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WSP Nature Finds (prototype)

World Science Festival 2015 culminates in Washington Square Park on Sunday, May 31. Washington Square Park (WSP) Eco Projects is collaborating with SciStarter to log the nature observations people make in the park on May 31. SciStarter has formally partnered with Discover Magazine and the Science Cheerleaders to help park visitors observe and share wildlife sightings with researchers. SciStarter was founded by Darlene Cavalier and is a platform to "find, join, and contribute to science through recreational activities and citizen science research projects."




What Do Birds Eat?

We (Douglas Tallamy's lab in the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware) are collecting photo contributions to an ongoing research project about avian diets-- in a nutshell, we are trying to figure out "what birds eat"!

If you have any photos of birds holding insects or other arthropods (spiders, etc.) in their bills, please consider submitting them on our site. Thanks to everyone who has already contributed!




Bugs In Our Backyard

Bugs In Our Backyard is an educational outreach and collaborative research program, providing project-based learning opportunities for K-12 students-- or anyone! The core activity for Bugs In Our Backyard takes advantage of the bugs in your own backyard, schoolyard or neighborhood. Students become citizen-scientists by surveying this diversity of insects and plants. How much insect diversity can you find? How does insect diversity vary over time? How does insect diversity vary across geographic and urban scales? These are some of the questions that can be asked. The survey targets are “true bugs” (what entomologists call Heteroptera) in the eastern US, but activities are designed to be open-ended. Everyone is welcome to get involved. Let’s expand what we know about about insect diversity across rural and urban landscapes!

BioB is part of an NSF-funded research program at Colby College, which will also provide students with insight into the practice of science. Our goal is to engage students with biology by making them citizen scientists. Get involved in ecological surveys of local bugs and their host plants! Produce data to contribute to a growing community database. Connect to the biological diversity in your own backyard!

A series of modular activities on different life science topics, such as biodiversity, growth and development, invasive species, genetics, insects, evolution, urban ecology and statistical analysis, are also being produced. These modules can be scaled to the needs of different classes and grade-levels or used over multiple grade-levels. For older students, survey data are available to be used in hypothesis-testing or exploratory analyses. Teachers are encouraged to modify the activities to their own needs and share success stories.




LabintheWild

LabintheWild tests your abilities and preferences. At the end of each experiment, you will see a page with your personalized feedback, which lets you compare yourself and your performance to other people around the world.

By participating, you contribute to research on people's similarities and differences and help improve users' experience when interacting with technology. We believe that research should be done in collaboration with people—people like you from all over the world who are interested in learning about themselves and helping research. With your help, we can, for example, compare the website preferences of people from different countries, or analyze what user interfaces should look like if optimized for the most interaction abilities of certain age groups.




Beats Per Life

What is the secret to a long life? The heartbeat of some animals may hold a clue. We are consolidating reports of the heart rate and lifespan of as many vertebrate species as possible. Our goal is to integrate the data from various sources into a single database, where they can be more readily accessible.




Great Fish Count

Strap on a pair of waders, cast a net and see what type of marine life you can find in the New York waterways. Maybe you’ll be the first to find a seahorse or identify the 222nd species in the Hudson River? Nearly all of the city’s waterways, from the piers along the West Side Highway to the tips of Jamaica Bay and the East River, are teeming with life. Drop by one of our 13 sites throughout and beyond the city to join top ecologists and biologists to catch, count, identify and release the animals you come across in our waters.

This program is presented in collaboration with the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and environmental education programs at each site. It is a free program, lasting for two hours to educate the public about the waterways of NYC and how they are full of life.





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