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Counter Culture Labs

Come help us build a new community lab for the East Bay, focused on DIY biology and citizen science. A place to explore, learn, work on fun projects, tinker with biology and other sciences. Open to biotech professionals, scientists, and citizen scientists of all stripes. Be part of our community of creative thinkers, hackers and mad scientists!




SynBio4all

Discover and learn about synthetic biology on our platform.

Once inspired, participants will be able to submit their research ideas to our synthetic biology community forum.

The research ideas are next shaped into a testable hypothesis with the help of the SynBio4all community. Community members will then have the opportunity to join the research project and develop a research plan and potentially test the hypothesis in our scientific laboratory.

The community votes on the online forum to decide which research projects will be tested in our laboratory.

All results from the citizen science designed research plan will be posted on the SynBio4all online platform giving the community an opportunity to help analyze and interpret the data.




BioCurious

Our Mission:
We believe that innovations in biology should be accessible, affordable, and open to everyone.
We’re building a community biology lab for amateurs, inventors, entrepreneurs, and anyone who wants to
experiment with friends.

What We Are:

- a complete working laboratory and technical library for entrepreneurs to cheaply access equipment, materials, and co-working space,

- a training center for biotechniques, with an emphasis on safety

- a meeting place for citizen scientists, hobbyists, activists, and students




GeckoWatch

GeckoWatch is a citizen science project to map the fine-scale distribution of nonnative geckos in the United States. The primary interest is in mapping the rapidly increasing range of the Mediterranean House Gecko, Hemidactylus turcius. However, we are interested in all nonnative gecko species.

There are at least 18 species of nonnative geckos that have established populations in the United States. Although many of these species are known only in Florida, others are showing up with increasing regularity in multiple states. At the most extreme end is the Mediterranean House Gecko, which has established populations in at least 24 states in the U.S.

To undertake any research on these nonnative geckos, scientists must first understand where these geckos occur. As we learn about the rapidly changing distributions of these nonnative geckos, we can then ask:

1. What are the impacts of these nonnative geckos on our native species?

2. What makes some species successful colonizers?

3. What are the likely routes of colonization?

Observations from citizen scientists are essential to answering these questions and allowing us to learn about the biology of these nonnative geckos.




Genspace

Our mission is to promote citizen science and the public access to biotechnology. Our organization serves the greater New York area through education outreach, events and community involvement in science. To this end we created a community biotechnology laboratory in Brooklyn, New York, which hosts public hands-on courses and supports scientific inquiry for students, teachers and the curious individual with a focus on molecular and synthetic biology.




Welsh Sea Watchers Project

The Sea Watch Foundation is looking to recruit enthusiastic individuals with a keen interest in Welsh whales, dolphins and porpoises to become part of the Welsh Sea Watchers project. The Welsh Sea Watches Project is a new initiative with that aims to develop a network of reliable volunteers throughout Wales to assist in data collection and further understanding and public awareness of the amazing cetacean species that can be seen off Welsh coasts. Volunteers will take part in a variety of tasks and gain experience in cetacean surveying and species identification, as well as public awareness work and social networking.
‘Sea Watchers’ will assist the Wales Development Officer and Sightings Officer in a number of tasks including but not limited to

• Organising and conducting regular land based watches for cetaceans

• Organising, attending and assisting during Sea Watch events

• Representing Sea Watch during public talks and school visits

The Welsh Sea Watchers project is an on-going project; volunteers may apply throughout the year. Due to the nature of the project, it is advisable that applicants are already resident in Wales, as accommodation cannot be provided.

Desirable skills/qualifications

• Background in education or marine biology

• Driving license and use of own car

Duration/minimum commitment
Welsh Sea Watcher volunteers should ideally be active all year around with a minimum commitment of 4 hours per month.

This is a flexible, part-time positions; volunteers are expected to organise their own time and work independently (with guidance from the Welsh Development Officer).




Nanocrafter

Nanocrafter invites you to become a citizen scientist in the field of synthetic biology! As you solve puzzles to progress through the game, you'll learn about DNA biochemistry and how DNA strand displacement can be used to build computers, gears, walking constructs, and more! Compete in challenge levels that let you submit creative solutions to problems ranging from casual to highly technical. Review the solutions that others submit, team up to come up with even better solutions, and help scientists forge the future of synthetic biology!

Check out our game video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IaQEQ8Tiu_0

Follow us on twitter: @nanocrafter

Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nanocraftergame




SubseaObservers

Help track the health and abundance of the mid-Atlantic scallop fishery!

Researchers at the University of Delaware have developed a new robot-based approach to surveying marine life the ocean floor. They use Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs), which can navigate underwater without direct human control, to take photos of marine life in its natural habitat.

By becoming a SubseaObserver you'll play a roll in ocean conservation by helping organizations such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) make better decisions about how to manage the scallop fishery now and for future generations.

As a SubseaObserver you can name your own virtual AUV and choose what part of the mid-Atlantic you'd like to explore.

SubseaObservers also includes information about scallop biology, how the fishery is managed, how AUVs work and where they're used.




Mourning Warbler Song Mapper

The Mourning Warbler Song Mapper is a citizen science project that will map the songs of males during spring migration.




Habitat Restoration Bird Monitoring

MUVE (Museum Volunteers for the Environment) is Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science's volunteer-led coastal habitat restoration project. Because habitat restoration creates considerable ecological change, we are monitoring the ecosystem responses to that change using bird habitat use as an indicator. Citizen scientists complete a weekly or monthly transect walk of the site and note the category of birds they observe, so species identification skills are not necessary.




Beats Per Life

What is the secret to a long life? The heartbeat of some animals may hold a clue. We are consolidating reports of the heart rate and lifespan of as many vertebrate species as possible. Our goal is to integrate the data from various sources into a single database, where they can be more readily accessible.




Great Fish Count

Strap on a pair of waders, cast a net and see what type of marine life you can find in the New York waterways. Maybe you’ll be the first to find a seahorse or identify the 222nd species in the Hudson River? Nearly all of the city’s waterways, from the piers along the West Side Highway to the tips of Jamaica Bay and the East River, are teeming with life. Drop by one of our 13 sites throughout and beyond the city to join top ecologists and biologists to catch, count, identify and release the animals you come across in our waters.

This program is presented in collaboration with the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and environmental education programs at each site. It is a free program, lasting for two hours to educate the public about the waterways of NYC and how they are full of life.




American Gut

The Human Microbiome Project and other microbiome projects worldwide have laid an important foundation for understanding the trillions of microbes that inhabits each of our bodies. However, opportunities for the public to get involved in such research has been limited. Now, American Gut gives you an opportunity to participate and to compare the microbes in your gut to those in the guts of thousands of other people in the US and elsewhere. American Gut is a project built on open-source, open-access principles. Our data are for the good of understanding and will be shared both with participants and with other scientists.




National Plant Monitoring Scheme

We are a habitat-based plant monitoring program that collects data to provide an annual assessment of plant abundance and diversity.

Our volunteers are assigned a random but convenient 1km area to monitor. Monitoring involves recording the plant species present in that plot of land.




NOVA Evolution Lab

In NOVA’s Evolution Lab (pbs.org/nova/labs), phylogenetics—the study of the evolutionary relationships between species—is explored in depth as players evaluate similarities in the traits and
DNA of species and conduct their own investigations in a virtual tree of life. Along the way, players can watch short animated videos that explain the evidence of evolution and illustrate it with specific examples.

The Evolution Lab contains two interactives, Build A Tree and Deep Tree, that were developed by the Life on Earth project based at Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Life on Earth is a NSF-funded project led by principal investigator Chia Shen, director of the Scientists’ Discovery Room (SDR) Lab. Shen’s team, including lead developer Florian Block and collaborators around the country, worked for several years to find the most effective ways to make the tree an open-ended space to explore how life formed and continues to evolve.




