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Wisconsin Water Action Volunteers

Water Action Volunteers (WAV) is a statewide program for Wisconsin citizens who want to learn about and improve the quality of Wisconsin’s streams and rivers. The program is coordinated through a partnership between the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and the University of Wisconsin – Cooperative Extension.




Leaf Pack Network

What is the Leaf Pack Network®?

A Hands-On Stream Ecology Investigation Based on Real Science!

Science involves more than simply collecting data. Science is also the process of communicating and sharing results, initiated through inquiry.

The Leaf Pack Network® is an international network of teachers, students, and citizen monitors investigating their local stream ecosystem. Through the Leaf Pack Experiment, monitors use tree leaves and aquatic insects to determine the health of their stream and to understand its ecology.

Individuals participating in the Leaf Pack Experiment and Leaf Pack Network® engage in the full process of designing an experiment, conducting research and communicating their results. Leaf Pack can also easily be implemented into any curriculum and fulfills many state and national science standards. Watch your students become empowered and energized learning about their local watershed!




Wissahickon Creek Watch Program

The WVWA is looking for a dedicated group of volunteers to help monitor the health of the Wissahickon Creek and its tributaries! The Citizen Scientists will be trained in water quality monitoring, primarily using visual assessments. Each volunteer is assigned a 1-­2 mile section on public land from the headwaters in North Wales to Fairmount Park. They will submit data for algae cover, animal observations, erosion, percent shade and a myriad of other indicators of stream health. Additionally, there will sub-­group of Creek Watchers known as the “Wading Team” that will take samples from the stream to determine the amount of nutrients, dissolved oxygen and water temperature. The WVWA held training sessions in July and monitoring will begin in August. The dates of the next training sessions are to be determined.




Loss of the Night

How many stars can you see where you live? The Loss of the Night App (available for Android devices) challenges citizen scientists to identify as many stars as they can in order to measure light pollution. The app is fun and easy to use, and helps users learn constellations as they contribute to a global real-time map of light pollution.

Stargazing is a fantastic way to engage young scientists, but this ancient past time has become increasingly difficult in growing urban areas. Help scientists understand the effects of light pollution and learn about your night sky!

You don't need to leave the city to take part, in fact, the app is designed specifically for use in very polluted areas.

The more stars you observe, and the more often you run the app, the more precise the data for your location will become. As the seasons change so do the stars in the sky, and since there aren't so many very bright stars it is extremely helpful if urban users do measurements in each season.




Bat Detective

Bat Detective is an online citizen science project which allows visitors to the website to take part in wildlife conservation by listening out for bat calls in recordings collected all over the world.

By sorting the sounds in the recordings into insect and bat calls, bat detectives will help biologists learn how to reliably distinguish bat 'tweets' to develop new automatic identification tools.

Bats use lots of different types of sounds, from singing to each other to find a mate, to using the echoes from their tweets to find their way around. Usually bat sounds are inaudible to humans as they are too high for us to hear, but special 'time expansion' ultrasonic detectors convert these sounds to a lower frequency, and visitors to the Bat Detective website can listen to these unique recordings and help distinguish different sounds.

One out of every five species of bats is threatened with extinction and better automatic identification tools are desperately needed to quickly process vast amounts of sound data collected by volunteers from the bat monitoring programme iBats who survey bat populations each year.

Bats are found all over the world from local parks to pristine rainforests and monitoring their population trends provides an important indicator of healthy ecosystems. Developing new tools that allow biologists to interpret population trends from sound will allow bats' tweets to act as a way to track environmental change.

Bat Detective was developed at University College London, Bat Conservation Trust, Bat Life Europe with the Citizen Science Alliance.




ZomBeeWatch

ZomBee Watch is a citizen science project sponsored by the San Francisco State University Department of Biology, the San Francisco State University Center for Computing for Life Sciences and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. ZomBee Watch was initiated as a follow-up to the discovery that the Zombie Fly Apocephalus borealis is parasitizing honey bees in California and possibly other areas of North America.

ZomBee Watch has three main goals.

1. To determine where in North America the Zombie Fly Apocephalus borealis is parasitizing honey bees.

2. To determine how often honey bees leave their hives at night, even if they are not parasitized by the Zombie Fly.

3. To engage citizen scientists in making a significant contribution to knowledge about honey bees and to become better observers of nature.

You can help in finding out where honey bees are being parasitized by the Zombie Fly and how big a threat the fly is to honey bees. So far, the Zombie Fly has been found parasitizing honey bees in California, Oregon, South Dakota, Vermont and Washington. We are teaming up with citizen scientists (like you!) to determine if the fly has spread to honey bees across all of North America.




Dragonfly Migration

We need your help to better understand dragonfly migration in North America. Although it spans three countries and has been documented since the 1880s, North American dragonfly migration is still poorly understood, and much remains to be learned about migratory cues, flight pathways, and the southern limits of overwintering grounds. Become part of an international network of citizen scientists and help monitor the spring and fall movements of the 5 main migratory species in North America, or report on these species throughout the year at a pond or wetland of your choice.




Solar Storm Watch

You don’t have to be a science expert to be a brilliant solar stormwatcher. Help scientists spot explosions on the Sun and track them across space to Earth. Your work will give astronauts an early warning if dangerous solar radiation is headed their way. And you could make a new scientific discovery.

Explore interactive diagrams to learn out about the Sun and the spacecraft monitoring it. The STEREO spacecraft is scientists’ latest mission to study the Sun and space weather – not clouds and rain, but how solar storms change conditions in space and on Earth.

Solar Stormwatch isn't just about classifying data. You can talk to other members on our forum, sign up for our space weather forecast from Twitter, and learn about the latest discoveries on our blog. You can also see how solar storms affect Earth at our Flickr group Aurora chasers, featuring beautiful photos of aurora.

if you’d like to know more about what you’re looking at, then explore our beautiful and interactive zoomable diagrams to find out about the Sun and the STEREO spacecraft monitoring it. And check out our scientists’ profiles too.




Colorado Spider Survey

The Colorado Spider Survey (CSS) is a means of gathering critical information about the ecology and distribution of this understudied taxonomic group. Researchers have documented the distribution and species diversity of several groups of insects in the Rocky Mountain region such as ants, grasshoppers, and butterflies. However, information about the distribution and diversity of other arthropod groups in this region is lacking. One group that is particularly understudied is the Order Araneae, or the spiders. Little is known about either the biodiversity of spiders in Colorado or the impact urbanization is having on species distribution in the state. No formal spider surveys have ever been conducted in Colorado.

The survey will be carried out through a series of Spider Identification and Collection Workshops that will be held throughout the state, but particularly in cooperation with the State Park system. These workshops, led by a team of professional and amateur arachnologists (or spider biologists), will train members of local communities in spider biology, morphology, taxonomy, and collection techniques. The specimens will be collected during the next several years by team leaders as well as workshop participants and will be sent to the Denver Museum of Nature & Science for identification and storage. Data from these specimens and from Colorado specimens housed at other collections throughout the country will be compiled and published in an electronic database.




Project NOAH

Noah is a mobile phone app that allows nature lovers to document local wildlife and add their observations to a growing database for use by ongoing citizen-science projects.

Using the Noah mobile application, users take a photograph of an interesting organism, select the appropriate category, add descriptive tags, and click submit. The application captures the location details along with the submitted information and stores all of it in the species database for use by efforts such as Project Squirrel and the Lost Ladybug Project.

In addition, users can see what kinds of organisms are nearby by searching through a list or exploring a map of their area, all on a mobile phone.

Noah is all about discovering and documenting local wildlife. We work with research groups and organizations to help gather important data and we want you to help by logging recent spottings on your mobile phone. Missions can range from photographing specific frogs or flowers to tracking migrating birds or invasive species or logging the effects of the oil spill.




Great Lakes Worm Watch

The Great Lakes Worm Watch needs citizen scientists to conduct earthworm surveys in forests and other habitats anywhere in North America.

Earthworms are not native to the Great Lakes Region; they were all wiped out after the last glaciation. The current population, brought here by early Europeans, is slowly changing the face of our native forests, but very little is known about the distributions of earthworm and earthworm species across the region. While valuable, this type of information is labor-intensive, and it is difficult for researchers to get funding to do this kind of work. Citizen scientists can help.

