Archive for the ‘Biology’ Category

Fighting Alzheimer’s Together, Through Citizen Science

By January 23rd, 2016 at 12:14 pm | Comment

Old Couple

by Egle Marija Ramanauskaite

Maybe you’re finding it hard to stick to that New Year’s resolution of making it to the gym every week. How about trying something easier instead? Like changing the world for example, by helping cure Alzheimer’s – one of the most devastating diseases that we face today.  How, you ask? Read on to find out.

A “historic” increase of $350 million in U.S. federal funding for Alzheimer’s research was signed into law last month to help battle this aggressive form of dementia. But while we wait for much anticipated breakthroughs to happen, everyday citizens like us can do our bit to further progress. Read the rest of this entry »

‘Tis the Season! 12 Days of Christmas with Citizen Science

By December 23rd, 2015 at 2:51 pm | Comment

Photo: John Ohab
12 Days of Christmas
The holiday season is upon us! In the spirit of the season, we’ve put together another edition of our ever popular annual 12 Days of Christmas Newsletter.

Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

On the 1st Day of Christmas, Treezilla gave to me:
A measuring tape around a pear tree, as I measured and mapped the trees of Great Britain. Get started!

On the 2nd Day of Christmas, iSTOR gave to me:
Two reports of sea turtles, from citizen scientist observers worldwide. Get started!

Read the rest of this entry »

Citizen Scientists Help Unravel the Genetics of Taste

By December 19th, 2015 at 11:40 am | Comment

Citizen scientists participate in the genetics of taste lab (Image Credit: Denver Museum of Natural History)

Citizen scientists participate in the genetics of taste lab (Image Credit: Denver Museum of Natural History)

Citizen scientists help make discoveries about how genetics may shape the way we taste food. 

Turkey or ham? Stuffing or mashed potatoes? Pumpkin or apple pie?

As I prepared for Thanksgiving this year, I reflected on all the culinary choices this feasting day offers and wondered why people who share a culture, a community, or a family have such diverse preferences when it comes to their favorite holiday foods.

Maybe it’s genetics?

Researchers at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science are exploring this question through their Genetics of Taste Lab, a permanent “science on the floor” health exhibit that brings together citizen science and crowdsourcing to understand our relationship with food. Read the rest of this entry »

6 Ways to Be a Citizen Scientist From the Comfort of Your Couch

By December 10th, 2015 at 2:03 pm | Comment

person-apple-laptop-notebook
Take a break from online shopping and sharpen that brain by contributing a few minutes to science. Below, our editors present six projects in need of your help.
(And really, you know you’re going to abandon that online shopping cart, anyway!)

 

Visit the SciStarter Project Finder for 1100 more opportunities and join our community to learn more about new projects near you!

 

AgeGuess
Some people seem to age faster than others. You can add to our knowledge of aging by guessing how old people are, based on their photos, or uploading your own images to be put to the test.
Get Started!

 

Photo: tiltfactor.org
Purposeful Gaming
To preserve important historical texts, documents are scanned and then made available to you for online transcription. This project uses gaming to make the task fun and to establish consensus transcriptions.

 

Read the rest of this entry »

Saving the Majestic Redwoods With Citizen Science

By October 15th, 2015 at 8:12 am | Comment

California redwoods at Humboldt State Park (Image Credit: Steve Dunleavy/Flickr)

California redwoods at Humboldt State Park (Image Credit: Steve Dunleavy/Flickr)

Citizen scientists collect data to find out how climate change impacts redwoods

by Kristin Butler

“The redwoods, once seen, leave a mark or create a vision that stays with you always. No one has ever successfully painted or photographed a redwood tree. The feeling they produce is not transferable. From them comes silence and awe. It’s not only their unbelievable stature, nor the color which seems to shift and vary under your eyes, no, they are not like any trees we know, they are ambassadors from another time” John Steinbeck, Travels with Charley: In Search of America.

Anyone who’s ever been in a redwood forest knows the sacred experience Steinbeck described in his famous book. Even my dog Kia, on her first hike along the hooded trails of Sanborn Park near our home, bowed uncertainly at the hush of that forest’s redwoods and gazed with wonder at its canopied sky. While photos may fail to replicate the stature of these magnificent trees, they can help conservationists protect them.

Five years ago, a nonprofit in San Francisco called Save the Redwoods League (which buys, protects, and restores redwood habitat) started a citizen science projected called Redwood Watch. Volunteers in the project take photos of redwoods using an app called iNaturalist and the data they collect is helping conservationists better understand redwood distribution and take strategic measures to protect these iconic trees.

“You’d think we’d know where every redwood tree is, but we don’t,” said Deborah Zierten, Education and Interpretation Manager for the Save the Redwoods League. “This projects helps us refine our maps.” The Save the Redwoods League, which is heading into its centennial anniversary soon, will use the data from Redwood Watch to create restoration plans for the organization’s next 100 years, Zierten said.

In particular, the organization is interested in understanding how climate change may be impacting redwoods and their ecosystems and how to help the trees adapt and survive, she said. In California, Redwoods grow within a narrow 450-mile strip that hugs the coast from Big Sur to just over the Oregon border. In the winter months, the trees rely on rainfall and in summer they get the water they need by absorbing coastal fog through their needles and roots, Zierten said. This could make them vulnerable to drought and temperature changes.

Interestingly, redwoods are one of the best protections the planet has against climate change.

Old growth redwoods (trees that are over 200 years old and that survived the gold rush of logging) can take in three to five times more carbon from the atmosphere than any other force on the planet, Zierten said, making them one of the best carbon sinks. Their high branches are so dense, intertwined, and coated with decomposing needles that new trees actually take root and grow on them high above the ground. Of the original coastal redwood range, only about 5% of the old growth forest is left. In addition, 26% of redwood timberland habitat (forests that have been logged and replanted) has been lost to roads and other development.

“One of our goals is to make sure the remaining forests remain protected,” she said, against development, fire, invasive species, and other threats. The Save the Redwoods League encourages volunteers to not only photograph redwoods, but to also photograph the plants and animals that rely on old growth and newer timberland redwood forest ecosystems. These include threatened species such as the Spotted Owl and Marbled Murrelet; Black Bears and Pacific Salmon; the Pacific Fisher; the Marten; and plants like Huckleberry and many types of lichen.

Volunteers have already collected more than 2,000 observations and the organization plans to continue the project well into the future to preserve these awesome, silent “ambassadors from another time.”


Kristin Butler is a Bay Area journalist and Outreach and Communications Director for the San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory.