header green line bottom border

In the car


WomSAT

WomSAT is a new resource for communities to record sightings of wombats across the country. Australia's unique wombats are in crisis - Their numbers are declining and your help is needed to protect them by recording where you see wombats and their burrows in your local area. We are particularly interested in the incidence of mange in the population and where it occurs and where it does not occur. in the longer term we will use this information to aid the development of a nation-wide mange management plan.




Wisconsin Turtle Conservation Program

The main goals of the WTCP are to catalog species' statewide distributions more thoroughly and to document high turtle mortality locations along roads in order to promote effective management and conservation of Wisconsin’s 11 turtle species.

The WTCP was initiated in response to the increasing trend in highway collisions of migrating turtles and vehicles. Our ever-expanding dedicated volunteer base makes projects like these possible and allows for more efficient ways in which WDNR employees can productively manage turtle numbers.

Volunteering is easy! When you see a live turtle or a turtle that has been hit on the road, use our online or paper form to report it. Photographs are also welcome.




Midwinter Bald Eagle Survey

The Midwinter Bald Eagle Survey takes place during the first two weeks of January each year. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) coordinates the Midwinter Bald Eagle Survey, in which several hundred individuals count eagles along standard, non-overlapping survey routes. Nationwide counts of eagles were coordinated by the National Wildlife Federation from 1979 until 1992, when the Bureau of Land Management's Raptor Research and Technical Assistance Center assumed responsibility for overseeing the count. Responsibility for count coordination shifted to the National Biological Survey (1993-1996) and later to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, Snake River Field Station. In April 2007, the USGS established a partnership with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to maintain the long-term, national coordination of the survey, data analysis, and reporting. USACE will assume responsibility for coordinating the national survey, organizing the results, maintaining the long-term database, and jointly compiling, analyzing, and reporting survey data gathered with USGS following previously used methods (Steenhof et al. 2002) in 2010 and 2015.




The Great Backyard Bird Count

The next count is being held February 17-20, 2017

The Great Backyard Bird Count is an annual four-day event during which bird watchers count birds to create a real-time snapshot of where birds are located around the world.

Scientists and bird enthusiasts can learn a lot by knowing where birds are. Unfortunately, no single scientist or team of scientists could hope to document the complex distribution and movements of so many species in such a short time.

Anyone, from beginning bird watchers to experts, can participate in the The Great Backyard Bird Count. It takes as little as 15 minutes on one day, or you can count for as long as you like during each day of the event. It’s free, fun, and easy, and it helps the birds. In addition, yearly data collection makes the information more meaningful and allows scientists to investigate far-reaching questions.

Hosted by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, National Audubon Society, and Bird Studies Canada.




Save the Tasmanian Devil

The Roadkill Project was launched in 2009 to help determine how significant the threat of roadkill mortality is to Tasmanian devil populations, particularly those populations already decimated by Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD). The Roadkill Project aims to continue to monitor the threat of roadkill mortality and the spread of DFTD and to try to reduce Tasmanian devil roadkill. Involving the public helps to greatly extend our limited resources.

Anyone who is using Tasmanian roads can help by reporting any Tasmanian devil roadkill they see.




Delaware Shorebird Project

The Delaware Shorebird Project involves a dedicated team of scientists, local volunteers, researchers and birders working to mitigate the threat to our shorebirds. Since 1997, they have researched the populations and health of migratory shorebirds. Their research is vital to an international network that supports and directs shorebird habitat protection and management plans. You can be a part of this important work, helping to preserve this awe-inspiring natural cycle. Volunteers assist researchers in gathering data during an intense 5 week field season in May-June of each year. Volunteers should plan to dedicate 3 or more days to the project during this period.




Did You See It? - Report a Landslide

Did You See It? (DYSI) - Report a Landslide is a website developed by the USGS Landslide Hazards Program that asks anyone who saw a landslide anywhere in the country to report their observations. These observations will build a much larger and more complete database that will help scientists gain a clearer picture of how landslides affect the entire United States. Every year, landslides cost the nation 1 to 2 billion dollars in damage. Falling rocks, mud, and debris flows are one of the most common and sometimes deadly hazards faced by all U.S. citizens, yet there is still a lot we do not know about how and why they happen. Now, scientists at the USGS are asking the public to help them track landslides to better understand how to protect lives and property.




Roadkill Survey for Road Bikers

Roadkill Survey for Road Bikers is a project that attempts to find out where wildlife live and how they move in relation to roads.

Wildlife is often lost due to accidents with cars and trucks. Identifying the types of wildlife that are often killed will give clues to wildlife distributions, activity, and responses to climate change.




AirVisual: The Air Pollution Monitoring Project

Unhealthy, polluted air is a ubiquitous, invisible threat that is responsible for 200,000 premature deaths every year in America alone. The NRDC estimates that about 81 million Americans live in areas that fail to meet national air quality standards for particulate pollution (PM2.5).

