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Meteorological Phenomena Identification Near the Ground (mPING) is a project to collect weather information from the public through their smart phone or mobile device. The free mPING mobile app was developed through a partnership between NSSL, The University of Oklahoma and the Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies.

Community air quality monitoring

Community Air Quality Monitoring support communities with accessing the materials and support required to collect evidence on the streets where they live work and play. You can find instruction on how to get diffusion tubes, and use an app and community maps to find out the level of pollution in their area.

Lake Observer mobile app

The Lake Observer mobile app was designed by members of the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) for both research scientists and citizen scientists to record lake and water quality observations. Lake Observer is part of a crowd-sourcing platform to facilitate the collection and sharing of lake- and water-related information across the globe.

The Lake Observer allows for easy submission of geo-referenced data, using a smartphone or tablet, including observations of weather, water (temperature, conductivity, pH, dissolved oxygen, and Secchi depth), ice cover, and aquatic vegetation (macrophytes, algae, metaphyton). The app can be used on lakes, rivers, streams, wetlands and other waterbodies.

GLEON teamed up with Esri and the US Geological Survey (USGS) as part of the White House Climate Data Initiative to further develop Lake Observer, including mapping and data visualization. GLEON has also partnered with the North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) and USEPA, to use the app for the annual Secchi Dip-In event.

WildCam Gorongosa

Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique was once among the most diverse places on Earth, but decades of war decimated the park’s large animal populations. Now, an international conservation effort is working to restore the park’s wildlife — and we need you to help document this incredible recovery. Join us in identifying Gorongosa’s animals in trail camera photos and become part of our conservation team!

CITiZAN (Coastal and Intertidal Zone Archaeological Network)

CITiZAN is a national community-led project to tackle the alarming threat to England's coastal and intertidal heritage from tides, storms and rising sea levels.

Training and working with volunteers, CITiZAN surveys and monitors these nationally-important but vulnerable archaeological sites before they disappear. Armed with tape measures, buckets and mobile phones, volunteers create standardised records of exposed archaeological sites on the CITiZAN coastal survey app.

Hosted by MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology), the CITiZAN project is funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund, the National Trust and The Crown Estate, together with support from Historic England.

The three-year project operates across England from regional centres: with MOLA in London, with partners the Council for British Archaeology in York and the Nautical Archaeology Society in Portsmouth.

For more information about CITiZAN and local training opportunities and events visit the CITiZAN website citizan.org.uk. Download the IPhone and Android CITiZAN app via ITunes or Google Play.

Colony B

Unravel the secrets of microscopic life!

Colony B is a mobile game developed at McGill University that allows you to contribute to research on microbes. Collect microbes and grow your colony in a fast paced puzzle game. Unlock badges to learn about microbes living inside our body.

The results are used to analyze data from the American Gut project based at University of California San Diego. Play Colony B and become a citizen scientist!

GLOBE: El Nino

Join professional and community scientists in collecting and sharing important data and learn more about your local environment in the process. There are two ways to participate: 1) sign up and contribute as an individual; 2) join as a host-site ambassador to facilitate participation through your community-based organization.

Four Protocols to Collect Data for the El Nino campaign.

To support GLOBE in this long-term campaign, we are recruiting, training, and equipping participants for four separate but related protocols representing a range of commitments from a light touch to an in-depth experience ,based on the needs and interests of you and your community.

The four protocols range from atmosphere to pedosphere observations; from very simple to more complex:

The cloud protocol: a quick assessment of the type and density of cloud cover as viewed from the collection site.
The surface temperature protocol: uses a simple tool to capture 9 measurements that are averaged to submit a reading to GLOBE.
The precipitation protocol: documents rainfall from day to day or more frequently on a rainy day to provide data about rainfall volumes and rates
The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) protocol: provides data about soil moisture temperature that can be used to ground truth a NASA satellite that is in orbit.
All of these protocols help us to understand how climate change affects the global water cycle. Changes in the water cycle, such as increased periods of drought and increases in rain or snowfall, significantly impact people’s lives, biodiversity, food production and more. Some regions will see the impact of climate change long before others, but all of us will be affected by changing water patterns in our lifetime. The more granular data we have from citizen scientists, the more we can understand the changes and how to mitigate them.

Lingscape – Linguistic Landscaping

Have you ever wondered how many signs you pass on your daily way to work? In which languages these signs are lettered? And how language in public space changes over time? Welcome to Lingscape!

Writing is everywhere in public space. All different kinds of signs and lettering form the linguistic landscape of a place or community. Often these signs display different languages, be they on the same sign or next to each other. Lingscape is an app for researching such linguistic landscapes all over the world. Therefore we collect photos of signs and lettering on an interactive map.

Our main objectives: We want to analyze the diversity and dynamics of public writing. And we want to do that together with people from all over the world.

