to the ecology. No experience is required, all that is needed is access to a smart phone, camera, or a computer with the platform. Using the iNaturalist smartphone app, volunteer scientists can gather information that will be used to map distributions, identify important habitats, locate areas of nesting abundance, and detect roadways with high traffic-related mortality. In addition, the Bruce Museum will provide opportunities to assist with other aspects of turtle research and fieldwork.

Citizen Science harnesses the passion of the public to become amateur researchers, which helps not only with the gathering of important data on a wide scale but also with inspiring a new generation of future scientists. Citizen Science provides fun and interesting projects with real-world implications, breaks down barriers between society and scientist, opens discussion on STEM subjects and current events, shares research outcomes, and acknowledges participants’ important contributions.

Track a Tree

Are you are a regular visitor to your local woodland? If so, Track a Tree needs your help to record the spring timing (or phenology) of the UK’s woodland trees and the flowering plants that grow beneath them. Track a Tree aims to find out how much woodland species vary their seasonal timing, and how tree leafing affects the flowering of plants on the woodland floor.

We need volunteers to become citizen ecologists and record trees in their local woodland during spring, visiting on a weekly basis if possible. Track a Tree recorders are asked to monitor their chosen trees from before they budburst until they come into leaf, so the key recording period is usually between March and May. Track a Tree monitoring involves selecting a tree (or trees!) and revisiting it throughout spring to record its leafing stage and monitor the flowering plants beneath it.

As spring temperatures rise the leafing of trees is getting earlier and we are interested in testing whether woodland flowers can keep up with this change. With the help of citizen ecologists monitoring trees across the UK, we can see whether woodlands in warm parts of the country do as well as those from colder areas.

The Track a Tree project would suit anyone who regularly visits their local woodland; individuals, families, education groups… all are welcome to take part! Download the field guide from our website, get recording and share your observations to see how they compare with the rest of the UK.

UK Ladybird Survey

The Ladybird Survey aims to facilitate the recording of all the UK's ladybirds. Help us understand the ecology of native UK ladybirds by sending in your observations.

The invasion of the harlequin ladybird (Harmonia axyridis) threatens Britain's native populations. If you want to know more about this species in particular, or want to record sightings, please have a look at the Harlequin Ladybird Survey website.

$79 Dental Genome Kit

Why do some people get cavities and not others? What causes bad breath?
NO ONE KNOWS! Let's find out together!

We send you a collection KIT which includes everything you need to sample your dental microbiome! Instruction card, swab/interdental brush, and a collection tube. Sampling never looked so fun and easy!

Find out what bacteria you have and in what proportions. Also see how you compare to others in our data set!


We are all covered in trillions of bacteria on and in our bodies. These microbes are collectively called the microbiome. Like the rainforest, the healthy human microbiome is a balanced ecosystem. The correct balance of microbes keeps potential pathogens in check and regulates our immune system.

The dental microbiome has been linked to dental diseases such as periodontal disease, gingivitis, dental caries, and can even indicate more systemic ailments indirectly.


Cavities develop as a direct result of an imbalance in an otherwise-stable, oral microbiome (Struzycka, 2014).
Oral health is therefore associated with low diversity and richness within the microbial community. (Costalonga & Herzberg, 2014).
The oral microbiome has also been linked to many diseases including neurodegeneration in glaucoma (Astafurov et al., 2014), pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (Docktor et al., 2011), and Alzheimer's Disease through inflammatory processes related to periodontal disease (Kramer et al., 2007).
Some studies have been done, but they haven't been done with YOUR data yet!

(Please note, that purchasing a kit does not mean you must partake in the study. You may opt out of our data set at any time and still receive information about which microbes inhabit your chosen dental site.
Remember, uBiome is not a diagnostic test and the results should not be used to cure, treat, or diagnose any disease.)


TreeKIT works with volunteers to map street trees on dozens of blocks in East Harlem, NYC.

Southwest Monarch Study

The Southwest Monarch Study is a citizens science research project dedicated to learning about monarch butterflies in the Southwestern United States including Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, western Colorado and the California deserts. We provide education and conservation programs as well as training to help citizen scientists tag and monitor monarch butterflies and their immatures.

Identify the cloud

Share photos of unusual cloud types and formations, and help identify other people's cloud pictures.

FreshWater Watch

FreshWater Watch is Earthwatch's global research project which aims to involve at least 100,000 people in a program to research and learn about fresh water. The purpose of FreshWater Watch is to safeguard the quality and supply of fresh water, our planet's most precious and vital resource.

Participants have the opportunity to become citizen scientists and take an active role in scientific data gathering. As a citizen scientist, you will join a global community working together to promote freshwater sustainability.


nQuire-it is a platform to join, create, and share citizen science missions with people around the world. There are three kinds of missions: Spot-it allows people to spot and share things around us; Sense-it links to the Android Sense-it app (available on Google Play) to capture data from any mobile device sensor; Win-it missions set science challenges.

2015 Big Garden Milkweed Butterfly Count

Our gardens, backyards, parks, and meadows could be magical places filled with life if we could only slow down and pay attention for a while. This summer, you’re invited to go out to your garden or backyard, or else to a local park, forest, or meadow, to count milkweed butterflies for one hour. This project seeks to establish a tradition of bringing people together, relaying important information, and teaching the appreciation of nature that will continue for years to come.

Milkweed is a unique plant group that serves as a host to four butterflies species: the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), the queen butterfly (Danaus gilippus), the tropical milkweed butterfly (Lycorea cleobaea),and the soldier butterfly (Danaus eresimus). However, as milkweed slowly disappears, so do these butterflies. Currently, the monarch butterfly count is at a second-year low, indicating the threats that it and other similar species face.

By counting butterflies, we can survey their numbers in the United States and Canada, while having fun outside and learning more about butterflies and other wildlife. The event promises to be a fun, educational activity for children and families.

What is the 2015 Big Garden Milkweed Butterfly Count?

This year’s Big Garden Milkweed Butterfly Count is a fun, educational project with far-reaching implications. People will be invited to go outside for one hour during the weekend of July 25–26 to count the number of milkweed butterflies seen at one time. That way, we will avoid counting the same butterflies over and over again.

This project will have a specially designed website accessible via laptops, desktops, tablets, and smartphones.

The materials and website will include identifying information and illustrations that will help people to learn what milkweed butterfly species look like.

Participants can also use the website for counting that will have a 60-minute timer and where information can be entered right away. The website will also have a pop-up quiz with butterfly trivia questions and a list of games and fun activities for children.

Exploring Rising Tides in South Carolina

Your work will help the scientists uncover what climate change could mean for the plants, animals, and people that depend on these wetlands. By understanding these changes, the scientists can recommend the best way to protect this critical wetland forest and others like it around the world.


GeckoWatch is a citizen science project to map the fine-scale distribution of nonnative geckos in the United States. The primary interest is in mapping the rapidly increasing range of the Mediterranean House Gecko, Hemidactylus turcius. However, we are interested in all nonnative gecko species.

There are at least 18 species of nonnative geckos that have established populations in the United States. Although many of these species are known only in Florida, others are showing up with increasing regularity in multiple states. At the most extreme end is the Mediterranean House Gecko, which has established populations in at least 24 states in the U.S.

To undertake any research on these nonnative geckos, scientists must first understand where these geckos occur. As we learn about the rapidly changing distributions of these nonnative geckos, we can then ask:

1. What are the impacts of these nonnative geckos on our native species?

2. What makes some species successful colonizers?

3. What are the likely routes of colonization?

Observations from citizen scientists are essential to answering these questions and allowing us to learn about the biology of these nonnative geckos.

Rakali community survey

WWF-Australia and the WA Department of Parks and Wildlife have launched a citizen science survey to learn more about the distribution of rakali or Australian water rats in Western Australia. Very little is known about this species, where it is currently found and if it is stable or declining.The rakali is protected nationally and a Priority 4 species in WA.

This survey will obtain broadscale ecological data critical for the monitoring of the species that would be impossible to obtain without the help of the community.

The Rakali Community Survey is supported by Lotterywest and runs until 31 March 2015.

SCARAB (Scientific Collaboration for Accessible Research About Borers)

This is a citizen science project to help track the spread of invasive beetles, such as the polyphagus shothole borer (PSHB), to better understand factors leading to their spread and how to manage them.


The participants will sign up with the online Weather-it community, create and join weather missions (investigations), collaborate with weather experts or help non-experts, meet and discuss with the other community members, and they can also win prizes every month (top contributor, best photographer, top sharer, the most popular, the most voted win-it idea) .
Weather-it will run for 3 months (December-February) and the participants can register at any time and spend as much time as they want, whenever they want. The community and the platform will remain open after the study finishes.

River Instream Flow Stewards

The River Instream Flow Stewards program helps people to collect and use streamflow data in Massachusetts. RIFLS, as it is known, began in 2002 in response to concerns that many small streams were flow-stressed and that these impacts were not being documented. RIFLS staff work with partners to collect high quality streamflow data, to better understand the causes of unnatural streamflows, and to inform and support policy and actions that restore and maintain environmental flows.

IDAH2O Master Water Stewards

The IDAH2O Master Water Steward program participants attend an 8-hour workshop which combines classroom instruction and hands-on field work.

A certified Master Water Steward then can adopt a stream location to conduct regular monitoring of habitat, biological, chemical and physical assessments. Stewards upload all data collected to an interactive HIS website that is publicly available. Another focus of the program is to educate citizens on the science behind water quality and to help them understand streams, rivers and lakes systems. Youth involvement and K-12 participation (formal and after-school enrichment) is also strongly supported.

SharkPulse: submit your wild shark sighting photos!

SharkPulse is a smartphone application developed to involve citizen scientists in monitoring global shark populations (all species). The app can be downloaded from Apple Store and Google Play stores and allows user to report a shark sighting to the Shark Baseline Project.

SharkPulse’s vision is to build a global observer network made by scientists, professionals, and the general public where anybody can contribute in taking the pulse of global shark population.

Wissahickon Creek Watch Program

The WVWA is looking for a dedicated group of volunteers to help monitor the health of the Wissahickon Creek and its tributaries! The Citizen Scientists will be trained in water quality monitoring, primarily using visual assessments. Each volunteer is assigned a 1-­2 mile section on public land from the headwaters in North Wales to Fairmount Park. They will submit data for algae cover, animal observations, erosion, percent shade and a myriad of other indicators of stream health. Additionally, there will sub-­group of Creek Watchers known as the “Wading Team” that will take samples from the stream to determine the amount of nutrients, dissolved oxygen and water temperature. The WVWA held training sessions in July and monitoring will begin in August. The dates of the next training sessions are to be determined.

Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center

The U.S. Geological Survey's Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center (GCMRC) is the science provider for the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program. In this role, the research center provides the public and decision makers with relevant scientific information about the status and trends of natural, cultural, and recreational resources found in those portions of Grand Canyon National Park and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area affected by Glen Canyon Dam operations.

Stipend offered, approximately $15.00 per sample.

Citizen Science Amphibian Surveys at Mount Rainier National Park

Do you love amphibians, science and National Parks? Then the Citizen Science Program is for you. The Citizen Science program gives volunteers the opportunity to hike and explore some of Mount Rainier’s remote lakes and wetland habitats while gaining experience in surveying and science. This year’s Citizen Science program will be starting up around late July and will run until mid-September. We will be conducting amphibian surveys by locating, identifying, and surveying amphibians at breeding habitats with an emphasis on Western Toad (Anaxyrus boreas) sites. You do not need any previous experience and surveying equipment will be provided. If you need to stay overnight for a few days, free camping is available at Cougar Rock, White River, Ohanapecosh and Longmire campgrounds, however, there is no long term housing available. Surveys will be conducted based on volunteer availability. If you are interested or have any questions contact Laura Davis (Citizen Science Coordinator) at 360-569-6756. I look forward to hearing from you!

NAOCC's Orchid Reporting Project

North America is home to over 200 orchid species, and more than half are endangered or threatened somewhere in their native range. Because the majority of orchid research focuses on tropical orchids, many questions remain about temperate orchids, including basic information such as the details of their distributions.

By submitting photographs of wild orchids in North America, you can help researchers at the North American Orchid Conservation Center (NAOCC) learn information that will be vital for conserving these amazing plants. The data you submit will be used refine our knowledge about orchid distributions and to create fine-scale maps. This will help researchers and advocates better understand these orchids and work to protect them and their habitats.

Please obscure the locations of the orchids that you add to the project. Researchers will still be able to see the coordinates, but it will help to protect these fragile organisms.

If you can't identify the orchids you see, please visit the Go Orchids website for help.

Natural North Carolina

North Carolina is a beautiful place! With the huge variation in habitat types - from the mountains to the piedmont to the coastal plain - our state boasts a grand diversity of plants, animals, and fungi. Just look around. You likely encounter hundreds of species in your daily life, and many just beyond your front door!

Scientists at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences document the species in our great state and share the things we learn with you in our Museum exhibits. But, we can't be everywhere at once! We need YOUR help. By photographing and reporting the wildlife you see in your everyday life to Natural North Carolina, you can help us learn more about the species that call North Carolina home. You will also help us create an atlas of North Carolina's flora and fauna that you can use to identify the natural things you see in your local area. And all you have to do to help is snap a photo of something in nature and tell us where and when you took it. Easy!

So, get outside! Snap a few photos. Become a citizen scientist by submitting your photos to Natural North Carolina. Together, we can discover the wonders of North Carolina and learn more about our amazing state.

BC Cetacean Sightings Network

Twenty-three species of cetaceans and sea turtles have been recorded in the waters of British Columbia, Canada. Many of these populations are 'at-risk' and under-studied.
The B.C. Cetacean Sightings Network (BCCSN) collects sightings of cetaceans and sea turtles in the waters surrounding British Columbia, Canada using a network of citizen scientist observers. Our observer base is diverse, from interested citizens to lighthouse keepers, ecotourism professionals, mariners and recreational boaters. Anyone can participate and reports are made via an on-line form, toll free number, email, or supplied logbook. Look for our smartphone app, WhaleReport, available now for free download from the iTunes and Google Play stores.

Flying Ant Survey

Flying ants commonly appear on exactly the same day in different locations in the UK, but sometimes they come out over a period of days or even weeks. For the last two years we have been collecting records of flying ants, and this has revealed some surprising results. We are collecting our third year of data in 2014, so please let us know if you see flying ants.

Where is the Elaphrus Beetle?

Dan Duran, assistant professor in Drexel University’s Department of Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science, has just embarked on a search for the marsh ground beetle, which also goes by the Latin name for its genus, Elaphrus.

It is found along muddy stream banks in temperate regions like ours. It's an effective "indicator species" because it's adversely affected by run-off, like road salts and agricultural chemicals--that make it into a stream without being visible.

Cascades Carnivore Project

Cascade red fox on Mt Adams, WA

Search for Mystery Snails in N. Virginia

Mystery snails (Bellamya chinensis and Bellamya japonica) are two non-native snail species from the viviparidae family found within North America, including right here in the Potomac River watershed. Originally transported from Asia to North America, and sold as a food commodity or ornamental garden species over 100 years ago, the snails are now found across the Pacific Northwest, Great Lakes, New England, and Mid-Atlantic coasts.

Despite their widespread distribution in North American freshwater systems, researchers do not fully understand the morphology and possible impacts of B. chinensis and B. japonica on native freshwater systems such as the Potomac River.

Spot A Ladybug

Did you ever wonder how ladybugs got their spots?

I am working with a extremely interesting type of ladybug called the Harlequin ladybug, or Harmonia axyridis. This ladybug can vary in the way they look with respect to both color (they can be red, orange, yellow, and black) and spot number (they can have anywhere from zero spots to twenty-two spots).

This projects uses citizens to understand what these ladybugs look like across continents! Knowing how the Harlequin ladybug's look varies will help determine, genetically, how so much variation exists.

Pieris Project

The Pieris Project is a citizen science initiative designed to collect morphology and genetic data on a single species - the cabbage white butterfly (Pieris rapae) - from across its entire range, including your backyard! The small cabbage white butterfly is a great species to study how organisms adapt to new environments, because this butterfly has invaded many parts of the world within the last two centuries and is now found on nearly every continent. With your help, and only with your help, we can create the world's most comprehensive butterfly collection that will allow us to learn how the cabbage white has adapted to new environments as it expanded across the globe. This type of data will be critical to understanding how species may respond to environmental changes, such as climate change and habitat destruction.

Freshwater Mussel Volunteer Survey

Streams without mussels are at a serious disadvantage. Mussels provide valuable natural benefits, such as fortifying stream beds against erosion, and providing habitat and food for other plants and animals. Additionally, a single mussel can filter/clean up to 20 gallons of water per day. Imagine a healthy population of these filter-feeding powerhouses doing the work of a manmade water treatment plant!

The Partnership for the Delaware Estuary (PDE) needs your help locating streams with freshwater mussels, as well as those with no mussels at all. Volunteers play an important role in helping scientists monitor the health and locations of these extremely threatened animals (the most endangered animal in the US!) and identify streams in need of freshwater mussel restoration.

A.T. Seasons

The A.T. Seasons project brings together different parks and organizations that are actively monitoring seasonal changes in plants and animals (phenology) along the Appalachian Trail. Using Nature’s Notebook or our customized mobile app observers at all levels will be contributing to a comprehensive dataset with the goal of understanding the relationship between phenology and climate change along the Appalachian Trail. Get Involved today!

A.T. Seasons is your opportunity to help track the unfolding of important life cycle events each year along the iconic Appalachian Trail, linking your observations with others from Georgia to Maine. By observing and reporting seasonal changes of plants and animals you will help build the foundation to understanding and protecting the scenic & natural beauty of the trail corridor.

National Moth Week

Like moths to a flame? Did you know the US is home to over 11,000 moth species? Head outside during National Moth Week July 19-27, 2014 and find a few. Join existing teams or organize a count in your area! Photograph or record moths spotted in parks, environmental education centers, or fluttering around your porchlight.

Why study moths?
 Moths are among the most diverse and successful organisms on earth.
 Scientists estimate there are 150,000 to more than 500,000 moth species.
 Their colors and patterns are either dazzling or so cryptic that they define camouflage. Shapes and sizes span the gamut from as small as a pinhead to as large as an adult’s hand.
 Most moths are nocturnal, and need to be sought at night to be seen – others fly like butterflies during the day.
 Finding moths can be as simple as leaving a porch light on and checking it after dark. Serious moth aficionados use special lights and baits to attract them.

Lil' Miss Atrazine

Lil’ Miss Atrazine is a nationwide project using crowd sourcing methods to collect data on the presence of atrazine in the Mississippi River and its tributaries. In 2014, efforts will be put toward collecting data focused on a single day (June 7 in 2014), to develop a water quality “snapshot” of the Mississippi River watershed. This undergraduate-organized project provides easy-to-use test strips and guidance to citizen scientists who test the water for atrazine at river sites of their choosing.