Particulate matter, abbreviated as PM2.5, is a term used for particles found in the air; including dust, soot, dirt, smoke and liquid droplets that are 2.5 micrometers in size, or less. These particles are so small that they can be absorbed into the bloodstream upon inhalation and cause a variety of adverse health effects.

We tend to assume the air we breathe indoors is safe, yet indoor air quality is frequently worse than outdoors due to high confinement and a variety of indoor sources.

We are calling on interested participants to help determine sources of air pollution both indoors and out. Use the AirVisual Node to discover factors that influence air quality and then download the data from the device to validate your conclusions.

Scientific findings will be posted on our website, airvisual.com, (with credit to you) in order to grow awareness of air pollution sources in the home, office and classroom.

You can also make your air quality monitor a public outdoor station, connected to our monitoring platform (airvisual.com) and crowd-sourced air pollution map (airvisual.com/world) to fill in gaps in government air quality data.

Have an interesting idea for using the device that would contribute to our understanding of air pollution? We want to hear from you!




BeachObserver

When a vessel accidentally discharges cargo at sea, or when oil spills occur, or when plastics or any floating marine debris is cast adrift on the ocean, it will eventually arrive on shore. In most cases affected landowners, neighborhoods, small communities, or municipalities will be the first to notice the accumulation of flotsam and jetsam on local beaches. We have developed a mobile phone application to simplify the recording, mapping, and networking of observations. The app works anywhere but is tailored for wildlife and objects found on shore or near the coast. The main objectives of the project are to:
1) Promote citizen science,
2) Develop baseline data,
3) Analyze change over time,
by facilitating the recording, sharing, and networking of credible shoreline observations including wildlife, beach cast animals, and marine debris with geo-tagged observations and photos. The browser based app is available at www.beachobserver.com and is also available for download from iTunes.




WildPaths

WildPaths is a volunteer citizen science project to monitor road crossings in their neighborhood, through tracks, roadkill and live sightings. The goal of the project is to use the data to better direct our local efforts with future development so that we can maintain crucial connections between core wildlife habitats.




Share a flood observation

If you've seen a flood, no matter how big or small, old or recent, share it at floodcrowd.co.uk!
We've had observations of large floods from Kendal...
...and small pools in Watford
All these observations are important as they can help researchers understand the environment better. The records are forming an online database which will be available to all researchers and stakeholders.




Decodoku

A series of games and puzzles, allowing players to take learn about and take part in quantum error correction research.

Users are given puzzles to solve. They need to come up with a method that gets high scores as much as possible. This can then be used to protect real-life quantum computers against noise.




NatureWatch

NatureWatch is a community that engages all Canadians in collecting scientific information on nature to understand our changing environment.

NatureWatch hosts the following nature monitoring programs in Canada, with more to come in the future:

FrogWatch: Learn about Canada’s favourite amphibians while helping researchers and zoos monitor the health of frogs population and frog habitat.

Ice Watch: Do you live near a pond, lake, or river that freezes over each winter? The dates when ice appears and disappears provide important information about patterns in Canada’s climate. Join our network of citizen scientists who have been tracking changes in winter ice conditions over many years.

PlantWatch: The blooming times of Canada’s most easily-recognized plant species help scientists to track changing climate trends and their impacts. If you love to garden or have an eye for flowers, please help PlantWatch and its network of volunteer provincial coordinators monitor Canada’s changing natural environment.

WormWatch: Worms might gross some people out, but at
WormWatch, we think worms provide an exciting way to teach kids about the importance of soil and the organisms that live in it. And the kids agree with us. If you’re a teacher, guide or scout leader, or someone with a bunch of kids to amuse on a sunny afternoon, get out your shovel and your smartphone and give WormWatch a try.




SquirrelMapper

Life has evolved over millions of years. Yet evolution can produce dramatic change quickly! The coat color of gray squirrels, which occur over much of eastern North America and are introduced around the globe, is a good example. Today most are indeed gray but two centuries ago most were apparently black. How could evolution change this species so profoundly and so quickly?

Help us explore this question at SquirrelMapper where you can: contribute observations of squirrels from your own neighborhood, test hypotheses about why squirrel color varies geographically, directly measure natural selection on squirrel coloration by participating in our "squirrel hunt" exercise, view the geographical pattern of morphs across the gray squirrel's range. Together we can crack this nut!




moo-Q

moo-Q is a scientific iPhone application designed by the Hungry Mind Lab team at Goldsmiths, University of London with the aim of measuring mood and brain power. It allows users to see at what time of day their brain works best, and whether being in a good or a bad mood has an effect on brain power. This data is also securely and confidentially gathered by the researchers at Goldsmiths in order to assess whether there is a correlation between mood and cognitive performance.

Users will complete a set of exercises, lasting no longer than a few minutes, several times over the course of a few days. Doing so unlocks their moo-Q performance chart.

moo-Q is free for users across the world to download. For more information, please visit our website at www.hungrymindlab.com .




