Archive for the ‘Biology’ Category

Celebrate Earth Day and Arbor Day with SciStarter and Citizen Science!

By April 22nd, 2015 at 8:01 am | Comment

Photo: NPS

Photo: NPS

Earth Day is April 22 and Arbor Day (in the USA) is April 24!

 

Just about every one of the 1,000 projects featured on SciStarter contributes to a better planet but here five projects you can do to participate in research about trees, just about anywhere on Earth.

 

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Citizen Science Helps Discover Thirty New Species Where You Would Least Expect It

By April 17th, 2015 at 9:40 am | Comment

30 New fly species discovered by the citiens c0ience project BioSCAN (Image Credit: Kelsey Bailey/Emily Hartop)

30 New fly species discovered by the citiens c0ience project BioSCAN (Image Credit: Kelsey Bailey/Emily Hartop)

Thisi a guest post by Aaron Pomerantz, a version of which originally appeared on the author’s website The Next Gen Scientist. Search through hundreds of citizen science projects on SciStarter to find one that gets you buzzing!

A recent study has revealed thirty species that are new to science living in the bustling city of Los Angeles. This is really exciting news because we usually don’t think of urbanized areas as having biologically diverse environments. Our human-made habitat seems removed from nature; buildings and concrete replacing trees and earth. But our lack of information on urban environments has turned into an interesting research opportunity. A few years ago, The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County initiated a project called BioSCAN to search for biodiversity, also known as the variety of life forms. Read the rest of this entry »

We want your germs! For Citizen Science!

By April 10th, 2015 at 5:00 am | Comment

Photo: CDC

Microbes are germs and they are everywhere! Most are good for you. Some are not.

Learning more about microbes (where they live, how they behave) can teach us more about their influence on diseases, cures, and our entire ecosystem.

Here are five microbial citizen science projects you can do now.

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“What’s in store for citizen scientists this spring,” WHYY’s The Pulse

By March 20th, 2015 at 1:24 pm | Comment

Credit: Sarah Newman

Credit: Sarah Newman

As part of SciStarter’s regular radio series with WHYY’s The Pulse, we highlight new developments in citizen science and a few projects ripe for spring!

As the weather starts warming up and we all begin shedding our thick, winter coats, a crop of new citizen science projects are enticing us to get outdoors in the name of science.

Darlene Cavalier, founder of the citizen science website SciStarter and regular Pulse contributor, says a top project this spring involves paying attention to phenology, or the life cycle changes of plants and animals.

“This might be changes in the nesting habits of birds, certainly in the leafing cycle of plants near you and, specifically, looking at the timing that your lilacs bloom and when they die,” says Cavalier.

All of that information is connected in the sense that birds tend to time their nesting habits to when insects will likely be around to feed their baby birds. And those insects are dependent on certain plants to be around to survive.

Cavalier says the information that’s collected through this phenology project will eventually help inform climate assessment acts in the U.S.

As part of the Philadelphia Science Festival in April, the SciStarter crew will be at the Schuylkill Nature Center in Roxborough to get people involved in the Zombee Watch project.

“We have zombie flies that actually infect honeybees and we’ll tell you how to look for that,” says Cavalier. “It’s pretty disgusting and it’s also eerily attractive for some reason.”

But Cavalier says not all scientific research has to happen outdoors.

Read the rest of this post and listen to the radio segment.

Finding our origins: The Genographic Project uses genetics to map the past

By March 20th, 2015 at 9:00 am | Comment

Ancient human migration patterns. Source: National Geographic.

Ancient human migration patterns. Source: National Geographic.

Have you ever tried tracing back your family tree only to get stuck at great great Grandpa Jim? Are you curious about who your ancestors were and where they might have come from? If so, you’ll definitely want to check out National Geographic’s The Genographic Project. Not only will you learn about your lineage but you’ll have the opportunity to contribute to our scientific understanding of the human story.

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