PressureNet is a network of crowdsourced weather sensors. We automatically collect atmospheric pressure measurements using barometers in new Android devices. We're sharing this live data with scientists and researchers to improve weather forecasting. Soon we'll provide you with a weather forecast based on everyone's live, shared data!

We're going to make new weather models using the data that PressureNet automatically collects - these models should produce forecasts that are significantly more accurate than any other method! Since the data is collected using smartphones, we can gather way more data about the atmosphere than ever before.

Until we make forecasts, PressureNet shows you the raw data. The pressure data is displayed in graphs so that you can see both your own data as well as other regions' graphed over time. We've just added animations as well, so you can watch storms moving across a region. Furthermore, you can now report what the weather is where you are! Current weather conditions automatically refresh every twenty minutes to keep it accurate.

PressureNet has been featured on BBC World Service, Wired Science, and MIT Technology Review.

Clean Air Council Climate Tracker

The Clean Air Council Climate Tracker, developed in partnership with Code for Philly, is developing mobile sensors that can be mounted to city buses and bikes and report pollution and climate-related in real time to be shared as Open Data, for use by app developers and researchers.

With this data being openly available, app developers can empower citizens to avoid areas of high pollution, while also demonstrating the local effects of climate change. Researchers will be able to use an unprecedented level of data to study the effects of climate change on microclimate.

This data will be linked with OpenTreeMaps to demonstrate trees' impact on microclimate, as well as quantify their capacity to mitigate the effects of climate change in an urban setting.

L.A. Nature Map

The L.A. Nature Map hosted by the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles is an interactive map that displays local plant and wildlife observations.

Our Southern California region is a hotspot for urban biodiversity. With your help, we can show Angelenos and the world the diversity of nature all around us. You can contribute to this citizen science project by sending photos of plants and animals.

The L.A. Nature Map is created in collaboration with iNaturalist.

RASCals (Reptiles and Amphibians of Southern California)

RASCals is designed to improve our knowledge of native and non-native reptiles and amphibians in southern California. This region is home to 22.5 million people and has experienced dramatic urbanization and habitat modification. We need your help in documenting reptiles and amphibians throughout the region so that we can examine how various species have responded to these habitat changes. We are interested in native and non-native species and in observations in all types of habitats, from relatively pristine habitats to heavily modified, urban habitats, such as backyards, schoolyards, and urban parks. This project is conducted in collaboration with iNaturalist.

American Meteor Society - Meteor observing

Join the American Meteor Society community and contribute valuable and precise data relating to meteor shower and fireball observations. The AMS App allows witnesses of fireball meteors to log details about their observation using the mobile device. Sensors in the phone provide an accurate means to record the location of the observation as well as the azimuth and elevation values for the start and end points of the meteor. Using this data the AMS can accurately triangulate fireball meteors and plot their orbits to determine their celestial origins. The APP also provides a means to log observations from meteor showers. Simply start your observing session and then each time you see a meteor point to that place in the sky and swipe your finger on the screen in the direction the meteor traveled. Observation data is uploaded to the AMS website, available under your profile there and shared with the scientific community. The AMS App also provides a useful meteor shower calendar with star charts and moon conditions for all major and minor showers throughout the year.

Monitor Change: Fire Monitoring

Inspired by the USGS's Sam Droege (the man behind, we have a couple projects to turn park visitors into a remote sensor network! It's simple: Put up a sign asking people to set their cameras or phones in an angle bracket, take a photo, and post it with a hashtag to Twitter, Instagram, or Flickr. Then we harvest the photos and create timelapse views of change over time.

The Fairchild Challenge- Citizen Science


Birdeez is the easiest way to identify, collect and share bird sightings. The goal of this project is to educate you about the birds in your area while you contribute sightings that will be used for scientific understanding of bird migration, bird populations and climate change.

Currently Birdeez is available as an iPhone application at but soon we we will be online and on different phone platforms as well.

Every bird counts, so help us help them by collecting and sharing sightings.

Riverwatch: Water Quality Monitoring

RIVERKEEPER is a community-based organization dedicated to protecting the quality and quantity of water, while connecting people to water. We do this by cleaning up pollution from our waterways, restoring fish and wildlife habitat, and enhancing public access through greenways that expand parks and open space.

Riverkeeper is a member of the global WATERKEEPER ALLIANCE.

Riverwatch aims to provide surveillance monitoring to bolster baseline, local water quality data. This data will allow Riverkeeper to track the health of the waterways and be able to determine if restoration efforts are having a positive effect on water quality.

The Riverwatch program consists of concerned citizens trained to gather important water quality data in the Buffalo and Niagara River watersheds. Riverwatch has trained more than 100 volunteers to test the health of our waterways and address public health issues.

The following water quality parameters are tested:

Dissolved Oxygen,
pH Levels,
Conductivity, &

Riverwatch Captains go out once a month to over 50 sites throughout the field season.

We need your help! Please participate in this project that provides important information about our waterways, teaches the public how they can improve local water quality and gives volunteers a great opportunity to get outside and explore their rivers!

Snapshots in Time

Snapshots in Time is a long-term Citizen Science project aimed at mobilizing people to monitor the timing of Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) and Wood Frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) breeding throughout the respective ranges of these species. The purpose of this project is to use the data collected by on-the-ground citizens year after year to investigate possible effects of climate change on the timing of reproduction. Determining changes in the timing of breeding is very important, not just for these species, but also for others that use the same habitat. The results of this project could allow us to inform land managers and development planners of important areas for conservation and to look deeper into what other species in these ecosystems may be negatively affected by climate change, including some endangered species.

This is what is commonly referred to as a phenology project. Phenology is the study of periodic events in a plant or animal's life cycle, such as breeding or migration, and how the timing of these events are influenced by changes in the climate. Phenology allows us to understand variations in breeding times, even in limited geographic areas or specific sites, to develop a range-wide picture of any shifts in the timing of breeding.

Our objective is to collect your data long-term, so those that choose to participate in this project are encouraged to do so at the same sites year after year when possible.

This effort will focus on populations found throughout their range in North America. Both of these amphibians breed following heavy rains during winter to spring that flood woodland depressions and various other types of ephemeral (short-lived) ponds or wetlands that lack fish. These can include areas such as lime-sink ponds in karst regions or pools in the floodplains of streams.

Both species migrate en mass to breeding sites when weather conditions are appropriate from winter to spring depending on where you are within their range. Spotted Salamanders and Wood Frogs often share the same breeding sites and breed simultaneously—with breeding typically occurring earlier for southern populations (i.e., winter) compared to more northerly populations (late winter–early spring). During most of the year (when not at breeding sites), Spotted Salamanders live in burrows and/or under large logs in forest habitats. Wood Frogs are terrestrial and reside in leaf litter-carpeted forests away from water where their coloration affords them excellent camouflage.

We request that you submit field observations for either species, including any information related to: 1) Migrations of adults to/from breeding pond sites; 2) Observations of adults at breeding ponds; 3) Observations of egg masses; 4) Observations of larvae (Spotted Salamander) or of tadpoles (Wood Frog), and 5) Whether metamorphs were observed leaving the wetland. We are betting the wetlands you monitor become spots (no pun intended!) that you regularly visit well into the future (or continue to visit if you are already doing so…).

We have prepared datasheets for the information we desire from your observations and also have an identification sheet for each species. One data sheet should be used for each observation. For example, if you heard Wood Frogs on one date, that is one observation. If you see tadpoles the next time you visit the wetland, you would use a separate data sheet. We request a photograph for each observation so that we can confirm identification.

Encountering Wood Frogs and Spotted Salamanders (or evidence of these species) in the field is always exciting. Rolling a pond-side log to see the bright orange spots of a plump Spotted Salamander or hearing the duck-like chuckling sounds of a sizeable Wood Frog chorus are always memorable natural history experiences. With this study, you can make your observations count toward a scientific review of these species’ breeding patterns. This will benefit our knowledge of these animals and also provide you an opportunity to better acquaint yourself with the amphibian life in your own backyard while doing your part for conservation.

Consider participating in Snapshots in Time... it will be a great experience for all ages!

Joshua Tree National Park Association: Tracking the Effects of Climate Change

Climate change is one of the most difficult challenges land managers face in meeting their charge of sustaining biodiversity. From a modern human perspective we may be dealing with changes that are unprecedented; inherent in that uncharted future is the uncertainty of what will happen and how to prepare for it. Joshua Tree National Park and UC Riverside’s Center for Conservation Biology have begun a partnership aimed at reducing the unknowns and providing directions that we anticipate will guide management. The results of this project will feed directly into the Park’s resource management program, allowing them to both anticipate and measure changes in resources, and focus on reducing associated threats (invasive species, wildfire) to ensure the Park’s biodiversity has the best opportunity to persist in the face of climate change. This approach should also be seen both as a template for assessing climate change effects elsewhere in the desert region and as a resource for other desert land managers to assess management needs.
Joshua Tree National Park is noted for its rich biodiversity, a richness that is due in large degree to its position at the transition between the Colorado and Mojave Deserts and between those deserts and the more coastal and higher elevation San Bernardino Mountains. Our goal is to establish a series of monitoring stations along those transitions to measure whether climate shifts are changing the distribution of the Park’s flora and fauna. At each station we will be measuring many aspects of the Parks’ amazing biodiversity, including plants, insects, reptiles, mammals, and birds. Overtime (years up to decades) as we revisit the same plots we should then detect changes in species composition, and be able to identify whether those changes were due to climate shifts, shifts in wildfire frequency, increased weedy invasive species, or some combination of those factors. This is an ideal opportunity for the public to participate in a critically important endeavor, and at the same time learning from local scientists how to conduct field research and identify animals and plants from throughout the Park.


LepiMAP is the African butterfly and moth mapping project. LepiMAP is a joint project of the Animal Demography Unit and Lepidopterists' Society of Africa.

LepiMAP is a project aimed at determining the distribution and conservation priorities of butterflies and moths on the African continent. This project is building the 21st century distribution maps for Africa's butterflies and moths. LepiMAP is the continuation of SABCA (the Southern African Butterfly Conservation Assessment)

Anybody, anywhere in Africa can contribute to this awesome Citizen Science project! And we need YOUR help!!

Domeland Project

Screen capture of the Domeland realm from the NOAA weather cam atop Bald Mountain. View is looking south, and the closest granite domes are ~7 km (~4.3 mi) away.

Tangaroa Blue Foundation

Tangaroa Blue Foundation coordinates the Australian Marine Debris Initiative (AMDI), a network of volunteers, communities, schools, indigenous rangers, industry bodies and government organisations. The objectives of the AMDI are to remove marine debris from the environment, collect scientific data on what is removed, track to the source wherever possible, and engage stakeholders to find practical ways to stop those items from entering the environment in the first place.

Poo Power! Global Challenge

An invitation to 700 school-aged students from 25 different schools has been extended to the wider community to participate in a global competition. Students and classes will be pitched against each other to see who can identify the most and largest dog poo 'hotspots' in their local neighbourhood in the 'Poo Power! Global Challenge'.

Participating schools and students will use their GPS-enabled iPhone to download the free Poo Power! App from the App Store. Their task is to identify and map dog poo 'hotspots' in dog parks and public spaces from their neighbourhood over a 2 week period starting Monday 25 November 2013.

This eyebrow-raising initiative is a collaboration between dog poo entrepreneur Duncan Chew from Poo Power! and Mia Cobb from the Anthrozoology Research Group, recent winner of I'm a Scientist, Get Me Out of Here!

The collected information will be uploaded onto the Global Poo Map and provides a platform for students to discuss the scientific, social and environmental issues of dog waste. The students are then encouraged to write a letter to their local Government representative of their findings and recommendations.

"From our research only 3% of Australians see uncollected dog waste as an environmental concern," explains Duncan Chew. "When it rains, uncollected dog poo gets washed down drains, effecting water quality and habitat for native animals, as well as making rivers and creeks unpleasant for us to visit."

Mia Cobb echoes her enthusiasm for the initiative: "This is the great way to utilise the prize money from winning the IAS competition to raise awareness of new sustainable energy sources, environmental issues and responsible dog ownership while increasing student engagement in a citizen science activity."

The collated information has the poo-tential to identify sites for biogas-powered lights for parks as proposed by the Melbourne-based project, Poo Power!, currently in development. The methane that is released from the dog waste as it breaks down inside a 'biogas generator' can be used as a viable renewable energy source.

Competition prizes and giveaways are up for grabs for the most photo submissions received between 25th November and 9th December 2013.

Visit for full competition details.


SENSR is a tool to create, share and manage a citizen science project running on mobile devices to harness the power of citizen scientists.

SENSR provides a simple and easy way to obtain a custom data collection application running on mobile devices for your project.

If you are running a grassroots project for science, education, environmental conservation, community monitoring, or other reason, and are seeking ways to expand citizen scientists' participation in contributing data, SENR can help you create a mobile data collection tool for your project.

It is part of a research project at Carnegie Mellon University. Please try out if you are seeking ways to harness citizens' power of data collection.

IceWatch USA

As an IceWatch USA™ volunteer, you observe a water body in your area over the winter, and report on weather (snow, precipitation, ice cover, as well as wildlife activity. In as little as ten minutes, your observations help scientists analyze climate change and other environmental factors as well as how people can adapt to those changes. The IceWatching season begins every year on the day of fall and ends with your last ice coverage and/or last snowfall.

Pennsylvania Senior Environment Corps

The Senior Environment Corps (SEC) program engages volunteers mostly aged 55 and over. SEC volunteers are engaged in numerous activities from water quality monitoring, stream habitat assessment, storm-drain stenciling, environmental education, community gardening, wildlife surveying, marking abandoned oil and gas wells, and cleaning up parks and trails.

Since 1997, SEC volunteers in Pennsylvania have contributed over 2,000,000 hours, and their contribution is estimated to be of value to the state at over $3 million per year. Coming into 2014, SEC volunteers are active in 20 counties across Pennsylvania, and will soon be expanding into to more areas.

Watch the Wild

Watch the Wild™ needs your help. As a Watch the Wild™ volunteer, you observe and report the "wild" in your community, from trees and plants to lakes and streams to weather and wildlife activity. In as little as ten minutes, your observations help us to understand how our eco-systems are changing and helps us to adapt for the future. Your observations will be entered into a database and shared with interested scientists.

Citizen Science and The Race North: Population Ecology of Joshua Trees In an Era of Climate Change

Joshua trees are the most unique and recognizable plants of the Mojave Desert, but the most amazing thing about them may be their unusual pollination biology. Joshua trees are pollinated exclusively by two species of yucca moths – tiny grey moths that carry pollen to the trees in their mouths. The moths in turn reproduce by laying their eggs inside the Joshua tree flowers. Thus, both the moths and the Joshua trees are dependent on each other for reproduction. The future of this remarkable pollination system is threatened, however, by ongoing global climate change. Computer models predict that within the next 100 years Joshua trees may disappear from much of their current range, and emerging demographic data suggest that many populations in the southern Mojave Desert are already on their way to extinction. It is possible that the species may be able to survive by migrating to more temperate environments further north, but the trees’ capacity to escape warming climates will depend on how quickly they are able to colonize new habitats. A lonely valley in central Nevada, on the northern edge of the Joshua trees’ range, creates a ‘natural laboratory’ for studying how Joshua trees are responding to global climate change. At this site, eastern and western subspecies of Joshua trees, along with their respective yucca moth pollinators, meet and interbreed. By tracking spatial patterns in plant demography at this site, it may be possible to predict which Joshua trees -if any- will win the The Great Race North. During a four-day citizen science program, participants in this course will contribute to ongoing scientific research on the population ecology of this most famous Mojave Desert species.
Food, lodging, gas and supplies are available in Alamo which is approximately 30 miles from the research site. Primitive camping is also available much closer to the research site.

Field Photo Library

A photo taken in the field helps scientists and citizens to document changes in landscape, wildlife habitats, impacts of drought and flood and fire, and so on. This Geo-referenced Field Photo Library is a citizen science and community remote sensing data portal, where people can share, visualize and archive field photos in the world. Users can upload, edit, query and download geo-referenced field photos in the library. All photos are also linked with satellite image series images (MODIS), so that people can see the changes over time.

Comparing the Behaviors of Wild and Captive Native Songbirds

This project gives participants a chance to observe bird behaviors of wild birds and compare with behaviors of birds in captive settings. Participants of this project will observe native songbirds at bird feeders. They will fill out an ethogram provided with the observations they have made. The next time the participant visits a zoo or nature center with native captive birds, they will fill out another ethogram. The directions on how to use each ethogram will be provided with it.

This project was designed with educators in mind as an assignment to go along with zoo field trips. T

It was also designed based off the native songbird aviary of the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium. However, it can be adapted for other facilities with captive songbirds.

NatureWatch NZ

NatureWatch NZ is a citizen science project dedicated to exploring and discovery New Zealand's biodiversity. If you see an unusual or interesting bug, plant, or any other species, take a photo of it, upload the photo to NatureWatch NZ, and learn all about it. The NatureWatch NZ online community will ID your species for you. You can also help others to ID their photos, and you can join (or create!) projects about the species and places you're most interested in.

Together, we're documenting what's living in NZ so we can understand NZ nature better, and have fun while we do it.

(NatureWatch NZ is a website and online community of New Zealand nature watchers powered by the international system. Thanks iNat!)

Fern Watch

Help Track the Health of Redwood Forests

In 2008, League scientist Emily Burns discovered that the height of the most common plant in the coast redwood forest is affected by how much rain and fog fall in the woods. Western sword fern (Polystichum munitum) has tall fronds in wet redwood forests and much shorter fronds in dry forests. For this reason, sword fern is an important indicator of climate change and we are studying these ferns to detect drought in the redwood forest.

Just by monitoring the ferns on the forest floor, you can help League scientists learn how changes in climate may be affecting redwood forest habitats. You can help us track changes in these ferns in your local forest by either volunteering to collect data at one of our Fern Watch plots with a League scientist, setting up your own plot in your local forest, or by using our Redwood Watch app to document forest changes.

Amphibian Conservation and Education Project

The Amphibian Conservation Education Project aims to empower educators, students, and individuals to become involved in amphibian conservation efforts.

Through this project, participants will become field scientists by analyzing water quality and testing amphibians for the disease, Chytrid Fungus. Collected data is then used by local herpetologists (scientists who study reptiles and amphibians) to gain a better understanding of the species of amphibians being affected by the disease and where Chytrid is being spread.

Water Quality Monitoring

Dinoflagellates emitting bioluminescence make us happy.

It means San Diego’s water does not have harmful levels of toxic chemicals that can harm plants, fish and bugs. And it’s one of the tests we conduct during our monthly water quality monitoring events.