Investigating Indoor Air Quality in Northeast Denver

The harmful effects of indoor air contaminants, such as perchloroethylene (PERC), are clear. Knowing how to assess our own risk is less clear. We will assemble and distribute air quality test kits to homes in Northeast Denver in order to collect data on two pollutants: PERC and radon. Our goals are simple, help a local community understand if they are at risk, raise awareness of air quality issues, and test a low-cost method for PERC detection that could allow anyone to screen their home.




HerpMapper

HerpMapper is a cooperative project, designed to gather and share information about reptile and amphibian observations across the planet. Using HerpMapper, you can create records of your herp observations and keep them all in one place. In turn, your data is made available to HerpMapper Partners – groups who use your recorded observations for research, conservation, and preservation purposes. Your observations can make valuable contributions on the behalf of amphibians and reptiles.




South Texas Wintering Birds

Contribute your observations to a database for the state of Texas. Whether you are on a large private ranch, small yard in the city, or public nature area -- if you go birding, we need your sightings. Help us better understand the richness, abundance and changes in bird life in Texas!




Columbia Basin Water

We are collecting rain and snow samples to develop a water balance for the region based on the isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen in the water molecule. This is part of a larger project that is evaluating the past, present, and future of water resources in the Columbia Basin.
More information on the project can be found here: http://janicebrahney.weebly.com/columbia-basin.html and here: https://www.instrumentl.com/campaigns/janicebrahney/




Play to Cure: Genes in Space

Help researchers cure cancer.

The problem:

We know that faults in our genes can lead to cancer cells forming. This can be linked to the amount of genes in our cells - sometimes we have more and sometimes we have less.

It can take years for scientists to analyze all of their genetic data, but with thousands of citizen scientists playing Genes in Space, the process is greatly accelerated.

How it works:

First, you plot a galactic route. In the context of the game, you're choosing your flight path, but these “space coordinates” are actually a visualization of DNA data, and you're showing our scientists where the genetic variations are which may lead to cancer.

Then you collect Element Alpha, a mist like substance that can be traded for ship upgrades. It actually represents the same DNA data that has just been mapped – which means our scientists have two perspectives on the same sample, from one player.

And we’ve added an asteroid field. This makes the gameplay more engaging and challenging. You need to dodge or shoot a multitude of asteroids to complete a stage.

Each data sample is analyzed multiple times for accuracy. Don’t worry about making mistakes - the more people who use Genes in Space, the more accurate the results will be and the faster data can be translated into new ways to beat cancer.




Yellowhammer Dialects

Project aims to compare distribution of yellowhammer dialects in the UK and in New Zealand, where were yellowhammers imported in the 19th century. Whether any new songs evolved during isolation is only one of the questions that intrigue us. The other is, whether current distribution of dialects reflects well the known history, reconstructed from the available information about introduction events (when, where and in which numbers were yellowhammers released) and about subsequent spread.




PressureNet

PressureNet is a network of crowdsourced weather sensors. We automatically collect atmospheric pressure measurements using barometers in new Android devices. We're sharing this live data with scientists and researchers to improve weather forecasting. Soon we'll provide you with a weather forecast based on everyone's live, shared data!

We're going to make new weather models using the data that PressureNet automatically collects - these models should produce forecasts that are significantly more accurate than any other method! Since the data is collected using smartphones, we can gather way more data about the atmosphere than ever before.

Until we make forecasts, PressureNet shows you the raw data. The pressure data is displayed in graphs so that you can see both your own data as well as other regions' graphed over time. We've just added animations as well, so you can watch storms moving across a region. Furthermore, you can now report what the weather is where you are! Current weather conditions automatically refresh every twenty minutes to keep it accurate.

PressureNet has been featured on BBC World Service, Wired Science, and MIT Technology Review.




Clean Air Council Climate Tracker

The Clean Air Council Climate Tracker, developed in partnership with Code for Philly, is developing mobile sensors that can be mounted to city buses and bikes and report pollution and climate-related in real time to be shared as Open Data, for use by app developers and researchers.

With this data being openly available, app developers can empower citizens to avoid areas of high pollution, while also demonstrating the local effects of climate change. Researchers will be able to use an unprecedented level of data to study the effects of climate change on microclimate.

This data will be linked with OpenTreeMaps to demonstrate trees' impact on microclimate, as well as quantify their capacity to mitigate the effects of climate change in an urban setting.




L.A. Nature Map

The L.A. Nature Map hosted by the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles is an interactive map that displays local plant and wildlife observations.

Our Southern California region is a hotspot for urban biodiversity. With your help, we can show Angelenos and the world the diversity of nature all around us. You can contribute to this citizen science project by sending photos of plants and animals.

The L.A. Nature Map is created in collaboration with iNaturalist.