Gotham Whale

Gotham Whale monitors marine mammals in the waters around New York City. We work primarily on board the whale watching vessel, The American Princess. We enlist other on-the-water observers to report sightings of whales, dolphins, and seals in the area.




BUGSS

BUGSS stands for Baltimore UnderGround Science Space. We are a community lab for amateur, professional, and citizen scientists and a place to be curious about biotechnology and have fun responsibly.




DIYBio

Started in 2008, the mission of DIYBio is to encourage an active and safe community of do-it-youself biologists. At the core of our mission is to improve the public's understanding of biotechnology.

Our website maintains a list of global DIYBio events and local organizations, bio-safety practices, and more!




Track a Tree

Track a Tree gives you the opportunity to become a citizen ecologist. The project involves revisiting a tree throughout the spring and recording the timing (phenology) of budburst and leafing and also the timing of flowering beneath the tree. As temperatures rise leafing gets earlier and we are interested in testing whether the understory can keep up with the pace of change. Through citizen ecologists monitoring trees across the UK we can see whether the understory in warm parts of the country fares as well as those from colder parts.




The Microbiome and Oral Health

Help researchers learn more about the normal bacteria in the mouth!

You may Qualify if you:
• Are able to collect samples from yourself
• Have NO active dental disease
• Have NO chronic medical conditions

What is the Time Commitment?
• Six 2.5 hour office visits at UCSF
• Daily sample collection by you at your home (~30 minutes per day) for 28 days
Benefits?
• A free dental examination (no xrays) and a free dental cleaning
• A maximum of $245




UK Ladybird Survey

The Ladybird Survey aims to facilitate the recording of all the UK's ladybirds. Help us understand the ecology of native UK ladybirds by sending in your observations.

The invasion of the harlequin ladybird (Harmonia axyridis) threatens Britain's native populations. If you want to know more about this species in particular, or want to record sightings, please have a look at the Harlequin Ladybird Survey website.




Southwest Monarch Study

The Southwest Monarch Study is a citizens science research project dedicated to learning about monarch butterflies in the Southwestern United States including Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, western Colorado and the California deserts. We provide education and conservation programs as well as training to help citizen scientists tag and monitor monarch butterflies and their immatures.




The Dental Arcade Game

Are you fascinated by forensic science? This project is run by a real life forensic anthropologist, and is about teeth. It is designed to gather information about your age, ethnicity and the teeth you have in your mouth, to see if what we think we know about when teeth erupt is accurate.

At the moment, if an unknown body is found, forensic scientists (forensic anthropologists and forensic odontologists) examine the teeth and work out how old the person was when s/he died by noting which teeth have erupted, and comparing this to reference data. This data then gives the scientist an age range, which can help the police narrow down the list of possible people that the body could be. The problem is that this data is out of date, and there is lots of variation between populations.

That's where YOU come in. We can improve this data set by getting as many people as possible to complete our survey. That way, we can build up a mega-database of ages and tooth eruption and ethnicities, and build up a really useful bank of data for scientists to use in the future.




Monitoring an Invasive Seaweed

We need your help to track the changes in abundance of an invasive seaweed, Gracilaria vermiculophylla. Native to Asia, G. vermiculophylla was introduced to the Southeast via the oyster trade back in the 1990's. Scientist studying G. vermiculophylla are trying to determine how the seaweed is changing southeastern estuaries where it is most prolific, and here is how you can help!

An informational sign is placed on the Jay Wolf Nature Trial Dock, a high-traffic area adjacent to a mudflat where G. vermiculophylla can be found. The sign, along with educating the public about the invasive seaweed, instructs passersby to take a photograph with a camera or phone and to then share the photograph with us using social media or email. A bracket is installed adjacent to the sign to designate where the camera or phone should be placed, allowing us to guarantee that all photographs are taken from the same location. The photographs will be compiled in a time lapse series, which will be used to better understand seasonal changes in G. vermiculophylla populations. The time lapses will be available for viewing by the public through the project’s blog.




FaceTopo Beta

Help scientists build a taxonomy of the world's faces!

Our goal is 10K faces. You can use your iphone or ipad to create a 3D selfie and send your facial data to the Facetopo database.

Facetopo is for adults faces. Users must be age 14+. Under age 18 must get parental approval to create a user account.




Nina Valley EcoBlitz

High school students, scientists, teachers, and support crew working together to discover and document the biological diversity of the Nina Valley




Qualitative Understanding of Ecosystem Services Tool

This will be a test run for gathering citizen science inputs on what ecosystem attributes are valued for contributing to cultural well being. Beneficiaries of these final ecosystem service attributes will be classified using the EPA''s Final Ecosystem Goods and Services Classification System (FEGS-CS). User engagements with nature as a particular beneficiary type doing a particular activity in a specified ecosystem type will be ranked and the contribution to their overall well-being assessed. Inputs will be used to generate heat maps of where cultural value is being generated by ecosystem services. User identified locations will also serve as geo-caches where other users can find things in nature that other community members value.




2015 Big Garden Milkweed Butterfly Count

Our gardens, backyards, parks, and meadows could be magical places filled with life if we could only slow down and pay attention for a while. This summer, you’re invited to go out to your garden or backyard, or else to a local park, forest, or meadow, to count milkweed butterflies for one hour. This project seeks to establish a tradition of bringing people together, relaying important information, and teaching the appreciation of nature that will continue for years to come.

Milkweed is a unique plant group that serves as a host to four butterflies species: the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), the queen butterfly (Danaus gilippus), the tropical milkweed butterfly (Lycorea cleobaea),and the soldier butterfly (Danaus eresimus). However, as milkweed slowly disappears, so do these butterflies. Currently, the monarch butterfly count is at a second-year low, indicating the threats that it and other similar species face.

By counting butterflies, we can survey their numbers in the United States and Canada, while having fun outside and learning more about butterflies and other wildlife. The event promises to be a fun, educational activity for children and families.

What is the 2015 Big Garden Milkweed Butterfly Count?

This year’s Big Garden Milkweed Butterfly Count is a fun, educational project with far-reaching implications. People will be invited to go outside for one hour during the weekend of July 25–26 to count the number of milkweed butterflies seen at one time. That way, we will avoid counting the same butterflies over and over again.

This project will have a specially designed website accessible via laptops, desktops, tablets, and smartphones.

The materials and website will include identifying information and illustrations that will help people to learn what milkweed butterfly species look like.

Participants can also use the website for counting that will have a 60-minute timer and where information can be entered right away. The website will also have a pop-up quiz with butterfly trivia questions and a list of games and fun activities for children.




ReverseTheOdds

With our free mobile game, you can turn your mobile or tablet into a weapon against cancer. By playing Reverse The Odds, you’ll accelerate cancer research – and potentially help our scientists find new treatments faster.

The wonderful world of Odds needs your help to restore it back to its former glory. To do that, you’ll need to beat fun puzzles, earn potions and, most importantly, analyse cancer cell images on every level. It’s super simple.

Our scientists need you to join us. Together, we can seek out cancer’s weak spots, and unlock clues to kinder treatments today, for the people who’ll need them tomorrow.




myObservatory

myObservatory is an information management system useful with virtually any type of data. The platform allows users to easily implement and manage rigorous and exact data collection, even for casual and citizen users. The platform allows you to:

1. Identify your area of interest (anywhere on the globe) and map those locations using GIS mapping tools for easy reference

2. Harvest public information (such as local, regional, and global data)

3. Collect your own data through field observation tools, sensors, automatic location tagging, and customizable collection forms

4. Use quality assurance tools ensure data is valid as it comes in, with customizable tests bringing rigor to the data acquisition process
Multi-level user access control makes it easy to work with others

5. Share and collaborate with others about what you learn

Visit our site to sign up, or contact us if you have any special needs or questions! We have plans fitting every need, from $10/month and up, or we can work with you for a custom arrangement.