Coastkeeper has monitored San Diego’s waterbodies since 2000. We use the data collected by our volunteers to identify polluted waters and reduce sources of pollution. San Diego’s local government agencies have limited resources and they monitor infrequently, providing only a snapshot of water quality. Data collected by Coastkeeper volunteers increases the amount available so regulators can assess more comprehensive water resources data to make more effective decisions on how to reduce sources of pollution.

Coastkeeper staff and its crew of trained volunteers (we train more than 100 volunteers each year) currently collect and analyze water samples that are analyzed for basic chemistry, nutrients, bacteria, and toxicity from nine out of 11 watersheds in San Diego County on a monthly basis. To ensure that our data meets the highest quality standards possible, Coastkeeper follows a rigorous quality assurance and control plan and standard operating procedures that have been approved by our state regulatory agencies.

To our knowledge, we are the largest volunteer-based water quality monitoring program in the state. Through this program, we create community involvement and stewardship by educating the public on the importance of good water quality in our coastal and inland waters. It adds the scientific data component to Coastkeeper's work. We are tremendously grateful to the volunteers and partners who share our passion for keeping our waters clean and healthy.

MPA Watch

In 2012, San Diego's Marine Protected Area (MPA) network went into effect. To help assess the effectiveness and functions of our MPAs, the region will undergo a 5-year review in 2015, looking at ecological impacts and human use.

To collect a robust data source for human use of our protected areas, we are training up citizen scientists to conduct visual transects of our MPAs in San Diego County.

During training, all participants will learn how to take a transect during an MPA Watch assessment and receive the data sheets and information you need to participate. We are asking volunteers only to document human uses of our MPAs. Data collection is done following state-wide methods and protocols.

All information will be used in the future assessment of our MPAs in San Diego and helpful in understanding how human use has changed since their implementation.

The Secchi Dip-In

Tracking water quality is an important tool for measuring the effects of human activity on local waterways. An estimate of water quality is transparency. The more polluted the water, the less transparent.

In this project, participants take transparency readings of their local waterways using a secchi disk. This black and white disk is lowered into the water until it is no longer visible. The depth of the disk reflects water transparency.

Participants take just one reading per year, preferably during official "dip-in" period in early July. Active since 1994, the Secchi Dip-In project currently tracks over 2,000 waterbodies.

Photosynq-measure plant photosynthesis

We are building a low cost, handheld device which researchers, educators, and citizen scientists can use to build a global database of plant health.

The Photosynq platform starts with a Arduino compatible hand-held device which connects to your cell phone and measures fluorescence and absorbance of photosynthetic plants and algae in a non-destructive way.

These measurements provide a detailed picture of the health of the plant and are used for plant breeding, improving plant efficiency, and to identify novel photosynthetic pathways for energy and crop research. Existing field-portable fluorescence and absorbance devices cost thousands of dollars and are too expensive for plant breeders in the developing world. In addition, these devices use proprietary software and hardware, so each user experience and dataset is isolated.

We believe that phenomic plant data, like genomic data, is a critical global resource and must both be shared and agglomerated to be useful.

Therefore, the devices will automatically sync all user data to the cloud via users’ cell phones, where anyone can see and analyze it. In this way we can create a high quality, open set of photosynthesis data points taken from around the world. Most importantly, the data is taken using the same instrument and protocols, making it highly comparable and consistent.


BioTrails will use 'DNA barcoding' to validate the identifications of invertebrate animals collected by citizen scientists' in - and in the waters around - Acadia National Park, Maine, USA.

Though citizen science has the potential to dramatically expand the scientific workforce while providing opportunities for public engagement with science, there's a problem when it comes to projects where the fundamental task is identifying organisms in the field. These projects are limited by the amount of time and training required for participants to gain the skills they need to identify species, and usually rely heavily on taxonomic experts to both supervise participants while they identify collected specimens and also to validate and complete these identifications. This imposes a bottleneck that limits the scope and scale of such projects, no matter how many citizen scientists would wish to be involved.

DNA barcoding can help by extending taxonomic expertise to empower researchers and citizen scientists alike to identify organisms. DNA barcoding is a global movement to create libraries of short DNA sequences from known species, against which any specimen would be identifiable by its DNA alone.

BioTrails participants will collect and help identify invertebrate specimens in the context of eelgrass habitat restoration in Frenchman's Bay and climate change research in Acadia National Park. DNA barcoding will be used to accurately identify these specimens for downstream science applications.

Our vision for this project is to establish best practices so that the BioTrails model can be expanded to other national parks and long-distance trails, paving the way for engaging more citizen scientists in more places to understand, monitor and manage biodiversity in a rapidly changing world.

BioTrails is a project of the Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory in collaboration with the National Park Service and the Schoodic Institute and is supported by an award from the National Science Foundation (DRL-1223210).

Pathways: Wildlife Corridors of NM

Pathways: Wildlife Corridors of NM runs a wildlife track and sign monitoring program, documenting "common" species before they become "uncommon". 6 Focal Species include, Black Bear, Elk, Mule Deer, Bobcat, Pronghorn, and Mountain Lion. We monitor transects between the mountain ranges of New Mexico, documenting the movements of these large mammals between the mountains and the river valleys.

Michigan Butterfly Network

The Michigan Butterfly Network (MiBN) is a citizen-science project that seeks to assess the changing population status of our state’s butterfly species, evaluate the quality of Michigan ecosystems, and engage the Michigan public in significant citizen science research. The project was started in 2011 by the Kalamazoo Nature Center, and has grown to include several collaborating institutions and over 30 monitoring sites across the state.

We are actively looking for new partnerships and volunteers across the state in order to expand and grow the network. We welcome engagement in the project - Please contact us!


The MyEnvironment mapping tools provides immediate access to a cross-section of environmental data for any geographical location in the U.S. Users of the official site can choose the location and environmental issue to examine.


Treezilla is a mapping project based in Great Britain that challenges citizen scientists to map every tree in Britain. The mapping interface is easy to use and users can easily add their tree listings and even add photos for others to help them identify species. It’s free to use and the website even offers educational material for inquiry based science lessons.

Ultimately, a more complete map of Britain’s trees will help scientists how certain species are affected by climate change, disease, and patterns of land use. The website even has built in tools to measure how much CO2 is captured and what total economic benefit is gained from the different types of species for a given area.

Every tree added to the mapping system helps, and Treezilla helps make contributing easy. With the focus of the project is to map trees in urban environments – you can even map the trees in your back yard, school, or local park. Go outside, bring a friend, and start mapping trees today!

New Forest Cicada Project

The New Forest Cicada is the only cicada native to the UK. During May to July it sings with a very characteristic high-pitched song, which is at the limits of human hearing, and is particularly difficult for most adults to hear. Sightings of the cicada within the New Forest date back to 1812, but the last unconfirmed sighting was in 2000. However, it's quite likely that colonies remain undiscovered in less visited parts of the forest. The New Forest Cicada Project aims to equip the millions of visitors to the forest with a smart phone app that can detect and recognise the song of the cicada, and hopes to rediscover it in 2013.

Urban Buzz: Cicadas!

Periodical cicada (Magicicada spp.) populations are vulnerable to the ways we change the land around us. They live in the dirt. They suck on plant roots. They are born one year and then 17 years later rise to often find a landscape quite different from the one their parents experienced. When forests (and with them, tree roots) disappear completely, periodical cicadas never emerge at all, but in many cases forests do not disappear entirely, they just change. With urbanization, they become hotter, more polluted, and, more afflicted by herbivores other than the cicadas. What do these changes do to 17-year cicadas? We don’t really know.

One particular aspect of the cicadas that is likely influenced by urbanization is how crooked they are – that is, how much the length, width and shape of parts on the right and left side of the cicada body, respectively, differ from one another. Scientists have given a fancy name to these small, random deviations from perfect symmetry; they call it fluctuating asymmetry (FA).

Fluctuating asymmetry has been used as a low cost way to monitor the effects of environmental stressors like pesticides and water pollution on terrestrial and aquatic insects. We (at Your Wild Life) think it might be a quick-and-dirty way to gauge the negative effects of urbanization on periodical cicadas – We predict that cicadas experiencing more intense levels of urbanization (as measured by the amount of forest cover or concrete and blacktop in an area) will be more crooked.

And so we need your help!

Kinsey Reporter

Kinsey Reporter is a global mobile survey platform to share, explore, and visualize anonymous data about sex.

Reports are submitted via smartphone, then explored at or downloaded for off-line analysis.

The Kinsey Institute is exploring new ways to record and describe people's sexual experiences worldwide. We are also exploring new ways for people to be connected while protecting their privacy. We hope to reach people with all kinds of different ideas, beliefs, and experiences, and who might be willing to report on sexual behaviors, regardless of who is involved and where it is observed. By using Kinsey Reporter, you contribute to research on human sexual behavior. We ask you to act ethically, in the role of a good journalist or "citizen scientist." Submit what is true and accurate to the best of your ability.

Ideally, you would submit a report within 24 hours of the event you are reporting. The report can be about yourself or someone else. It is all anonymous. Kinsey Reporter includes surveys about various sexual activities and other intimate behaviors. These surveys cover sexual behaviors and events, sexual health issues, violence reports, public displays of affection, and other unique behaviors and experience. A 'survey' in this case is a report of information shared by many individuals on a topic of interest; it is not based on a random or representative sample of a community or population.

To ensure that reported data is strictly anonymous, you can only select among the provided tags when answering a question. However, contact us to suggest new surveys, questions, or tags.

To protect the anonymity of the reports even in sparsely populated areas, we aggregate reports over time. A report is not published until a sufficient number of reports have been received from the same location, and then all of those reports are recorded with a randomized timestamp. The more sparsely populated your area and/or the higher the geographic resolution you select, the longer the delay until your report appears. Therefore, in a sparsely populated area, you might want to select a lower resolution (e.g., state/region or country), to minimize the delay until your report becomes public.

Interactive visualizations of the data are available on the website. The anonymous data we collect is also publicly available to the community via an Application Programming Interface (API), documented on the website. We welcome your feedback.

Kinsey Reporter is a joint project of the world-famous Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction (KI) and the Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research (CNetS), both at Indiana University, Bloomington.

Where's the Elderberry Longhorn Beetle?

Hi, my name is Dr. Dan Duran and I'm an evolutionary biologist and entomologist at Drexel University (Philadelphia, PA) and I need your help finding "Desmond," an Elderberry Longhorn Beetle, formally known as *Desmocerus palliatus!*

This *beautiful* beetle species used to live throughout a large part of eastern North America but in recent decades it appears as if it has declined in numbers. We need your help to figure out if and why this might be true and how we can help them move back into areas they once lived.

The Elderberry Longhorn Beetle is easy to spot with its bold patterns of blue and gold and long antennae. It's so attractive, in fact, that it was chosen for a USPS stamp design in 1999! I can't promise you'll find one, but if you keep an eye out, you might have a chance at seeing one of these impressive creatures. They come out at different times in different places, but June is often a good time to see them.

Dark Sky Meter

The Dark Sky Meter (available for iPhones) allows citizen scientists to contribute to a global map of nighttime light pollution.
Light pollution is a growing problem in urban environments, but now you can help scientists better understand its effects on the environment. The map is also a great help for (amateur) astronomers looking for dark skies.
By utilizing the camera built in to your iPhone, the Dark Sky Meter actually measures ‘skyglow’ and updates the data in real time.

The Dark Sky Meter International Year of Light version is free and gives you a rough estimate of the night sky brightness.

The Pro version of the app also charts weather conditions and cloud cover so you can take readings at optimal times. The app is as easy to use as taking a picture, and is a fun way to learn about your night sky.

The Results are live and visible for everyone on a global light pollution map generated by the app users. Visit to see the map.

Loss of the Night

How many stars can you see where you live? The Loss of the Night App challenges citizen scientists to identify as many stars as they can in order to measure light pollution. The app is fun and easy to use, and helps users learn constellations as they contribute to a global real-time map of light pollution.

Stargazing is a fantastic way to engage young scientists, but this ancient past time has become increasingly difficult in growing urban areas. Help scientists understand the effects of light pollution and learn about your night sky!

You don't need to leave the city to take part, in fact, the app is designed specifically for use in very polluted areas.

The more stars you observe, and the more often you run the app, the more precise the data for your location will become. As the seasons change so do the stars in the sky, and since there aren't so many very bright stars it is extremely helpful if urban users do measurements in each season.

Detailed instructions for Android:

Detailed instructions for iPhone:


CyberTracker Conservation is a non-profit organisation that promotes the vision of a Worldwide Environmental Monitoring Network. Our ultimate vision is that smart phone users worldwide will use CyberTracker to capture observations on a daily basis.

CyberTracker is the most efficient method of gps field data collection. You can use CyberTracker on a Smartphone or handheld computer to record any type of observation. CyberTracker, which requires no programming skills, allows you to customize an Application for your own data collection needs.

Marine Debris Tracker

The Marine Debris Tracker mobile application allows you to help make a difference by checking in when you find trash on our coastlines and waterways. Data you submit is available to download online and you also have access to mapping all data, worldwide. Marine Debris Tracker is a joint partnership of the NOAA Marine Debris Division and the Southeast Atlantic Marine Debris Initiative (SEA-MDI), located within the College of Engineering at the University of Georgia.

Atlas of Living Australia

The Atlas of Living Australia (Atlas) contains information on all the known species in Australia aggregated from a wide range of data providers: museums, herbaria, community groups, government departments, individuals and universities.

The Atlas was initiated by a group of 14 (now 17) organisations—our partners. The intent was to create a national database of all of Australia’s flora and fauna that could be accessed through a single, easy to use web site. Information on the site would be used to: improve our understanding of Australian biodiversity assist researchers to build a more detailed picture of Australia’s biodiversity assist environmental managers and policy makers develop more effective means of managing and sustaining Australia’s biodiversity.

You can participate by submitting a species record, joining an existing citizen science project, digitizing specimen labels, or starting your own citizen science endeavour!


FoxPop is a public science engagement project which aims to get Dublin citizens involved in a city-wide collection of data on urban foxes. Despite their presence all over the capital, little or no research has been carried out in terms of numbers. Please help us by submitting any sightings, locations, dates and times if you please.

SOD Blitz

Sudden Oak Death (SOD) is a serious exotic disease that is threatening the survival of tanoak and several oak species in California. By collecting leaf samples during community SOD blitzes and submitting your samples to UC Berkeley diagnostic laboratory, you can help create a detailed local map of disease distribution.

SOD-blitzes inform and educate the community about Sudden Oak Death, get locals involved in detecting the disease, and produce detailed local maps can then be used to identify those areas where the infestation may be mild enough to justify proactive management. You can participating in an existing SOD-blitz or create your own.

Good news: SOD-Blitzes are COMPLETELY FREE thanks to funding from the US Forest Service to the UC Berkeley Forest Pathology Lab!

Hummingbirds @ Home

Starting March 15, 2013, the Audubon Society needs citizen scientists to track, report on, and follow the spring hummingbird migration in real time. A free mobile app makes it easy to report sightings, share photos and learn more about these remarkable birds.

Your participation will help scientists understand how hummingbirds are impacted by climate change, flowering patterns, and feeding by people.

You can participate at any level – from reporting a single sighting to documenting hummingbird activity in your community throughout the life of the project. Help scientists document the hummingbirds journey and direct change in the future to ensure these incredible birds do not disappear.

Hedgehog Hibernation Survey

A study was conducted 40 years ago which suggested a link between climate and when west-European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) come out of hibernation. Since the first year of this survey in 2012, over 90,000 hedgehog sightings have been recorded and we are starting to build up an invaluable picture of how British hedgehogs behave. This will inform our understanding of how hedgehog behaviour may change as the climate changes.

We need your help to collect hedgehog records from 1st February until 31st August 2014. Understanding patterns of hedgehog behaviour across the UK will enable us to target the conservation strategy for this charming animal, which is currently in severe decline.

Vital Signs Maine

Where are the invasive species in Maine? Where aren’t they? Students, educators, citizens, and scientists are working together to find out.

As part of the Vital Signs community you can help steward the 32,000 miles of rivers and streams, 6,000 lakes and ponds, 5,000 miles of coastline, and 17 million acres of forest that are threatened by invasive species.

Together we are using scientific tools and habits of mind to look for native and invasive species in local habitats. We are sharing what we find and do not find online. We are contributing to a greater understanding of our shared environment.

Where is my spider?

By just taking photos and observing spiders, you can help the Explorit Science Center learn about which climates certain spiders live in and track the distribution of spiders over time.

Join the Explorit’s Community Science Project by finding and recording spiders in your home or neighborhood (as many as you can!). Use your camera or smart phone to take a photo of the spider and submit it online to add to our geographical database.

Spiders have long been thought of a useful natural method of pest control, but how will expected temperature changes or other environmental changes affect the spider’s usefulness as pest-killers and their distribution?

We don't yet know how climate change will impact spiders, and in turn impact agriculture such as crops and farms- but when we understand where spiders are living today, we will be better able to predict what may happen to spiders and agriculture in the future.


The iSeeChange Almanac is a socially networked weather Almanac for communities to collectively journal their climate experiences -- their observations, feelings, questions, and decisions --- against near-real time climate information.

This groundbreaking environmental reporting project combines citizen science, participatory public media, and cutting-edge satellite monitoring of environmental conditions.

Incubated in 2012 by producer Julia Kumari Drapkin at Colorado public station KVNF Mountain Grown Community Radio via AIR’s Localore project, iSeeChange is poised to expand in 2015. The team will work with media and scientific partners across the country to help audiences document environmental shifts in their backyards and connect to the bigger-picture climate changes transforming all of our lives and livelihoods.

The project’s growing list of collaborators includes NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Berkeley BEACO2N project, Yale Climate Connections, the Allegheny Front in the Western Pennsylvania, KPCC in Pasadena, WWOZ in New Orleans, Delaware Public Media, KSJD and KVNF in Colorado, Developing Radio Partners, and more.

This spring, the iSeeChange team is expanding its crowdsourced reporting platform, the iSeeChange Almanac, coast to coast. In the coming months, the team will also develop a related app to help synchronize local citizen climate reports with satellite data on regional carbon levels. Combining these two perspectives—a global view of the earth from space and a granular view from individuals on the ground—offers an unprecedented opportunity to match big science with daily life, and surface hidden patterns and stories.

Stay tuned!

Landmark Trees of India

Landmark Trees of India is a documentation, geography, and monitoring project with a focus on famous, remarkable, and heritage trees of India.
India is a country of superlative population, superlative biodiversity, and superlative environmental variety. These landmark trees can teach us about the landscapes, biodiversity, and people of India and the other nations of the world.

Librería Metagenómica del Ecuador

We are a group of scientists interested in exploring the potential applications of Ecuador’s unique biodiversity. As a first step, we are working to assemble and apply gene libraries collected from around the country.
You can join field trips in Ecuador to collect samples, work in a lab extracting and sequencing nucleic acids, or from home assembling and curating the electronic database.