RASCals (Reptiles and Amphibians of Southern California)

RASCals is designed to improve our knowledge of native and non-native reptiles and amphibians in southern California. This region is home to 22.5 million people and has experienced dramatic urbanization and habitat modification. We need your help in documenting reptiles and amphibians throughout the region so that we can examine how various species have responded to these habitat changes. We are interested in native and non-native species and in observations in all types of habitats, from relatively pristine habitats to heavily modified, urban habitats, such as backyards, schoolyards, and urban parks. This project is conducted in collaboration with iNaturalist.




Birdeez

Birdeez is the easiest way to identify, collect and share bird sightings. The goal of this project is to educate you about the birds in your area while you contribute sightings that will be used for scientific understanding of bird migration, bird populations and climate change.

Currently Birdeez is available as an iPhone application at www.GetBirdeez.com/ but soon we we will be online and on different phone platforms as well.

Every bird counts, so help us help them by collecting and sharing sightings.




SENSR

SENSR is a tool to create, share and manage a citizen science project running on mobile devices to harness the power of citizen scientists.

SENSR provides a simple and easy way to obtain a custom data collection application running on mobile devices for your project.

If you are running a grassroots project for science, education, environmental conservation, community monitoring, or other reason, and are seeking ways to expand citizen scientists' participation in contributing data, SENR can help you create a mobile data collection tool for your project.

It is part of a research project at Carnegie Mellon University. Please try out if you are seeking ways to harness citizens' power of data collection.




Watch the Wild

Watch the Wild™ needs your help. As a Watch the Wild™ volunteer, you observe and report the "wild" in your community, from trees and plants to lakes and streams to weather and wildlife activity. In as little as ten minutes, your observations help us to understand how our eco-systems are changing and helps us to adapt for the future. Your observations will be entered into a database and shared with interested scientists.




MyEnvironment

The MyEnvironment mapping tools provides immediate access to a cross-section of environmental data for any geographical location in the U.S. Users of the official site can choose the location and environmental issue to examine.




Michigan Herp Atlas

The Michigan Herp Atlas began in 2004 with the goal of collecting observations of Michigan's amphibians and reptiles (herpetofauna) to better document their distribution and population changes. The data is to be used to best manage and conserve these important indicator species. The Herp Atlas project continues to grow in partners and collaborators demonstrating the effectiveness of this public-private partnership in helping conserve Michigan's herpetofauna. Contributing observations is now easier than ever with an updated online system and recently developed smart phone app.




Kinsey Reporter

Kinsey Reporter is a global mobile survey platform to share, explore, and visualize anonymous data about sex.

Reports are submitted via smartphone, then explored at http://KinseyReporter.org or downloaded for off-line analysis.

The Kinsey Institute is exploring new ways to record and describe people's sexual experiences worldwide. We are also exploring new ways for people to be connected while protecting their privacy. We hope to reach people with all kinds of different ideas, beliefs, and experiences, and who might be willing to report on sexual behaviors, regardless of who is involved and where it is observed. By using Kinsey Reporter, you contribute to research on human sexual behavior. We ask you to act ethically, in the role of a good journalist or "citizen scientist." Submit what is true and accurate to the best of your ability.

Ideally, you would submit a report within 24 hours of the event you are reporting. The report can be about yourself or someone else. It is all anonymous. Kinsey Reporter includes surveys about various sexual activities and other intimate behaviors. These surveys cover sexual behaviors and events, sexual health issues, violence reports, public displays of affection, and other unique behaviors and experience. A 'survey' in this case is a report of information shared by many individuals on a topic of interest; it is not based on a random or representative sample of a community or population.

To ensure that reported data is strictly anonymous, you can only select among the provided tags when answering a question. However, contact us to suggest new surveys, questions, or tags.

To protect the anonymity of the reports even in sparsely populated areas, we aggregate reports over time. A report is not published until a sufficient number of reports have been received from the same location, and then all of those reports are recorded with a randomized timestamp. The more sparsely populated your area and/or the higher the geographic resolution you select, the longer the delay until your report appears. Therefore, in a sparsely populated area, you might want to select a lower resolution (e.g., state/region or country), to minimize the delay until your report becomes public.

Interactive visualizations of the data are available on the KinseyReporter.org website. The anonymous data we collect is also publicly available to the community via an Application Programming Interface (API), documented on the KinseyReporter.org website. We welcome your feedback.

Kinsey Reporter is a joint project of the world-famous Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction (KI) and the Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research (CNetS), both at Indiana University, Bloomington.




Atlas of Living Australia

The Atlas of Living Australia (Atlas) contains information on all the known species in Australia aggregated from a wide range of data providers: museums, herbaria, community groups, government departments, individuals and universities.

The Atlas was initiated by a group of 14 (now 17) organisations—our partners. The intent was to create a national database of all of Australia’s flora and fauna that could be accessed through a single, easy to use web site. Information on the site would be used to: improve our understanding of Australian biodiversity assist researchers to build a more detailed picture of Australia’s biodiversity assist environmental managers and policy makers develop more effective means of managing and sustaining Australia’s biodiversity.

You can participate by submitting a species record, joining an existing citizen science project, digitizing specimen labels, or starting your own citizen science endeavour!