You can help us to collect as many photos as possible. Upload your own photos or explore the map with all photos added by other users. Share photos you like with your friends. Become part of our crowd research team by contributing to the project.

Citizen science meets linguistic landscaping, or short: Lingscape!


Help bring the Georgia Adopt-A-Stream program to the South Carolina Midlands and keep our waterways clean by volunteering to be community coordinator. Volunteers will be trained to collect chemical, biological, and bacterial data that will create a baseline for our streams' health and serve as an indicator for pollution hotspots. Participate as a individual, or lead a class or community group!

#100Kbio Challenge

Amino Labs and The BioBuilder Educational Foundation challenge you to become a Virtual Bioengineer!

Genetic engineers produce medicine, food, fuel, household products and now materials. There are genetically engineered consumer products in the hands of hundreds of millions of people each day, and this will continue to increase. We depend heavily on these "bio-products" and it is vital that we learn about the technology. We challenge you to become a Virtual Bioengineer!

Visit #100Kbio campaign page and follow the simple instructions to complete the challenge and learn about bioengineering! Then challenge your friends, teachers, and family to do the same! Together we can all learn about DNA, cells, and how important products are made using biology.

Salt Marsh Plant Survey

Researchers from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) are studying salt marshes to determine how quickly plants are growing in different locations. We need volunteers to spend some time in the field, helping to collect and measure the marsh plants. Volunteers are needed for full day shifts (8AM-4PM) on weekdays from October 18 through October 20.


The Smartfin is a surfboard fin with sensors that measure multiple ocean parameters including salinity, temperature, location, wave characteristics, and pH (in development). The data surfers acquire while in the water will become accessible in near real-time to the world-wide scientific community. But Smartfin is not only about the data. It is also an effort to connect surfers and their communities to larger issues affecting ocean health. Using the data collected with Smartfin, we can better understand trends in ocean warming and acidification and mobilize our communities to take action to combat these problems caused by climate change.

Passengers in a Driverless Future

Driverless cars and autonomous technologies are beginning to appear on the nation’s roads in significant numbers — and people are talking about them. To capture that enthusiasm, and engage people in the project, we are creating a simple infrastructure for citizens to begin reporting on when and where they see autonomous vehicles.•Built on the model of simple citizen science geographic reporting apps like e-bird and Did You Feel It? •Maps the shifting geography of autonomous vehicle usage. •Creates a cohort of citizen scientists engaged in reporting on autonomous vehicle experience


Studies of human evolution often focus on the fossils and artifacts left by our early ancestors. However, we can also make inferences about human origins by studying our closest living relatives: chimpanzees, the great apes of West and Central Africa. Because humans and chimps are so closely related, patterns in chimpanzee behavior may tell us quite a bit about how the earliest humans lived and evolved.

It is thought that a major leap in the mental, physical, and cultural development of Homo sapiens was associated with increases in hunting, meat-eating, and the use of tools. We sometimes see similar human-like behaviors appear among diverse populations of today’s wild chimpanzees. If we study when, where, and how such behavior is more prominent, we can get a better idea of the evolutionary scenarios that led to the rise of our species.

For this project, we have collected nearly 7,000 hours of footage, reflecting various chimpanzee habitats, from camera traps in 15 countries across Africa. (We are also collecting a wide variety of organic samples from these sites, such as feces, hair, and plant matter, and information on the ecology and environment of each habitat.) By scanning the videos from these traps and identifying the types of species and activity that you see, you’ll help us to understand the lives of these apes—their behaviors, relationships, and environments—and to extrapolate new ideas about human origins.

In addition to helping us better understand cultural evolution, this project will also document wildlife populations and biodiversity in these areas. Already we have both documented new chimpanzee behaviors and made some startling finds of animals in locations where they were no longer thought to live! We hope that drawing attention to a great many of these sites will incite conservation organizations to take an interest in these areas and move to protect them.

Cochrane Crowd

Become a Cochrane citizen scientist. Anyone can join our collaborative volunteer effort to help categorise and summarise healthcare evidence so that we can make better healthcare decisions. No experience necessary. Just 60 seconds a day could make a difference.

Cochrane is a global independent network of researchers, professionals, patients, carers, and people interested in health. Cochrane Crowd is Cochrane’s new ‘micro-tasking’ platform.

In the last 20 years research output has grown exponentially making it really difficult to keep up with the evidence. As a Cochrane citizen scientist you would be helping us to identify and describe the research that may be very important in helping us to determine whether a treatment works, or whether a diagnostic test is accurate.

Join our growing community of Cochrane citizens and together let's find those trials!

Eek of Ecology

It’s time once again for fall science fun with Eek of Ecology!

Meet the Eeek!-y creatures and ghouls of National Park sites across the US, at Schoodic Institute in Acadia National Park! You’ll find bats, spiders, creepy crawlies, art, games, and more to entertain and educate!