North Mountain Plant Inventory Project

The North Mountain Plant Inventory Project is a collaboration between the Conservation Alliance, the Plant Atlas Project of Arizona, the Phoenix Mountains Preservation Council, and the City of Phoenix.
Our goals are to:
1)improve our scientific knowledge of North Mountain Park flora for land management, scientific, conservation, and educational purposes.
2)to train, engage and educate members of the public as plant stewards
3)to provide a databased plant atlas located on the Southwest Environmental Information Network (SEINET).

Project: Play With Your Dog

The Horowitz Dog Cognition Lab in NYC is investigating the different ways people and dogs play together, and we need your help (well, you and your dog’s help). We are cataloguing all the ways people play with their dogs and asking dog owners to submit short videos of their own dog-human play.

By participating in Project: Play with Your Dog, citizen scientists are providing valuable information into the nuances and intricacies of our relationships with dogs.

Wading for Water Sticks

Prepare to get wet and muddy for science! We're looking for citizen scientists in North Carolina to help us learn more about the large, charismatic aquatic insects known as water sticks.

Simply find a body of water in your area, follow the protocol, and submit your data! We'll teach you how to identify the water sticks you find and how to cheaply build any equipment you don't already have (you'll have most of it). And if you don't find anything in the body of water you choose, no problem! Every bit of information helps and anything you can share is useful. With YOUR help, we can discover more about the seasonality, habitat preferences, and distribution of water sticks - together!

Deforestation Mapping in Canada

The Canadian Forest Service is asking Canadians to use their local knowledge to identify possible deforestation areas.

Satellites produce much of the available imagery about Canadian forests. However, many of these images do not have enough detail to identify an area has been deforested. The only way to identify deforestation is to visit the area in person. These visits involve travel by air and land vehicles, which results in heavy use of fossil fuels.

By asking local people to visit the sites and then report back to us on the event, we can saving money, reduce travel costs/green house gas emissions, and engaging citizens with their local environment. In addition, your local knowledge and input can help reduce our carbon footprint and deliver one of the most accurate Carbon accounting estimates in world.


uBiome is the world's first effort to map the human microbiome through citizen science.

What's the microbiome? The microbiome are the bacteria that live on and within us. It sounds kind of funny, but all of us are actually covered in helpful germs. Many conditions – from diabetes to depression, asthma to autism -- have been found to relate to the microbiome.

uBiome brings this cutting edge technology directly to consumers for the first time. The more data we collect, the more we can learn about this important area of research. We've been featured so far in Wired, Venture Beat, the Los Angeles Times, Scientific American, BoingBoing, and more.

Magpie Mapper

Magpie Mapper is a smartphone app for recording observations of Magpies, one of the most fascinating and striking birds in the United Kindgom. When you see a magpie, simply log it on the app and your data will be used in our research into how birds are distributed throughout our towns cities and countryside.

With their long tails and impressive black and white plumage, magpies are unmistakable. Magpies are so ingrained in our folklorethat people often greet them with "Hello Mr Magpie!".

Now you can digitally salute a magpie with the Magpie Mapper app!


AirCasting is an open-source, end-to-end solution for collecting, displaying, and sharing health and environmental data using your smartphone. The platform consists of wearable sensors that detect changes in your environment and physiology, including a palm-sized air quality monitor called the AirBeam, the AirCasting Android app, the AirCasting website, and wearable LED accessories. By documenting and leveraging health and environmental data to inform personal decision-making and public policy, the AirCasting platform empowers citizen scientists and changemakers.

Los Angeles Butterfly Survey

The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County is partnering with Butterflies and Moths of North America (BAMONA) to share data and learn more about L.A. butterflies and moths. Help us find and photograph them in Los Angeles.

We know there are 237 species recorded for L.A, County, but how many can you find?

Lost Ladybug Project

Partnering with Cornell's Lost Ladybug Project, the Museum hopes to census the ladybugs found in our region. We have historic data of ladybug species in Los Angeles County, but we don't know how much it has changed — we need your help to find out.

Utah Water Watch

Utah Water Watch (UWW) is a water quality education and data collection program that seeks to increase awareness about the importance of water quality and promote stewardship of Utah’s aquatic resources.

UWW is a partnership between USU Water Quality Extension and the Utah Division of Water Quality that creates a way for the public to help in monitoring Utah’s lakes and streams. This is a free program for volunteers of all ages to monitor water quality once a month and report the data to water managers.

Community of Observers

Get to know the nature of YOUR world! The Fairbanks Community of Observers is to encourage greater public clarity around environmental indicators of climate change in Vermont and northern New Hampshire. Using the website developed by the Fairbanks Museum, we'll collect your quantitative data focused on the life cycles of specific birds, butterflies and wildflowers that are sensitive to environmental change as well as seasonal weather data that is characteristic to our region.

The Community of Observers is for individuals, families, clubs, groups and schools. It is designed to encourage citizen scientists to gain a deeper understanding of the cycles and patterns that characterize our region through the seasons, and how the habitats that depend on these cycles might be affected by global climate shifts.

Geo-Wiki Project

The Geo-Wiki Project is a citizen science network that hopes to improve the overall quality of land use and land cover maps across the globe. They host a variety of projects, all of which use their online Google Earth Application to enlist citizen scientists to improve spatial data. By comparing global land use and land cover data to the aerial photography that appears in Google Earth, you can help improve the validity of important data that is being used to solve important global problems.

Geo-Wiki supports a variety of projects that tackle issues that include climate change, the bio-diversity of plants, and the viability of changing agriculture.

They even have developed mobile apps that allow you to ‘ground truth’ data by adding your own photographs of what’s near you.

Owl Citizen Science Project

The Owl Citizen Science Project is a great opportunity to better understand the owls of Tryon Creek and improve your knowledge of these amazing creatures. The Friends of Tryon Creek will host a lively kick-off lunch and information session for an exciting citizen science project dedicated to the owls of Tryon Creek. This lunch is intended for adults interested in participating in this year’s monitoring effort twice monthly, December through April, as we attempt to discover where Tryon’s owl species are nesting. This is a great opportunity to better understand the owls of Tryon Creek and improve your knowledge of these amazing creatures. Join us for lunch and learn more. Free. Preregistration required. On October 27th, Citizen Science Project – Owls of Tryon Creek Kick-off Lunch, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. –

Brown marmorated stink bug locations

The brown marmorated stink bug is an invasive insect species that has become an damaging pest of a wide variety of fruit, vegetable, grain, and ornamental crops. This stink bug species also enters homes and can be a nuisance pest. Our webpage allows citizens to report the presence and severity of this stink bug species in their home, yard, farm, or commercial nursery.

Public Laboratory Balloon and Kite Mapping

This DIY mapping tool was the first developed by Public Lab, as part of the Grassroots Mapping project. Citizens use helium-filled balloons and digital cameras to generate high resolution “satellite” maps of areas such as in the Gulf Coast and Gowanus Canal. Although this tool has been in use for two years, components of the kit -- kite and balloon design, the rig, the camera -- continue to evolve as they are adopted in new places and adapted for new purposes. Besides the aerial mapping tools, Public Lab has also developed, an online tool for stitching aerial images into maps.

Public Laboratory Infrared Camera

Infrared photography can help in assessing plant health, and has been used on satellites and planes for agricultural and ecological assessment primarily by vineyards, large farms and large-scale (read: expensive) research projects. By creating and open-sourcing a low-cost near-infrared camera and working with wetlands advocates, farmers and environmental activists, the Public Lab community has begun to explore grassroots uses for this powerful analytic technique.


Help tackle invasive plant species!

The Environment Agency, the Nature Locator team at the University of Bristol and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology have joined forces to help combat the spread of the UK’s most problematic invasive, non-native plant species.

We need your help to find them and record them.


This smartphone app will help you explore habitats in your area and easily monitor wildlife populations by logging locations, photos, and responding to form questions all with the ease of your smartphone.

Tracking ring-billed gulls

More than 9,000 ring-billed gulls have been marked near Montreal, Quebec with individually coded bands to track their movements throughout their annual cycle. We are more specifically interested by their post-breeding dispersal and their fidelity to their colony. Repeated observations of individuals also allow us to estimate annual survival. This is part of a larger study that aimed at understanding the behavior and population dynamics of these birds within an integrated management framework.

New England Basking Shark Project

The New England Coastal Wildlife Alliance (NECWA) invites beach walkers, boaters, fishermen, and divers to report their sightings and send in their photos of basking sharks and ocean sunfish seen in our New England waters. Your data will help scientists monitor the local populations and better understand their migration patterns.

The Biodiversity Group

We are currently seeking research assistants to join our field team in Ecuador studying the conservation ecology of reptiles and amphibians.

While Ecuador is a relatively small country—it’s roughly the size of Arizona—it stands as the third most diverse country in the world for amphibians (510 species) and is seventh for reptiles (430 species), making it a herpetologically mega-diverse region. Due to the severe deforestation taking place in addition to many other pressures on Ecuador’s fauna, TBG research program aims to study, document, and preserve these rich and unique communities of reptiles and amphibians found within the country’s diverse array of ecosystems.

As we are now in our 8th year working in Ecuador, we have study sites encompassing both the coastal forests in western Ecuador and the Amazon rainforest on the eastern side of the Andes Mountains. The work that research participants will be involved with will primarily consist of conducting night surveys for reptiles and amphibians (however other taxa such as invertebrates are also of interest), animal data collection, and lab work. Lab work consists of more detailed information such as scale counts (for reptiles) and other morphological information, animal measurements, screening for chytrid disease (amphibians), preservation (only when necessary), and acquisition of DNA samples. Diagnostic photographs of all animals will be taken. Other tasks include animal handling and general note taking and data organization

Volunteer participants will gain valuable research experience, contribute towards our mission in conservation ecology, and will have an unforgettable experience that provides the opportunity to study the most biologically diverse region of reptiles and amphibians in the world. For 2013 we now have expeditions scheduled in Western Ecuador for February 2-13 and FeBruary 16-27 and in Amazonian Ecuador for June 2-13.


ZomBee Watch is a citizen science project sponsored by the San Francisco State University Department of Biology, the San Francisco State University Center for Computing for Life Sciences and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. ZomBee Watch was initiated as a follow-up to the discovery that the Zombie Fly Apocephalus borealis is parasitizing honey bees in California and possibly other areas of North America.

ZomBee Watch has three main goals.

1. To determine where in North America the Zombie Fly Apocephalus borealis is parasitizing honey bees.

2. To determine how often honey bees leave their hives at night, even if they are not parasitized by the Zombie Fly.

3. To engage citizen scientists in making a significant contribution to knowledge about honey bees and to become better observers of nature.

You can help in finding out where honey bees are being parasitized by the Zombie Fly and how big a threat the fly is to honey bees. So far, the Zombie Fly has been found parasitizing honey bees in California, Oregon, South Dakota, Vermont and Washington. We are teaming up with citizen scientists (like you!) to determine if the fly has spread to honey bees across all of North America.

Dragonfly Migration

We need your help to better understand dragonfly migration in North America. Although it spans three countries and has been documented since the 1880s, North American dragonfly migration is still poorly understood, and much remains to be learned about migratory cues, flight pathways, and the southern limits of overwintering grounds. Become part of an international network of citizen scientists and help monitor the spring and fall movements of the 5 main migratory species in North America, or report on these species throughout the year at a pond or wetland of your choice.

Big Butterfly Count

Counting butterflies for just fifteen minutes could help scientists better understand the environment. The Big Butterfly Count is a recently started national survey that hopes to engage citizen scientists by creating easy and engaging survey methods. Started by the charity group Butterfly Conservation in 2010, the program has grown to over 34,000 participants!

The big butterfly count takes place this year from Saturday 17th July - Sunday 9th August 2015. All you have to do is submit your butterfly counts for just fifteen minutes of observation. A colorful identification poster is available online and submission on the project website couldn’t be easier.

Butterflies are quite sensitive to changes in the environment and are excellent indicators of potential issues with other wildlife. By studying the trends in butterfly counts, scientists can better understand the relationships between wildlife and the environment.

This is an easy, fun, and meaningful way to engage in science. Print out an identification poster, get outside, and start counting!

Tiny Terrors Project

The Tiny Terrors Project needs volunteers to monitor the invasive insect species of adelgids that attack both hemlocks and Fraser firs (the most popular Christmas Tree in North America).

Although barely visible to the naked eye, adelgids and their effects on trees can be detected by citizen scientists. Tiny Terrors is calling on you to help them identify both healthy and infected trees all across the Eastern United States.

Data collection is easy once you have identified an area that contains hemlock or Fraser fir, and you can submit your observations online.

Not only are both tree species valued for their beauty, but because of their numbers, they provide wildlife habitat and are an important source of lumber. Your help can help researchers find potentially resistant trees and aid in developing genetically resistant trees to restore forests.

The Tiny Terrors Project is based out of the North Carolina State University Forest Entomology Lab and was created for the Alliance for Saving Threatened Trees.

Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation

Adventurers and Scientist for Conservation is a unique initiative that helps create working reationships between scientists and adventure athletes to perform some truly unique research. Projects have been created all over the world and by groups of all kinds. The project even provides training for adventurers to become adventure-scientists.

The exciting benefits from these projects are numerous. Adventurers benefit by contributing to meaningful conservation research in areas that they visit. Additionally, scientists benefit from attaining inexpensive data that would have been previously hard or impossible to acquire. By no means, however are these adventure research projects limited to avid adventurers and professional scientists. Programs can be created anywhere for any age group. The goal of the project is to train and inspire the next generation of citizen scientists. In short, Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation will help you create a project, recruit participants, and start an Adventure Science project near you!


Leafsnap is an exciting new mobile app that is designed to help citizen scientists identify and locate tree species from photographs and ultimately help the scientific world develop a better understanding of biodiversity. Developed by Columbia University, the University of Maryland, and the Smithsonian Institution, Leafsnap contains a unique visual recognition software that helps users identify species from the photographs taken straight from your iphone or ipad.

The app is completely free and will be the first in a series of apps that takes advantage of the newly developed recognition software. The app also contains high-resolution photos of the leaves, flowers, fruit, seeds, and bark of all sorts of species, and is a wonderful visual field guide. Currently, the species of New York City and Washington D.C. are supported, but this list will be expanded in the future.

The app is very user friendly and easy to use. With each photo of a leaf you take, the photo, species information, and geo-location is all automatically sent to the Leafsnap database for scientists to study species distribution.

This Leafsnap website shows the tree species included so far, a visual map of the collectors that have recently contributed, and more information on the project. Contributing to citizen science couldn’t be easier than with this visually engaging app! Get snapping and identify a tree near you!

The Snake Count

The Snake Count needs citizen scientists to map and track snake distributions across North America. This is your chance to take an active role in in snake conservation.

Usual Count Dates (check website for most updated details):
Spring: May 12-20
Fall: September 15-23

The goal of the Snake Count is to document every species of snake that occurs in the United States in a single time period. The data collected during the Snake Count will be used by the Center for Snake Conservation to map the current distribution of snakes. The data collected will confirm the existence of some rare species and provide baseline data to help monitor selected populations of more common species in the future.

By participating in this project, you'll learn how to find and identify snakes, and your efforts will help scientists identify conservation concerns for snakes across North America. Everyone who participates in the Snake Count does it for the joy of being outdoors and helping promote the conservation of our most unique predators--snakes!


eButterfly is a citizen science project that helps document butterflies in Canada. By creating a user profile and documenting observed butterflies, citizens can help scientists better understand butterfly distribution in Canada. Users can also track which butterflies they have observed on a dynamic map application, and share photos with the eButterfly community.

The 2,045 eButterfly records of over 170 species help the Canadian Facility for Ecoinformatics Research at the University of Ottawa's Department of Biology better understand how butterflies adapt to environmental change. Eventually, the data you collect will help contribute to the preservation of Canada’s great biodiversity.

Tucson Bird Count

The Tucson Bird Count is an annual project in which volunteers collect data on the abundances and distributions of bird species from hundreds of sites in the Tucson area.

Volunteers can participate in two programs: 1) The annual Route Program, in which participants count individuals of all bird species, and 2) the quarterly Park Monitoring Program, in which groups adopt an area and spend four mornings a year counting birds at that area.

The data collected will help researchers monitor the status of the Tucson area bird community over time, identify land use practices that are succeeding at sustaining native birds, and investigate the ecology of birds in human-inhabited landscapes. Data and analyses, including distribution maps for most species counted in the Tucson Bird Count, are publicly available on the project web site.

The Tucson Bird Count (TBC) is a cooperative project begun by members of Tucson's science, conservation, and birding communities.

UF Native Buzz

Solitary bees and wasps in your own backyard!!!

Native Buzz is a citizen science project created by the University of Florida (UF) Honey Bee Research and Extension Lab. Our goal is to learn more about the nesting preferences, diversity and distribution of our native solitary bees and wasps, share the information gained and provide a forum for those interested in participating in the science and art of native beekeeping (and wasp-keeping!).

Here at University of Florida Native Buzz you can keep track of your own native buzz nest site and see the results of other participant’s nest sites.

The River Otter Ecology Project

River otters are ideal ambassadors for habitat preservation and restoration since they are charismatic carnivores reliant on healthy watersheds to thrive. The River Otter Ecology Project strives to build understanding and shed light on the conservation status and ecology of the North American river otter and the ecosystems they inhabit in the San Francisco Bay Area. Our work will serve to fill key gaps in the biology and ecology of these elusive but important aquatic carnivores while also directly engaging the public in their conservation through field-research, environmental education and strategic restoration partnerships.


Osprey Watch is a project of the Center for Conservation Biology for birdwatchers across the nation to help identify osprey nests and observe osprey behavior. The project hopes to acquire data across a large enough spatial scale in order to address three pressing issues associated with aquatic ecosystems: climate change, depletion of fish stocks, and environmental contaminants. Ospreys are great indicators of the health of aquatic ecosystems as they are sensitive to small changes in fish populations and water quality.

OspreyWatch has almost 500 Osprey Watchers monitoring almost 800 nests across North America, Europe, and Australia. Ospreys are incredible birds of prey and viewing them in the wild can be an amazing experience. And it may be easier than you think. Many osprey nest in man made objects and might even be right outside your backdoor. There are also many nests viewable online through web cameras.

So grab a camera, some binoculars, and locate a nest near you to add photos and descriptions to OspreyWatch’s interactive map. You can even find other nests in your area and help monitor and add updates to nesting activity.

PHOWN, Photos of Weaver Nests

The aim of PHOWN is to study variation of colony sizes of weavers, to map their breeding distribution, and to study these aspects in relation to climate change. This is achieved with the help of citizen scientists submitting photos of weaver nests or colonies.