There are several ways to get involved:

1. Document earthworm occurrences: This involves collecting and sending earthworm specimens with location information to Great Lakes Worm Watch. These specimens will be archived at the University of Minnesota, and the species and location information will be added to the project database.

2. Collect habitat data: Great Lakes Worm Watch would like data from all habitat types, especially natural ecosystems like forests, woodlands, and prairies. In addition, data from habitats dominated by human activity are also of value, such as farm fields, pastures, and parks. Depending on your level of interest and expertise, you can choose to conduct a general or detailed habitat survey. You can use the instructions and data sheets developed by the project coordinators to make the data easily transferable to the database.

3. Conduct soil surveys: In addition to earthworm and habitat data, Great Lakes Worm Watch is also interested in getting data about the soil conditions at sites in which you sampled for earthworms. You can use the instructions and data sheet developed by project coordinators to make the data easily transferable to the database.

Get started! Anyone can make a BIG difference when it comes to containing the spread of exotic earthworms!




Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiments (INSPIRE)

INSPIRE volunteers use build-it-yourself kits to measure and record very low frequency radio emissions. These include naturally occurring "sferics" (short for "atmospherics") often generated by lightning and known as "tweeks," "whistlers," and "chorus" as well as man-made emissions.

There is a great deal of scientific curiosity about the nature and generation mechanisms of natural very low frequency radio emissions and how they interact with the Earth's ionosphere and magnetic fields. INSPIRE is taking an active role in furthering the investigation of very low frequency emissions by involving citizen volunteers in its research.

INSPIRE represents a rare opportunity to work with real NASA space scientists on real scientific problems.




Quake-Catcher Network

The Quake-Catcher Network provides software so that individuals can join together to improve earthquake monitoring, earthquake awareness, and the science of earthquakes.

The Quake-Catcher Network links existing networked laptops and desktops in hopes to form the world’s largest and densest earthquake monitoring system. With your help, the Quake-Catcher Network can provide better understanding of earthquakes, give early warning to schools, emergency response systems, and others.

The Quake-Catcher Network also provides a natural way to engage students and the public in earthquake detection and research. This project places USB-connectable sensors in K-12 classrooms as an educational tool for teaching science and a scientific tool for studying and monitoring earthquakes. Through a variety of interactive experiments students can learn about earthquakes and the hazards that earthquakes pose.

Earthquake safety is a responsibility shared by billions worldwide. Let's get to work!




World Water Monitoring Challenge

World Water Monitoring Challenge is an international program that encourages citizen volunteers to monitor their local water bodies. An easy-to-use test kit enables everyone from children to adults to sample local water bodies for basic water quality parameters: temperature, acidity (pH), clarity (turbidity), and dissolved oxygen.

The results of current and past studies are shared with participating communities around the globe through the organization's online Data & Reports page.




Radio JOVE

NASA's Radio JOVE project enables students and amateur scientists to observe natural radio emissions from Jupiter, the Sun, and our galaxy. Participants learn about radio astronomy first-hand by building their own radio telescope from an inexpensive kit and/or using remote radio telescopes through the Internet. They also collaborate with each other through interactions and sharing of data on the network.

The Radio JOVE project began in 1998. Since then, more than 1,600 teams of students and interested individuals have purchased non-profit radio telescope kits and are learning radio astronomy by building and operating a radio telescope. This self-supporting, non-profit program continues to thrive and inspire new groups of students as well as individuals.




Precipitation ID Near the Ground (PING)

The National Severe Storms Laboratory needs YOUR help with a research project!

If you live in the area shown on the map, the Precipitation Identification Near the Ground project (PING) wants YOU to watch and report on precipitation type.

PING is looking for young, old, and in-between volunteers to make observations—teachers, classes and families too! We have collected tens of thousands of observations since 2006, already making PING successful because of your help.

PING volunteers can spend a little or a lot of time making observations. The basic idea is simple: the National Severe Storms Laboratory will collect radar data from NEXRAD radars in your area during storm events, and compare that data with YOUR observations.

Why? Because the radars cannot see close to the ground, we need YOU to tell us what is happening. Scientists will compare your report with what the radar has detected, and develop new radar technologies and techniques to determine what kind of precipitation—such as snow, soft hail, hard hail, or rain—is falling where.




American Gut

The Human Microbiome Project and other microbiome projects worldwide have laid an important foundation for understanding the trillions of microbes that inhabits each of our bodies. However, opportunities for the public to get involved in such research has been limited. Now, American Gut gives you an opportunity to participate and to compare the microbes in your gut to those in the guts of thousands of other people in the US and elsewhere. American Gut is a project built on open-source, open-access principles. Our data are for the good of understanding and will be shared both with participants and with other scientists.




URI Watershed Watch

The URI Watershed Watch (URIWW) is a volunteer water quality monitoring program that works with local communities to assess water quality, identify sources of pollution in water and provide information about water leading to more effective management of critical water resources. Led by trained scientists, URI Watershed Watch helps local governments, watershed, tribal and other organizations recruit and train volunteers to become citizen scientists gathering detailed, quality assured monitoring data. Our comprehensive watershed-based program focuses on long-term environmental monitoring of RI's fresh and salt water resources including lakes, ponds, streams and coastal waters. We provide training, equipment, supplies and analytical services tailored to organizational needs, while meeting strict quality assurance and quality control guidelines in the field and in our state-certified water testing laboratory.




Project ScumScan

Our citizen science group in LA has been measuring water quality along the river as well as capturing water samples. We're trying to measure the base biodiversity of the river system by getting a census of all of the species we've been sampling. This will help indicate the overall health and diversity of the river system.




River Instream Flow Stewards

The River Instream Flow Stewards program helps people to collect and use streamflow data in Massachusetts. RIFLS, as it is known, began in 2002 in response to concerns that many small streams were flow-stressed and that these impacts were not being documented. RIFLS staff work with partners to collect high quality streamflow data, to better understand the causes of unnatural streamflows, and to inform and support policy and actions that restore and maintain environmental flows.




The Pacific Flyway Shorebird Survey

The PFSS is a coordinated, multi-partner monitoring program led by Point Blue Conservation Science designed to guide the management and conservation of wintering shorebirds in the Pacific Flyway.

Many shorebird species are thought to be declining in North America; however, we still have a lot to learn about species population trends, such as which species are at greatest risk, and which habitats they most depend upon. To answer these questions the PFSS coordinates both ongoing (e.g. at specific sites such as refuges or coastal estuaries) and newly established monitoring efforts in the Pacific Flyway.




Play to Cure: Genes in Space

Help researchers cure cancer.

The problem:

We know that faults in our genes can lead to cancer cells forming. This can be linked to the amount of genes in our cells - sometimes we have more and sometimes we have less.

It can take years for scientists to analyze all of their genetic data, but with thousands of citizen scientists playing Genes in Space, the process is greatly accelerated.

How it works:

First, you plot a galactic route. In the context of the game, you're choosing your flight path, but these “space coordinates” are actually a visualization of DNA data, and you're showing our scientists where the genetic variations are which may lead to cancer.

Then you collect Element Alpha, a mist like substance that can be traded for ship upgrades. It actually represents the same DNA data that has just been mapped – which means our scientists have two perspectives on the same sample, from one player.

And we’ve added an asteroid field. This makes the gameplay more engaging and challenging. You need to dodge or shoot a multitude of asteroids to complete a stage.

Each data sample is analyzed multiple times for accuracy. Don’t worry about making mistakes - the more people who use Genes in Space, the more accurate the results will be and the faster data can be translated into new ways to beat cancer.




Butler County Stream Team

The Butler County Stream Team is a volunteer group that studies local water quality on the second Saturday of each month - March through November. We conduct two kinds of testing, chemical and biological.

Chemical- Volunteers collect water samples from set locations around the county from rivers and streams. The water samples are then tested by volunteers at our water quality lab for the following parameters: nitrates, total phosphorous, bacteria, conductivity, total dissolved solids, pH, turbidity. We are always interested in more interested citizen scientists helping with this lab work. It typically takes about 3 hours, on the 2nd Saturday each month.

