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Risk Factors for Low-Appeal Shelter Dogs

This project is part of a a year-long research project on behalf of PetRescue – investigating the risk factors associated with low appeal animals on their website. A part of the project is this web-based scoring system to assess photographic attributes of the four most common breeds within the data (Australian Cattle Dog, Jack Russell Terrier, Staffordshire Bull-Terrier and Labrador Retriever). These data in addition to other results will be correlated with the length of stay (time) to determine whether certain phenotypic characteristics enhance adoptability of dogs.




C-BARQ

The C-BARQ (or Canine Behavioral Assessment and Research Questionnaire) is designed to provide dog owners and professionals with standardized evaluations of canine temperament and behavior. The C-BARQ was developed by researchers at the Center for the Interaction of Animals and Society of the University of Pennsylvania, and is currently the only behavioral assessment instrument of its kind to be extensively tested for reliability and validity on large samples of dogs of many breeds. The current version consists of 101 questions describing the different ways in which dogs typically respond to common events, situations, and stimuli in their environment. The C-BARQ is simple to use, and can be completed by anyone who is reasonably familiar with a dog's typical, day-to-day behavior. On average, it takes from 10-15 minutes to complete.

The C-BARQ is available to veterinarians, behavioral consultants, researchers, shelters, breeders, and working dog organizations with an interest in screening dogs for the presence and severity of behavioral problems. For a limited period, it is also open to pet-owners interested in comparing their dogs to others in the C-BARQ database.




Emotional Load of Calls

Assist in research investigating the evolutionary and ethological foundations of dog-human relationship. Dogs, like other animals, communicate through vocalization. They communicate their needs and desires, and they can also communicate their emotions.

The Emotional load of calls is a 30 minute survey, with two optional pauses after 10-minute intervals. You will hear human and dog calls, and your task is to mark the sound sample based on the emotional state and intensity of the caller.




Canid Howl Project

Come listen to the enchanting, haunting sounds of wolves, coyotes, and dogs, and help us better understand and conserve these species.

Analysing these recordings is difficult and time consuming. It's easy to make mistakes, and mistakes can change the conclusions that we draw. But here's where you can help! By having hundreds, even thousands of volunteers giving their own analysis of the canid howls, we can investigate the role of these sounds, and understand more about the social behaviour of the whole range of canid species and breeds.

You can also donate your dog's howl for the project.




Precipitation ID Near the Ground (PING)

The National Severe Storms Laboratory needs YOUR help with a research project!

If you live in the area shown on the map, the Precipitation Identification Near the Ground project (PING) wants YOU to watch and report on precipitation type.

PING is looking for young, old, and in-between volunteers to make observations—teachers, classes and families too! We have collected tens of thousands of observations since 2006, already making PING successful because of your help.

PING volunteers can spend a little or a lot of time making observations. The basic idea is simple: the National Severe Storms Laboratory will collect radar data from NEXRAD radars in your area during storm events, and compare that data with YOUR observations.

Why? Because the radars cannot see close to the ground, we need YOU to tell us what is happening. Scientists will compare your report with what the radar has detected, and develop new radar technologies and techniques to determine what kind of precipitation—such as snow, soft hail, hard hail, or rain—is falling where.




American Gut

The Human Microbiome Project and other microbiome projects worldwide have laid an important foundation for understanding the trillions of microbes that inhabits each of our bodies. However, opportunities for the public to get involved in such research has been limited. Now, American Gut gives you an opportunity to participate and to compare the microbes in your gut to those in the guts of thousands of other people in the US and elsewhere. American Gut is a project built on open-source, open-access principles. Our data are for the good of understanding and will be shared both with participants and with other scientists.





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