Some feral populations exist throughout the world, and may be included in PHOWN. Species include the true weavers, bishops and widows, queleas, social weavers, sparrow weavers, buffalo weavers, malimbes and fodies. Sparrows are not included.

Weavers are often common species, and often found near human habitation. This makes them easy to study. Some species are of conservation concern and for some the nest has not even been described yet!


FieldScope is a community web-mapping tool that promotes student engagement as citizen scientists and involves them in learning through mapping. By combining easy data integration with powerful mapping visualization, FieldScope is on the cutting edge of community mapping.

The application is accessed online and is requires no installation. Students are able to upload field data photos and other media as well as collaborate with other students and scientists, and perform analysis on existing data. There are many rich projects to choose from, including mapping water quality in the Chesapeake Bay, investigating watershed dynamics, and mapping rivers and streams in the National Parks.

With students able to contribute and interact alongside scientists, meaningful science is sure to happen!


Spy on nature, and contribute to science. Share photos and observations through SciSpy and you're contributing to research initiatives that rely on amateur participation. Created by Science Channel (Discovery), SciSpy enlists paticipants to document the natural world of their backyards, parks, cities, and towns. Photos and observation data are tagged and stamped with date, time and location information and will hopefully provide helpful information to track migrations, changes in the natural environment, seasonal trends and more.


THE BROAD PICTURE: The aim of MammalMAP is to update the distribution records of all African mammal species. Through collaborations with professional scientists, conservation organisations, wildlife authorities and citizen scientists across Africa, we consolidate all reliable and identifiable evidence (camera trap records, photographs) of current mammal locations into an open-access digital database. The database software automatically generates online distribution maps of all recorded species which are instantly visible and searchable. The information consolidated within MammalMAP will not only yield crucial information for species conservation policies and landscape conservation policies, but provides an excellent platform for educating the public about African mammals and their conservation challenges.

WHY MAMMALMAP IS NECESSARY: In Africa, our knowledge of mammal distribution patterns is based largely on historical records. However, the last three centuries have seen extensive human-modification of African landscapes with the associated conversion, compression and fragmentation of natural land. With further land development presenting a likely reality for the future, the effectiveness of mammal conservation efforts depends on ecological records being updated so that they accurately reflect mammal distribution patterns in the 21st Century. With MammalMAP we plan to conduct these ecological updates over the coming years, by mapping the current distribution of mammal species (including marine mammals and small mammals) across Africa.

HOW MAMMALMAP CONTRIBUTES TO CONSERVATION: The conservation benefits of this research are multiple. First, the comparison of these updated distribution records with both historical and future records will enable the detection of species’ distribution changes in response to human-related and climate-related habitat changes. These change detections will assist the guidance of continent-wide conservation policies and decision making processes. Second, the research will promote and facilitate interdisciplinary and international collaboration amongst scientists and conservation practitioners, with potential benefits to the advancement of conservation science. Finally, both the project input stage (data collection) and output stage (data dissemination) will offer interactive, dynamic and widely applicable education tools suitable for both formal and informal education sectors.

THE WHERE AND THE HOW OF MAMMALMAP: The area of interest for MammalMAP is the whole of Africa. To achieve this we collaborate with scientists, conservation organisations, wildlife authorities and citizen scientists across the continent. Our methods involve consolidating evidence of mammal occurrence in a given location (camera trap records, photographs and other reliable records) into a digital database hosted by the Animal Demography Unit (ADU) at the University of Cape Town. In time, we will use the records in the database to generate distribution maps for all recorded species, in the same way that the ADU has done for birds, reptiles, frogs and butterflies.

Wildlife Sightings

Wildlife Sightings is a free service that lets anyone to publish, organize, and manage their own wildlife sightings data.

Wildlife Sightings helps eliminate the technical barriers and costs to non-profit organizations and educators wishing to conduct their own wildlife surveys. That way, nature lovers, conservation groups, eco-tourism business, and educators can focus their energy on what they love most -- citizen science!

By documenting the biodiversity around you, you can enjoy nature and aid conservation efforts at the same time.

Temperature Blast

Temperature Blast is a Maryland Science Center C3 Citizen Science project designed to introduce participants to methods of studying climate. Citizen Scientists collect live and archive Weatherbug data from select stations in the Baltimore region to compare temperatures and log this data for scientists.

Scientists at the Baltimore Ecosystem Study then use this data to test models of temperature patterns across the city to aid in urban planning. This data illustrates the Urban Heat Island effect on the area, a phenomenon classified by temperature differences between a metropolitan area and more rural landscape nearby. An Urban Heat Island is not an effect of climate change, but rather of our activity shaping the environment around us.

Using either this website or our Smartphone application (available free of charge for both iPhone and Android) Citizen Scientists submit temperature data from six weather stations in the Baltimore region. The purpose of this is to collect a stream of simultaneous data from multiple sites in and around the metropolitan area. This data, along with first-hand location observations, will be used to understand the Urban Heat Island Effect in Baltimore.

Anyone with access to the Internet and/or a Smartphone can be a Citizen Scientist and participate in Temperature Blast!? While the data obtained from the program is relevant to the Baltimore metropolitan region, there is no geographic or age restriction for Citizen Scientists.

LA Spider Survey

In order to conduct a large-scale survey of urban spiders, we need the help of the public. We are asking people to collect spiders in their homes and gardens, fill out a simple data sheet about their collection, and send or bring the spiders and forms to the Natural History Museum.

In spite of their importance and abundance, we do not know much about the spiders in Los Angeles. There are no truly large collections of urban spiders from this area, as most collectors concentrate on studying natural areas.

As an important international port, new species of spiders from various parts of the world are always being accidentally introduced into the Los Angeles area, and some of these have established breeding populations. We need to know how widespread these introduced species have become, and how they have interacted with the native spiders. Also, we want to know how urbanization and the loss of natural habitat has affected populations and distributions of naturally occurring spiders.

Bumble Bee Watch

Bumble Bee Watch ( is a collaborative effort to track and conserve North America’s bumble bees. This citizen science project allows individuals or groups to: 1) Upload photos of bumble bees to start a virtual bumble bee collection; 2) Identify the bumble bees in your photos and have your identifications verified by experts; 3) Help researchers determine the status and conservation needs of bumble bees; 4) Help locate rare or endangered populations of bumble bees; 5) Learn about bumble bees, their ecology, and ongoing conservation efforts; and 6) Connect with other citizen scientists.

Find out more at


Students and teachers will gain hands on experience undertaking field work led by a team of experienced scientists from CSIRO. A comprehensive website is available ( to further student learning and to provide a unique, protected environment in which students and teachers can connect with other schools across the country to share their experiences. Also, students can continue their monitoring program without the assistance of our staff.

Your school will be provided with access to the Australian Biosecurity Intelligence Network (ABIN) and our Teach Wild secure community space. This community space will be kept up to date with innovative information about marine debris.

The activities have been developed to ensure part of the key learning areas in Science, Maths and Geography in the Australian Curriculum are achieved for years 6‐12.

The Black Squirrel Project

The Black Squirrel Project aims to gather data on the geographical range of the black squirrel within the United Kingdom.

Black squirrels originate from North America and are the same species as grey squirrels. The only difference is that they have a piece of DNA missing on a gene that produces pigment, which means they can only produce black fur.

You can make an important contribution to the project by submitting your own squirrel sightings (grey, black or red) and also learn more about the history and genetics of the black squirrel.

Mountain Watch

Mountain Watch is an ongoing trail-side citizen science program that tracks plant development, aka phenology, of a small set of alpine and forest plants In the Eastern Appalachian mountains and other Northeast areas.

AMC is also a partner with the USA National Phenology Network, the National Park Service, and the Appalachian Trail Conservancy in the
AT Seasons project, the new endeavor to track plant and animal development along the AT corridor. Similar to AMC’s Mountain Watch, AT Seasons ( will provide much needed information on climate impacts at upper elevations.

These citizen science programs are components of the Appalachian Mountain Club alpine ecology and climate science research being conducted in the Northeast mountains.

General teaching material on phenology can be found here: Bumble Bee Photo Group

Bumble bees are important pollinators, and science needs YOUR help to conserve them. You can contribute to our knowledge of bumble bees and their lives all over the world. Your contribution will tell us about which bumble bees live where, the flowers they visit, and when they're active during the year.

The photo group is administered by Athena Rayne Anderson, a doctoral candidate in Ecology at the University of Georgia, and author of the website.

Journey North

Journey North invites you to join in a global study of wildlife migration and seasonal change. Share your local observations with people across North America. Track the coming of spring through the migrations of monarch butterflies, robins and hummingbirds, the budding of plants, changing day length and other natural events. Predict when plants will emerge and bloom with Journey North Tulip Test Gardens. Track changes in day length to find ten Mystery Classes hidden around the globe. Explore weekly news updates, migration maps, photos, video clips, live cams, lessons, and other resources. Journey North exemplifies best-practice instruction and is one of the nation's premiere citizen science projects.

Greater Prairie Chicken Project

The Iowa Department of Natural Resources needs your help to ensure that Greater Prairie Chickens remain in Iowa. All you have to do is submit your sightings.

Greater Praire Chickens were once abundant in central and eastern United States; however, their numbers have dwindled since the 1800s.

Project organizers are looking for information about how prairie chickens are distributed in Southern Iowa regions, including Adair, Madison, Adams, Union, Clarke, Taylor, Ringgold, Decatur and Wayne Counties.

Ruffed Grouse Drumming Survey

The ruffed grouse is a forest species widely distributed across New York State. While some grouse are found in more mature forests, the greatest population densities are in younger-aged forests. These preferred habitats are declining as most of New York State's forests grow older, thus resulting in a decline in grouse numbers since the 1960s.

Turkey hunters in pursuit of that wary gobbler in the spring are ideally suited for monitoring ruffed grouse during the breeding season. The characteristic sound of a drumming male grouse is as much a part of the spring woods as yelping hens and gobbling toms.

DEC currently monitors grouse populations in the fall through the Cooperator Ruffed Grouse Hunting Log where hunters record the number of birds flushed per hour of hunting effort. The Ruffed Grouse Drumming Survey survey provides a harvest-independent index of grouse distribution and abundance during the critical breeding season in the spring.

British Trust for Ornithology

The BTO's Nest Record Scheme (NRS) gathers vital information on the breeding success of Britain's birds by asking volunteers to find and follow the progress of individual bird nests.

The data collected are used to produce trends in breeding performance, which help us to identify species that may be declining because of problems at the nesting stage. These trends are published on the BTO website and are updated every year. NRS data also allow us to measure the impacts of pressures such as climate change on bird productivity.

Anyone can be a nest recorder. Some people watch a single nest box in their back garden while others spend hundreds of hours finding and monitoring nests in the wider countryside.

American Kestrel Partnership

Now's the time to set up your American Kestrel nest box! This bird's population is experiencing long-term declines in North America, and existing data are insufficient for understanding the causes. The American Kestrel Partnership is an international research network designed to generate data, models, and conservation plans for kestrel habitat and populations at large spatial scales. The Partnership unites the data-generating capacity of citizen scientists with the data-analysis expertise of professional scientists by promoting research collaboration among citizen scientists, universities, government agencies, conservation organizations, schools, and businesses. The Partnership also fosters long-term conservation values and appreciation of science by engaging the public with hands-on research experiences.

Summer Wild Turkey Sighting Survey

Partner with New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) to monitor turkeys in the wild. The DEC seeks wildlife lovers in every county to help them observe and count young male and female turkeys (also known as Jakes and Jennies) in August. This survey sheds light on the interaction between weather, environment and flock vitality. It also helps determine fall hunting potential.

Thanksgiving Day Western Bird Count

Count birds within a 15-foot area, anywhere in the Western states, for one hour on Thanksgiving Day; you decide the hour and the location.
Last year 431 counters in the eleven Western States and Alaska made 440 counts. They tallied 161 species of birds (plus a lot of mammals and other things, too). The top five species counted in these states were House Sparrow (1), Dark-eyed Junco (2), House Finch (3), Black-capped Chickadee (4) and European Starling (5). As predicted, the Pine Siskin dropped out of the top five last season, but should be more numerous this year. Participants should send in a report even if no birds were seen during the hour.

New Hampshire Turkey Observers

N.H. Fish and Game's winter wild turkey flock survey invites you to help record sightings of wild turkey flocks in New Hampshire from January to mid-March each year. This effort helps biologists assess the impact of winter weather on our turkey population!

Creek Watch

Creek Watch is an iPhone application created by IBM Research that enables you to help monitor the health of your local watershed. Whenever you pass by a waterway, spend a few seconds using the Creek Watch application to snap a picture and report how much water and trash you see. We aggregate the data and share it with water control boards to help them track pollution and manage water resources. You can use the map on the left to explore the data that people have contributed, or see recent contributions as a table.

The Creek Watch App uses four pieces of data:

The amount of water: empty, some, or full.
The rate of flow: still, moving slowly, or moving fast.
The amount of trash: none, some (a few pieces), or a lot (10 or more pieces).
A picture of the waterway.

This data helps watershed groups, agencies and scientists track pollution, manage water resources, and plan environmental programs.

Creek Watch is a project developed at IBM Research - Almaden in consultation with the California State Water Resources Control Board's Clean Water Team.

The iPhone application is now available free on the iTunes store, so you can get started contributing data!

Golden Eagle Survey Project

Help survey golden eagles in the wild in the blufflands region of southeast Minneosta, western Wisconsin and northeast Iowa during our Annual Wintering Golden Eagle Survey held each January. We are conducting the survey as a part of a project investigating golden eagles that winter in this region. Little is known about their breeding origins, migration and habitat use. Your participation in this project will enhance our understanding of one of North America's largest birds of prey.

My Invasive

My Invasive allows the public to report sightings of invasive species. You can take a picture of the animal or plant and upload it along with details about the location of your sighting. Sightings are plotted on a map to help scientists track the geographical distributions of invasive species like Giant African Snails, weeds, and insects.

Chestnut Mega-Transect

The goal of the Chestnut Mega-Transect Project is to document the current status of American chestnuts along the Appalachian Trail. Using the idea that the Appalachian Trail is really a transect through a unique US ecosystem, TACF trains hikers to identify and count American chestnuts along the Appalachian Trail as divided into approximately 1 mile segments.

Albedo Project

Wherever you are – anywhere in the world – contribute to science by taking a photo of a blank white piece of paper!

Photos are needed on the following dates:

September 17 and 18, 2011
September 23, 2011
November 6, 2011
December 12, 2011
February 4, 2012
March 20, 2012
May 5, 2012
June 20, 2012
August 6, 2012
September 22, 2012
November 5, 2012

Your photo will used to measure how much of the sun’s energy is reflected back from the Earth -- our planet's "albedo." It's one way scientists can monitor how much energy – and heat – is being absorbed by our planet. By contributing to the Albedo Project, you will be providing data that can be used to examine the similarities and differences of reflectivity around the world.

Should grassy surfaces have the same value in Brazil as in Norway? How does clay soil in the southeastern USA differ from sandy desert in the southwestern USA? Is there any difference in urban “hot spots” that can be attributed to latitude?

Individuals, schools, small and large groups can all use these data to help inform activities that are appropriate and effective for their communities. Whether it is maintaining the health of parks and green spaces, or legislating green building codes, there is something each can do. It is the hope of this project to present some of the actions taken, as well as follow their albedo records over time.

Cascades Butterfly Project

We are monitoring butterfly population responses to climate change in North Cascades National Park and Mount Rainier National Park. Please join our effort.

Subalpine meadows in these two National Parks are expected to shrink dramatically due to the effects of climate change, but as of now, the rate and magnitude of this change is unknown. Butterflies make ideal indicator species because they are particularly sensitive to climatic changes, and are relatively easy to identify in the field by scientists and volunteers alike. Trained participants will hike to scenic alpine meadows and help scientists identify and count butterflies along the way.

Pika Monitoring

We need people to document where and when they see Pika (smallest member of the rabbit family), hear pika, or see their hay piles.

If you are out hiking in scree fields, this is a great opportunity to contribute.

Invaders of Texas

The Invaders of Texas Program is an innovative campaign whereby volunteer "citizen scientists" are trained to detect the arrival and dispersal of invasive species in their own local areas. That information is delivered into a statewide mapping database and to those who can do something about it. The premise is simple. The more trained eyes watching for invasive species, the better our chances of lessening or avoiding damage to our native landscape.

The Invaders of Texas Program supports the creation and perpetuation of a network of local citizen scientist teams who seek out and report outbreaks of selected environmentally and economically harmful invasive species. These teams, coordinated by the Wildflower Center contribute important data to local and national resource managers who will, in turn, coordinate appropriate responses to control the spread of unwanted invaders. The Invaders Program is designed to move the target audience beyond awareness to action on invasive species.

This is your chance to help slow down the spread of harmful invasive species and reduce their ecological and economic damage.


Help identify and catalog the trees in Philadelphia's urban forest! PhillyTreeMap is an open-source, web-based map database of trees in the greater 13-county 3-state Philadelphia region. The wiki-style database enables non-profits, government, volunteer organizations, and the general public to collaboratively create an accurate and informative inventory of the trees in their communities. The project was funded by a USDA Small Business Innovation Research Grant and is in support of the Philadelphia Parks & Recreation's 30% tree canopy goal and the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's "Plant One Million" campaign. As more trees are added to the database, PhillyTreeMap uses the iTree software from the USDA Forest Service to calculate the environmental impact of the region's urban forest. So get outside and add some trees!

Community Wrack Monitoring Project

The Skidaway Institute of Oceanography has been funded by the Georgia Coastal Zone Management Program to assess the distribution of wrack in the salt marshes of coastal Georgia. Marsh wrack is the dead marsh grass that forms large layers on top of the water or the marsh surface.

The project will map the distribution for a number of different years from aerial photographs to determine how much wrack is present in coastal Georgia and where wrack is found in different seasons. The project also aims to study how long wrack persists in a variety of marsh settings.

To do this, the project needs citizen scientists to help document marsh wrack sites. Volunteers will do the following activities:

1. Identify site or sites that you can document at least weekly by taking photos.
2. Gather latitude/longitude location data for each site.

Anyone who helps out will get a copy on the final results of the study and acknowledgement of their help in the text

Redwood Watch

Redwood Watch needs volunteers to take photographs of redwood trees and other redwood forest plants and animals and submit them to researchers. Your data will help Save the Redwoods League better understand species distribution within the redwood range.

We do not yet know how climate change will impact the redwood forest in the coming decades, but when we know where redwood forests and their inhabitants do well today, we will be better able to predict where the redwood forests of tomorrow will thrive!

As you walk through the forest, Redwood Watch encourages you to submit observations of plants and animals that live in the redwood forest. Snap a picture and submit it online using the iNaturalist app and the selecting the Redwood Watch project.