Biological- In 2014 we started looking at benthic macroinvertebrates (AKA creek critters) to provide a fuller picture of the health of the water. This is conducted 2-3 times per year at specific sites within the county, although not on a set day.

Other happenings: We have numerous events both for education and of course for fun throughout the year. These include a data sharing potluck in February, kayak floats, trips to floating wetland projects and water treatment plants, and classes on macroinvertebrates and rain barrels.




IDAH2O Master Water Stewards

The IDAH2O Master Water Steward program participants attend an 8-hour workshop which combines classroom instruction and hands-on field work.

A certified Master Water Steward then can adopt a stream location to conduct regular monitoring of habitat, biological, chemical and physical assessments. Stewards upload all data collected to an interactive HIS website that is publicly available. Another focus of the program is to educate citizens on the science behind water quality and to help them understand streams, rivers and lakes systems. Youth involvement and K-12 participation (formal and after-school enrichment) is also strongly supported.




Night Cities

Since 2003, the astronauts have been taking photos from the International Space Station. Many of these images have been published on the websites of participating agencies or the Twitter accounts of the astronauts. However, most of the images taken by astronauts have not been published remaining on archive without being shown to the world. We have added a section to this gallery dedicated to displaying more than a thousand examples of images of cities at night. However, there are still hundreds of thousands of images on file to discover. You can help.

Light pollution causes serious problems. Its effects can be measured from the inside of our bedroom to hundreds of kilometers away. The light destroys the essence of the evening darkness. Humans have an ancestral fear of the dark, but too much light produces very negative effects on the ecosystem and our health.

Satellite images help us measure and compare large illuminate areas. With the colors of the images taken by astronauts on the International Space Station, we can measure the efficiency of lighting in many cities on the planet.

We need volunteers to help us sort the pictures and identify the locations of the images to create maps of light pollution. It will help governments and local authorities to make the right decisions to reduce light pollution.




The NOVA RNA Lab

Nature’s best kept secret is a wonder molecule called RNA. It is central to the origin of life, evolution, and the cellular machinery that keeps us alive.

In this Lab you’ll play the role of a molecular engineer by solving RNA folding puzzles. Then take your skills to Eterna, where you can design RNAs that could be at the heart of future life-saving therapies.

This project is part of the NOVA Labs platform




Natural North Carolina

North Carolina is a beautiful place! With the huge variation in habitat types - from the mountains to the piedmont to the coastal plain - our state boasts a grand diversity of plants, animals, and fungi. Just look around. You likely encounter hundreds of species in your daily life, and many just beyond your front door!

Scientists at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences document the species in our great state and share the things we learn with you in our Museum exhibits. But, we can't be everywhere at once! We need YOUR help. By photographing and reporting the wildlife you see in your everyday life to Natural North Carolina, you can help us learn more about the species that call North Carolina home. You will also help us create an atlas of North Carolina's flora and fauna that you can use to identify the natural things you see in your local area. And all you have to do to help is snap a photo of something in nature and tell us where and when you took it. Easy!

So, get outside! Snap a few photos. Become a citizen scientist by submitting your photos to Natural North Carolina. Together, we can discover the wonders of North Carolina and learn more about our amazing state.




BC Cetacean Sightings Network

Twenty-three species of cetaceans and sea turtles have been recorded in the waters of British Columbia, Canada. Many of these populations are 'at-risk' and under-studied.
The B.C. Cetacean Sightings Network (BCCSN) collects sightings of cetaceans and sea turtles in the waters surrounding British Columbia, Canada using a network of citizen scientist observers. Our observer base is diverse, from interested citizens to lighthouse keepers, ecotourism professionals, mariners and recreational boaters. Anyone can participate and reports are made via an on-line form, toll free number, email, or supplied logbook. A smartphone app will be released shortly.




Where is the Elaphrus Beetle?

Dan Duran, assistant professor in Drexel University’s Department of Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science, has just embarked on a search for the marsh ground beetle, which also goes by the Latin name for its genus, Elaphrus.

It is found along muddy stream banks in temperate regions like ours. It's an effective "indicator species" because it's adversely affected by run-off, like road salts and agricultural chemicals--that make it into a stream without being visible.




Nanocrafter

Nanocrafter aims to increase the number of people working in the field by orders of magnitude. Players learn how to build devices with DNA through a series of engaging levels that teach how to craft strand displacement-based reaction networks. Players can compete in challenge levels meant to foster creative solutions to open-ended scientific problems, giving the opportunity for players to improve upon published results. With social elements including peer review of solutions and forming groups to solve difficult problems, Nanocrafter’s players will team up with scientists to advance both the breadth and depth of synthetic biology research far faster than the scientists could alone.




Bat Watch

Bat Watch is a citizen science initiative to monitor bat populations over the long-term. Given the spread of White Nose Syndrome (WNS), a devastating disease that is killing bats during hibernation, monitoring bat populations is more important than ever. Since WNS has not yet reached British Columbia, assessing populations annually will allow biologists to detect drastic changes in populations providing an early detection of WNS. Anyone in British Columbia can participate in the BC Bat Count if they know of a roost sites of bats. This might be an attic, barn, shed, bat-house, cave or mine.




Blue Catfish Watch

Show us your blue catfish catch! Collaborate with scientists at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center to help us track the expanding range of the non-native blue catfish into the upper Chesapeake Bay and into Delaware Bay and the Delaware River.

Native to the Mississippi, Ohio and Missouri Rivers, blue catfish were introduced to Virginia for sport fishing beginning in 1974. Since introduction, these non-native top predators have expanded their range into many of Maryland’s tributaries, including the Nanticoke, Patuxent, Choptank, Susquehanna and Sassafras Rivers. Due to their large size and adult predatory feeding behavior, blue catfish are consuming many native fish species, such as white perch, largemouth bass, American shad, river herring and menhaden. Knowing where and when these catfish are being caught is an important part of understanding their rising impact on the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. Remember that it is illegal in Maryland, Virginia, and Delaware to transport and release live blue catfish.

Identifying Blue Catfish
Blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) have a bluish-gray body and a deeply forked tail. Unlike channel catfish, they do not have spots on their body. One feature that distinguishes blue catfish from other catfishes is the prominent straight edge on their anal fin; other catfishes, including the similarly colored white catfish, have a rounded anal fin (see pictures on website).




Be A Smithsonian Archaeology Volunteer

Join the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) Archaeology Lab as we excavate two sites on SERC property this summer! Work with scientists and students to excavate sites, preserve artifacts, and collect environmental data to understand the ways that people change the land has changed (or not) over the past 200 years.

We request that volunteers serve at least one, and volunteers may volunteer for one or more days. No experience is necessary and training will be provided. This opportunity is suitable for families with older children (13+ directly supervised by a parent/guardian, 16+ may be able to work without having a parent/guardian present)and groups. Volunteers will be working outside and some bending and kneeling is required.

For people who wish to become more deeply involved with the program, we offer a research citizen science track, where volunteers will pursue semi-independent research and may even publish their findings in professional journals. This opportunity is only available to people aged 18+. Research Citizen Scientists must commit to a minimum of 10 hours per month for at least 4 months.

All volunteer activities occur on Wednesdays on the campus of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, MD.




Pieris Project

The Pieris Project is a citizen science initiative designed to collect morphology and genetic data on a single species - the cabbage white butterfly (Pieris rapae) - from across its entire range, including your backyard! The small cabbage white butterfly is a great species to study how organisms adapt to new environments, because this butterfly has invaded many parts of the world within the last two centuries and is now found on nearly every continent. With your help, and only with your help, we can create the world's most comprehensive butterfly collection that will allow us to learn how the cabbage white has adapted to new environments as it expanded across the globe. This type of data will be critical to understanding how species may respond to environmental changes, such as climate change and habitat destruction.




Dark Skies ISS

Right now there are around 1.800.000 images at the Johnson Space Center database (The Gateway of the Astronauts). Around 1.200.000 images were taken aboard the ISS (date 20/02/2014). However the number of the classified images is much smaller and there is no archive of georeferenced images. There is a project to classify the day time images (Image detective). But, the techniques that are used in this project are not useful for the classification of night time images. The reason is that the patterns on Earth are not the same during the day and night. This is why another technique is needed to classify these night time, images.

