Celebrate Thanksgiving with Citizen Science!

By Editorial Team November 24th, 2015 at 7:28 am | Comment

Photo: USFWS

For many people, Thanksgiving brings to mind family, friends, food, and football.  For us here at SciStarter, it’s a time to give thanks to you! So thank you for making the world a better place through citizen science.

Below, you’ll find five projects that will put you in the Thanksgiving spirit!
Visit the SciStarter Project Finder for 1000 more citizen science opportunities and join our community to learn more about new projects near you!
Happy Thanksgiving,

Candace Fallon, Xerces Society
Western Monarch Thanksgiving Count
Every year the monarch butterflies west of the Rocky Mountains migrate to the coast of California, where they spend the winter. In November and December, help monitor the population of these migrants!

Get Started!

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How Fast is Your Carrier? Crowdsourcing Mobile Network Quality with OpenSignal

By Guest November 23rd, 2015 at 6:00 am | Comment

Global map of cell phone network coverage uploaded by OpenSignal users in 24 hours (Credit: OpenSignal)

Global map of cell phone network coverage uploaded by OpenSignal users in 24 hours (Credit: OpenSignal)

Interested in citizen science you can do on your phone? Check out these cool projects on SciStarter that let you contribute valuable data to research via cell phone apps!

by Nina Friedman

I was on a call with Teresa Murphy-Skorzova, Community Growth Manager for OpenSignal, an app that uses crowd-sourcing to aggregate cell phone signals and WiFi strength data throughout the world. Teresa began to explain how OpenSignal maps signal strength and how this process contrasts the way cell phone networks map it. “We aren’t following a pre-determined route like they are; we measure the amount of time a user has coverage, not the …” The connection becomes fuzzy. “Can you repeat that?” I ask.

Teresa wonders if my latency connection (a metric used to measure mobile data connection quality) is poor. She explains that while cell phone networks like Verizon and AT&T measure the percent of the population that usually has coverage, OpenSignal is “measuring the experience of the user,” mapping signals from the devices themselves in real time. Individuals record their connection as they go about their day. The app recognizes that people and their cell phone devices are, well… mobile. Read the rest of this entry »

Six Citizen Science Projects to Study Your Mind and Body

By Editorial Team November 13th, 2015 at 9:07 am | Comment

Photo: USFWS

From human cognition to gut microbes, people just like you are working with researchers to study the human mind and body.

Below, you’ll find six projects to do today.
Visit the SciStarter Project Finder for 1000 more opportunities to power science for, and by, the people!

Photo: DOD
Flu Survey
This project tracks the spread of influence in the United Kingdom. If you have flu symptoms, report them via their easy online data form.

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Categories: Citizen Science

How Citizen Scientists are Helping the Cause of Bat Conservation

By Guest November 10th, 2015 at 9:15 am | Comment


by Kristin Butler

About fifteen of us were gathered in a classroom one Thursday evening last month on San Francisco’s South Bay. We were there to hear a talk as part of a bat banding workshop and field demonstration  at a riparian restoration site. The wildlife ecologist and bat expert who gave the talk explained why the nocturnal creatures deserve our protection and respect.

In the field the following night, we watched our teacher wade chest deep across a creek, deftly extract a tiny bat from a mist net by the light of his headlamp, and measure, observe, and band it back at our camp.

As I watched, I imagined what it would be like to be a scientist who gets to study and protect these fascinating animals every day, and I wondered if there was a way for a non-scientist like me to get involved. Read the rest of this entry »

Frightfully Delightful Citizen Science for Halloween!

By Editorial Team October 30th, 2015 at 5:30 pm | Comment

It’s time for ghouls and goblins, candy and costumes, AND citizen science!

Here are six creep crawly projects to spice up your Halloween festivities.


Photo: NASA
Send Us Your Skeletons
This project needs skeletons, but don’t worry- they don’t want human ones! The Department of Fisheries in Western Australia needs fishers from that region to send them their fish skeletons. This will help the department evaluate the local fish populations.

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