Archive for the ‘Birds’ Category

Citizen Science Love: a Valentine’s Weekend Special!

By February 11th, 2016 at 4:26 pm | Comment

Who needs chocolate, cards, roses, or a significant other, when you can celebrate Valentine’s Day with citizen science?

Below you’ll find five projects we love. Visit SciStarter to find 1000 more.

PS: If you have 30 seconds, consider taking this quick poll. We’re curious to learn more about the formal education level of the citizen science community.

Cheers!

The SciStarter Team

 

The Great Backyard Bird Count gbbc

This annual bird count runs from February 12th to 16th this year, and it’s open to anyone in the world. Simply pick a location (such as your backyard!) and count the birds that you see for at least 15 minutes; by participating and reporting your data you’ll contribute to our understanding of birds across the globe. Get started!

 

 

Beats Per Life rdll

Is there a correlation between heart rate and lifespan? Help researchers find out by looking through published research results to compare the resting heart rates of all types of animals. Get started!

 

 

 

Snow Tweets st

When it snows in your area, stick a ruler in the snow and tweet your location along with the snow depth. Your data will be added to a real-time worldwide map of snow depth which will help scientists calibrate the accuracy of satellite instruments.  Get started!

Bonus! The SciStarter team will join Discover Magazine, Astronomy Magazine and the Science Cheerleaders at the AAAS Family Science Days in Washington, DC February 13th and 14th. This free event is open to the public! We’ll give away rulers with Snow Tweets instructions to help you get started.

 

Health eHeart heh

Want to help fight heart disease? By completing a simple online survey about your health and behavior, you can contribute to our understanding of heart health.  Get started!

 

 

 

Baby CROINC bbc

Create a diary for your child and harness crowd wisdom to predict and improve her/his development. This project is part of an international scientific effort to understand the way children grow.
Get started!

‘Tis the Season! 12 Days of Christmas with Citizen Science

By December 23rd, 2015 at 2:51 pm | Comment

Photo: John Ohab
12 Days of Christmas
The holiday season is upon us! In the spirit of the season, we’ve put together another edition of our ever popular annual 12 Days of Christmas Newsletter.

Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

On the 1st Day of Christmas, Treezilla gave to me:
A measuring tape around a pear tree, as I measured and mapped the trees of Great Britain. Get started!

On the 2nd Day of Christmas, iSTOR gave to me:
Two reports of sea turtles, from citizen scientist observers worldwide. Get started!

Read the rest of this entry »

Celebrate Thanksgiving with Citizen Science!

By November 24th, 2015 at 7:28 am | Comment

Photo: USFWS

For many people, Thanksgiving brings to mind family, friends, food, and football.  For us here at SciStarter, it’s a time to give thanks to you! So thank you for making the world a better place through citizen science.

Below, you’ll find five projects that will put you in the Thanksgiving spirit!
Visit the SciStarter Project Finder for 1000 more citizen science opportunities and join our community to learn more about new projects near you!
Happy Thanksgiving,

Candace Fallon, Xerces Society
Western Monarch Thanksgiving Count
Every year the monarch butterflies west of the Rocky Mountains migrate to the coast of California, where they spend the winter. In November and December, help monitor the population of these migrants!

Get Started!

Read the rest of this entry »

The (Citizen) Science of Bird Branding

By September 14th, 2015 at 12:15 am | Comment

A citizen scientist at SFBBO's Coyote Creek Field Station bands a small passerine and collects data on the bird's age, sex, weight, and other characteristics. (Photo by SFBBO)

A citizen scientist at SFBBO’s Coyote Creek Field Station bands a small passerine and collects data on the bird’s age, sex, weight, and other characteristics. (Photo by SFBBO)

 

Have you ever been interested in bird banding? If so, the San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory (SFBBO) has the citizen science program for you.

For over three decades, SFBBO’s mission has been to conserve birds and their habitats through science and outreach. One of our longest-running citizen science programs is our bird banding research at the Coyote Creek Field Station (CCFS) in Milpitas, California.

Tucked away from the Bay Area’s urban environment, the field station is situated near three riparian habitat restoration projects on Santa Clara Valley Water District land and is a favorite home and resting spot for many species of birds.

Every Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday morning—year-round—citizen science volunteers in the program work with a staff biologist to capture sparrows, woodpeckers, thrushes, and other resident and migrating passerine landbirds in delicate mist nets.

They carry the birds to the field station in soft cloth bags, check the birds’ legs for silver bands, and if a bird does not have a band yet, the volunteers use specialized tools to gently fasten a tiny one to the bird’s leg. They then use scales, rulers, and other measuring and observation tools to collect and record data about the bird’s species type, age, size, and health on data sheets before setting the bird free.

Volunteers in the program go through a thorough apprenticeship training process that can take up to three years. During the first phase, volunteers patrol the mist net lanes to make sure predators like raptors or feral cats don’t get to the birds as they hang in the nets. During this phase, participants begin to develop their bird identification skills, become familiar with the tools of the trade, and get to work closely with field biologists.

During the second phase of training, volunteers learn how to deftly extract birds from the mist nets and bring them safely to the station for study. This tricky task requires the ability to make careful observations about how a bird has entered the net and what part of the bird is caught, and then undo sometimes intricate knots.

In the final phase of training, volunteers learn to use tools like specially-made pliers and viewfinder devices, as well as how to hold a bird securely in the “banders’ grip” while recording data.

Researchers are required by law to have special permits and training to handle wild birds like this, so volunteering at the Coyote Creek Field Station gives participants a unique opportunity.

In addition to the “cool factor” of getting to do avian science in the field, many volunteers also say they appreciate the opportunity to help promote bird conservation and the chance to enjoy nature with like-minded people.

“I really love volunteering at CCFS because it is like a little oasis in the city,” said Deanna de Castro, a citizen scientist with the program. “It’s also really great to be around other people who love birds and studying them as much as I do, and I feel like I learn something new every time I visit!”

Thanks to the commitment of our long-term volunteers, SFBBO has one of the longest-running data sets on birds in the region. We share our data with the U.S. Geological Survey Bird Banding Laboratory and with students at local universities, who use it to answer questions about bird populations in our area.

To learn more about SFBBO or become a volunteer, please visit our website at www.sfbbo.org or contact outreach@sfbbo.org.

Kristin Butler is a Bay Area journalist and Outreach and Communications Director for the San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory.

The White House Wants Your Help to Stop the Decline in Pollinators

By May 27th, 2015 at 11:59 am | Comment

Pollinators: A critical component of a healthy ecosystem. And oh, they also affect 35% of the world's crop production. (Image Credit: USFWS)

Pollinators: A critical component of a healthy ecosystem. They also affect 35% of the world’s crop production. (Image Credit: USFWS)

Pollinating animals play a crucial role in our food production system, and they are essential in maintaining the health and vitality of many ecosystems.  Unfortunately, many pollinator species, such as bees and butterflies, have been declining recently.  In response to that decline, the national Pollinator Health Task Force, commissioned by the White House, recently released the Pollinator Health Strategy. Read the rest of this entry »