Our main objective it's to study the light pollution that came from the cities. We want to stop the waste of energy and the destruction of the mighty ecosystem.

Your collaboration it is really important because algorithms cannot distinguis between stars, cities, and other objects (i.e. moon). Thus, we need your help to assess the light pollution in our world!




Planet Mappers: Mercury Edition

Map the surface of Mercury by marking and measuring craters and linear surface features in images from NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft.

By mapping craters across the planet, we can start to piece together the global crater population and figure out what these new images are showing us about the solar system’s inner-most planet.




Asteroid Mappers: Vesta Edition

Help us map the surface of asteroid Vesta using images from NASA' Dawn spacecraft. Measure the sizes and positions of craters and other surface features.

Why do we care about craters? Craters can tell us a lot about what’s happening on a planetary surface. One of the main uses of craters is to tell ages. The age of Vesta’s surface is really important to know, because it was probably one of the very first objects to fully form in the solar system.




BiodiversiTREE

BiodiversiTREE is an experimental forest on the campus of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, MD. Last fall, staff and volunteers planted around 20,000 trees in 75 plots. Some of the plots have one species, some have 4 species, and others have 12 species. Over the next 100 years, professional and citizen scientists will collect data to better understand the impacts of forest biodiversity on environmental factors such as tree growth, insect diversity, and soil quality.

We are seeking volunteers to help us maintain our forest and to help us collect data! No prior knowledge is required. This opportunity is suitable for people age 16 and over. Younger volunteers (under the supervision of a parent or guardian) will be considered on a case by case basis. Volunteers will be working outside and this work involves a lot of kneeling and bending. Volunteers must come to the SERC campus in Edgewater, MD to volunteer.

As we move forward, we are looking for individuals, families, or groups to "adopt" plots. This would involve continued maintenance of the plots and data collection, involving activities such as measuring trees and collecting soil samples.




Lookit

If you've ever wondered what your child is thinking or what it's like inside your newborn's mind, you're not alone.
The single most amazing computational engine known to mankind is your child's mind.

We're hoping to learn more about how babies and children learn by enlisting the help of their most dedicated and curious observers: their own parents!

By participating in a quick online activity with your child and submitting a webcam recording of his/her responses, you can contribute to our collective understanding of the fascinating phenomenon of children's learning.

In some experiments you'll step into the role of a researcher, asking your child questions or controlling the experiment based on what he or she does.

Traditionally, developmental studies happen in a quiet room in a university lab. Why complement these in-lab studies with online ones? We're hoping to...

...Make it easier for you to take part in research, especially for families without a stay-at-home parent

...Work with more kids when needed--right now a limiting factor in designing studies is the time it takes to recruit participants

...Draw conclusions from a more representative population of families--not just those who live near a university and are able to visit the lab during the day

...Make it easier for families to continue participating in longitudinal studies, which may involve multiple testing sessions separated by months or years

...Observe more natural behavior because children are at home rather than in an unfamiliar place

...Create a system for learning about special populations--for instance, children with specific developmental disorders

...Make the procedures we use in doing research more transparent, and make it easier to replicate our findings

...Communicate with families about the research we're doing and what we can learn from it




A.T. Seasons

Tracking the Seasons

The A.T. Seasons project brings together different parks and organizations that are actively monitoring seasonal changes in plants and animals (phenology) along the Appalachian Trail. Using Nature’s Notebook or our customized mobile app observers at all levels will be contributing to a comprehensive dataset with the goal of understanding the relationship between phenology and climate change along the Appalachian Trail. Get Involved today!

A.T. Seasons is your opportunity to help track the unfolding of important life cycle events each year along the iconic Appalachian Trail, linking your observations with others from Georgia to Maine. By observing and reporting seasonal changes of plants and animals you will help build the foundation to understanding and protecting the scenic & natural beauty of the trail corridor.




Which English?

One of the oldest findings in the study of the mind is that children are better at learning languages than adults. But when you bring children and adults into the lab, adults are better at any language-learning task you give them. So whatever is happening, it happens at a very different timescale than what we can study in the lab.

In this project, we are taking advantage of the fact that different people start learning English at different ages -- anything from birth to old age. We are using the Internet to get a very broad sample of people who started English and different ages and have different first languages -- a much, much more detailed survey than has ever been attempted before.

To help you get a sense of what we're learning as the project progresses, we've added some machine learning to the quiz that tries to guess your dialect. As we get more participants, the guesses will get more sophisticated, including guessing whether your native language is English.

We are also building interactive infographics to describe the data as it comes in. You can find them on our blog. The first one is available now at http://www.gameswithwords.org/WhichEnglish/dialect_results.html




Cat Tracker

Cats are mysterious, dangerous and far more unpredictable than one might expect from an animal that is theoretically, domesticated. Some of the mysteries of cats relate to where they go and what they do; this is especially true of cats that go outdoors. We open our doors. They leave. Just where they go, we can’t be sure. Or rather we couldn’t be sure, until now. With your help, we’re investigating the movement of domesticated cats across the landscape. We want to know: Where do they go? What are they eating? What do they bring home, microbially speaking?




L.A. Nature Map

The L.A. Nature Map hosted by the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles is an interactive map that displays local plant and wildlife observations.

Our Southern California region is a hotspot for urban biodiversity. With your help, we can show Angelenos and the world the diversity of nature all around us. You can contribute to this citizen science project by sending photos of plants and animals.

The L.A. Nature Map is created in collaboration with iNaturalist.




RASCals (Reptiles and Amphibians of Southern California)

RASCals is designed to improve our knowledge of native and non-native reptiles and amphibians in southern California. This region is home to 22.5 million people and has experienced dramatic urbanization and habitat modification. We need your help in documenting reptiles and amphibians throughout the region so that we can examine how various species have responded to these habitat changes. We are interested in native and non-native species and in observations in all types of habitats, from relatively pristine habitats to heavily modified, urban habitats, such as backyards, schoolyards, and urban parks. This project is conducted in collaboration with iNaturalist.




American Meteor Society - Meteor observing

Join the American Meteor Society community and contribute valuable and precise data relating to meteor shower and fireball observations. The AMS App allows witnesses of fireball meteors to log details about their observation using the mobile device. Sensors in the phone provide an accurate means to record the location of the observation as well as the azimuth and elevation values for the start and end points of the meteor. Using this data the AMS can accurately triangulate fireball meteors and plot their orbits to determine their celestial origins. The APP also provides a means to log observations from meteor showers. Simply start your observing session and then each time you see a meteor point to that place in the sky and swipe your finger on the screen in the direction the meteor traveled. Observation data is uploaded to the AMS website, available under your profile there and shared with the scientific community. The AMS App also provides a useful meteor shower calendar with star charts and moon conditions for all major and minor showers throughout the year.




Mount Diablo Fire Monitoring

Inspired by the USGS's Sam Droege (the man behind monitorchange.org), we're starting another project to turn park visitors into a remote sensor network! It's simple: Put up a sign asking people to set their cameras or phones in an angle bracket, take a photo, and post it with a hashtag to Twitter, Instagram, or Flickr. Then we harvest the photos and create timelapse views of change over time.




Birdeez

Birdeez is the easiest way to identify, collect and share bird sightings. The goal of this project is to educate you about the birds in your area while you contribute sightings that will be used for scientific understanding of bird migration, bird populations and climate change.

Currently Birdeez is available as an iPhone application at www.GetBirdeez.com/ but soon we we will be online and on different phone platforms as well.

Every bird counts, so help us help them by collecting and sharing sightings.




Our Radioactive Ocean

The release of radioactive contaminants from Fukushima remains an unprecedented event for the people of Japan and the Pacific Ocean. Help scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution reveal the ongoing spread of radiation across the Pacific and its evolving impacts on the ocean.

Clarification for fundraising costs: shipping is about 20% of the cost, the majority being the cesium extraction steps in the lab, radioactivity detection and data processing, along with managing the web site and database.