Investigating Reefs and Marine Wildlife in the Bahamas

You’ll help biologists fill in knowledge gaps by surveying the mangroves and patch reefs of the Bahamas. They particularly want to know what increases the abundance of fish in these habitats. Abundant fishy life tells scientists that a coral reef is healthy: fish graze on algae that would otherwise stifle corals, so a strong fish population keeps algae in check, which helps coral reefs flourish.




Mark2Cure

Bertrand Might was the first patient to be diagnosed with NGLY1, but he is not alone. NGLY1 Researchers are racing to find clues in biomedical literature and need your help to uncover hidden links.

You mark up abstracts to help researchers find the right information faster, uncover new relationships between different fields of research, and generate/prioritize new hypothesis faster. Join us and help researchers find cures faster.




Yukon Marine Life Survey

The 2015 Yukon Marine Life Survey is now LIVE.

Ocean Sanctuaries now offers an opportunity for San Diego divers to contribute to a citizen science survey of the abundant marine life that has accumulated on the Canadian destroyer 'Yukon' since its sinking off the coast of San Diego to be an artificial reef in 2000.

15 years ago, in 2000, the City of San Diego in collaboration with the San Diego Oceans Foundation, purchased, cleaned and deliberately sank a 366 foot-long Canadian warship called the Yukon to act as an artificial reef and attract local marine life, a task at which it is been spectacularly successful.

In the 15 years that the Yukon has been sitting on the bottom off the coast of San Diego, it has attracted dozens of species of local marine life as well as a revenue-generating attraction for tourist divers from around the world.

The first scientific study of the marine life on the Yukon was undertaken in 2004 by Dr. Ed Parnell of Scripps Institution of Oceanography in collaboration with the San Diego Oceans Foundation. It utilized data gathered by local citizen science divers to generate an initial baseline study of the marine life species on the ship. 1

It too, will utilize local divers as citizen scientists to systematically gather data about the marine life species that have accumulated on the ship since 2004.

The Yukon lies in 100 ft of water and is considered an advanced dive and should not be attempted except by those who have the proper training.




SCARAB (Scientific Collaboration for Accessible Research About Borers)

This is a citizen science project to help track the spread of invasive beetles, such as the polyphagus shothole borer (PSHB), to better understand factors leading to their spread and how to manage them.




Missouri Stream Team Volunteer Water Quality Monitoring

The Missouri Stream Team Volunteer Water Quality Monitoring program trains volunteers across the state to monitor streams and collect biological, physical, and chemical data.

There are four levels of training: Introductory Level, Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3. Each level needs to be taken sequentially since each class builds on the previous one. At the Introductory Level workshops you will learn about watersheds, how to measure stream discharge, and how to use the macroinvertebrates in the stream to assess the water quality. After you complete the Introductory Level Workshop and submit data at your chosen monitoring site, you will be eligible to attend the Level 1 Workshop. At this workshop, you will learn about water chemistry and get a review of macroinvertebrates. After the completion of this workshop you will get the chemical kits and other equipment to chemically monitor water quality. The Level 2 workshop is the Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QAQC) workshop. The Level 3 is an audit where Program Staff will come out to your monitoring site and verify techniques.




Experiment

Experiment is a crowdfunding platform for scientific research. We want to allow anyone with a credit card to be a modern day patron of science.




Stream Team

The goals of Channelkeeper’s Stream Team Program are to collect and disseminate data to measure the health of local streams; identify and abate specific sources of pollution to these streams; measure trends or changes resulting from pollution prevention efforts; and foster environmental stewardship in our community by providing a rewarding outdoor volunteer opportunity for local citizens.

Stream Team is one of Channelkeeper’s longest running and most successful programs, which to date has educated and engaged more than 1,000 volunteers in helping us conduct monthly water quality sampling. Each month, Stream Team volunteers test common water quality parameters at at 47 stream sites in the watersheds of the Goleta Valley, Carpinteria Valley and Ventura River. Volunteers use portable meters to test in-stream parameters such as temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, and conductivity. In addition, samples are collected that are later analyzed in the laboratory for bacteria and nutrients. Visual observations such as weather conditions, algae coverage, water clarity, odors, and trash are also recorded on standardized datasheets. We follow rigorous Quality Assurance/Quality Control protocols that are based on a Quality Assurance Project Plan approved by the State Water Resources Control Board.

Our Stream Team data is used by government agencies to inform pollution prevention programs and water resource management decisions. We’ve identified numerous pollution hot spots and sources through Stream Team sampling and have worked cooperatively with the relevant government agencies to get these problems cleaned up. Our ultimate goal is cleaner, healthier water and a more environmentally responsible citizenry that is actively engaged in addressing the pollution problems plaguing our waterways.




Play to Cure: Genes in Space

Help researchers cure cancer.

The problem:

We know that faults in our genes can lead to cancer cells forming. This can be linked to the amount of genes in our cells - sometimes we have more and sometimes we have less.

It can take years for scientists to analyze all of their genetic data, but with thousands of citizen scientists playing Genes in Space, the process is greatly accelerated.

How it works:

First, you plot a galactic route. In the context of the game, you're choosing your flight path, but these “space coordinates” are actually a visualization of DNA data, and you're showing our scientists where the genetic variations are which may lead to cancer.

Then you collect Element Alpha, a mist like substance that can be traded for ship upgrades. It actually represents the same DNA data that has just been mapped – which means our scientists have two perspectives on the same sample, from one player.

And we’ve added an asteroid field. This makes the gameplay more engaging and challenging. You need to dodge or shoot a multitude of asteroids to complete a stage.

Each data sample is analyzed multiple times for accuracy. Don’t worry about making mistakes - the more people who use Genes in Space, the more accurate the results will be and the faster data can be translated into new ways to beat cancer.




Butler County Stream Team

The Butler County Stream Team is a volunteer group that studies local water quality on the second Saturday of each month - March through November. We conduct two kinds of testing, chemical and biological.

Chemical- Volunteers collect water samples from set locations around the county from rivers and streams. The water samples are then tested by volunteers at our water quality lab for the following parameters: nitrates, total phosphorous, bacteria, conductivity, total dissolved solids, pH, turbidity. We are always interested in more interested citizen scientists helping with this lab work. It typically takes about 3 hours, on the 2nd Saturday each month.

Biological- In 2014 we started looking at benthic macroinvertebrates (AKA creek critters) to provide a fuller picture of the health of the water. This is conducted 2-3 times per year at specific sites within the county, although not on a set day.

Other happenings: We have numerous events both for education and of course for fun throughout the year. These include a data sharing potluck in February, kayak floats, trips to floating wetland projects and water treatment plants, and classes on macroinvertebrates and rain barrels.




Emotional Load of Calls

Assist in research investigating the evolutionary and ethological foundations of dog-human relationship. Dogs, like other animals, communicate through vocalization. They communicate their needs and desires, and they can also communicate their emotions.

The Emotional load of calls is a 30 minute survey, with two optional pauses after 10-minute intervals. You will hear human and dog calls, and your task is to mark the sound sample based on the emotional state and intensity of the caller.




Canid Howl Project

Come listen to the enchanting, haunting sounds of wolves, coyotes, and dogs, and help us better understand and conserve these species.

Analysing these recordings is difficult and time consuming. It's easy to make mistakes, and mistakes can change the conclusions that we draw. But here's where you can help! By having hundreds, even thousands of volunteers giving their own analysis of the canid howls, we can investigate the role of these sounds, and understand more about the social behaviour of the whole range of canid species and breeds.

You can also donate your dog's howl for the project.




Pets Can Do

Participate in the University of Lincoln's animal behavior, cognition and welfare research by participating in surveys or, if you live nearby, signing your dog up for their dog research programs.

Pet owners and non-pet owners from all over the world can participate by filling out surveys about topics such as: separation anxiety in dogs and self-disclosure with dogs. The survey list is updated regularly with new surveys.

If you live in the area, you can sign your dog up to take part in one of their research programs, found in one of three categories: observational, behavior/training tasks, or training skills practicals.




Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center

The U.S. Geological Survey's Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center (GCMRC) is the science provider for the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program. In this role, the research center provides the public and decision makers with relevant scientific information about the status and trends of natural, cultural, and recreational resources found in those portions of Grand Canyon National Park and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area affected by Glen Canyon Dam operations.

Stipend offered, approximately $15.00 per sample.




The NOVA RNA Lab

Nature’s best kept secret is a wonder molecule called RNA. It is central to the origin of life, evolution, and the cellular machinery that keeps us alive.

In this Lab you’ll play the role of a molecular engineer by solving RNA folding puzzles. Then take your skills to Eterna, where you can design RNAs that could be at the heart of future life-saving therapies.

This project is part of the NOVA Labs platform




WeCureALZ

One symptom of Alzheimer’s that has been known since the discovery of the disease is reduced blood flow to the brain, but until now, nobody knew why. That is why this aspect of the disease, which likely contributes to cognitive problems and accelerates injury to brain cells, has remained untreated.

New specialized imaging techniques have allowed Cornell University Researchers to discover a potential causal mechanism underlying the reduced blood flow. So for the first time, we have an explanation for this aspect of Alzheimer’s Disease. This explanation points to new treatments that could substantially slow progression of the disease and delay, or even prevent, the onset of symptoms.

However, homing in on the specific pharmaceutical targets using current methods would take about 60 years, limited primarily by the need for extensive manual image analysis. By crowdsourcing the blood flow analysis to citizen scientists, we expect to reduce that time to less than two years.




Natural North Carolina

North Carolina is a beautiful place! With the huge variation in habitat types - from the mountains to the piedmont to the coastal plain - our state boasts a grand diversity of plants, animals, and fungi. Just look around. You likely encounter hundreds of species in your daily life, and many just beyond your front door!

Scientists at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences document the species in our great state and share the things we learn with you in our Museum exhibits. But, we can't be everywhere at once! We need YOUR help. By photographing and reporting the wildlife you see in your everyday life to Natural North Carolina, you can help us learn more about the species that call North Carolina home. You will also help us create an atlas of North Carolina's flora and fauna that you can use to identify the natural things you see in your local area. And all you have to do to help is snap a photo of something in nature and tell us where and when you took it. Easy!

So, get outside! Snap a few photos. Become a citizen scientist by submitting your photos to Natural North Carolina. Together, we can discover the wonders of North Carolina and learn more about our amazing state.




BC Cetacean Sightings Network

Twenty-three species of cetaceans and sea turtles have been recorded in the waters of British Columbia, Canada. Many of these populations are 'at-risk' and under-studied.
The B.C. Cetacean Sightings Network (BCCSN) collects sightings of cetaceans and sea turtles in the waters surrounding British Columbia, Canada using a network of citizen scientist observers. Our observer base is diverse, from interested citizens to lighthouse keepers, ecotourism professionals, mariners and recreational boaters. Anyone can participate and reports are made via an on-line form, toll free number, email, or supplied logbook. A smartphone app will be released shortly.




Flying Ant Survey

Flying ants commonly appear on exactly the same day in different locations in the UK, but sometimes they come out over a period of days or even weeks. For the last two years we have been collecting records of flying ants, and this has revealed some surprising results. We are collecting our third year of data in 2014, so please let us know if you see flying ants.




Bat Watch

Bat Watch is a citizen science initiative to monitor bat populations over the long-term. Given the spread of White Nose Syndrome (WNS), a devastating disease that is killing bats during hibernation, monitoring bat populations is more important than ever. Since WNS has not yet reached British Columbia, assessing populations annually will allow biologists to detect drastic changes in populations providing an early detection of WNS. Anyone in British Columbia can participate in the BC Bat Count if they know of a roost sites of bats. This might be an attic, barn, shed, bat-house, cave or mine.




Blue Catfish Watch

Show us your blue catfish catch! Collaborate with scientists at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center to help us track the expanding range of the non-native blue catfish into the upper Chesapeake Bay and into Delaware Bay and the Delaware River.

Native to the Mississippi, Ohio and Missouri Rivers, blue catfish were introduced to Virginia for sport fishing beginning in 1974. Since introduction, these non-native top predators have expanded their range into many of Maryland’s tributaries, including the Nanticoke, Patuxent, Choptank, Susquehanna and Sassafras Rivers. Due to their large size and adult predatory feeding behavior, blue catfish are consuming many native fish species, such as white perch, largemouth bass, American shad, river herring and menhaden. Knowing where and when these catfish are being caught is an important part of understanding their rising impact on the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. Remember that it is illegal in Maryland, Virginia, and Delaware to transport and release live blue catfish.

Identifying Blue Catfish
Blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) have a bluish-gray body and a deeply forked tail. Unlike channel catfish, they do not have spots on their body. One feature that distinguishes blue catfish from other catfishes is the prominent straight edge on their anal fin; other catfishes, including the similarly colored white catfish, have a rounded anal fin (see pictures on website).




Pieris Project

The Pieris Project is a citizen science initiative designed to collect morphology and genetic data on a single species - the cabbage white butterfly (Pieris rapae) - from across its entire range, including your backyard! The small cabbage white butterfly is a great species to study how organisms adapt to new environments, because this butterfly has invaded many parts of the world within the last two centuries and is now found on nearly every continent. With your help, and only with your help, we can create the world's most comprehensive butterfly collection that will allow us to learn how the cabbage white has adapted to new environments as it expanded across the globe. This type of data will be critical to understanding how species may respond to environmental changes, such as climate change and habitat destruction.




Exogen Bio - Understanding DNA damage in humans

Exogen Bio's citizen science study hopes to collect big data on the causes and consequences of DNA damage in humans. Join our citizen science study! Gain access to leading edge information about the health of your DNA while helping advance science.

Scientists have linked DNA damage and poor repair to some cancers, neurological diseases, premature aging, and many other serious diseases. You might be surprised to learn that your DNA is constantly being damaged and broken. DNA damage can come from exposure to environmental toxins or can also result from lifestyle choices like diet and physical exercise. Your level of DNA damage may also be a reflection of your personal genetics.

Scientists have developed the technology to measure DNA damage over a decade ago, but the procedure is lengthy and can be error-prone when done manually. Their studies typically have small sample sizes because of technological limitations. Exogen scientists (from the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab) have developed and refined novel high-throughput technology to automate and standardize the procedure for measuring DNA damage in human blood samples. With this technology in hand, we can collect the big data needed to map DNA damage in humans to lifestyle/environment and diseases so that we can promote a healthier DNA for everyone.




A.T. Seasons

The A.T. Seasons project brings together different parks and organizations that are actively monitoring seasonal changes in plants and animals (phenology) along the Appalachian Trail. Using Nature’s Notebook or our customized mobile app observers at all levels will be contributing to a comprehensive dataset with the goal of understanding the relationship between phenology and climate change along the Appalachian Trail. Get Involved today!

A.T. Seasons is your opportunity to help track the unfolding of important life cycle events each year along the iconic Appalachian Trail, linking your observations with others from Georgia to Maine. By observing and reporting seasonal changes of plants and animals you will help build the foundation to understanding and protecting the scenic & natural beauty of the trail corridor.




The Winnower

Winnower is a new opportunity publish your scientific work.

Submission. Once you’re ready to publish your work with just a few simple clicks you can upload it to The Winnower website. It will be automatically formatted and open to read and review immediately.

Review. The paper can be reviewed by The Winnower community and authors are encouraged to gather reviews from their peers.

Revision. Based upon reviews received, papers will have the option of being revised. Previous comments will remain associated with the final publication.

Archival. Once the final version is posted your paper will be assigned a digital object identifier (DOI) and reviews will remain open for the duration of the papers life. Article-level metrics, including altmetrics and the reviews themselves will track the importance and accuracy of the paper.

Cost $100




L.A. Nature Map

The L.A. Nature Map hosted by the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles is an interactive map that displays local plant and wildlife observations.

Our Southern California region is a hotspot for urban biodiversity. With your help, we can show Angelenos and the world the diversity of nature all around us. You can contribute to this citizen science project by sending photos of plants and animals.

The L.A. Nature Map is created in collaboration with iNaturalist.




Birdeez

Birdeez is the easiest way to identify, collect and share bird sightings. The goal of this project is to educate you about the birds in your area while you contribute sightings that will be used for scientific understanding of bird migration, bird populations and climate change.

Currently Birdeez is available as an iPhone application at www.GetBirdeez.com/ but soon we we will be online and on different phone platforms as well.

Every bird counts, so help us help them by collecting and sharing sightings.




GoViral

GoViral is a free and real-time online Cold & Flu surveillance system administered by researchers at New York University. Participants will get a Do-It-Yourself flu saliva collection system that they can keep and use at home if they are feeling sick. All samples will be analyzed at a central laboratory that checks for 20 different viral infections. GoViral participants will get their own laboratory results and, through the aggregate data, be able to see what infections and symptoms are going around near them so they can take appropriate public health measures and understand when something might be abnormal. The data will be used for research purposes only.




Independent Generation of Research

IGoR facilitates scientific research by amateur scientists and science enthusiasts. Anyone (not just professional scientists) can propose their own research questions on the IGoR site. Then, other interested people can share ideas, skills, or time to address the question. In addition, a growing number of professional scientists have agreed to help answer users' questions about the users' research projects.

Some people may have science questions that they cannot answer on their own. Other people may have technical skills (e.g. electronics or microscopy, gardening or photography, and many others) that would be useful for addressing those questions. Still others may have the scientific training to design a sound study.

By working together and pooling skills and ideas, people of any experience level could carry out original, independent research. For example, do you want to decipher what scallops see with their bright-blue eyes? Do you wonder how mushrooms take shape? Or are you curious about how the plants in your garden behave? What do you want to discover?




Snapshots in Time

Snapshots in Time is a long-term Citizen Science project aimed at mobilizing people to monitor the timing of Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) and Wood Frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) breeding throughout the respective ranges of these species. The purpose of this project is to use the data collected by on-the-ground citizens year after year to investigate possible effects of climate change on the timing of reproduction. Determining changes in the timing of breeding is very important, not just for these species, but also for others that use the same habitat. The results of this project could allow us to inform land managers and development planners of important areas for conservation and to look deeper into what other species in these ecosystems may be negatively affected by climate change, including some endangered species.

This is what is commonly referred to as a phenology project. Phenology is the study of periodic events in a plant or animal's life cycle, such as breeding or migration, and how the timing of these events are influenced by changes in the climate. Phenology allows us to understand variations in breeding times, even in limited geographic areas or specific sites, to develop a range-wide picture of any shifts in the timing of breeding.

Our objective is to collect your data long-term, so those that choose to participate in this project are encouraged to do so at the same sites year after year when possible.

This effort will focus on populations found throughout their range in North America. Both of these amphibians breed following heavy rains during winter to spring that flood woodland depressions and various other types of ephemeral (short-lived) ponds or wetlands that lack fish. These can include areas such as lime-sink ponds in karst regions or pools in the floodplains of streams.

Both species migrate en mass to breeding sites when weather conditions are appropriate from winter to spring depending on where you are within their range. Spotted Salamanders and Wood Frogs often share the same breeding sites and breed simultaneously—with breeding typically occurring earlier for southern populations (i.e., winter) compared to more northerly populations (late winter–early spring). During most of the year (when not at breeding sites), Spotted Salamanders live in burrows and/or under large logs in forest habitats. Wood Frogs are terrestrial and reside in leaf litter-carpeted forests away from water where their coloration affords them excellent camouflage.

We request that you submit field observations for either species, including any information related to: 1) Migrations of adults to/from breeding pond sites; 2) Observations of adults at breeding ponds; 3) Observations of egg masses; 4) Observations of larvae (Spotted Salamander) or of tadpoles (Wood Frog), and 5) Whether metamorphs were observed leaving the wetland. We are betting the wetlands you monitor become spots (no pun intended!) that you regularly visit well into the future (or continue to visit if you are already doing so…).

We have prepared datasheets for the information we desire from your observations and also have an identification sheet for each species. One data sheet should be used for each observation. For example, if you heard Wood Frogs on one date, that is one observation. If you see tadpoles the next time you visit the wetland, you would use a separate data sheet. We request a photograph for each observation so that we can confirm identification.

Encountering Wood Frogs and Spotted Salamanders (or evidence of these species) in the field is always exciting. Rolling a pond-side log to see the bright orange spots of a plump Spotted Salamander or hearing the duck-like chuckling sounds of a sizeable Wood Frog chorus are always memorable natural history experiences. With this study, you can make your observations count toward a scientific review of these species’ breeding patterns. This will benefit our knowledge of these animals and also provide you an opportunity to better acquaint yourself with the amphibian life in your own backyard while doing your part for conservation.

Consider participating in Snapshots in Time... it will be a great experience for all ages!




OSF SciNet

Problem: Scientific citations are frequently constrained by terms-of-use or within proprietary systems making it difficult to see connections in the literature.

Solution: OSF SciNet uses the open source Citelet extension to crowdsource a free, open, and comprehensive metadata dataset of scientific citations and corresponding references to unlock the citation network.

Impact: The dataset generated through this project will make it easier to see the connections in the scientific literature and to promote open science.




LepiMAP

LepiMAP is the African butterfly and moth mapping project. LepiMAP is a joint project of the Animal Demography Unit and Lepidopterists' Society of Africa.

LepiMAP is a project aimed at determining the distribution and conservation priorities of butterflies and moths on the African continent. This project is building the 21st century distribution maps for Africa's butterflies and moths. LepiMAP is the continuation of SABCA (the Southern African Butterfly Conservation Assessment)

Anybody, anywhere in Africa can contribute to this awesome Citizen Science project! And we need YOUR help!!




Poo Power! Global Challenge

An invitation to 700 school-aged students from 25 different schools has been extended to the wider community to participate in a global competition. Students and classes will be pitched against each other to see who can identify the most and largest dog poo 'hotspots' in their local neighbourhood in the 'Poo Power! Global Challenge'.

Participating schools and students will use their GPS-enabled iPhone to download the free Poo Power! App from the App Store. Their task is to identify and map dog poo 'hotspots' in dog parks and public spaces from their neighbourhood over a 2 week period starting Monday 25 November 2013.

This eyebrow-raising initiative is a collaboration between dog poo entrepreneur Duncan Chew from Poo Power! and Mia Cobb from the Anthrozoology Research Group, recent winner of I'm a Scientist, Get Me Out of Here!

The collected information will be uploaded onto the Global Poo Map and provides a platform for students to discuss the scientific, social and environmental issues of dog waste. The students are then encouraged to write a letter to their local Government representative of their findings and recommendations.

"From our research only 3% of Australians see uncollected dog waste as an environmental concern," explains Duncan Chew. "When it rains, uncollected dog poo gets washed down drains, effecting water quality and habitat for native animals, as well as making rivers and creeks unpleasant for us to visit."

Mia Cobb echoes her enthusiasm for the initiative: "This is the great way to utilise the prize money from winning the IAS competition to raise awareness of new sustainable energy sources, environmental issues and responsible dog ownership while increasing student engagement in a citizen science activity."

The collated information has the poo-tential to identify sites for biogas-powered lights for parks as proposed by the Melbourne-based project, Poo Power!, currently in development. The methane that is released from the dog waste as it breaks down inside a 'biogas generator' can be used as a viable renewable energy source.

Competition prizes and giveaways are up for grabs for the most photo submissions received between 25th November and 9th December 2013.

Visit www.poopower.com.au for full competition details.




SENSR

SENSR is a tool to create, share and manage a citizen science project running on mobile devices to harness the power of citizen scientists.

SENSR provides a simple and easy way to obtain a custom data collection application running on mobile devices for your project.

If you are running a grassroots project for science, education, environmental conservation, community monitoring, or other reason, and are seeking ways to expand citizen scientists' participation in contributing data, SENR can help you create a mobile data collection tool for your project.

It is part of a research project at Carnegie Mellon University. Please try out if you are seeking ways to harness citizens' power of data collection.




Plate Watch

Volunteers hang settlement plates off docks in Alaska for three to nine months. Each plate is then surveyed for invasive species and redeployed. The survey involves photographing the fouling species attached to the plate and collecting specimens of new or target species. Training is available and settlement plates are provided.




Field Photo Library

A photo taken in the field helps scientists and citizens to document changes in landscape, wildlife habitats, impacts of drought and flood and fire, and so on. This Geo-referenced Field Photo Library is a citizen science and community remote sensing data portal, where people can share, visualize and archive field photos in the world. Users can upload, edit, query and download geo-referenced field photos in the library. All photos are also linked with satellite image series images (MODIS), so that people can see the changes over time.




Darwin for a Day

Darwin for a Day is a web application that allows you to explore the Galapagos Islands through Google Street View and document its unique plants and animals. When you see an animal or plant you’d like to catalogue, you can describe it by creating an observation. You can just enter your best guess at what it is (i.e. “bird”) or enter in the scientific name, if you know it!

All of your observations will be shared with the iNaturalist community & the Charles Darwin Foundation, and will contribute to research of the Galapagos Islands.




Counting Weddell Seals in Antarctica

Have your students help scientists count Weddell seals using satellite imagery.

Many people think seals on the ice are easy to count. There is no place for them to hide when they are out of the water. They are not afraid of people so don’t run away, and if they are with a pup, the adult stays in the same location for several days. However it is not that easy. There are seals all over the place as new cracks in the ice create new suitable locations for feeding and many seals move to these new areas. Counting individuals is difficult unless they are tagged because it’s hard to know if we counted this one yesterday or not. To solve these problem scientists are using satellite images that can take a picture of a large area at one moment in time. They then can count them using a computer.

In this activity, we ask for your help in counting the seals using satellite images. Scientists need all the help they can in creating an accurate count. We hope you will take the time to join our team and help do the counting as the images come in several times every season.




NatureWatch NZ

NatureWatch NZ is a citizen science project dedicated to exploring and discovery New Zealand's biodiversity. If you see an unusual or interesting bug, plant, or any other species, take a photo of it, upload the photo to NatureWatch NZ, and learn all about it. The NatureWatch NZ online community will ID your species for you. You can also help others to ID their photos, and you can join (or create!) projects about the species and places you're most interested in.

Together, we're documenting what's living in NZ so we can understand NZ nature better, and have fun while we do it.

(NatureWatch NZ is a website and online community of New Zealand nature watchers powered by the international iNaturalist.org system. Thanks iNat!)




Mothing

Moths are incredibly diverse, are ecologically important as plant eaters, pollinators, and food for songbirds. How will climate and other large-scale ecological factors affect moths? Take photographs of moths at your porch light and upload to Discover Life. You can identify them if you'd like, and we'll help. Students can compare moths at their own site with moths from other sites, to answer their own original questions and do real science. Interested participants may also wish to coordinate a study site.




NanoDoc

NanoDoc is an online game that allows bioengineers and the general public to design new nanoparticle strategies towards the treatment of cancer. You’ll learn about nanomedicine and explore how nanovehicles can cooperate with each other and their environment to kill tumors. Best strategies will be considered for validation in vitro or in robotico. Are you ready to become a NanoDoc?




Amphibian Conservation and Education Project

The Amphibian Conservation Education Project aims to empower educators, students, and individuals to become involved in amphibian conservation efforts.

Through this project, participants will become field scientists by analyzing water quality and testing amphibians for the disease, Chytrid Fungus. Collected data is then used by local herpetologists (scientists who study reptiles and amphibians) to gain a better understanding of the species of amphibians being affected by the disease and where Chytrid is being spread.




Notes from Nature

Most natural history collections are housed in museum cabinets, where they are not easily available to citizens and researchers. The Notes from Nature transcription project addresses this problem by digitizing biological collections one record at a time! Help museum staff and scientists by transcribing the labels and ledgers that have been meticulously recorded and stored over the past century. In many cases these are the only historical records of species distribution available. Join us in unlocking this important information - take some notes from nature!




Reef Check Tropical EcoDiver Training

Become certified to conduct your own Reef Check surveys and take an active role in conserving your favorite coral reefs. This course is designed to teach you everything you need to know to conduct full scale Reef Check surveys. In this program you will learn all about the globally standardized Reef Check methodology as well as how to identify key indicator fish, invertebrates and substrates selected by Reef Check for global monitoring and conservation of coral reefs! This course will allow you to join the Reef Check monitoring team and assist in underwater surveys around the world.




Caribbean Lionfish Response Program

The Caribbean Lionfish Response Program (CLRP) was developed using a bilateral marine management strategy. This two-fold program approach includes Information and Education (I&E) and Lionfish Location and Removal. This Program has been running successfully since October 2009.
The goals of the CLRP are:

Educate local divers, fishermen, local schools, tourists and the general-public on the urgent Lionfish crisis and how each can contribute to help resolve this rapid growing invasive issue.

Safely and efficiently search and remove Lionfish across the USVI territory by placing trained divers in the water.




Photosynq-measure plant photosynthesis

We are building a low cost, handheld device which researchers, educators, and citizen scientists can use to build a global database of plant health.

The Photosynq platform starts with a Arduino compatible hand-held device which connects to your cell phone and measures fluorescence and absorbance of photosynthetic plants and algae in a non-destructive way.

These measurements provide a detailed picture of the health of the plant and are used for plant breeding, improving plant efficiency, and to identify novel photosynthetic pathways for energy and crop research. Existing field-portable fluorescence and absorbance devices cost thousands of dollars and are too expensive for plant breeders in the developing world. In addition, these devices use proprietary software and hardware, so each user experience and dataset is isolated.

We believe that phenomic plant data, like genomic data, is a critical global resource and must both be shared and agglomerated to be useful.

Therefore, the devices will automatically sync all user data to the cloud via users’ cell phones, where anyone can see and analyze it. In this way we can create a high quality, open set of photosynthesis data points taken from around the world. Most importantly, the data is taken using the same instrument and protocols, making it highly comparable and consistent.