OhDeer

Welcome to OhDeer! Helping to map deer road casualties throughout Britain (or beyond!) via your Smart Phone.

The six species of deer living wild in Britain are our largest terrestrial mammals, ranging from the majestic red deer, to smaller fallow, roe, sika, muntjac and Chinese water deer. The large rise over the past 40 years in road traffic volumes as well as numbers and distribution of deer has unfortunately led to deer casualties at roadsides becoming an increasingly common sight. The total number of deer-vehicle collisions in Britain is estimated to exceed 42,000 per year, but most are not actually recorded. Information you log using this citizen-science smart phone app will assist our research on numbers and locations of deer accident hotspots.




ISeeChange

ISeeChange is a socially networked weather Almanac for communities to collectively journal their climate experiences -- their observations, feelings, questions, and decisions --- against near-real time climate information.

This groundbreaking environmental reporting project combines citizen science, participatory public media, and cutting-edge satellite monitoring of environmental conditions.

Incubated in 2012 by producer Julia Kumari Drapkin at Colorado public station KVNF Mountain Grown Community Radio via AIR’s Localore project, iSeeChange is poised to expand in 2015. The team will work with media and scientific partners across the country to help audiences document environmental shifts in their backyards and connect to the bigger-picture climate changes transforming all of our lives and livelihoods.




uBiome

uBiome is the world's first effort to map the human microbiome through citizen science.

What's the microbiome? The microbiome are the bacteria that live on and within us. It sounds kind of funny, but all of us are actually covered in helpful germs. Many conditions – from diabetes to depression, asthma to autism -- have been found to relate to the microbiome.

uBiome brings this cutting edge technology directly to consumers for the first time. The more data we collect, the more we can learn about this important area of research. We've been featured so far in Wired, Venture Beat, the Los Angeles Times, Scientific American, BoingBoing, and more.




Magpie Mapper

Magpie Mapper is a smartphone app for recording observations of Magpies, one of the most fascinating and striking birds in the United Kindgom. When you see a magpie, simply log it on the app and your data will be used in our research into how birds are distributed throughout our towns cities and countryside.

With their long tails and impressive black and white plumage, magpies are unmistakable. Magpies are so ingrained in our folklorethat people often greet them with "Hello Mr Magpie!".

Now you can digitally salute a magpie with the Magpie Mapper app!




AirCasting

AirCasting is an open-source, end-to-end solution for collecting, displaying, and sharing health and environmental data using your smartphone. The platform consists of wearable sensors that detect changes in your environment and physiology, including a palm-sized air quality monitor called the AirBeam, the AirCasting Android app, the AirCasting website, and wearable LED accessories. By documenting and leveraging health and environmental data to inform personal decision-making and public policy, the AirCasting platform empowers citizen scientists and changemakers.




SubseaObservers

Help track the health and abundance of the mid-Atlantic scallop fishery!

Researchers at the University of Delaware have developed a new robot-based approach to surveying marine life the ocean floor. They use Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs), which can navigate underwater without direct human control, to take photos of marine life in its natural habitat.

By becoming a SubseaObserver you'll play a roll in ocean conservation by helping organizations such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) make better decisions about how to manage the scallop fishery now and for future generations.

As a SubseaObserver you can name your own virtual AUV and choose what part of the mid-Atlantic you'd like to explore.

SubseaObservers also includes information about scallop biology, how the fishery is managed, how AUVs work and where they're used.




Community of Observers

Get to know the nature of YOUR world! The Fairbanks Community of Observers is to encourage greater public clarity around environmental indicators of climate change in Vermont and northern New Hampshire. Using the website developed by the Fairbanks Museum, we'll collect your quantitative data focused on the life cycles of specific birds, butterflies and wildflowers that are sensitive to environmental change as well as seasonal weather data that is characteristic to our region.

The Community of Observers is for individuals, families, clubs, groups and schools. It is designed to encourage citizen scientists to gain a deeper understanding of the cycles and patterns that characterize our region through the seasons, and how the habitats that depend on these cycles might be affected by global climate shifts.




WildlifeBlitzGarneau

This smartphone app will help you explore habitats in your area and easily monitor wildlife populations by logging locations, photos, and responding to form questions all with the ease of your smartphone.




Tucson Bird Count

The Tucson Bird Count is an annual project in which volunteers collect data on the abundances and distributions of bird species from hundreds of sites in the Tucson area.

Volunteers can participate in two programs: 1) The annual Route Program, in which participants count individuals of all bird species, and 2) the quarterly Park Monitoring Program, in which groups adopt an area and spend four mornings a year counting birds at that area.

The data collected will help researchers monitor the status of the Tucson area bird community over time, identify land use practices that are succeeding at sustaining native birds, and investigate the ecology of birds in human-inhabited landscapes. Data and analyses, including distribution maps for most species counted in the Tucson Bird Count, are publicly available on the project web site.

The Tucson Bird Count (TBC) is a cooperative project begun by members of Tucson's science, conservation, and birding communities.




OspreyWatch

Osprey Watch is a project of the Center for Conservation Biology for birdwatchers across the nation to help identify osprey nests and observe osprey behavior. The project hopes to acquire data across a large enough spatial scale in order to address three pressing issues associated with aquatic ecosystems: climate change, depletion of fish stocks, and environmental contaminants. Ospreys are great indicators of the health of aquatic ecosystems as they are sensitive to small changes in fish populations and water quality.

OspreyWatch has almost 500 Osprey Watchers monitoring almost 800 nests across North America, Europe, and Australia. Ospreys are incredible birds of prey and viewing them in the wild can be an amazing experience. And it may be easier than you think. Many osprey nest in man made objects and might even be right outside your backdoor. There are also many nests viewable online through web cameras.

So grab a camera, some binoculars, and locate a nest near you to add photos and descriptions to OspreyWatch’s interactive map. You can even find other nests in your area and help monitor and add updates to nesting activity.




SciSpy

Spy on nature, and contribute to science. Share photos and observations through SciSpy and you're contributing to research initiatives that rely on amateur participation. Created by Science Channel (Discovery), SciSpy enlists paticipants to document the natural world of their backyards, parks, cities, and towns. Photos and observation data are tagged and stamped with date, time and location information and will hopefully provide helpful information to track migrations, changes in the natural environment, seasonal trends and more.




MammalMAP

THE BROAD PICTURE: The aim of MammalMAP is to update the distribution records of all African mammal species. Through collaborations with professional scientists, conservation organisations, wildlife authorities and citizen scientists across Africa, we consolidate all reliable and identifiable evidence (camera trap records, photographs) of current mammal locations into an open-access digital database. The database software automatically generates online distribution maps of all recorded species which are instantly visible and searchable. The information consolidated within MammalMAP will not only yield crucial information for species conservation policies and landscape conservation policies, but provides an excellent platform for educating the public about African mammals and their conservation challenges.

WHY MAMMALMAP IS NECESSARY: In Africa, our knowledge of mammal distribution patterns is based largely on historical records. However, the last three centuries have seen extensive human-modification of African landscapes with the associated conversion, compression and fragmentation of natural land. With further land development presenting a likely reality for the future, the effectiveness of mammal conservation efforts depends on ecological records being updated so that they accurately reflect mammal distribution patterns in the 21st Century. With MammalMAP we plan to conduct these ecological updates over the coming years, by mapping the current distribution of mammal species (including marine mammals and small mammals) across Africa.

HOW MAMMALMAP CONTRIBUTES TO CONSERVATION: The conservation benefits of this research are multiple. First, the comparison of these updated distribution records with both historical and future records will enable the detection of species’ distribution changes in response to human-related and climate-related habitat changes. These change detections will assist the guidance of continent-wide conservation policies and decision making processes. Second, the research will promote and facilitate interdisciplinary and international collaboration amongst scientists and conservation practitioners, with potential benefits to the advancement of conservation science. Finally, both the project input stage (data collection) and output stage (data dissemination) will offer interactive, dynamic and widely applicable education tools suitable for both formal and informal education sectors.

THE WHERE AND THE HOW OF MAMMALMAP: The area of interest for MammalMAP is the whole of Africa. To achieve this we collaborate with scientists, conservation organisations, wildlife authorities and citizen scientists across the continent. Our methods involve consolidating evidence of mammal occurrence in a given location (camera trap records, photographs and other reliable records) into a digital database hosted by the Animal Demography Unit (ADU) at the University of Cape Town. In time, we will use the records in the database to generate distribution maps for all recorded species, in the same way that the ADU has done for birds, reptiles, frogs and butterflies.




Trumpeter Swan Watch

By 1900, Trumpeter Swans were extirpated from their nesting and wintering areas in Central and Eastern North America. Their historic migrations to southerly wintering sites were totally destroyed. In recent decades wild nesting populations of Trumpeters have successfully recovered or have been restored. Many swans migrate to separate wintering areas, but others winter near their northern breeding areas. An unknown number are pioneering southward where they are beginning to establish use of more southerly wintering sites.

Little is known regarding the numbers and groupings of southward migrants east of the Rocky Mountains, the location and characteristics of the sites they are pioneering, the duration of use, or problems they may be encountering. By providing information through Trumpeter Watch, observers can help document the changing distribution of migrating and wintering Trumpeter Swans and help identify potential new southerly migration and wintering sites.




Greater Prairie Chicken Project

The Iowa Department of Natural Resources needs your help to ensure that Greater Prairie Chickens remain in Iowa. All you have to do is submit your sightings.

Greater Praire Chickens were once abundant in central and eastern United States; however, their numbers have dwindled since the 1800s.

Project organizers are looking for information about how prairie chickens are distributed in Southern Iowa regions, including Adair, Madison, Adams, Union, Clarke, Taylor, Ringgold, Decatur and Wayne Counties.




