Celebrate Earth Day and Arbor Day with SciStarter and Citizen Science!

By Arvind Suresh (Editor) April 22nd, 2015 at 8:01 am | Comment

Photo: NPS

Photo: NPS

Earth Day is April 22 and Arbor Day (in the USA) is April 24!

 

Just about every one of the 1,000 projects featured on SciStarter contributes to a better planet but here five projects you can do to participate in research about trees, just about anywhere on Earth.

 

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SciStarter and Citizen Science at Philly Tech Week and the Philadelphia Science Festival!

By Darlene Cavalier April 20th, 2015 at 3:26 am | Comment

Philly Tech Fest SciStarter and Drexel
Wednesday, April 22
9:00am12:00pm 
Excite Center

3401 Market St, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104
In partnership with Drexel University’s Center for Science, Technology & Society and the ExCITe Center, this event will workshop digital projects and their platforms to improve accessibility and empower citizen scientists.SciStarter.com is a Philly start-up with international reach featuring 1,000 citizen science projects in need of help from the public. TheAsthmaFiles.orgis a collaborative ethnographic research project designed to advance understanding and efforts to address environmental public health challenges around the world. Both platforms will benefit from enhanced cyberinfrastructure to make it easier for people to participate in citizen science, track their contributions, connect with others, and more.At this event, representatives from the programs will present an overview and describe their cyber infrastructure challenges.

Learn about the projects then weigh in during the hands-on workshop designed to enhance the platforms and improve the experience for participants.

soil citizen science
Saturday, April 25
11:00am – 2:00pm
The Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education

8480 Hagys Mill Rd, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19128
Meet the SciStarter team and get involved in citizen science to collect microbes from soil for drug discoveries, track air quality, monitor phenology, map tress, build your own ZomBEE trap and more! We’re partnering with Discover Magazine and Astronomy Magazine to bring you more opportunities to get your hands dirty with science!
phillies citizen science
Saturday, April 25
6:00pm
SciStarter, Science Cheerleader Discover Magazine and Astronomy Magazine present:
“Be a Citizen’s (Bank) Scientist!”
Get involved in real research projects right in Citizen’s Bank Park at thePhiladelphia Phillies ! Monitor air quality, light pollution, and help inform NASA’s Asteroid Initiative from your stadium seat. Learn about the 1,000 opportunities to become a citizen scientist wherever you are!
fishtown citizen science scistarter
Sunday, April 26 2pm
Frankford Hall
1210 Frankford Ave, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19114
Take pub hopping to a whole new level during the Fishtown Science Crawl! Enjoy great drink specials as you explore your favorite Fishtown spots. Be A Citizen Scientist: Take part in some Citizen Science with SciStarter and explore Leafsnap, an electronic field guide, or if you’re feeling daring learn all about and zombees! FREE to attend, $5.00 wristband for Happy Hour prices at all venues.
Philadelphia Science Festival citizen science
Saturday, May 2
10:00am – 4:00pm
Ben Franklin Parkway
Science like you’ve never enjoyed it before! Meet the SciStarter team andScience Cheerleader s. We’re joined forces with Discover Magazine andAstronomy Magazine to bring you tons of opportunities to do citizen science and make a difference in the world. Find microbes in soil that may advance drug discoveries. Learn how to use low cost sensors to track air and water quality. Design your own community research question and more. Pick up a #citizenscience pin or a copy of a magazine. #GetNerdy!

Citizen Science Helps Discover Thirty New Species Where You Would Least Expect It

By Editorial Team April 17th, 2015 at 9:40 am | Comment

30 New fly species discovered by the citiens c0ience project BioSCAN (Image Credit: Kelsey Bailey/Emily Hartop)

30 New fly species discovered by the citiens c0ience project BioSCAN (Image Credit: Kelsey Bailey/Emily Hartop)

Thisi a guest post by Aaron Pomerantz, a version of which originally appeared on the author’s website The Next Gen Scientist. Search through hundreds of citizen science projects on SciStarter to find one that gets you buzzing!

A recent study has revealed thirty species that are new to science living in the bustling city of Los Angeles. This is really exciting news because we usually don’t think of urbanized areas as having biologically diverse environments. Our human-made habitat seems removed from nature; buildings and concrete replacing trees and earth. But our lack of information on urban environments has turned into an interesting research opportunity. A few years ago, The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County initiated a project called BioSCAN to search for biodiversity, also known as the variety of life forms. Read the rest of this entry »

Meet the Spring interns!