The project is a partnership between the Save the Redwoods League, iNaturalist, Google Earth Outreach, and the California Academy of Sciences.

Track Invasive Species

**This project is no longer active**

You can help the fight against invasive species by tracking phenophases of invasives through the USA National Phenology Network’s Nature’s Notebook. We need observers to track species such as leafy spurge, purple loosestrife, and tamarisk-species designated as invasive by the USFS, USGS and NatureServe.

Invasive species have infested hundreds of millions of acres across the United States, causing widespread disruption to ecosystems and reducing biodiversity. The invasive species threat is one of the top priorities of the US Forest Service. Knowledge of invasive species phenology can assist managers to better control invasives and predict future spread. The purpose of the Track Invasive Species project is to monitor distribution and phenophases, or life cycle events, of invasive species across the US.

Oklahoma Invasive Plant Council

The Oklahoma Invasive Plant council needs Oklahoma residents to report data on invasive plants in their area.

Participants gather information about the invading species and its location, and then submit it on the project website.

By contributing, you can help the project facilitate management of invasive plants and protect the economic and natural resources of Oklahoma’s land and water.


MySwan is a citizen science project for people who love swans. Just record your black swan sighting on the interactive map, and you can make a valuable contribution to research on the behavior and movement of swans.

After you submit your sighting, you'll get an instant report about the swan, with interesting information about its history and recent movements.


BeeSpotter needs volunteers to go outside with a camera and capture quality pictures of bees! Researchers at the University of Illinois are trying to better understand bee demographics in the states of Illinois, Missouri, and Ohio (added for the 2015 spotting season!) and they can't do it without your help. Your data will become part of a nationwide effort to gather baseline information on the population status of these insects.

BeeSpotter is a partnership between citizen scientists and the professional science community. The project is designed to educate the public about pollinators by engaging them in a data collection effort of importance to the nation.

The Wildlife Health Event Reporter

Wildlife Health Event Reporter (WHER) is publicly available to anyone to use to report their sightings of sick or dead wildlife.

Individual reports viewed together can lead to the detection and containment of wildlife disease outbreaks that may pose a health risk to people, domestic animals and other wildlife. WHER hopes to harness the power of the many eyes of the public to better detect wildlife disease phenomenon.

Additionally, WHER was developed by the Wildlife Data Integration Network (WDIN), a program of the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

FrogWatch USA™

FrogWatch USA Chapters are overseen by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums and are hosted and managed by zoos, aquariums, and like-minded organizations.

At training sessions hosted by a local chapter, volunteers learn to identify local frog and toad species by their calls during the breeding season and how to report their findings accurately. By mastering these skills, volunteers gain increased experience and control over asking and answering scientific questions which, in turn, augments science literacy, facilitates conservation action and stewardship, and increases knowledge of amphibians.

Wildlife Sightings - Citizen Science

Wildlife Sightings is a free service that enables projects leaders to publish, organize, and manage their own wildlife sightings data.

Wildlife Sightings helps eliminate the technical barriers and costs to non-profit organizations and educators wishing to conduct their own wildlife surveys. That way, nature lovers, conservation groups, eco-tourism business, and educators can focus their energy on what they love most -- citizen science!

Educators and non profit groups can create and manage their own citizen science class activity or projects with easy to use free online tools. Create a citizen science project in minutes and avoid costly development costs.

Documenting wildlife sightings contributes to science, engages community participants/students and strengthens environmental community efforts.

Juniper Pollen Project

**This project is no longer active**

You can contribute to a nation-wide effort this spring to provide more accurate juniper pollen forecasts! Juniper pollen causes severe allergic reactions in many people. The Juniper Pollen Project is a NASA-funded collaborative effort between the USA National Phenology Network and several universities in Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas to improve predictions of pollen release and allergy and asthma warnings.

You can join this effort by periodically checking individual juniper trees in your area for pollen cone development and reporting your observations via the USA National Phenology Network web page. Just choose one or more of our four species of juniper: Pinchot's juniper (Juniperus pinchotii), Rocky Mountain juniper (Juniperus scopulorum), oneseed juniper (Juniperus monosperma), or Ashe's juniper (Juniperus ashei), make observations of your juniper, and report your findings via the USA-NPN’s online system, Nature’s Notebook.

Rusty Blackbird

The Rusty Blackbird project needs volunteers to help researchers study the distribution and abundance of rusty blackbirds.

The rusty blackbird is a widespread North American species that has shown chronic long-term and acute short-term population declines, based both on breeding season and wintering ground surveys. The decline, although one of the most profound for any North American species, is poorly understood. Moreover, no conservation or monitoring programs exist for this species.

There are two ways you can help:

1. Submit rusty blackbird observations, particularly information related to breeding sites
and concentrations of birds during winter (Dec-Mar).

2. Join the rusty blackbird feather and blood donor project. If you regularly band rusty blackbirds, researchers could use feathers for isotope analysis and blood for genetic research, contaminant studies, and disease screening.

Dragonfly Swarm Project

The Dragonfly Swarm Project uses the power of the internet to allow everyone to participate in a large-scale study of dragonfly swarming behavior. Participants observe dragonfly swarms wherever they occur, make observations of the composition and behavior of the swarm, then submit a report online.

Data is compiled from the reports by an aquatic entomologist with a passion for dragonflies. Her goal is to use the data collected from participants for two purposes: 1) to publish data from a massive number of dragonfly swarms in the scientific literature, making this information available to scientists, and 2) to provide information about this behavior to the public. Many people see dragonfly swarms and are curious about what they see. The creator of this project hopes to provide answers to the curious while simultaneously collecting information from eye-witnesses to improve our overall knowledge of this fascinating behavior.

Because any given person has to be in the right place at the right time to see a dragonfly swarm, this project isn't possible for a single scientist to do alone. Collecting data from a large network of people is thus the best way to study dragonfly swarming behavior. Participation requires only curiosity and a few minutes of your time, so keep an eye out for dragonfly swarms in your area this summer and send in your reports!

Thanks in advance for your participation!

The Great Yew Tree Hunt

The mission of the Great Yew Hunt is to map the locations of ancient Yew trees across the UK and measure the girths of their trunks. The age of the Yew trees will then be estimated from looking at their girth measurements.

If you have an iPhone or Android Mobile--and an interest in tree hunting in the UK--you can help. Download the Epicollect application from iTunes (for iPhone users) or from the Android Marketplace (for Android Users). Once Epicollect has download, please load up the project 'YewHunting' and submit a photo and some basic information on the Yew tree you have found. This includes its Trunk girth measurement and the location in which the Yew tree has been found.

University of Florida Cuban Treefrog Citizen Science Project

Cuban Treefrogs are not native to Florida, but have become invasive throughout the peninsula and are causing the decline of native frogs--especially in urbanized areas. However, many people report that when they start to manage Cuban Treefrogs around their homes, they begin to see native species return. Participants in this project capture and remove invasive treefrogs around their homes, collect and submit data on these frogs, and monitor for native treefrogs.

Colorado Spider Survey

The Colorado Spider Survey (CSS) is a means of gathering critical information about the ecology and distribution of this understudied taxonomic group. Researchers have documented the distribution and species diversity of several groups of insects in the Rocky Mountain region such as ants, grasshoppers, and butterflies. However, information about the distribution and diversity of other arthropod groups in this region is lacking. One group that is particularly understudied is the Order Araneae, or the spiders. Little is known about either the biodiversity of spiders in Colorado or the impact urbanization is having on species distribution in the state. No formal spider surveys have ever been conducted in Colorado.

The survey will be carried out through a series of Spider Identification and Collection Workshops that will be held throughout the state, but particularly in cooperation with the State Park system. These workshops, led by a team of professional and amateur arachnologists (or spider biologists), will train members of local communities in spider biology, morphology, taxonomy, and collection techniques. The specimens will be collected during the next several years by team leaders as well as workshop participants and will be sent to the Denver Museum of Nature & Science for identification and storage. Data from these specimens and from Colorado specimens housed at other collections throughout the country will be compiled and published in an electronic database.

Beaver Creek Reserve BioBlitzes

A BioBlitz is a rapid biological survey of a property in which as many species from as many taxonomic groups as possible are counted during a 24-hour period. It is used to provide a snapshot of wildlife in an area, and to identify any rare or endangered species there. As a volunteer, you would participate in training to learn how to collect data during the BioBlitz, and on the day of the event you work with experts to identify species. By participating in the BioBlitz, you get the opportunity to meet and spend time with people who are interested in the environment, and learn about critters in Wisconsin!

Acoustic Bat Monitoring

Citizen Science Center volunteers assist the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources with their Acoustic Bat Monitoring Program. Volunteers attend a training workshop during the spring where they learn how to use an AnaBat detector, which records bat calls using a personal digital assistant that has a global positioning system to record the location and time. The bat detector translates the bat's call "on the fly" to a frequency that humans can hear. In this way, volunteers can actually hear what a bat call sounds like, while making sure the device is working correctly.

After training, bat volunteers borrow the AnaBat detection system, dubbed the “Bat Monitoring Kit,” for one to three nights to conduct bat surveys of local parks, neighborhoods, lakes and trails. Sometimes volunteers survey areas of their choice and sometimes they are asked to survey specific sites.

Once a volunteer selects a site to survey, they agree to survey that site three times during the season, once in April/May, once in June/July, and once in August/September. Each survey is between one to three hours (a minimum of 1 hour). Surveys begin a half-hour after sunset. Bat monitoring volunteers of all ages are welcome to participate. Volunteers younger than 16 must be accompanied by an adult.

Jay Watch: Monitoring Florida's Only Endemic Bird

Jay Watch needs volunteers in Florida to conduct surveys of the charismatic scrub-jay, the only Florida bird species that lives nowhere else on earth. Volunteers play recorded, territorial scrub-jay calls to attract the birds, then observe and record the number of family groups, adults and juveniles. Volunteers note any band color combinations, helping track individual birds. Information is
recorded on aerial maps by volunteers in the field and is then computerized.

During spring workshops, volunteers learn about Florida scrub-jay identification and biology, the scrub ecosystem and survey protocols. Permanent survey locations are established and each site is surveyed three times—before noon on separate days—to ensure all scrub-jays are observed. Jay Watch surveys are conducted from mid-June through July.

The scrub-jay is considered the indicator species of Florida’s oldest wild lands – the ancient islands that make up today’s scrub. When the scrub-jay does not thrive, something is wrong with its habitat.Today, degradation of scrub habitat pushes the scrub-jay toward extinction; they are listed as a threatened species by state and federal governments.

Unless people act, the Florida scrub-jay may blink right out of existence. The Conservancy and our Jay Watch partners know what the scrub-jay needs and how to provide it. The time to act is now. Will you help?

Noxious Weeds Citizen Science Project

The Noxious Weeds Citizen Science Project needs volunteers to document the presence or absence of five noxious weeds along 700+ miles of Glacier National Park's hiking trails to determine the distribution and extent of noxious weeds invading the park.

Glacier National Park hosts over 1,000 different types of plants, but the unique native flora has serious competition. There are currently 126 exotic plant species within the park and although many of them are not invasive, the list does include 20 noxious weeds, or highly invasive plants that are a direct threat to the proliferation of native plant communities.

The Non-native Invasive Plant Citizen Science program assists park managers map where invasive plants exist in the back-country. The data gathered by citizen scientists throughout the park's million acres provides critical assistance in mapping these invasive plants and managing them.

Since 2005 the Glacier National Park Citizen Science program has enlisted trained park visitors, staff and volunteers to collect scientific information that would otherwise be unavailable to resource managers and researchers due to lack of personnel or funding. For citizen scientists, the rewards are a sense of stewardship and a greater awareness and understanding of the park’s resource issues. For the park, it provides a wealth of data which can be used to increase understanding of our natural resources, offering an opportunity to get much-needed baseline information about key plant and animal species.

High Country Citizen Science Project

The High Country Citizen Science Project trains citizen scientists to participate in back-country surveys to collect data on the number and distribution of mountain goats, bighorn sheep and pikas, three species of concern in the high country of Montana's Glacier National Park. This contribution will enable the park to more effectively manage these species and their habitats.

Concern about wildlife in Glacier’s alpine and sub-alpine areas is growing. High country habitats are highly vulnerable to impacts from climate change and invasions of insects and plant diseases. Mountain goat and pika population declines have been documented in areas outside of Glacier. The primary goal of the project is to collect baseline information about population size and distribution and to monitor population trend over time.

Participants attend a one-day classroom and field-based education program. Participants learn about species identification, management concerns, and how to observe and document observations of each species. They also learn how to use field equipment such as spotting scopes, compasses, and global positioning system (GPS) units. Once trained, participants select survey sites from a list of mapped locations and hike to sites to conduct a one hour observational survey on mountain goats and bighorn sheep or pikas. Hiking distances vary between 3 to 15 miles one way. During pika surveys participants traverse talus (boulder) fields looking under rocks for signs of pikas.

Since 2005, the Glacier National Park Citizen Science program has engaged trained park visitors, staff, and volunteers to collect scientific information that would otherwise be unavailable to resource managers and researchers due to lack of personnel or funding. For citizen scientists, the rewards are a sense of stewardship and a greater awareness and understanding of the park’s resource issues. For the park, it provides a wealth of data that can be used to increase understanding of our natural resources, offering an opportunity to get much-needed baseline information about key plant and animal species.

Common Loon Project

The Common Loon Citizen Science Project needs volunteers to conduct surveys at 45 high priority lakes in Glacier National Park to document presence of common loons and observations of breeding and nesting behaviors.

Common Loons are a Montana Species of Special Concern, and Glacier National Park harbors about 20 percent of Montana’s breeding pairs. Since 1988, data has been collected once every year during Loon Days. Analysis of these data indicate lower reproductive rates for pairs in the park compared to the rest of Montana. Finally, there is evidence that loons are adversely impacted by human disturbance at nest and nursery sites.

The Common Loon Citizen Science Project educates park staff and volunteers on successful identification and observation techniques when surveying for loons in hopes of increasing our understanding of this species. By improving accuracy of sightings and surveys and increasing coverage of lakes with loons throughout the nesting season, the project aims to gather season-long information to gain a better estimate of the health of Glacier National Park's loon population. The project will also use the data to begin to identify factors affecting nesting success.

Since 2005 the Glacier National Park Citizen Science program has enlisted trained park visitors, staff and volunteers to collect scientific information that would otherwise be unavailable to resource managers and researchers due to lack of personnel or funding. For citizen scientists, the rewards are a sense of stewardship and a greater awareness and understanding of the park’s resource issues. For the park, it provides a wealth of data which can be used to increase understanding of our natural resources, offering an opportunity to get much-needed baseline information about key plant and animal species.

Arizona Odonates

Arizona residents are needed to contribute to a photographic guide to dragonflies and damselflies in their state.

Interest in dragonfly watching and photography is growing across the country. Arizona is no exception, especially since dragonflies are an important indicator of water quality, a natural concern in the growing southwest. Although there are a number of Mexican species which reach the United States borders in Arizona, there remains a great deal of work to do in inventorying the species found in the state as well as better defining their ranges and flight seasons.

A number of people have studied the odonates of Arizona over the years, but readily available information has been sparse. This project provides a collection of odonate photos, many not well known within the United States.

This is your chance to contribute to the growing body of knowledge on Arizona dragonflies and damselflies.

Ohio Odonata Society Dragonfly Monitoring

The Ohio Odonata Society needs you to send in photos and specimens of dragonflies and damselflies in Ohio to help advance our understanding of these beautiful creatures.

Volunteers can submit photographs documenting new county or state records of dragonflies and damselflies in Ohio. Once accepted, the photographs will be listed in the project database of nearly 28,000 specimens, published literature citations, and photos.

Many dragonfly and damselfly species simply cannot be identified without placing them under a microscope where detailed examinations can be performed. You can help by collecting and sending in your specimens. The physical collection of living insects is not for everyone, but it is a viable and biologically sound practice if done according to sound scientific principles. Furthermore, some species are very, very, hard to confidently identify from a photo and thus require microscopic examinations. Finally, genetic review in some cases is teaching us that some species are actually two different species!

This is your chance to help promote knowledge and appreciation of dragonflies and damselflies in Ohio!

Mountain Watch: Adopt-A-Peak

Adopt-A-Peak volunteers agree to visit a peak or trail section in the Appalachian Mountains periodically during the growing season. Volunteers will help track long-term trends in plant flowering, fall foliage, and visibility conditions on the mountain they adopt.

Hikers are great resources for frequent reporting from remote areas that could not be observed otherwise. Adopt-A-Peak focuses our monitoring efforts on a specific location year after year. Volunteers are needed for forest and alpine flower monitoring from late May through August, but this effort intensifies in June, which is Flower Watch Month. Fall foliage monitoring can begin as early as September and go through the end of leaf drop.

Visibility is monitored on every visit by taking a photograph. Volunteers are encouraged to monitor both plants and visibility.

Individuals, school groups, outing clubs, flower groups: Adopt-A-Peak! is a platform that supports a variety of citizen science programs using a centralized database to store and deliver science data, with a focus on community based monitoring programs. This platform allows program coordinators to create their own projects and datasheets, manage members, define measurements, create analyses, and even write feedback forms.

Butterflies & Moths of N. America

Butterflies and Moths of North America (BAMONA) is seeking individuals to submit their sightings of butterflies, moths, and caterpillars. BAMONA is a user-friendly web site and database that shares butterfly and moth species information with the public via dynamic maps, checklists, and species pages. Data are updated in real time and come from a variety of sources, including citizen scientists. Individuals can get involved by documenting butterflies and moths in their neighborhoods and submitting photographs for review. Collaborating lepidopterists serve as coordinators and oversee quality control. Submitted data are verified, added to the database, and then made available through the web site.

BAMONA also provides free support to partners. Partner with BAMONA to build local or regional species checklists, to get secure data storage, or to set up a project-specific submission and review process. Or, let us know how we can work with you to create a customized solutions for browsing, searching, and visualizing your data. See for details and links to partners.

Colorado River Watch Network

The Colorado River Watch Network supports volunteers who monitor the water quality at strategically located sites across the Colorado River watershed from West Texas to the coast. The network serves as an early warning system that alerts the Lower Colorado River Authority to potential water quality threats.

The network's mission is to encourage and support community-based environmental stewardship by providing citizens, teachers, and students with the information, resources, and training necessary to monitor and protect the waterways of the lower Colorado River watershed.

Volunteer monitors submit data for approximately 120 sites each year, with an average annual total of roughly 1,000 monitoring events reported.

Audubon of Florida EagleWatch

Audubon of Florida's EagleWatch Program seeks volunteers to monitor active Bald Eagle nest sites and help identify potential threats to nesting success.