Pathways: Wildlife Corridors of NM

Pathways: Wildlife Corridors of NM runs a wildlife track and sign monitoring program, documenting "common" species before they become "uncommon". 6 Focal Species include, Black Bear, Elk, Mule Deer, Bobcat, Pronghorn, and Mountain Lion. We monitor transects between the mountain ranges of New Mexico, documenting the movements of these large mammals between the mountains and the river valleys.




Where's the Elderberry Longhorn Beetle?

Hi, my name is Dr. Dan Duran and I'm an evolutionary biologist and entomologist at Drexel University (Philadelphia, PA) and I need your help finding "Desmond," an Elderberry Longhorn Beetle, formally known as *Desmocerus palliatus!*

This *beautiful* beetle species used to live throughout a large part of eastern North America but in recent decades it appears as if it has declined in numbers. We need your help to figure out if and why this might be true and how we can help them move back into areas they once lived.

The Elderberry Longhorn Beetle is easy to spot with its bold patterns of blue and gold and long antennae. It's so attractive, in fact, that it was chosen for a USPS stamp design in 1999! I can't promise you'll find one, but if you keep an eye out, you might have a chance at seeing one of these impressive creatures. They come out at different times in different places, but June is often a good time to see them.




Horseshoe crabs as homes

You are walking along the beach on a sunny spring day. But what is that? Something is moving slowly out of the water. It looks like a large crab, covered in barnacles and mussels. Creepy? Ugly? No, its home! At least for all those critters that live on Horseshoe crabs. Horseshoe crabs have been around for more than 250 million years, unimpressed by dinosaurs and ice ages.

Since then, Horseshoe crabs have played a key role in coastal ecosystems: the eggs are eaten by shore birds, juveniles are food for sea turtles, and adults aerate the ocean floor through their digging activity.

We believe Horseshoe crabs serve yet another important function: as substrate for many invertebrate species such as mussels, barnacles and snails. Many marine species require hard substrates to live on, and such substrates are historically rare on the predominantly sandy beaches of the Eastern US.
In more recent times, docks and boats may offer new opportunities for intertidal species - but what about animals that do not like the tidal influence? Are there even species living on Horseshoe crabs that we have not discovered yet?

Help us decipher who lives on Horseshoe crabs! Take clear pictures of Horseshoe crabs and their critters when you see them on the beach, and send them to us. Just let us know when and where you saw the crab. That's it.

In return, we will post the best pictures on our website and explain every animal that you discovered on the Horseshoe crab. New species will be featured on the site, and we would like to name our most successful discoverers.

With your help, we will be able to address the following questions:
Which region has the highest diversity of animals attached to Horseshoe crabs? When are the crabs found the most? The least?
Moreover, we will build a valuable resource for school classes, beach walkers and everybody else who ever wanted to know: What is that thing sitting on the Horseshoe crab?

Horseshoe crabs come to the beaches to mate and lay eggs when the tides are highest. This happens at full and new moons. So be on a lookout for them!




CyberTracker

CyberTracker Conservation is a non-profit organisation that promotes the vision of a Worldwide Environmental Monitoring Network. Our ultimate vision is that smart phone users worldwide will use CyberTracker to capture observations on a daily basis.

CyberTracker is the most efficient method of gps field data collection. You can use CyberTracker on a Smartphone or handheld computer to record any type of observation. CyberTracker, which requires no programming skills, allows you to customize an Application for your own data collection needs.




Atlas of Living Australia

The Atlas of Living Australia (Atlas) contains information on all the known species in Australia aggregated from a wide range of data providers: museums, herbaria, community groups, government departments, individuals and universities.

The Atlas was initiated by a group of 14 (now 17) organisations—our partners. The intent was to create a national database of all of Australia’s flora and fauna that could be accessed through a single, easy to use web site. Information on the site would be used to: improve our understanding of Australian biodiversity assist researchers to build a more detailed picture of Australia’s biodiversity assist environmental managers and policy makers develop more effective means of managing and sustaining Australia’s biodiversity.

You can participate by submitting a species record, joining an existing citizen science project, digitizing specimen labels, or starting your own citizen science endeavour!




OhDeer

Welcome to OhDeer! Helping to map deer road casualties throughout Britain (or beyond!) via your Smart Phone.

The six species of deer living wild in Britain are our largest terrestrial mammals, ranging from the majestic red deer, to smaller fallow, roe, sika, muntjac and Chinese water deer. The large rise over the past 40 years in road traffic volumes as well as numbers and distribution of deer has unfortunately led to deer casualties at roadsides becoming an increasingly common sight. The total number of deer-vehicle collisions in Britain is estimated to exceed 42,000 per year, but most are not actually recorded. Information you log using this citizen-science smart phone app will assist our research on numbers and locations of deer accident hotspots.




Canine Health Project

The Canine Health Project tracks individual statistics on purebred dogs, using the Rat Terrier as a model. Information such as height, weight, date of birth, genotype, number of progeny and list of related individuals are recorded as a reference.




Secchi App

Join seafarers in the global scientific experiment to study marine phytoplankton.

The phytoplankton underpin the marine food chain, so we need to know as much about them as possible. To participate in this project, you'll need to create a Secchi Disk, a tool that measures water turbidity, and use the free iPhone or Android ‘Secchi’ application.

You can take a Secchi Disk reading as often as you wish, every day, once a week, twice a month, or just occasionally. The data you collect will help scientists around the world to understand the phytoplankton.

Join in and help make this the world’s largest public marine biological study.




Tag A Tiny

Help the Large Pelagics Research Center improve scientific understanding of large pelagic species by catching, measuring and releasing juvenile bluefin with conventional “spaghetti”-ID tags.

The LPRC initiated its Tag A Tiny program in 2006 to study the annual migration paths and habitat use of juvenile Atlantic bluefin tuna.

As of 2012, 1258 recreational fishermen have helped LPRC to tag 1,645 bluefin, mostly juveniles from 1-4 years old, and some “medium” size fish, nearing 70 inches. All of the records are entered into the Billfish Foundation, NMFS, and ICCAT databases.




Vital Signs Maine

Where are the invasive species in Maine? Where aren’t they? Students, educators, citizens, and scientists are working together to find out.

As part of the Vital Signs community you can help steward the 32,000 miles of rivers and streams, 6,000 lakes and ponds, 5,000 miles of coastline, and 17 million acres of forest that are threatened by invasive species.

Together we are using scientific tools and habits of mind to look for native and invasive species in local habitats. We are sharing what we find and do not find online. We are contributing to a greater understanding of our shared environment.




Where is my spider?

By just taking photos and observing spiders, you can help the Explorit Science Center learn about which climates certain spiders live in and track the distribution of spiders over time.

Join the Explorit’s Community Science Project by finding and recording spiders in your home or neighborhood (as many as you can!). Use your camera or smart phone to take a photo of the spider and submit it online to add to our geographical database.

Spiders have long been thought of a useful natural method of pest control, but how will expected temperature changes or other environmental changes affect the spider’s usefulness as pest-killers and their distribution?

We don't yet know how climate change will impact spiders, and in turn impact agriculture such as crops and farms- but when we understand where spiders are living today, we will be better able to predict what may happen to spiders and agriculture in the future.




iSeeChange

The iSeeChange Almanac is a socially networked weather Almanac for communities to collectively journal their climate experiences -- their observations, feelings, questions, and decisions --- against near-real time climate information.

This groundbreaking environmental reporting project combines citizen science, participatory public media, and cutting-edge satellite monitoring of environmental conditions.

Incubated in 2012 by producer Julia Kumari Drapkin at Colorado public station KVNF Mountain Grown Community Radio via AIR’s Localore project, iSeeChange is poised to expand in 2015. The team will work with media and scientific partners across the country to help audiences document environmental shifts in their backyards and connect to the bigger-picture climate changes transforming all of our lives and livelihoods.