Winter Wild Turkey Flock Survey

Harsh winter conditions significantly affect young turkeys. New York State Department of Environmental Conservation seeks wildlife lovers in every county to help them observe and count young male and female turkeys (also known as Jakes and Jennies), from January through March.




New Hampshire Turkey Observers

N.H. Fish and Game's winter wild turkey flock survey invites you to help record sightings of wild turkey flocks in New Hampshire from January to mid-March each year. This effort helps biologists assess the impact of winter weather on our turkey population!




The Wildlife Health Event Reporter

Wildlife Health Event Reporter (WHER) is publicly available to anyone to use to report their sightings of sick or dead wildlife.

Individual reports viewed together can lead to the detection and containment of wildlife disease outbreaks that may pose a health risk to people, domestic animals and other wildlife. WHER hopes to harness the power of the many eyes of the public to better detect wildlife disease phenomenon.

Additionally, WHER was developed by the Wildlife Data Integration Network (WDIN), a program of the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.




Dragonfly Swarm Project

The Dragonfly Swarm Project uses the power of the internet to allow everyone to participate in a large-scale study of dragonfly swarming behavior. Participants observe dragonfly swarms wherever they occur, make observations of the composition and behavior of the swarm, then submit a report online.

Data is compiled from the reports by an aquatic entomologist with a passion for dragonflies. Her goal is to use the data collected from participants for two purposes: 1) to publish data from a massive number of dragonfly swarms in the scientific literature, making this information available to scientists, and 2) to provide information about this behavior to the public. Many people see dragonfly swarms and are curious about what they see. The creator of this project hopes to provide answers to the curious while simultaneously collecting information from eye-witnesses to improve our overall knowledge of this fascinating behavior.

Because any given person has to be in the right place at the right time to see a dragonfly swarm, this project isn't possible for a single scientist to do alone. Collecting data from a large network of people is thus the best way to study dragonfly swarming behavior. Participation requires only curiosity and a few minutes of your time, so keep an eye out for dragonfly swarms in your area this summer and send in your reports!

Thanks in advance for your participation!




California Roadkill Observation System

Volunteer scientists report their observations of roadkill (animals killed after collision with a vehicle) with an easy-to-use form. Roadkill data can be analyzed by observers and will be used to understand where roadkill occurs and the severity of the impact to wildlife species.




Sound Around You Project

I am building a sound map of the world as part of a study into how sounds in our everyday environment make us feel. We need your help!

We’re asking people across the world to use our new iOS app on their iPhones or iPads (or any recorder) to record short clips from different sound environments, or "soundscapes"--anything from the inside of a family car to a busy shopping centre. Then we ask volunteers to comment on their soundscapes and upload them to our virtual soundscape map.

Recordings and responses will be analyzed by acoustic scientists, and significant findings will be reported on this website.

Sound Around You aims to raise awareness of how our soundscape influences us, and could have far reaching implications for professions and social groups ranging from urban planners to house buyers.




Project NOAH

Noah is a mobile phone app that allows nature lovers to document local wildlife and add their observations to a growing database for use by ongoing citizen-science projects.

Using the Noah mobile application, users take a photograph of an interesting organism, select the appropriate category, add descriptive tags, and click submit. The application captures the location details along with the submitted information and stores all of it in the species database for use by efforts such as Project Squirrel and the Lost Ladybug Project.

In addition, users can see what kinds of organisms are nearby by searching through a list or exploring a map of their area, all on a mobile phone.

Noah is all about discovering and documenting local wildlife. We work with research groups and organizations to help gather important data and we want you to help by logging recent spottings on your mobile phone. Missions can range from photographing specific frogs or flowers to tracking migrating birds or invasive species or logging the effects of the oil spill.




Bird Conservation Network Survey

The Bird Conservation Network Survey needs citizen scientists to record bird distribution and abundance information for birds in the Greater Chicago region.

Bird monitors can participate at different levels:

- If you have a special interest in a particular site, you can become a regular monitor at that site and keep a year-round watch on the birds that nest, winter, or migrate through that site.

- You may help track changes in nesting populations by conducting point count surveys during the breeding season.

- You may visit a site during the nesting season and record numbers and species of birds just as you would on a Christmas Count.

- If you do not have the time to become a regular site monitor, you can still contribute your sightings.

The Bird Conservation Network has created a set of standardized methods for studying the birds of the Chicago Wilderness region. These methods can serve a variety of research purposes while also allowing birders to participate at different levels of intensity. Participants commit to making five or more visits to the site each year with at least two of those visits coming during breeding season (June). Also, participants should be able to recognize Illinois birds by sight and sound. By general rule, a birder should have about at least three years of experience with field identification of birds in the Illinois area.

The goals of this study are to generate a general picture of bird distribution in the region, to collect data to assist land managers and conservation planners in decision making, and to create a database compatible with other types of habitat data being gathered in the region which can be used by researchers investigating specific ecosystem questions.