As a result of Florida’s rapidly changing environment, Bald Eagles currently nest successfully in urban areas. This increased exposure to human activity and the pressure that exposure can put on the eagle population prompted the EagleWatch Program.

EagleWatch seeks information about Bald Eagles, active nest locations, and possible disturbances or threats to nesting activities. The program is designed to educate volunteers in general eagle nesting biology, applicable laws, the identification of nest threats, monitoring techniques, and the verification of previously unrecorded active eagle nests.

This data is compiled and used to assist Florida's Mid-winter Annual Bald Eagle Nesting Survey by documenting both urban and rural eagle nesting activity, successes, and failures. The U.S Fish and Wildlife Service also utilizes EagleWatch data to enhance their conservation and law enforcement efforts.

Texas Turtle Watch

Texas Turtle Watch is a citizen science program developed to study three native turtle species whose population numbers are poorly understood. After volunteers collect numbers and trends over time, the data will directly contribute to an understanding of these native Texas turtle species.

The data collected by citizens plays a critical role in learning more about turtles. By counting the number of turtles they see basking in the sun, trained citizen watch groups of all ages and interests will help scientists create a knowledge base about turtles populations in Texas, which will lead to better conservation efforts and strategies. Additionally, citizens involved in monitoring turtles are provided a unique opportunity to get outside while contributing to science and conservation research.

The three turtle groups of focus are sliders (genus Trachemys), cooters (genus Pseudemys) and softshells (genus Apalone) because these species are frequent baskers. Their basking and nesting behaviors make them more visible than other turtle species.

Through the Texas Turtle Watch program, local citizens of all ages are provided an unique opportunity to explore the world around them while contributing to local conservation efforts. Become a Texas Turtle Watcher today!

Birds in Forested Landscapes

Volunteers with the Birds in Forested Landscapes project observe and record forest-dwelling birds in North America to help scientists better understand the birds' habitat and conservation needs. As a volunteer, you will help answer the following questions:

1. How much habitat do different forest-dwelling bird species require for successful breeding?

2. How are habitat requirements affected by land uses, such as human development, forestry, and agriculture?

3. How do the habitat requirements of a species vary across its range?

Anyone who can or would like to learn to identify forest birds by sight and sound can become a volunteer. Birds in Forested Landscapes is an excellent project for birding groups, such as bird clubs and Audubon chapters, and works well with high school or college curricula.

After identifying a target species and an appropriate forest area to survey, you will conduct two visits, two weeks apart, to determine if the target species is present and to record any signs of breeding activity by playing recordings of bird songs and listening for responses from birds in your survey area.

The project runs from January to September every year.

Black Hills Bee Project

Volunteers with the Black Hills Bee Project monitor and collect bees, record flower visitations, and provide insights on the activities of bees in the Black Hills ecoregion. The project depends upon a volunteer effort to provide essential data, specimens, records, and observations of these native bees.

Volunteers can also contribute photographs of bees from their gardens or elsewhere in the Black Hills. The project will post these photos and identify volunteers as the photographer.

There are four primary benefits of participating:

1. Volunteer bee and information contributions will be fully recognized on the project Web page and in any scientific publications.

2. Specimens with names of their collector will be permanently retained in the Severin‐McDaniel insect Research Collection at South Dakota State University, with duplicate specimens going to the US Department of Agriculture Bee Lab.

3. Bees and information provided will contribute to an understanding of the bee diversity of the Black Hills region.

4. The survey of the home and garden bees will allow a determination of which native species can survive in developed areas and be important garden pollinators.

Frog Listening Network

The Frog Listening Network trains community volunteers of all ages and backgrounds to collect data about frog and toad populations in west-central Florida. Volunteers learn how to identify amphibians both by sound and by sight.

Volunteers receive free trainings complete with educational materials such as audiotapes and compact discs, CD-ROMs, and full-color field identification cards to help learn each amphibian species and their individual calls. Volunteers also learn how to collect and record frog population data in a way that's fun and easy.

Amphibians are considered "sentinels" of environmental health because of their sensitive skin. Their populations are declining worldwide, so frog and toad populations need to be monitored in Florida. By watching them and keeping track of their populations, we can begin to understand the health of the environment. It is difficult to assemble a professional team to do this, which is why the project relies on the help of volunteers. Although similar to other amphibian monitoring groups across the country, the Frog Listening Network is the only group of its kind in west-central Florida.

Along with additional environmentally important data collected by others, the frog data are compiled into an annual report that is made available for use by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the National Amphibian Monitoring Program. These data help to paint a picture of the health of the environment.

Bee Hunt

Bee Hunt participants use digital photography to record and study the interactions between plants and pollinators, following rigorous protocols to ensure high-quality data. The data collected will help provide a better understanding of pollinators' importance in growing food and maintaining healthy natural ecosystems. Bee Hunt is open to anyone, anywhere, whenever pollinators are flying. In North America, depending upon your location, you can start as early as March and go as late as November.

There are four ways to participate in Bee Hunt:

1. Inventory pollinators at your site with photographs
2. Compare species in two patches
3. Provide nesting sites for mason bees and study when they are active
4. Use bowls and soapy water to collect insects for a more complete inventory of species

Bee Hunt is a great way to teach and learn about pollination ecology and other aspects of natural history. Bee Hunt is a participatory science project. It's your research. You are the scientists. By following the project’s methods, you will collect and contribute high-quality data.

Sound Around You Project

I am building a sound map of the world as part of a study into how sounds in our everyday environment make us feel. We need your help!

We’re asking people across the world to use our new iOS app on their iPhones or iPads (or any recorder) to record short clips from different sound environments, or "soundscapes"--anything from the inside of a family car to a busy shopping centre. Then we ask volunteers to comment on their soundscapes and upload them to our virtual soundscape map.

Recordings and responses will be analyzed by acoustic scientists, and significant findings will be reported on this website.

Sound Around You aims to raise awareness of how our soundscape influences us, and could have far reaching implications for professions and social groups ranging from urban planners to house buyers.


TreeWatch volunteers "adopt" a tree in Europe, and observe and record changes in the the tree's visible health through regular surveys. TreeWatch's pilot project is on horse chestnuts.

Europe's trees are facing unprecedented environmental threats, including pollution and land use change. A number of new tree diseases and pests have affected trees in recent years; the horse chestnut leaf miner, acute oak decline, and red band needle blight to name a few. Scientists are working hard to monitor and understand these and other pests and diseases. However, they are small teams and increasingly stretched, both in terms of the growing demand for their expertise, and by tightening budgets. This is where you can help and make a difference.

TreeWatch aims to:

- Create and maintain a registry of tree health.
- Contribute to a scientific understanding of the impacts of environmental stress on tree health.
- Develop a national volunteer network that could function as an early warning system in the face of new threats.
- Promote public engagement with environmental science in general, and specifically with the health and vitality of our trees.

TreeWatch is open to anyone, and getting involved is completely free. Are you up to the challenge?

Project NOAH

Noah is a mobile phone app that allows nature lovers to document local wildlife and add their observations to a growing database for use by ongoing citizen-science projects.

Using the Noah mobile application, users take a photograph of an interesting organism, select the appropriate category, add descriptive tags, and click submit. The application captures the location details along with the submitted information and stores all of it in the species database for use by efforts such as Project Squirrel and the Lost Ladybug Project.

In addition, users can see what kinds of organisms are nearby by searching through a list or exploring a map of their area, all on a mobile phone.

Noah is all about discovering and documenting local wildlife. We work with research groups and organizations to help gather important data and we want you to help by logging recent spottings on your mobile phone. Missions can range from photographing specific frogs or flowers to tracking migrating birds or invasive species or logging the effects of the oil spill.

Great Lakes Worm Watch

The Great Lakes Worm Watch needs citizen scientists to conduct earthworm surveys in forests and other habitats anywhere in North America.

Earthworms are not native to the Great Lakes Region; they were all wiped out after the last glaciation. The current population, brought here by early Europeans, is slowly changing the face of our native forests, but very little is known about the distributions of earthworm and earthworm species across the region. While valuable, this type of information is labor-intensive, and it is difficult for researchers to get funding to do this kind of work. Citizen scientists can help.

There are several ways to get involved:

1. Document earthworm occurrences: This involves collecting and sending earthworm specimens with location information to Great Lakes Worm Watch. These specimens will be archived at the University of Minnesota, and the species and location information will be added to the project database.

2. Collect habitat data: Great Lakes Worm Watch would like data from all habitat types, especially natural ecosystems like forests, woodlands, and prairies. In addition, data from habitats dominated by human activity are also of value, such as farm fields, pastures, and parks. Depending on your level of interest and expertise, you can choose to conduct a general or detailed habitat survey. You can use the instructions and data sheets developed by the project coordinators to make the data easily transferable to the database.

3. Conduct soil surveys: In addition to earthworm and habitat data, Great Lakes Worm Watch is also interested in getting data about the soil conditions at sites in which you sampled for earthworms. You can use the instructions and data sheet developed by project coordinators to make the data easily transferable to the database.

Get started! Anyone can make a BIG difference when it comes to containing the spread of exotic earthworms!

Plants of Concern

Plants of Concern (POC) engages a diverse, dedicated group of citizen scientists to monitor endangered, threatened, and rare plants in the Chicago Wilderness region, which includes northeastern Illinois and northwestern Indiana. The program provides this important data to our partners, who use it to conserve and protect native wildflowers, grasses, and other plants that once flourished in our region. Plants of Concern is coordinated by the Chicago Botanic Garden in partnership with local, state, federal, and nonprofit agencies.

The program aims to:

- Train volunteers as citizen scientists to monitor rare plant populations and become conservation advocates

- Monitor endangered, threatened, and locally rare plant species using standardized protocols

- Assess long-term trends in rare plant populations in response to management activities and/or threats to populations

- Provide information on population trends and potential threats to the populations to public and private landowners, land managers, and agencies as feedback to help determine future management practices

Since its ambitious inception in 2000, Plants of Concern has grown and continues to expand. New sites, plant species, and volunteers have been added every year. Volunteer participation is the backbone of the program, and Plants of Concern has thrived because of the dedication and perseverance of volunteers and the collaboration of regional partners.

You can help! The project needs volunteers to help with monitoring rare species in northeastern Illinois and northwestern Indiana.

Bird Conservation Network Survey

The Bird Conservation Network Survey needs citizen scientists to record bird distribution and abundance information for birds in the Greater Chicago region.

Bird monitors can participate at different levels:

- If you have a special interest in a particular site, you can become a regular monitor at that site and keep a year-round watch on the birds that nest, winter, or migrate through that site.

- You may help track changes in nesting populations by conducting point count surveys during the breeding season.

- You may visit a site during the nesting season and record numbers and species of birds just as you would on a Christmas Count.

- If you do not have the time to become a regular site monitor, you can still contribute your sightings.

The Bird Conservation Network has created a set of standardized methods for studying the birds of the Chicago Wilderness region. These methods can serve a variety of research purposes while also allowing birders to participate at different levels of intensity. Participants commit to making five or more visits to the site each year with at least two of those visits coming during breeding season (June). Also, participants should be able to recognize Illinois birds by sight and sound. By general rule, a birder should have about at least three years of experience with field identification of birds in the Illinois area.

The goals of this study are to generate a general picture of bird distribution in the region, to collect data to assist land managers and conservation planners in decision making, and to create a database compatible with other types of habitat data being gathered in the region which can be used by researchers investigating specific ecosystem questions.

Dragonfly Monitoring Network

The Dragonfly Monitoring Network is a citizen-scientist program that monitors the health of dragonfly populations throughout the Chicago area. This program represents an important step in collecting data on insect populations and their response to land management techniques.

Volunteers will be trained to collect and submit data each summer from an assigned site. They commit to:

- attendance of one Spring Workshop a year

- learning to identify key dragonfly and damselfly species

Contact information: Craig Stettner email:

- conducting at least six site visits between late May and late September

- spending one to two hours walking the route during each visit

- submitting data sheets at the end of the season, which are then added to the project database

With your help, the Dragonfly Monitoring Network hopes to gain a greater knowledge of the distribution and abundance of dragonfly and damselfly species in the Chicago region and eventually to expand the network across Illinois and beyond.

Chicago Park District Butterfly Monitoring Program

The Chicago Park District Butterfly Monitoring Program is a citizen-scientist project that monitors the health of butterfly populations in Chicago Park District nature areas.

Volunteers will:

- learn to identify common butterflies likely to be found in our park system

- conduct at least six site visits between June and early August

- spend 20 to 30 minutes walking the route during each visit

- submit data sheets at the end of the season, which are then added to the butterfly database

- attend a butterfly monitoring workshop held in the spring

Through analysis of the extensive database generated by citizen scientists, researchers are able to gain a greater knowledge of the butterfly species present in the Chicago park system. These results will assist land managers in more effective conservation of the city's butterflies.

Illinois Butterfly Monitoring Network

The Illinois Butterfly Monitoring Network is a citizen-scientist program that monitors the health of butterfly populations throughout northeastern and central Illinois.

Each summer, trained volunteers collect and submit butterfly data from an assigned site. Volunteers commit to conducting at least six site visits between June 1 and August 7, completing four of them before July 20. During the first year they volunteers, participants learn to identify 25 different butterfly species, and they learn another 25 species the second year.

Through analysis of the extensive database generated by citizen scientists, populations trends of species throughout the Chicagoland area are starting to emerge. These results will assist land managers in more effective conservation of the state's butterflies.

Many important sites do not yet have butterfly monitors, and project coordinators continue to look for more volunteers. Join the fun!


Collect Gulf Oil Spill data using your iPhone. MoGO (Mobile Gulf Observatory) is an app that turns you and your iPhone into a "citizen scientist" helping wildlife experts find and rescue oiled birds, sea turtles, and dolphins.

The MoGO app allows you to take and submit photos of oiled, injured, and dead marine and coastal wildlife; tar balls on beaches; oil slicks on water; and oiled coastal habitats.

Camas Citizen Science Monitoring Program

The Camas Citizen Science Monitoring Program seeks to engage high school volunteers in the long-term scientific monitoring of camas lily populations in the Weippe Prairie site of Nez Perce National Historical Park. Students are trained in the classroom and then spend time in the field using data collection techniques specifically designed for this program. Results of the monitoring effort are available to National Park Service managers so that they can make better management decisions based on sound, scientific information.

Camas is an important cultural and natural resource. For the last 7,000 years, camas has been an important part of the Nez Perce history, life and culture, as well as those of many other tribes of the Pacific Northwest. In addition, camas is one of a suite of wetland species associated with seasonal wet prairie ecosystems. However, as a result of recent agricultural conversion, irrigation, flood control, and other land use practices, remaining wet prairies in this region have been drastically reduced. Projected climate change will also impact these wet prairie ecosystems and monitoring camas populations will provide the National Park Service an opportunity to track climate change impacts on park natural resources.

Monitoring of camas and invasive weeds is a unique opportunity to integrate natural resource monitoring with the cultural history of the Nez Perce people. Citizen scientists will use carefully designed scientific procedures and modern technology to collect data, such as the number of camas plants and flowering plants and the presence of invasive species. Components of the program are tied to state science standards, and high school students will work alongside ecologists, statisticians, natural resource managers, and interpretive rangers.

Three local high schools are currently participating each year. This is a unique learning opportunity that students are sure to remember.

Bird Atlas 2007-11: Mapping Britain and Ireland's Birds

Bird Atlas 2007-11 needs volunteers in the United Kingdom to help produce maps of distribution and relative abundance for all bird species that breed and winter in the area.

Bird atlases provide a fascinating periodic insight into the status of all of the bird species of an area. This project will allow researchers to assess changes in bird distributions since previous breeding atlases in 1970 and 1990, and since the last winter atlas of the early 1980s. Atlases have been immensely important for furthering bird knowledge and conservation, and Bird Atlas 2007-11 is destined to set the agenda for the next decades of ornithology in Britain and Ireland.

Fieldwork will span four winters and four breeding seasons, starting November 1, 2007, and concluding in 2011. There are two ways in which you can help:

1. Timed Tetrad Visits - record all the birds you see and hear in a 2km x 2km square. Visit for an hour or more in the winter and breeding season.

2. Roving Records - any bird, anytime, anywhere. If you see it, record it, and, the project coordinators will map it.

The Bird Atlas is a huge project that will synthesize millions of individual bird records. Don't miss this chance to make an important contribution.

Bird Ringing at the British Trust for Ornithology

Bird Ringing at the British Trust for Ornithology is a network of more than 2,500 trained and licensed volunteers in the United Kingdom that ring--or tag--more than 900,000 birds every year.

Bird ringing involves the fitting of small, uniquely numbered metal rings on the legs of birds. By identifying these birds as individuals, researchers can start to understand changes in the survival and movements of bird populations.

Bird ringers come in many types, from individuals working in urban areas to large groups working in a wide geographic area, and can start at any age. Though you definitely don’t need to be a bird expert to ring, it does help if you have some prior bird knowledge. Anyone who wants to participate in the project will need to gain field experience with a qualified trainer.

You’ll no doubt find that ringing is a very satisfying activity. Not only will you be adding to 100 years of data used directly by conservationists, but you will also enjoy the experience of seeing birds close up. Whether you want to train to ring birds in nest boxes, gardens, or a local gravel pit, your contribution is vital to the project's success.

Nest Record Scheme

Nest Record Scheme volunteers gather vital information on the productivity of the United Kingdom's birds, using simple, standardized techniques. Participants provide the evidence needed to confirm whether a species in decline is encountering problems at the nesting stage.

Nest recording is one of the simplest citizen science projects at the British Trust for Ornithology in which to participate. Data are analyzed annually, and the results are published in the
"Breeding Birds in the Wider Countryside" report along with information on species’ abundance obtained through other British Trust for Ornithology monitoring schemes. Nest record data are also used to investigate the causes of species-specific trends in breeding success.

The project provides an ideal opportunity to participate in the conservation of Britain’s birds. Whether you can monitor a single garden nestbox or carry out a larger study, your records make a valuable contribution to the project.

Wetland Bird Survey

The Wetland Bird Survey (WeBS) needs volunteer birdwatchers to monitor non-breeding waterbirds in the United Kingdom. The principal aims of the project are to measure population sizes, determine trends in numbers and distribution, and to identify important sites for waterbirds.

Counts are made at around 2,000 wetland sites, of all habitat types. Volunteers make monthly coordinated counts. The principal months of data collection are from September to March, though observations are increasingly submitting data throughout the year.

Volunteers use the so-called "look-see" methodology, whereby the observer, familiar with the species involved, surveys the whole of a predefined area. Data are widely used for a variety of purposes and are presented in the annual WeBS Report.

The Wetland Bird Survey is dependent upon the enthusiasm and dedication of the several thousand volunteer counters throughout the UK. New counters are always needed to cover new sites, particularly habitats such as rivers which are monitored less comprehensively, as well as to replace counters who retire.