A costume contest will be held for children 12 and under. Prizes for the best National Park–themed costume will be awarded. All activities will be hosted by Acadia National Park rangers and Schoodic Institute staff.

This is a free public event aimed at families with children 12 and under. Children must be accompanied by an adult. No registration is required.

Eek of Ecology is an Acadia National Park Centennial event.

Bee Germs

The “Bee Germs” project is focusing on learning more about bees that live underground. We know very little about bees that make their homes underfoot; by learning more about their germs (or pathogens) we will be able to understand what diseases they are suffering from and, eventually, find ways to help them.

ASU Citizen Science Maker Summit

The ASU Citizen Science Maker Summit 2016 is a two-day event, hosted by Arizona State University in partnership with SciStarter, designed to explore the crossroads of citizen science and the maker movement. The summit is scheduled for October 26 (evening), 27 & 28, 2016 in downtown Chandler, Arizona at the ASU Chandler Innovation Center.

1. Explore best practices between makers and citizen scientists and learn how these two communities can benefit from each other.

2. Participate in multiple networking activities that allow you to connect with other conference attendees.

3. Engage in hands-on workshops conducted by TechShop staff and experience first hand what select machines can do. You will be able to take home what you make!

Bay Area Science Festival

SciStarter will be at the Bay Area Science Festival Discovery Day promoting local citizen science projects you can get involved in!

AT&T Park becomes a science wonderland when the Bay Area Science Festival concludes again with this FREE science extravaganza. The entire ballpark is packed to the rafters with science content: on the field, at every entry/exit, and every level of the ballpark. With more than 150 hands-on exhibits, get ready to unleash your inner scientist.

Biodiversity of Telangana State

Since 2007, we had been compiling the list of flora and faun present in the ten districts of Telangana State, along with the thirteen districts of the Andhra Pradesh based on published literature, field surveys and personal observations, and museum based records. Our attempt has resulted in compilation of 9500 plus species records for both Andhra Pradesh and Telangana State. This Citizen Science Project aims to add to this database through documentation of flora and fauna present in Telangana State through citizen partnership, collaboration and contribution.

Surfrider Foundation's Blue Water Task Force Kaua'i

The Blue Water Task Force (BWTF) is the Surfrider Foundation’s citizen science program which provides valuable water quality information to beach communities, raises awareness of local water pollution problems and works collaboratively with local stakeholders to implement solutions.

Surfrider’s network of 30+ volunteer-run BWTF labs measure bacteria levels at ocean and bay beaches and in freshwater sources, and compare them to the national water quality standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency to protect public health in recreational waters.

Surfrider started its water testing program on Kaua’i nine years ago to provide more information to beachgoers on where it is safe to swim and surf. The Hawaii Department of Health monitors water quality at life-guarded beaches, while the Kaua’i Surfrider Chapter tests nearly 30 surf breaks, estuaries, and popular freshwater recreational sites on a monthly basis.

All BWTF water quality data are posted online and available to the public at ( http://www.surfrider.org/blue-water-task-force). The Kaua’i Chapter also publishes an annual water quality report in their local paper and gives frequent talks in the community to build public awareness of local water quality issues.

The Kaua’i Chapter uses its volunteer-generated data to advocate for better public health protection at the beach and to motivate government agencies to investigate and fix the sources of pollution.

Surfrider Foundation's Blue Water Task Force Santa Cruz

The Blue Water Task Force (BWTF) is the Surfrider Foundation’s citizen science program which provides valuable water quality information to beach communities, raises awareness of local water pollution problems and works collaboratively with local stakeholders to implement solutions.

Surfrider’s network of 30+ volunteer-run BWTF labs measure bacteria levels at ocean and bay beaches and in freshwater sources, and compare them to the national water quality standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency to protect public health in recreational waters.

The Santa Cruz Chapter established its BWTF water testing program over 20 years ago, in 1993, and has since been building a historical record of water quality at area beaches and freshwater outlets from Natural Bridges State Park in Santa Cruz down to Manresa State Beach in Watsonville, CA. There are currently twelve BWTF volunteers in Santa Cruz that collect water samples from 17 local beaches every week. Samples are processed at the chapter’s lab located at the Santa Cruz Yacht Harbor. A map of sampling sites and all water quality results can be viewed at Surfrider.org . ( http://www.surfrider.org/blue-water-task-force)

The Surfrider Chapter also shares its data via social media and gives educational presentations in local schools to build community awareness of local water quality conditions.

The Santa Cruz Chapter has also used their citizen science program to provide comprehensive water quality information from the surf zone between Main Beach and Steamer’s Lane in Santa Cruz to support the Cowell Beach Working Group’s investigation of local sources of pollution. Partnering with the City, County and other local NGOs, the Surfrider Chapter participates in this Working Group to develop management recommendations to improve local water quality conditions at Cowell’s Beach.