There are 3 ways to support us:

1) Help us reach our goal by donating to sample an existing site. Simply click on "HELP FUND A LOCATION" and choose to support one of the many sites that are underway

2) Someone can propose a new sampling site. Click on "PROPOSE A LOCATION" and see what is involved. If accepted (we are trying to get spread of locations up/down coast), we as for a donation of $100 and we'll set up a fundraising webpage, add that page to our website, and send you a sampling kit once your goal of $550 to $600 has been reached.

3) We also seek funds for general capacity building and public education activities at CMER: http://ourradioactiveocean.org/support ($20 minimum donation)




GoViral

GoViral participants who log in and report symptoms weekly using our website or mobile app will get a Do-It-Yourself flu test kit and a saliva collection system that they can keep and use at home if they are feeling sick. The home test detects 4 different kinds of flu and cold viruses, and all samples will be analyzed at a central laboratory that checks for 20 different viral infections. GoViral participants will get the results of their own tests and as well, through the aggregate data, be able to see in real-time what infections and symptoms are going around near them so they can take appropriate public health measures and understand when something might be abnormal.




Snapshots in Time

Snapshots in Time is a long-term Citizen Science project aimed at mobilizing people to monitor the timing of Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) and Wood Frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) breeding throughout the respective ranges of these species. The purpose of this project is to use the data collected by on-the-ground citizens year-after-year to investigate possible effects of climate change on the timing of reproduction. Determining changes in the timing of breeding is very important, not just for these species, but others that use the same habitat. The results of this project could allow us to inform land managers and development planners of important areas for conservation and look deeper into what other species in these ecosystems may be negatively affected by climate change, including some endangered species.

This is a what is commonly referred to as a phenology project. Phenology is the study of periodic events in a plant or animal's life cycle, such as breeding or migration, and how the timing of these events are influenced by changes in the climate. Phenology allows us to understand variations in breeding times, even in limited geographic areas or specific sites, to develop a range-wide picture of any shifts in the timing of breeding.

Our objective is to collect your data long-term, so those that choose to participate in this project are encouraged to do so at the same sites year after year when possible.

This effort will focus on populations found throughout their range in North America. Both of these amphibians breed following heavy rains during winter–spring that flood woodland depressions and various other types of ephemeral (short-lived) ponds or wetlands that lack fish. These can include areas such as lime-sink ponds in karst regions, or pools in the floodplains of streams.

Both species migrate en mass to breeding sites when weather conditions are appropriate from winter to spring depending on where you are within their range (see range map below). Spotted Salamanders and Wood Frogs often share the same breeding sites and breed simultaneously—with breeding typically occurring earlier for southern populations (i.e., winter) compared to more northerly populations (late winter–early spring). During most of the year (when not at breeding sites), Spotted Salamanders live in burrows and/or under large logs in forest habitats. Wood Frogs are terrestrial and reside in leaf litter-carpeted forests away from water where their coloration affords them excellent camouflage.

We request that you submit field observations for either species, including any information related to: 1) Migrations of adults to/from breeding pond sites; 2) Observations of adults at breeding ponds; 3) Observations of egg masses; 4) Observations of larvae (Spotted Salamander) or of tadpoles (Wood Frog), and 5) Whether metamorphs were observed leaving the wetland. We are betting the wetlands you monitor become spots (no pun intended!) that you regularly visit well into the future (or continue to visit if you are already doing so…).

We have prepared datasheets for the information we desire from your observations, and are also including an identification sheet for each species. One data sheet should be used for each observation. For example, if you heard wood frogs on one date, that is one observation. If you see tadpoles the next time you visit the wetland, you would use a separate data sheet. We request a photograph for each observation so that we can confirm identification.

Encountering Wood Frogs and Spotted Salamanders (or evidence of these species) in the field is always exciting. Rolling a pond-side log to see the bright orange spots of a plump Spotted Salamander, or hearing the duck-like chuckling sounds of a sizeable Wood Frog chorus, are always memorable natural history experiences. With this study, you can make your observations count toward a scientific review of these species’ breeding patterns. This will benefit our knowledge of these animals, and also provide you an opportunity to better acquaint yourself with the amphibian life in your own backyard while doing your part for conservation. Consider participating in Snapshots in Time, it will be a great experience for all ages!




SynBio4all

Discover and learn about synthetic biology on our platform.

Once inspired, participants will be able to submit their research ideas to our synthetic biology community forum.

The research ideas are next shaped into a testable hypothesis with the help of the SynBio4all community. Community members will then have the opportunity to join the research project and develop a research plan and potentially test the hypothesis in our scientific laboratory.

The community votes on the online forum to decide which research projects will be tested in our laboratory.

All results from the citizen science designed research plan will be posted on the SynBio4all online platform giving the community an opportunity to help analyze and interpret the data.




The NOVA Cloud Lab

Covering some 70 percent of Earth's surface, clouds play a key role in our planet's well-being. But how do they form, why are there so many types, and what clues can they give us about the weather and climate to come? Try your hand at classifying clouds and investigating the role they play in severe tropical storms. Featuring NOVA-produced videos and real feeds from NASA Earth Science satellites, this Lab challenges you to classify clouds and investigate the role they play in severe tropical storms.

This project is part of the larger NOVA Labs platform: www.pbs.org/nova/labs




The NOVA Energy Lab

For something we use every day, energy is a pretty mysterious concept. This lab from NOVA investigates what energy is, how it can be converted into useful forms, and why some sources are running low. In our Research Challenge, you'll use scientific data to design renewable energy systems for cities across the U.S.—and compete with others to see whose designs can produce the most power.

This project is part of the larger NOVA Labs platform: www.pbs.org/nova/labs




LepiMAP

LepiMAP is the African butterfly and moth mapping project. LepiMAP is a joint project of the Animal Demography Unit and Lepidopterists' Society of Africa.

LepiMAP is a project aimed at determining the distribution and conservation priorities of butterflies and moths on the African continent. This project is building the 21st century distribution maps for Africa's butterflies and moths. LepiMAP is the continuation of SABCA (the Southern African Butterfly Conservation Assessment)

Anybody, anywhere in Africa can contribute to this awesome Citizen Science project! And we need YOUR help!!




MIT Museum's Friday After Thanksgiving (FAT) Chain Reaction

The MIT Museum's F.A.T. Chain Reaction encourages people to join the fun as spectators or as participants. Participants register in advance to create their own contraptions and bring them to Rockwell Cage on November 29. Artist and inventor Arthur Ganson, renowned chain reaction creator, will be on hand, along with local artist and MIT alumnus Jeff Lieberman, to help with connections and emcee the event.




Tangaroa Blue Foundation

Tangaroa Blue Foundation coordinates the Australian Marine Debris Initiative (AMDI), a network of volunteers, communities, schools, indigenous rangers, industry bodies and government organisations. The objectives of the AMDI are to remove marine debris from the environment, collect scientific data on what is removed, track to the source wherever possible, and engage stakeholders to find practical ways to stop those items from entering the environment in the first place.




Birds and Windows Project

Birds face many threats when they come into contact with urban populations. One of the leading causes of avian mortality in cities is window collisions. In Canada it is estimated 25 million birds are killed each year as a result of bird window collisions.

For my master’s thesis I have developed the University of Alberta Birds and Windows Project to use citizen science and active participation to continue to identify the factors that affect collision risk at residential homes.

In late September, Environment Canada released a report on the leading causes of bird deaths, with collisions with houses or buildings tied for second spot with power lines, collisions and electrocutions, behind domestic and feral cats. Most studies on window collisions have focus on tall skyscrapers but based on the sheer number of houses compared to tall skyscrapers, houses represent 90 % of the mortality. More work is needed; only four studies in the past have focused on bird window collision mortality at houses.

To better understand what can be done to reduce bird window collisions at your home, the University of Alberta has developed this project to actively involve YOU in data collection. We are asking you to think about bird window collisions you have observed in the past and would like you to regularly search around your residence for evidence of bird window collisions in the future.Ideally you will search your residence daily for a period of at least one month. There is no limit to the number of months you can be involved in the project however, if a daily search does not suit your lifestyle we still want you to participate. We simply need you to keep track of which days you searched for evidence of a collision. To effectively monitor bird window collisions we need to know when people find evidence of a collision BUT it is equally important that we also know when no evidence is found.