By Darlene Cavalier April 14th, 2015 at 2:33 am | Comment

My name is Hined Rafeh, and I’m a first year graduate student at Drexel University studying Science, Technology, and Society. I am interested in studying citizen science and mixing it up with project owners, participants and everyone in between. I hope to meet you and other members of the SciStarter community at some of the upcoming SciStarter events I am organizing at the Philadelphia Science Festival between April 23-May 2!

 

 

ErnestHi, my name is Ernest Clymer and I am a junior at Temple University. My area of study is marketing and I hope to graduate with my B.A. by 2016. At this time I am interning at SciStarter not only in hopes of gaining experience with a start-up but being a part of an organization that focuses on building public engagement in science! SciStarter, to me, is the future of how we will obtain and share information with other people all over the world and I’m happy to be able to further promote these efforts through social media and working on promotions for upcoming events taking place in the Philadelphia area!

 

Editor’s note: It’s been such a pleasure working with Hined and Ernest. Their creativity is remarkable and inspiring! We are so fortunate to have the opportunity to work with them!

Categories: Citizen Science

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‘Snapshots in Time’: Spotting a Spotted Salamander

By Abigail Collins April 13th, 2015 at 9:06 am | Comment

Citizen scientists on a field trip to spot wood frogs and spotted salamanders. Image Credit: Chase Mclean.

Citizen scientists on a field trip to spot wood frogs and spotted salamanders. Image Credit: Chase Mclean.

by Aditi Joshi

Are you a resident of the northern US or Canada? You can help scientists to spot amphibians!

Welcome Spring! As the temperature rises, the beauty of spring unfolds: snow melts, flowers bloom, and birds begin to chirp. In the amphibian world, spring marks the beginning of breeding activities. Among amphibians, wood frogs and spotted salamanders are usually the first to breed, laying eggs (spawns) in short-lived pools, ponds and wetlands.

Scientists like Dr. Stephen Spear, from the Orianne Society, are interested in monitoring amphibian breeding activity for further insight into the effect of climatic changes on certain ecosystems. For instance, a cold spell in spring may disrupt the breeding activities of amphibians. Additionally, the presence of commonly found amphibian species, such as wood frogs and spotted salamanders, indicates a relatively healthy landscape, which helps determine important conservation areas.

Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) in wetlands. Image Credit: Pete Oxford

Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) in wetlands. Image Credit: Pete Oxford

Monitoring the timing of breeding activity can be tricky. Wood frogs and spotted salamanders are found in wetlands across various states, including Alaska, southeastern states such as Georgia and Tennessee, northeastern states such as New York and Maine, and large parts of Canada. Realizing a small team would be ineffective in monitoring wood frogs and spotted salamanders widely distributed across the U.S. and Canada, the scientists sought support from citizen scientists.

Last year, the Orianne Society launched the citizen science project ‘Snapshots in Time’, providing participants with a unique opportunity to identify, observe, and photograph the various stages of amphibian life that they found near their homes. In 2014, citizen scientists contributed over 100 such observations. More observations reported from southern states as compared to northern states, likely due to the differences in the breeding season. In states such as North Dakota, Wisconsin and Michigan, breeding season spans from April to June, unlike southern states where breeding activity begins in January. This year, the project hopes for more observations from the northern states. Compared to the adult and egg stages of amphibian life, larvae are more difficult to spot, and only 15 percent of the observations were of the larvae and metamorphic stages. Some participants were able to see a fascinating courtship ritual – a well choreographed dance by salamanders to attract their partners.

According to Dr. Spear, spotted salamanders live on land but breed in wetlands. People who study spotted salamanders look forward to ‘mass migration’, an intriguing breeding activity where, on a rainy night, salamanders parade en masse from land to wetlands. That’s an exciting natural history experience.

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Visit Snapshots in Time on SciStarter and learn how to participate.

If you loved reading about this citizen science project from SciStarter, use our project finder to search our database of more than 1000 projects! What’s more, subscribe to our newsletter and we’ll send you handpicked citizen science projects once every two weeks!


 

Aditi Joshi, a freelance science writer, is an expert in the field of clinical psychophysiology. She holds a PhD in Human Physiology from the University of Oregon and has published several academic papers. Apart from science, she is interested in Native American art, and art history.