Massachusetts Vernal Pool Salamander Migrations Study

Massachusetts Vernal Pool Salamander Migrations Study needs the public to document, through an online mapping interface, large migrations across roads of amphibians that breed in the state's vernal pools.

The project aims to minimize the impact of roads and traffic on rare and non-game wildlife, while improving highway safety, through cost-effective research, planning, and implementation of partnerships with citizens and communities of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Help contribute data and learn more about proactive efforts to protect rare wildlife in Massachusetts.




Massachusetts Statewide Roadkill Database

The Massachusetts Statewide Roadkill Database needs the public to document any roadkill observations in the state through an online mapping interface.

The project aims to minimize the impact of roads and traffic on rare and non-game wildlife, while improving highway safety, through cost-effective research, planning, and implementation of partnerships with citizens and communities of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Help contribute data and learn more about proactive efforts to protect wildlife in Massachusetts.




Massachusetts Turtle Roadway Mortality Study

This project allows the public to document turtle roadkill observations in Massachusetts through an online mapping interface.

The project aims to minimize the impact of roads and traffic on rare and non-game wildlife, while improving highway safety, through cost-effective research, planning, and implementation of partnerships with citizens and communities of Massachusetts.

Help contribute data and learn more about proactive efforts to protect turtles and other wildlife in Massachusetts.




BirdTrack

BirdTrack is a free, online and smartphone-based recording tool for birdwatchers to store and manage their own records from anywhere in the world. Everyone with an interest in birds can get involved by recording when and where they watched birds then completing a list of the species seen and heard during the trip.

Exciting real-time outputs are generated by BirdTrack, including species reporting rate graphs and animated maps of sightings, all freely-available online. The data collected are used by researchers to investigate migration movements and distributions of birds and to support species conservation at local, national and international scales.

BirdTrack is year-round and ongoing, making it an ideal project for getting children enthused about birds and migration. Teachers are encouraged to add their school grounds as a BirdTrack site then help their students to record the birds they see and hear.

The success of BirdTrack relies on YOU. Get started today!




Nature's Notebook

Pay attention to the plants and animals in your yard, and you can contribute to scientific discovery! Observing life cycles of plants and animals with Nature's Notebook is easy and fun, and you will discover so much more about the plants and animals you see everyday.

Sign up to observe one or more species in your yard or another place that you frequent. Use the Nature's Notebook smartphone app to send your observations directly to the National Phenology Database, or fill out paper datasheets and submit them online.




Students’ Cloud Observations On-Line (S’COOL)

Students’ Cloud Observations On-Line (S’COOL) is a citizen science project in which volunteers make and report cloud observations from sites of their choosing, such as a field trip, vacation, or even a backyard. The project aims to collect data on cloud type, height, cover, and related conditions from all over the world. Observations are sent to NASA for comparison to similar information obtained from satellite.

Many people take for granted how powerful clouds are in our atmosphere. It is clouds, in part, that affect the overall temperature and energy balance of the Earth. The more that scientists know about clouds, the more they will know about our Earth as a system. The S'COOL observations help validate satellite data and give a more complete picture of clouds in the atmosphere and their interactions with other parts of the integrated global Earth system. Citizens benefit from their participation in a real-world science experiment and from their access to a variety of background material. Educational materials for teachers are also available.




Open Street Map

Open Street Map is a free, interactive map that allows anyone to view, edit, and use geographical data in a collaborative way from anywhere on Earth. The project was started because many maps available online have legal or technical restrictions on their use, holding back people from using them in creative, productive, or unexpected ways.

Contributors to Open Street Map take handheld global positioning system (GPS) devices with them on journeys or go out specially to record GPS tracks. They record street names, village names, and other features using notebooks, digital cameras, and voice-recorders. Back at the computer, contributors upload those GPS logs showing where they traveled and trace out the roads on Open Street Map's collaborative database. Using their notes, contributors add the street names, connections between roads, and other information such as the type of road or path. That data is then processed to produce detailed street-level maps, which can be published freely on sites such as Wikipedia, used to create handheld or in-car navigation devices, or printed and copied without restriction.




The Lost Ladybug Project

Find and photograph ladybugs! Join us in finding out where all the ladybugs have gone, so we can try to prevent more native species from becoming so rare. NEW - Email us and check our website or Facebook page for new opportunities to help restore native ladybug species.

Across North America, ladybug species distribution is changing. Over the past twenty years, several native ladybugs that were once very common have become extremely rare. During this same time, ladybugs from other places have greatly increased both their numbers and range. Some ladybugs are simply found in new places.

This is happening very quickly and we don’t know how, or why, or what impact it will have on ladybug diversity or the role that ladybugs play in keeping plant-feeding insect populations low.

Free downloadable educational materials and activities. Ladybug song!

View 37,000+ ladybug photos submitted so far. See what species of ladybugs have been found near you!

The Lost Ladybug Project database of 37,000 plus ladybug (Coccinellid) photos and locations is located on our website and is open to the public for mapping, graphing, searching, downloading.





footer border shadow line