Poo Power! Global Challenge

An invitation to 700 school-aged students from 25 different schools has been extended to the wider community to participate in a global competition. Students and classes will be pitched against each other to see who can identify the most and largest dog poo 'hotspots' in their local neighbourhood in the 'Poo Power! Global Challenge'.

Participating schools and students will use their GPS-enabled iPhone to download the free Poo Power! App from the App Store. Their task is to identify and map dog poo 'hotspots' in dog parks and public spaces from their neighbourhood over a 2 week period starting Monday 25 November 2013.

This eyebrow-raising initiative is a collaboration between dog poo entrepreneur Duncan Chew from Poo Power! and Mia Cobb from the Anthrozoology Research Group, recent winner of I'm a Scientist, Get Me Out of Here!

The collected information will be uploaded onto the Global Poo Map and provides a platform for students to discuss the scientific, social and environmental issues of dog waste. The students are then encouraged to write a letter to their local Government representative of their findings and recommendations.

"From our research only 3% of Australians see uncollected dog waste as an environmental concern," explains Duncan Chew. "When it rains, uncollected dog poo gets washed down drains, effecting water quality and habitat for native animals, as well as making rivers and creeks unpleasant for us to visit."

Mia Cobb echoes her enthusiasm for the initiative: "This is the great way to utilise the prize money from winning the IAS competition to raise awareness of new sustainable energy sources, environmental issues and responsible dog ownership while increasing student engagement in a citizen science activity."

The collated information has the poo-tential to identify sites for biogas-powered lights for parks as proposed by the Melbourne-based project, Poo Power!, currently in development. The methane that is released from the dog waste as it breaks down inside a 'biogas generator' can be used as a viable renewable energy source.

Competition prizes and giveaways are up for grabs for the most photo submissions received between 25th November and 9th December 2013.

Visit www.poopower.com.au for full competition details.




Plate Watch

Volunteers hang settlement plates off docks in Alaska for three to nine months. Each plate is then surveyed for invasive species and redeployed. The survey involves photographing the fouling species attached to the plate and collecting specimens of new or target species. Training is available and settlement plates are provided.




Watch the Wild

Watch the Wild™ needs your help. As a Watch the Wild™ volunteer, you observe and report the "wild" in your community, from trees and plants to lakes and streams to weather and wildlife activity. In as little as ten minutes, your observations help us to understand how our eco-systems are changing and helps us to adapt for the future. Your observations will be entered into a database and shared with interested scientists.




Slooh

Since 2003 Slooh has connected land based telescopes to the internet for access by the broader public. Slooh members have taken 2.4m photos of over 40,000 celestial objects, and participated in numerous discoveries with leading astronomical institutions. Slooh’s automated observatories develop celestial images in real time for broadcast to the internet. Slooh’s technology is protected by patent 7,194,146 B2 which was awarded in 2006. Slooh’s flagship observatory is situated on Mt. Teide in the Canary Islands, in partnership with the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands (IAC). Slooh has also broadcast celestial events from partner observatories in Arizona, Japan, Hawaii, Cypress and Dubai. Slooh’s free live broadcasts of asteroids, comets, transits, eclipses, etc. feature narration by astronomy experts Bob Berman and Paul Cox and are syndicated to media outlets such as NBC, ABC, CNN, Fox News, National Geographic, Wired, The Weather Channel and more. Slooh’s live celestial events have been viewed over a billion times, the highlight of which was the 2011 lunar eclipse broadcast live on Google’s home page. Slooh’s iPad app launched in April of 2013 and makes it easy for beginners to watch live celestial event programming and take pictures from Slooh’s Canary Islands observatory.




Field Photo Library

A photo taken in the field helps scientists and citizens to document changes in landscape, wildlife habitats, impacts of drought and flood and fire, and so on. This Geo-referenced Field Photo Library is a citizen science and community remote sensing data portal, where people can share, visualize and archive field photos in the world. Users can upload, edit, query and download geo-referenced field photos in the library. All photos are also linked with satellite image series images (MODIS), so that people can see the changes over time.




Cyber Citizen

Cyber Citizen is a research initiative at Michigan Tech University aimed at creating mobile and web-based tools to facilitate citizen participation in scientist-led environmental and social research projects.

The project has four apps available:
Beach Health Monitor - analyzes whether beach conditions pose a human health risk.

Ethnographer - connects Upper Peninsula Michigan residents with ethnographers interested in studying and documenting local history.

Lichen AQ - uses lichen to track air pollution which helps federal land managers.

Mushroom Mapper - records and analyzes mushroom habitats.

App users either upload their data to a publicly accessible database or directly to the researchers' project website.




Darwin for a Day

Darwin for a Day is a web application that allows you to explore the Galapagos Islands through Google Street View and document its unique plants and animals. When you see an animal or plant you’d like to catalogue, you can describe it by creating an observation. You can just enter your best guess at what it is (i.e. “bird”) or enter in the scientific name, if you know it!

All of your observations will be shared with the iNaturalist community & the Charles Darwin Foundation, and will contribute to research of the Galapagos Islands.




Counting Weddell Seals in Antarctica

Have your students help scientists count Weddell seals using satellite imagery.

Many people think seals on the ice are easy to count. There is no place for them to hide when they are out of the water. They are not afraid of people so don’t run away, and if they are with a pup, the adult stays in the same location for several days. However it is not that easy. There are seals all over the place as new cracks in the ice create new suitable locations for feeding and many seals move to these new areas. Counting individuals is difficult unless they are tagged because it’s hard to know if we counted this one yesterday or not. To solve these problem scientists are using satellite images that can take a picture of a large area at one moment in time. They then can count them using a computer.

In this activity, we ask for your help in counting the seals using satellite images. Scientists need all the help they can in creating an accurate count. We hope you will take the time to join our team and help do the counting as the images come in several times every season.




NatureWatch NZ

NatureWatch NZ is a citizen science project dedicated to exploring and discovery New Zealand's biodiversity. If you see an unusual or interesting bug, plant, or any other species, take a photo of it, upload the photo to NatureWatch NZ, and learn all about it. The NatureWatch NZ online community will ID your species for you. You can also help others to ID their photos, and you can join (or create!) projects about the species and places you're most interested in.

Together, we're documenting what's living in NZ so we can understand NZ nature better, and have fun while we do it.

(NatureWatch NZ is a website and online community of New Zealand nature watchers powered by the international iNaturalist.org system. Thanks iNat!)




Harvard Forest Schoolyard LTER

The Harvard Forest is part of a national network of sites that supports K-12 teachers and students in hands-on ecological research.

In the Harvard Forest Schoolyard LTER program, teachers learn about and initiate ecology research in their classrooms and schoolyards. Students learn to collect data on important long-term ecological issues and processes. Student data are then shared on the Harvard Forest website.

[From the Harvard Forest website]




Mothing

Moths are incredibly diverse, are ecologically important as plant eaters, pollinators, and food for songbirds. How will climate and other large-scale ecological factors affect moths? Take photographs of moths at your porch light and upload to Discover Life. You can identify them if you'd like, and we'll help. Students can compare moths at their own site with moths from other sites, to answer their own original questions and do real science. Interested participants may also wish to coordinate a study site.




NanoDoc

NanoDoc is an online game that allows bioengineers and the general public to design new nanoparticle strategies towards the treatment of cancer. You’ll learn about nanomedicine and explore how nanovehicles can cooperate with each other and their environment to kill tumors. Best strategies will be considered for validation in vitro or in robotico. Are you ready to become a NanoDoc?




Fern Watch

Help Track the Health of Redwood Forests

In 2008, League scientist Emily Burns discovered that the height of the most common plant in the coast redwood forest is affected by how much rain and fog fall in the woods. Western sword fern (Polystichum munitum) has tall fronds in wet redwood forests and much shorter fronds in dry forests. For this reason, sword fern is an important indicator of climate change and we are studying these ferns to detect drought in the redwood forest.




