Archive for the ‘Astronomy & Space’ Category

Look Up Into to the Starry Night for Science

By May 4th, 2016 at 12:58 am | Comment

Composite image of the Earth at night (NASA)

Composite image of the Earth at night (NASA)

Help researchers monitor and understand light pollution with a simple smartphone app

Guest post by Christopher Kyba

How many stars can you see when you look up at the night sky? The answer depends a bit on your vision and a lot on where you live. The bright sky over cities reduces the contrast between the stars and the spaces between them, making them difficult or impossible to see. It’s similar to how the noise from traffic makes it hard to hear singing birds.

This phenomenon is known as light pollution and is of concern for both ecological and human health reasons. For example, the croaking of frogs and toads is a nighttime breeding ritual and artificial right disrupts this activity, reducing populations. Similarly, birds that migrate or hunt at night can have their navigation severely affected by artificial light. Read the rest of this entry »

Science in the Skies: Studying Clouds with CitSci

By March 15th, 2016 at 10:54 am | Comments (5)

Image Credit: Elroy Limmer

Image Credit: Elroy Limmer

Help NASA understand clouds by reporting your observations with the citizen science project S’Cool 

Clouds are so democratic. You don’t need to be rich or famous or smart or athletic to enjoy the majesty of clouds. You can just look up into the sky wherever you are and be knocked out by their beauty and elegance, their size and changing shapes, their relationship to light–the way clouds glow lit from behind, the way dawn edges them with a fluting of pink and sunset colors them orange and gold. Throughout the day, you can watch clouds billow and mass, flat-bottomed ships sailing and crashing, cloud architecture, cloud turrets, cloud towers, cloud streets, weird streaks, wisps, tails, cumulus, cumulonimbus, stratus, cirrus, mamma, virga. On some days, you stand transfixed under a cloudscape so continuously grand and mystical that the mind eventually loses interest. You sigh and continue on your errands. What’s for lunch? Read the rest of this entry »

‘Tis the Season! 12 Days of Christmas with Citizen Science

By December 23rd, 2015 at 2:51 pm | Comment

Photo: John Ohab
12 Days of Christmas
The holiday season is upon us! In the spirit of the season, we’ve put together another edition of our ever popular annual 12 Days of Christmas Newsletter.

Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

On the 1st Day of Christmas, Treezilla gave to me:
A measuring tape around a pear tree, as I measured and mapped the trees of Great Britain. Get started!

On the 2nd Day of Christmas, iSTOR gave to me:
Two reports of sea turtles, from citizen scientist observers worldwide. Get started!

Read the rest of this entry »

SMAP patches have arrived! Get one by submitting soil moisture data!

By October 16th, 2015 at 2:48 pm | Comment

SMAP patch final

If you’ve already signed up to participate in NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive research to ground-truth satellite data, great! (And thank you!) As soon as you input your data to the GLOBE site, you’ll receive an embroidered version of this patch.

Interested in joining SMAP? We are looking for teams in the following states: AK, AR, ME, NE, NV, NM, TN, UT, VT, WV

Learn more, sign up, and get trained soon!

SciStarter and Astronomy Magazine Partner to Bring Citizen Science to Astronomy Enthusiasts

By October 6th, 2015 at 7:41 am | Comment

logo astronomyPress Release – Astronomy enthusiasts can join forces with researchers through a partnership between Astronomy magazine and SciStarter

A “citizen science” movement is sweeping the country. Now, astronomy enthusiasts who want to collaborate with leading scientists can visit Astronomy.com to join cutting-edge research projects. Read the rest of this entry »

Categories: Astronomy & Space