Breeding Bird Survey

This project needs volunteers to survey breeding bird populations in the United Kingdom. Join more than 3,000 participants who now survey more than 3,200 sites across the region and monitor the population changes of more than 100 bird species!

Breeding Bird Survey is the main source of population trend information about the United Kingdom’s common and widespread birds. Knowing to what extent bird populations are increasing or decreasing is fundamental to bird conservation, and the status of these populations is an important indicator of the health of the countryside.

Breeding Bird Survey is designed to be a quick, simple, and enjoyable birdwatching experience. Survey sites are randomly selected, 1-km (.6-mile) squares of land. Participants make just three visits to specially selected squares, the first to record habitat and to set up a suitable survey route and the second and third to record birds that are seen or heard while walking along the route. Participants do not need to be world-class birders to take part, but they should be able to identify common birds by sight and sound.

Join today -- all new volunteers receive a free CD of the songs and calls of more than 70 British bird species.


BirdTrack is a free, online bird recording system for birdwatchers to store and manage their own records from anywhere in Britain and Ireland. Everyone with an interest in birds can get involved by recording when and where they watched birds then completing a list of the species seen and heard during the trip.

Exciting real-time outputs are generated by BirdTrack, including species reporting rate graphs and animated maps of sightings, all freely-available online. The data collected are used by researchers to investigate migration movements and distributions of birds and to support species conservation at local, national and international scales.

BirdTrack is year-round and ongoing, making it an ideal project for getting children enthused about birds and migration. Teachers are encouraged to add their school grounds as a BirdTrack site then help their students to record the birds they see and hear.

The success of BirdTrack relies on YOU. Get started today!

Garden BirdWatch

Garden BirdWatch needs citizen scientists in the United Kingdom to gather information on how different species of birds use gardens and how this use changes over time. Gardens are an important habitat for many wild birds and provide a useful refuge for those affected by changes in the management of the countryside. The data gathered in this project enables researchers at the British Trust for Ornithology to monitor the changing fortunes of garden birds.

Some 16,000 participants currently take part in Garden BirdWatch. Participants send in simple, weekly records of bird species that they see in their gardens. This information is either submitted on paper count forms or by using Garden BirdWatch Online. Each participant also supports the project financially through an annual contribution of £15 (approximately $22). In return, participants receive the quarterly color magazine, Bird Table, count forms, and access to advice on feeding and attracting garden birds.

All new joiners will receive a free copy of an exclusive paperback version of the acclaimed "Garden Birds and Wildlife" (normally £14.99).

Puget Sound Seabird Survey

Volunteer birdwatchers with the Puget Sound Seabird Survey gather valuable data on wintering seabird populations in the Puget Sound. The project is organized by the Seattle Audubon Society.

During monthly winter surveys from October to April, volunteers identify and count birds from the Puget Sound shoreline using a protocol designed by leading seabird researchers. Volunteers count all species of coastal seabirds including geese, ducks, swans, loons, grebes, cormorants, gulls, terns, and alcids. These data will be used to create a snapshot of seabird density on more than three square miles of nearshore saltwater habitat.

Puget Sound Seabird Survey is the only land-based, multi-month survey in the central or south Puget Sound.

Bald Eagle Watch

Bald Eagle Watch volunteers monitor various eagle nests across the Colorado Front Range to provide information to biologists on the nesting success of the Colorado Bald Eagle population.

From January to July, Bald Eagle Watch volunteers collect nesting data and record many aspects of the breeding cycle, including courtship, incubation, feeding of nestlings, and fledging of the juveniles.

Colorado is home to many resident and migrant Bald Eagles. This is a fantastic opportunity to continue monitoring the eagle population to ensure it remains viable.

ColonyWatch: Monitoring Colorado Waterbirds

ColonyWatch volunteers monitor colonial waterbirds in Colorado, and resource managers use this information to effect long-term conservation. Anyone who enjoys birds and is concerned with their conservation can be an effective ColonyWatcher.

ColonyWatchers devote anywhere from an hour to several days monitoring a colony. A large colony containing several species may require a number of visits, each of several hours duration. Most of the colonies are small and many can be surveyed in a single visit. Most ColonyWatchers take responsibility for a single colony, but some have adopted up to a dozen.

Anyone who has an interest can acquire the necessary skills, and technical support is always available from the project coordinator and Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory. Become a ColonyWatcher today!


BeakGeek allows citizen scientists to share information about birds and bird sightings using freely available and simple social networking tools such as Twitter. BeakGeek adds value to the data created with these tools by providing map based visualizations and monitoring for terms such as "Rare Bird Alert".

Monarch Larva Monitoring Project

The Monarch Larva Monitoring Project enlists citizen scientists to collect long-term data on larval monarch populations and milkweed habitat.

Developed by researchers at the University of Minnesota, the project aims to better understand how and why monarch populations vary in time and space, with a focus on monarch distribution and abundance during the breeding season in North America.

As a volunteer, you can participate in two ways: You can commit to regularly monitoring a specific patch of milkweed or you can submit anecdotal observations. If you commit to regular monitoring, you'll conduct weekly monarch and milkweed surveys, measuring per plant densities of monarch eggs and larvae. You'll also be able to participate in more detailed optional activities, such as measuring parasitism rates and milkweed quality. Your contributions will aid in conserving monarchs and their threatened migratory phenomenon, and will advance our understanding of butterfly ecology in general.

In addition to contributing to an understanding of monarch biology, you'll gain hands-on experience in scientific research. Through this experience, we hope that your appreciation and understanding of monarchs, monarch habitat, and the scientific process are enhanced.

Find the Swallow-tailed Kite

The Center for Birds of Prey needs your help identifying Swallow-tailed Kites.

You can help researchers determine the birds' distribution, monitor population trends, and locate important nesting and foraging sites.

Swallow-tailed Kites have striking black and white plumage with a long, scissor-like tail. They are primarily located in bottomland forests and open habitat.

If you see one, all you need to do is report when and where you saw the bird, as well as any other observation details.

Ancient Tree Hunt

The Cherry Bloomsday Project is your chance to find the oldest and most magnificent cherry trees in the United Kingdom.

Until 2008, Yorkshire boasted the United Kingdom’s largest wild cherry tree--18.8 feet (5.7 meters) in girth--but a freak storm snapped off the tree’s crown. Now, you can help find which cherry tree should claim the throne.

Even if you don’t find the next champion cherry tree, the project is collecting records of all types of Britain’s trees in its database. All you have to do is give the tree trunk a hug at chest height. If it’s larger than one human hug, record the information and post it in the project database.

Hug a cherry tree and put it on the map! It couldn't be easier to save the British cherry tree and help find the country’s undiscovered gems.

Scenic Hudson: Volunteer Herring and Eel Monitoring

The Hudson River Estuary Program and Scenic Hudson are working with citizen scientists to monitor herring and American eel in Ulster County's Black Creek Preserve.

Herring volunteers will observe the creek to see if, where, and when spawning runs occur. Those interested in eels will use nets and trap devices to catch juvenile glass eels, which are counted, weighed, and released unharmed.

Data may help biologists discover why populations of these important fish are declining.


The first continental phenology project in the southern hemisphere, ClimateWatch allows every Australian the opportunity of becoming a citizen scientist by observing and recording data on a number of plant and animal species.

Climate change is affecting rainfall and temperature across Australia. As a consequence, flowering times, breeding cycles and migration movements are likely to change as a result of also changing. However, scientists have very little data available to understand the impacts of this. You can help.

By observing the timing of natural events (the study of phenology), such as the budding of flowers, falling of leaves and the appearance of migratory birds, the data you collect and record will help shape the country's scientific response to climate change.

Become a regular ClimateWatcher by recording what you see in your backyard home, on the move, or on one of over 40 ClimateWatch trails in gardens and parks across Australia.

Record sightings online, or through the free ClimateWatch smartphone app.


eBird is a free, real-time, online program that enlists birdwatchers to record the presence or absence of different bird species.

Participants record when, where, and how they went birding, then fill out a checklist of all the birds seen and heard during the outing. eBird shares the observations of birders with a global community of educators, land managers, ornithologists, and conservation biologists.

eBird has revolutionized the way that the birding community reports and accesses information about birds. eBird provides rich data sources for basic information on bird abundance and distribution at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Importantly, it helps to increase our understanding of birds and our appreciation for the uniqueness of our planet's biodiversity.

Evolution Megalab

Evolution Megalab asks volunteers to survey banded snail populations in Europe to help map climate change effects.

Did you know that thanks to a common little snail you can find in your garden, in the park or under a hedge, you can see evolution in your own back yard?

Evolution is a very slow process. Life on Earth started about three-and-a-half billion years ago! It's the tiny changes accumulating over a long, long time that got us here. And you can see some of those tiny steps by joining the Evolution MegaLab.

It may look like banded snails are dressed-to-kill, but really they are dressed not to be killed. Banded snails are a favorite food of the song thrush, and their various shell colors and patterns camouflage them against different backgrounds. But, in some places there are fewer thrushes than there used to be.

Help us find out

* Have shell colors and bands changed where there are fewer thrushes?

Shell color also affects how sensitive a snail is to temperature.

* Have shell colors changed with our warming climate?

Global Garlic Mustard Field Survey

Help scientists gather much-needed data on the abundance and distribution of an invasive plant called 'garlic mustard' (scientific name: Alliaria petiolata).

Many invasive species, like garlic mustard, are quickly changing North America's ecosystems, but scientists still don't understand why or how this happens. Maybe it's an escape from enemies, maybe it's an increase in size or seed production, or maybe it's a misperception.

To figure this out we need sample data from all over the world, but that requires a large group effort. Fortunately, it does not require specialized training because plant performance can be reliably quantified with simple measurements such as height and seed production of individuals, as well as area of coverage and density of plants.

By spending as little as a single day on this project, you could help scientists to come to a new understanding about invasive species. This in turn could ultimately lead to important new management strategies.

Nature's Notebook

Observe seasonal changes in plants and animals to improve our understanding of climate change impacts.

Changes in climate are affecting plant and animal activity across the nation. These modifications impact our economy, human health, natural resources and agriculture. Join us-help document how things are changing!


Geoscientists-in-the-Parks partners geoscience students and experts with volunteers to conduct scientific research that helps the National Park Service better understand and manage its natural resources.

Participants may assist with research, synthesis of scientific literature, geologic mapping, geographic information system analysis, site evaluations, resource inventorying and monitoring, impact mitigation, developing brochures and informative media presentations, and educating park staff as well as park visitors.

Volunteers selected for the program have a unique opportunity to contribute to a variety of important research, resource management, interpretation and education projects. Parks benefit from a participant’s knowledge and skills in geological or physical sciences, while each participant gains valuable experience by working with the National Park Service. Volunteers with all levels of experience are encouraged to apply.

Students’ Cloud Observations On-Line (S’COOL)

Students’ Cloud Observations On-Line (S’COOL) is a citizen science project in which volunteers make and report cloud observations from sites of their choosing, such as a field trip, vacation, or even a backyard. The project aims to collect data on cloud type, height, cover, and related conditions from all over the world. Observations are sent to NASA for comparison to similar information obtained from satellite.

Many people take for granted how powerful clouds are in our atmosphere. It is clouds, in part, that affect the overall temperature and energy balance of the Earth. The more that scientists know about clouds, the more they will know about our Earth as a system. The S'COOL observations help validate satellite data and give a more complete picture of clouds in the atmosphere and their interactions with other parts of the integrated global Earth system. Citizens benefit from their participation in a real-world science experiment and from their access to a variety of background material. Educational materials for teachers are also available.

Bay Area Ant Survey

The Bay Area Ant Survey is a citizen science program that gives the public a chance to participate in research by obtaining baseline data for ants living in local counties. The major goals of this scientific survey are to identify local species, chart native ant distributions, and provide baseline data to monitor the distribution of the invasive Argentine ant.

Participants collect ants and send their ant-filled vial and corresponding data sheet back to the Naturalist Center at the California Academy of Sciences. All specimens will be identified and entered in a database by an Academy entomologist. All results are then uploaded to AntWeb where the location and identification of the ants are made public. Your contribution becomes part of the scientific record!

Christmas Bird Count

Known as the first and oldest Citizen Science project, at over 115 years, Audubon’s Christmas Bird Count is also one of the largest, with 70,000+ person-days of efforts and more than 64 million birds counted each year. The CBC has contributed greatly to the science of bird conservation with hundreds of publications, including many in important scientific journals. From December 14 through January 5 each year, tens of thousands of volunteers throughout the Americas take part in an adventure that has become a family tradition through the generations.

Count volunteers follow specified routes within a designated 15-mile diameter circle, counting every bird they see or hear all day, and submit data to each circle compiler. It’s not just a species tally—all birds are counted all day, giving an indication of the total number of birds in the circle that day. If observers live within a CBC circle, they may arrange in advance to count the birds at their feeders and submit those data to their compiler. All individual CBCs are conducted in the period from December 14 to January 5 (inclusive dates) each season, and each count is conducted in one calendar day (24-hour period).

Great World Wide Star Count

The Great World Wide Star Count is an international event that encourages learning in astronomy by inviting everyone to go outside, look skywards after dark, count the stars they see in certain constellations, and report what they see online. These observations are used to determine the amount and spread of light pollution worldwide.

Participating in the event is fun and easy! You can join thousands of other students, families and citizen scientists from around the world counting stars. Don't miss out!

The Great Sunflower Project

The Great Sunflower Project has three programs. The Safe Gardens for Pollinators program which uses data collected on Lemon Queen sunflowers to examine the effects of pesticides on pollinators. The Pollinator Friendly Plants program which is designed to identify the key plants to support healthy pollinator communities. And, the Great Pollinator Habitat Challenge which allows citizen scientists to evaluate and improve gardens, parks and other green spaces for pollinators.

Some bee populations have experienced severe declines that may affect food production. However, nobody has ever measured how much pollination is happening over a region, much less a continent, so there is little information about how a decline in the bee population can influence gardens.

The Great Sunflower Project makes it easy to gather this information. Find a plant you know (or a Lemon Queen Sunflower), observe it for 5 or more minutes and record all pollinators that visit, and contribute data online. You can make as many observations as you want while your flowers are in bloom. Plant, Watch, Enter. Repeat. That's it. And, who doesn't like sunflowers?!

Project BudBurst

Project BudBurst, a NEON citizen science program, is a network of people across the United States monitoring plants as the seasons change. We are a national field campaign designed to engage the public in the collection of important ecological data based on the timing of leafing, flowering, and fruiting of plants (plantphenophases). Project BudBurst participants make careful observations of these phenophases. We are interested in observations from five plant groups – deciduous trees and shrubs; wildflowers and herbs; evergreens; conifers; and grasses. To participate, you simply need access to a plant.

Supporting and enhancing our understanding of continental-scale environmental change, Project BudBurst data are being collected in a consistent manner across the country for scientists and educators to use to learn more about the responsiveness of individual plant species to changes in local, regional and national climates. Thousands of people from all 50 states are participating and have generated a robust data set that is available for use by scientists and educators to increase understanding of how plants respond to environmental change. Formal and informal educators are finding Project BudBurst an effective approach to engaging their students and visitors in an authentic research experience.
Join our growing community!

Whether you have an afternoon, a few weeks, a season, or a whole year, you can make an important contribution to a better understanding of changing climates. Participating in Project BudBurst is easy – everything needed to participate is on the web site. Choose a plant to monitor and share your observations with others online. Not sure where to start? Take a look at our Ten Most Wanted species.

Project BudBurst is a NEON Citzen Science Program funded by the National Science Foundation.

Project Squirrel

Project Squirrel is calling all citizen scientists to count the number of squirrels in their neighborhoods and report their findings. The goal is to understand urban squirrel biology, including everything from squirrels to migratory birds, nocturnal mammals, and secretive reptiles and amphibians. To gain data on squirrel populations across the United States, citizen scientists will also be asked, when possible, to distinguish between two different types of tree squirrels - gray and fox.

Anyone can participate in Project Squirrel. No matter where you live, city or suburb, from the Midwest to the East Coast, Canada to California, if squirrels live in your neighborhood, you are encouraged to become a squirrel monitor.

The scientists at Project Squirrel will also use this project to understand the effect that participation in citizen science has on participants. By contributing to Project Squirrel and documenting your experience, you can provide valuable information that will eventually be used to recruit other citizen scientists.

Santa Fe National Forest Site Stewards

The Santa Fe National Forest Site Stewards are volunteers who monitor archaeological and historical sites for evidence of deterioration due to natural causes or vandalism. They also serve as spokespersons to the general public by fostering awareness of the importance of preserving these sites.

Site Stewards are selected in part for their commitment to preserving the cultural heritage of the Santa Fe National Forest through their actions as the "eyes" and "legs" of the Heritage Resources staff. Site Stewards are also committed to educating the public and supporting the efforts of others who share these goals. Other skills such as archaeological experience, photography, and leadership are also taken into consideration.

Butterflies I've Seen

Butterflies I've Seen allows you to keep track of all of your butterfly sightings.

Once your sightings are logged in the database, you can retrieve them by location, by date, or by species. You can print out a list of all the butterfly species you've ever seen, a "Life List," or you can print out a list of all the butterfly species you've ever seen at a particular location. At the same time, the sightings you enter provide important information that the North American Butterfly Association, the major butterfly conservation organization in North America, will use to help answer scientists' questions about butterfly distributions, abundance, and conservation.

Enjoy the site and the fact that your efforts are increasing our knowledge and helping butterfly conservation!

Casey Trees

Casey Trees is a Washington DC-based organization that enlists volunteers to help restore, enhance, and protect the tree canopy of our Nation’s Capital.

At the heart of this effort are community volunteers known as "Citizen Foresters," who serve as tree ambassadors to their local community on behalf of Casey Trees. Citizen Foresters teach new volunteers how to properly plant and care for trees, represent Casey Trees at neighborhood meetings and events, perform tree maintenance such as watering and mulching, and spread the word about Casey Trees and the value of urban forests.

Casey Trees also offers many opportunities for citizen scientists interested in the environment, including their Trees 101 course, design and planting workshops, and urban forestry inventory training.

Wildlife Watch

Wildlife Watch is a national, nature-watching program created for people of all ages. When you record your observations, National Wildlife Federation and Wildlife Watch partners collect and review your findings to track the health and behavior of wildlife and plant species. In return, the Wildlife Watch website keeps you up-to-date on wildlife news and facts, and they provide new ideas for attracting wildlife to your backyard and community.

Wildlife’s ability to survive the challenges of the 21st century is becoming outpaced by the events that are transforming our world. Global warming, the loss of habitat, and people becoming more disconnected from nature than past generations are converging on a dangerous path for our planet. The work of the National Wildlife Foundation provides answers to these challenges and will help ensure America's wildlife legacy continues for future generations.

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