Study Adélie Penguin breeding

From November to January, classrooms take part in a virtual field study of Adélie Penguins as they breed, brood and rear their chicks in Antarctica. Photos of selected penguin families from Cape Royds Antarctica are posted to the website for students to follow on a daily basis. Weather data, event journal and background information about penguins is also provided. Students keep a field notebook gathering and analyzing their own data about each penguin family using the same process of the field biologist. This real time, long term activity provides students a window into the harshness of Adélie penguin life and the work of field scientists. Predation, competition and environmental challenges all affect the penguin’s ability to raise chicks. Witnessing these events themselves helps students begin to understand the world around them and the remote location of Antarctica. This project offers a real time daily field experience with outcomes we cannot predict.




Amphibian Conservation and Education Project

The Amphibian Conservation Education Project aims to empower educators, students, and individuals to become involved in amphibian conservation efforts.

Through this project, participants will become field scientists by analyzing water quality and testing amphibians for the disease, Chytrid Fungus. Collected data is then used by local herpetologists (scientists who study reptiles and amphibians) to gain a better understanding of the species of amphibians being affected by the disease and where Chytrid is being spread.




Notes from Nature

Most natural history collections are housed in museum cabinets, where they are not easily available to citizens and researchers. The Notes from Nature transcription project addresses this problem by digitizing biological collections one record at a time! Help museum staff and scientists by transcribing the labels and ledgers that have been meticulously recorded and stored over the past century. In many cases these are the only historical records of species distribution available. Join us in unlocking this important information - take some notes from nature!




Test the Fairness of US State Quarters

If you flip a quarter many times, it should land heads up just about as often as it lands tails up, assuming the coin is fair. But with so many different state designs, it's not clear that all U.S. quarters are fair. Help us check by taking a few moments to flip some quarters and report the results below.




Caribbean Lionfish Response Program

The Caribbean Lionfish Response Program (CLRP) was developed using a bilateral marine management strategy. This two-fold program approach includes Information and Education (I&E) and Lionfish Location and Removal. This Program has been running successfully since October 2009.
The goals of the CLRP are:

Educate local divers, fishermen, local schools, tourists and the general-public on the urgent Lionfish crisis and how each can contribute to help resolve this rapid growing invasive issue.

Safely and efficiently search and remove Lionfish across the USVI territory by placing trained divers in the water.




Photosynq-measure plant photosynthesis

We are building a low cost, handheld device which researchers, educators, and citizen scientists can use to build a global database of plant health.

The Photosynq platform starts with a Arduino compatible hand-held device which connects to your cell phone and measures fluorescence and absorbance of photosynthetic plants and algae in a non-destructive way.

These measurements provide a detailed picture of the health of the plant and are used for plant breeding, improving plant efficiency, and to identify novel photosynthetic pathways for energy and crop research. Existing field-portable fluorescence and absorbance devices cost thousands of dollars and are too expensive for plant breeders in the developing world. In addition, these devices use proprietary software and hardware, so each user experience and dataset is isolated.

We believe that phenomic plant data, like genomic data, is a critical global resource and must both be shared and agglomerated to be useful.

Therefore, the devices will automatically sync all user data to the cloud via users’ cell phones, where anyone can see and analyze it. In this way we can create a high quality, open set of photosynthesis data points taken from around the world. Most importantly, the data is taken using the same instrument and protocols, making it highly comparable and consistent.




Pathways: Wildlife Corridors of NM

Pathways: Wildlife Corridors of NM runs a wildlife track and sign monitoring program, documenting "common" species before they become "uncommon". 6 Focal Species include, Black Bear, Elk, Mule Deer, Bobcat, Pronghorn, and Mountain Lion. We monitor transects between the mountain ranges of New Mexico, documenting the movements of these large mammals between the mountains and the river valleys.




MyEnvironment

The MyEnvironment mapping tools provides immediate access to a cross-section of environmental data for any geographical location in the U.S. Users of the official site can choose the location and environmental issue to examine.




Treezilla

Treezilla is a mapping project based in Great Britain that challenges citizen scientists to map every tree in Britain. The mapping interface is easy to use and users can easily add their tree listings and even add photos for others to help them identify species. It’s free to use and the website even offers educational material for inquiry based science lessons.

Ultimately, a more complete map of Britain’s trees will help scientists how certain species are affected by climate change, disease, and patterns of land use. The website even has built in tools to measure how much CO2 is captured and what total economic benefit is gained from the different types of species for a given area.

Every tree added to the mapping system helps, and Treezilla helps make contributing easy. With the focus of the project is to map trees in urban environments – you can even map the trees in your back yard, school, or local park. Go outside, bring a friend, and start mapping trees today!




Michigan Herp Atlas

Help record sightings of amphibians and reptiles in Michigan. This helps provide needed data about the conservation practices of Michigan's regions. The Michigan Department of Natural Resources and its various partners need your help to monitor the entire state.




Great Lakes Environmental Monitoring with Passive Samplers

Great Lakes Passive Sampling is a research project being conducted by the Lohmann Lab at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. Polyethylene passive samplers are essentially just pieces of plastic that can absorb hydrophobic contaminants from the air or water. To obtain data in many different areas, we depend on a network of volunteers to deploy, recover, and return these samplers to us.

Participating is simple: we can send samplers and other supplies necessary to set up the samplers. You record the date and location where you set up your sampler, and then leave it for 8 weeks. After 8 weeks, you take down the sampler and send it back to us, and we analyze it to see what's present in the air or water at your site.

By deploying polyethylene passive samplers in the water and air throughout the Lake Ontario and Lake Erie region, we can measure levels of persistent hydrophobic organic pollutants and analyze how the amounts of these chemicals change in different locations.




Aurorasaurus

Aurorasaurus maps aurora-related Tweets and citizen science reports of the aurora during the first solar maximum (now!) with social media. The google maps contains predictions of the auroral oval based on space data, along with weather, and citizen scientist markers. When auroral activity really occurs this is the best place to go for accurate predictions of whether it can be seen in your area!




Where's the Elderberry Longhorn Beetle?

Hi, my name is Dr. Dan Duran and I'm an evolutionary biologist and entomologist at Drexel University (Philadelphia, PA) and I need your help finding "Desmond," an Elderberry Longhorn Beetle, formally known as *Desmocerus palliatus!*

This *beautiful* beetle species used to live throughout a large part of eastern North America but in recent decades it appears as if it has declined in numbers. We need your help to figure out if and why this might be true and how we can help them move back into areas they once lived.

The Elderberry Longhorn Beetle is easy to spot with its bold patterns of blue and gold and long antennae. It's so attractive, in fact, that it was chosen for a USPS stamp design in 1999! I can't promise you'll find one, but if you keep an eye out, you might have a chance at seeing one of these impressive creatures. They come out at different times in different places, but June is often a good time to see them.




Dark Sky Meter

The Dark Sky Meter (available for iPhones) allows citizen scientists to contribute to a global map of nighttime light pollution.
Light pollution is a growing problem in urban environments, but now you can help scientists better understand its effects on the environment. The map is also a great help for (amateur) astronomers looking for dark skies.
By utilizing the camera built in to your iPhone, the Dark Sky Meter actually measures ‘skyglow’ and updates the data in real time.

The lite version is free and gives you a rough estimate of the night sky brightness.

The Pro version of the app also charts weather conditions and cloud cover so you can take readings at optimal times. The app is as easy to use as taking a picture, and is a fun way to learn about your night sky.

The Results are live and visible for everyone on a global light pollution map generated by the app users. Visit darkskymeter.com to see the map.




The NOVA Sun Lab

Despite its apparently steady glow, the Sun is a churning mass of superhot plasma that regularly produces powerful flares and storms that can knock out power and communication systems here on Earth. In this lab, watch NOVA videos to explore what makes the Sun so volatile and get access to the same NASA data, images, and tools that scientists use to predict solar storms—so that you can predict them for yourself.




Horseshoe crabs as homes

You are walking along the beach on a sunny spring day. But what is that? Something is moving slowly out of the water. It looks like a large crab, covered in barnacles and mussels. Creepy? Ugly? No, its home! At least for all those critters that live on Horseshoe crabs. Horseshoe crabs have been around for more than 250 million years, unimpressed by dinosaurs and ice ages.

Since then, Horseshoe crabs have played a key role in coastal ecosystems: the eggs are eaten by shore birds, juveniles are food for sea turtles, and adults aerate the ocean floor through their digging activity.