The project’s growing list of collaborators includes NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Berkeley BEACO2N project, Yale Climate Connections, the Allegheny Front in the Western Pennsylvania, KPCC in Pasadena, WWOZ in New Orleans, Delaware Public Media, KSJD and KVNF in Colorado, Developing Radio Partners, and more.

This spring, the iSeeChange team is expanding its crowdsourced reporting platform, the iSeeChange Almanac, coast to coast. In the coming months, the team will also develop a related app to help synchronize local citizen climate reports with satellite data on regional carbon levels. Combining these two perspectives—a global view of the earth from space and a granular view from individuals on the ground—offers an unprecedented opportunity to match big science with daily life, and surface hidden patterns and stories.

Stay tuned! iseechange.org.





Landmark Trees of India

Landmark Trees of India is a documentation, geography, and monitoring project with a focus on famous, remarkable, and heritage trees of India.
India is a country of superlative population, superlative biodiversity, and superlative environmental variety. These landmark trees can teach us about the landscapes, biodiversity, and people of India and the other nations of the world.




Marine Metre Squared

Marine Metre Squared (MM2) is an easy way to survey the intertidal community. Monitor a 1m x 1m square patch of your local shore once every season by recording the animals and plants that live there.

Take part in special scientific studies and fun educational challenges such as hunting for pest species, looking for evidence of animals breeding, and measuring seaweed growth.

Help others identify their new finds with the online forum. Submit your own questions and encourage others around New Zealand to take part.

The perfect project for families looking for holiday activities, schools and community groups looking for ways to engage with and improve their local environments.

See the project website for survey protocols, forms and resources to help you with your surveys. Resources are available for both rocky and sandy and muddy shores.




Librería Metagenómica del Ecuador

We are a group of scientists interested in exploring the potential applications of Ecuador’s unique biodiversity. As a first step, we are working to assemble and apply gene libraries collected from around the country.
You can join field trips in Ecuador to collect samples, work in a lab extracting and sequencing nucleic acids, or from home assembling and curating the electronic database.




Science Pipes

Science Pipes is a free service that lets you connect to real biodiversity data, use simple tools to create visualizations and feeds, and embed results on your own website.

SciencePipes allows anyone to access, analyze, and visualize the huge volume of primary biodiversity data currently available online. This site provides access to powerful scientific analyses and workflows through an intuitive, rich web interface based on the visual programming paradigm, similar to Yahoo Pipes. Analyses and visualizations are authored in an open, collaborative environment which allows existing analyses and visualizations to be shared, modified, repurposed, and enhanced.

Behind the scenes, SciencePipes is based on the Kepler scientific workflow software which is used by professional researchers for analysis and modeling. SciencePipes brings that scientific power to new audiences by consolidating the same workflow components used by scientists into pieces that have more intuitive meaning, and by providing components specifically targeted to these audiences.

Because SciencePipes provides tools for original data analyses rather than visualizations of predetermined analyses, it empowers users to develop new and valuable results. Those results can be exposed as dynamic web resources, in web contexts unrelated this site. Finally, because of the generality of the Kepler scientific system upon which this site is built, this online system can be extended to science and engineering disciplines beyond the environmental sciences.




North Mountain Plant Inventory Project

The North Mountain Plant Inventory Project is a collaboration between the Conservation Alliance, the Plant Atlas Project of Arizona, the Phoenix Mountains Preservation Council, and the City of Phoenix.
Our goals are to:
1)improve our scientific knowledge of North Mountain Park flora for land management, scientific, conservation, and educational purposes.
2)to train, engage and educate members of the public as plant stewards
and
3)to provide a databased plant atlas located on the Southwest Environmental Information Network (SEINET).




Wading for Water Sticks

Prepare to get wet and muddy for science! We're looking for citizen scientists in North Carolina to help us learn more about the large, charismatic aquatic insects known as water sticks.

Simply find a body of water in your area, follow the protocol, and submit your data! We'll teach you how to identify the water sticks you find and how to cheaply build any equipment you don't already have (you'll have most of it). And if you don't find anything in the body of water you choose, no problem! Every bit of information helps and anything you can share is useful. With YOUR help, we can discover more about the seasonality, habitat preferences, and distribution of water sticks - together!




uBiome

uBiome is the world's first effort to map the human microbiome through citizen science.

What's the microbiome? The microbiome are the bacteria that live on and within us. It sounds kind of funny, but all of us are actually covered in helpful germs. Many conditions – from diabetes to depression, asthma to autism -- have been found to relate to the microbiome.

uBiome brings this cutting edge technology directly to consumers for the first time. The more data we collect, the more we can learn about this important area of research. We've been featured so far in Wired, Venture Beat, the Los Angeles Times, Scientific American, BoingBoing, and more.




Magpie Mapper

Magpie Mapper is a smartphone app for recording observations of Magpies, one of the most fascinating and striking birds in the United Kindgom. When you see a magpie, simply log it on the app and your data will be used in our research into how birds are distributed throughout our towns cities and countryside.

With their long tails and impressive black and white plumage, magpies are unmistakable. Magpies are so ingrained in our folklorethat people often greet them with "Hello Mr Magpie!".

Now you can digitally salute a magpie with the Magpie Mapper app!




Marblar

Marblar is unique and fun way to engage in citizen science and exchange ideas across disciplines. Marblar posts research projects in need of creative, real-world applications and they ask YOU to come up with those applications.

Singing up is easy and free and there are new projects added regularly. Projects are posted for three weeks. Through online collaboration, the final solutions are posted for users to vote on and further discuss. Top solutions are even awarded cash prizes!




Salamander Crossing Brigades

As the earth thaws and spring rains drench New Hampshire, thousands of salamanders, frogs, and toads make their way to vernal pools to breed. Many are killed when their journeys take them across busy roads. Each spring, AVEO trains volunteers to serve as Salamander Crossing Guards at amphibian road crossings throughout the Monadnock Region. Volunteers count migrating amphibians and safely usher the animals across roads during one or more “Big Nights.”




Panamath

Panamath is a free-standing software that can be used to assess number sense - your intuitive recognition of numbers and their relationship. Researchers in laboratories throughout the world have utilized this research tool in studies of number knowledge, mathematical acuity, and learning in general.

Curious? Use Panamath to test your own number sense, read more about the research being done or download the software and adapt it for your own research or educational purposes.




Cell Slider

There are cures for cancers buried in our data. Help us find them.

Cell Slider is the world’s first online platform that harnesses the collective force of the public to help beat cancer sooner. By examining tumour tissue samples and spotting cancerous cells, citizen scientists from all over the world can help us understand how well a patient will respond to different treatments.

There is a massive amount of data produced by clinical trials and large backlogs build up that can take our scientists years to analyse.

The most effective tool for analysing this data is the human eye – computers simply aren’t good enough at understanding the level of detail involved. With scientists dedicated to developing new treatments, we need more eyes on the data to spot the cancer cells.




Geo-Wiki Project

The Geo-Wiki Project is a citizen science network that hopes to improve the overall quality of land use and land cover maps across the globe. They host a variety of projects, all of which use their online Google Earth Application to enlist citizen scientists to improve spatial data. By comparing global land use and land cover data to the aerial photography that appears in Google Earth, you can help improve the validity of important data that is being used to solve important global problems.

Geo-Wiki supports a variety of projects that tackle issues that include climate change, the bio-diversity of plants, and the viability of changing agriculture.

They even have developed mobile apps that allow you to ‘ground truth’ data by adding your own photographs of what’s near you.





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