We believe Horseshoe crabs serve yet another important function: as substrate for many invertebrate species such as mussels, barnacles and snails. Many marine species require hard substrates to live on, and such substrates are historically rare on the predominantly sandy beaches of the Eastern US.
In more recent times, docks and boats may offer new opportunities for intertidal species - but what about animals that do not like the tidal influence? Are there even species living on Horseshoe crabs that we have not discovered yet?

Help us decipher who lives on Horseshoe crabs! Take clear pictures of Horseshoe crabs and their critters when you see them on the beach, and send them to us. Just let us know when and where you saw the crab. That's it.

In return, we will post the best pictures on our website and explain every animal that you discovered on the Horseshoe crab. New species will be featured on the site, and we would like to name our most successful discoverers.

With your help, we will be able to address the following questions:
Which region has the highest diversity of animals attached to Horseshoe crabs? When are the crabs found the most? The least?
Moreover, we will build a valuable resource for school classes, beach walkers and everybody else who ever wanted to know: What is that thing sitting on the Horseshoe crab?

Horseshoe crabs come to the beaches to mate and lay eggs when the tides are highest. This happens at full and new moons. So be on a lookout for them!




CyberTracker

CyberTracker Conservation is a non-profit organisation that promotes the vision of a Worldwide Environmental Monitoring Network. Our ultimate vision is that smart phone users worldwide will use CyberTracker to capture observations on a daily basis.

CyberTracker is the most efficient method of gps field data collection. You can use CyberTracker on a Smartphone or handheld computer to record any type of observation. CyberTracker, which requires no programming skills, allows you to customize an Application for your own data collection needs.




Marine Debris Tracker

The Marine Debris Tracker mobile application allows you to help make a difference by checking in when you find trash on our coastlines and waterways. Data you submit is available to download online and you also have access to mapping all data, worldwide. Marine Debris Tracker is a joint partnership of the NOAA Marine Debris Division and the Southeast Atlantic Marine Debris Initiative (SEA-MDI), located within the College of Engineering at the University of Georgia.




Save the Tasmanian Devil

The Roadkill Project was launched in 2009 to help determine how significant the threat of roadkill mortality is to Tasmanian devil populations, particularly those populations already decimated by Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD). The Roadkill Project aims to continue to monitor the threat of roadkill mortality and the spread of DFTD and to try to reduce Tasmanian devil roadkill. Involving the public helps to greatly extend our limited resources.

Anyone who is using Tasmanian roads can help by reporting any Tasmanian devil roadkill they see.




FoxPop

FoxPop is a public science engagement project which aims to get Dublin citizens involved in a city-wide collection of data on urban foxes. Despite their presence all over the capital, little or no research has been carried out in terms of numbers. Please help us by submitting any sightings, locations, dates and times if you please.




Sonoma BioChar Initiative

Help explore how biochar works in local soils by using your very own garden. (Biochar is a specialized form of charcoal that is suitable for use in agriculture.) This little-known soil enhancer has been shown in lab tests and field trials around the world to be beneficial for soil health and plant production, and we want to test it under local conditions.

This project is easy, fun, and an interesting activity for the whole family. We are also partnering with school garden programs, so if you are involved with one please contact us as well.




SOD Blitz

Sudden Oak Death (SOD) is a serious exotic disease that is threatening the survival of tanoak and several oak species in California. By collecting leaf samples during community SOD blitzes and submitting your samples to UC Berkeley diagnostic laboratory, you can help create a detailed local map of disease distribution.

SOD-blitzes inform and educate the community about Sudden Oak Death, get locals involved in detecting the disease, and produce detailed local maps can then be used to identify those areas where the infestation may be mild enough to justify proactive management. You can participating in an existing SOD-blitz or create your own.

Good news: SOD-Blitzes are COMPLETELY FREE thanks to funding from the US Forest Service to the UC Berkeley Forest Pathology Lab!




OhDeer

Welcome to OhDeer! Helping to map deer road casualties throughout Britain (or beyond!) via your Smart Phone.

The six species of deer living wild in Britain are our largest terrestrial mammals, ranging from the majestic red deer, to smaller fallow, roe, sika, muntjac and Chinese water deer. The large rise over the past 40 years in road traffic volumes as well as numbers and distribution of deer has unfortunately led to deer casualties at roadsides becoming an increasingly common sight. The total number of deer-vehicle collisions in Britain is estimated to exceed 42,000 per year, but most are not actually recorded. Information you log using this citizen-science smart phone app will assist our research on numbers and locations of deer accident hotspots.




Creek Freaks

Young people and adults collect information on stream health and post biological, chemical and physical data, photos and videos on an interactive map. This provides information to the public, to scientists and to conservation groups about local water quality. The Creek Freaks website includes data forms and activity guides to get started monitoring aquatic macroinvertebrates (stream insects and crustaceans), water chemistry, and to take visual observations and physical measurements of the stream and streamside vegetation.




Astro Drone

The Astro Drone game is part of a scientific crowdsourcing project. People who possess a Parrot AR drone can play the game, in which they are challenged to perform different space missions in an augmented reality. Contribute to future space exploration by playing the free Astro Drone game!

The app is more than a game. Players can choose to contribute to a scientific crowdsourcing experiment that aims to improve autonomous capabilities of space probes, such as landing, obstacle avoidance, and docking. The app processes the images made by the AR drone's camera, extracting abstract mathematical image features. These features can neither be interpreted by humans, nor can the original image be reconstructed. However, the features can be used by robots to learn how to navigate in their environment. Players can join the experiment by going to the high score table. If they agree, the feature data is sent over the Internet.

The latest release contains two levels. In the first players learn to dock as well as possible to the International Space Station. In the second level players enact the Rosetta mission from ESA, by avoiding space debris and releasing the Philae lander onto a comet's surface. New levels will be added incrementally with new releases.

Astro Drone is a project performed by the Advanced Concepts Team of the European Space Agency.




Secchi App

Join seafarers in the global scientific experiment to study marine phytoplankton.

The phytoplankton underpin the marine food chain, so we need to know as much about them as possible. To participate in this project, you'll need to create a Secchi Disk, a tool that measures water turbidity, and use the free iPhone or Android ‘Secchi’ application.

You can take a Secchi Disk reading as often as you wish, every day, once a week, twice a month, or just occasionally. The data you collect will help scientists around the world to understand the phytoplankton.

Join in and help make this the world’s largest public marine biological study.




Planet Four

Planet Four is a citizen science project in which volunteers help planetary scientists identify and measure features on the surface of Mars.

Scientists need your help to find and mark ‘fans’ and ‘blotches’ on the Martian surface, features that indicate wind direction and speed. By tracking these features, you can help planetary scientists better understand Mars’ climate.

All of the images you'll see depict the southern polar region, a little known area of Mars. The majority of these images have never been seen by humans until now.

This is your chance to explore the surface of Mars like never before!




Project Splatter

Become a 'Splatter Spotter'. Join Project Splatter and help us map and count wildlife road casualties in the United Kingdom (UK) using your data.

Project Splatter collates UK wildlife road casualty data via Twitter, Facebook and our website with an aim to map and quantify UK wildlife roadkill. By collating data you report to us we may be able to identify roadkill 'hotspots' for future mitigation projects and help preserve our wildlife.




Dognition

You’ll learn your dog’s cognitive style by playing fun, science-based games –- an experience that gives you the insight you need to make the most of your relationship with your best friend.

A key aspect of the Dognition methodology is our use of Citizen Science – research that can be conducted by everyone, not just people with Ph.D.s. By gathering this data we can begin to understand more about all dogs, much more quickly and on a broader scale than if scientists had to conduct this research themselves.




Vital Signs Maine

Where are the invasive species in Maine? Where aren’t they? Students, educators, citizens, and scientists are working together to find out.

As part of the Vital Signs community you can help steward the 32,000 miles of rivers and streams, 6,000 lakes and ponds, 5,000 miles of coastline, and 17 million acres of forest that are threatened by invasive species.

Together we are using scientific tools and habits of mind to look for native and invasive species in local habitats. We are sharing what we find and do not find online. We are contributing to a greater understanding of our shared environment.





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