Surfrider Foundation's Blue Water Task Force South Sound

The Blue Water Task Force (BWTF) is the Surfrider Foundation’s citizen science program which provides valuable water quality information to beach communities, raises awareness of local water pollution problems, and works collaboratively with local stakeholders to implement solutions.

Surfrider’s network of 30+ volunteer-run BWTF labs measure bacteria levels at ocean and bay beaches and in freshwater sources, and compare them to the national water quality standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency to protect public health in recreational waters.

The South Sound Chapter tests eight recreational beaches and public waterways in Puget Sound near Tacoma, Washington. Surfrider volunteers collect the water samples and deliver them to the Tacoma Public School's Science and Math Institute (SAMi), where a high school science teacher and his students analyze them in the lab and record the results. All BWTF water quality data are posted online and available to the public at Surfrider.org. (http://www.surfrider.org/blue-water-task-force/chapter/37)

The Chapter coordinates with the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department's Swimming Beaches program and the Washington State Department of Ecology's BEACH Program to ensure that their sampling protocols align with the agency programs. During the summer recreation season, the County Health Department monitors high-use beaches. The Chapter’s sampling schedule from September to May helps to extend the County’s regular beach testing program into the colder months when recreational users such as divers and paddlers are still very active.

The chapter alerts the State and County when the BWTF program detects high bacteria levels at their sampling sites, and the County goes back out, retests, and issues swimming advisories and beach closures if the results still exceed health standards. The program provides a great collaborative opportunity for an educational institution, Surfrider volunteers, and local health agencies to work together to provide better protection for beachgoers and water recreational enthusiasts in Tacoma.

MPCA Citizen Water Monitoring Program

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency's (MPCA) Citizen Lake and Stream Monitoring Programs engage over 1,300 people to monitor water clarity once a week from April-September each year. Data collected by participants are used by the state to assess compliance with water quality standards and to track changes in water clarity over time. Monitoring is quick and easy, and the MPCA provides equipment and instructions free of charge.

MI-MAST: Wildlife Food Tracker

MI-MAST is a program where YOU get to understand wildlife foods in areas you are interested in while playing an important role in the conservation of Michigan’s wildlife. Understanding the cycles of wild fruit and seeds that are produced by trees and shrubs, also called mast, is a critical component of understanding wildlife habitat and population performance. Mast crops are known to directly affect wildlife productivity and survival, hence knowing more about wildlife food sources can help you locate more wildlife. Additionally, biologists need mast information across the entire state of Michigan to fully understand how wildlife populations might be responding to masting.

Blue Thumb Water Quality Education Program

Blue Thumb’s mission is “stream protection through education.” We work
with “citizen scientist” volunteers to collect stream data and offer
information to the public at large about stream and river protection.

We offer several 1 and 1/2 day trainings each year and work with the volunteers four times a year to collect benthic macroinvertebrates and perform quality assurance tests.

We also encourage our volunteers to do outreach and educational activities in their communities with equipment they can borrow from us.

Midwest Invasive Species Information Network

The Midwest Invasive Species Information Network (MISIN) is a regional effort rooted in a strong Michigan-based network of partners committed to the development and application of an early detection and rapid response (EDRR) resource for invasive species. This regional resource assists both experts and citizen scientists in the detection and identification of invasive species.

The Portland Urban Coyote Project

The Portland Urban Coyote Project is a citizen science project developed by the Department of Geography at Portland State University in partnership with the Audubon Society of Portland that seeks to: better understand how humans and coyotes interact; learn more about the ecology of coyotes in the Portland Metropolitan Area; and to act as a resource to the public for more information about living with coyotes.

Surfrider Foundation's Blue Water Task Force Eastern Long Island

The Blue Water Task Force (BWTF) is the Surfrider Foundation’s citizen science program which provides valuable water quality information to beach communities, raises awareness of local water pollution problems and works collaboratively with local stakeholders to implement solutions.

Surfrider’s network of 30+ volunteer-run BWTF labs measure bacteria levels at ocean and bay beaches and in freshwater sources, and compare them to the national water quality standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency to protect public health in recreational waters.

Surfrider began monitoring water quality on Eastern Long Island in 2013 in partnership with the Concerned Citizens of Montauk, another local environmental NGO. Testing is performed weekly at ocean and bay beaches, freshwater ponds and creeks during the summer beach season and monthly during the colder winter months at over 30 sampling sites.

This joint water testing program augments the seasonal beach water quality monitoring program conducted by the Suffolk County Department of Health, providing Enterococcus bacteria results at recreational beaches and coastal waterways year-round. All BWTF water quality data are posted online and available to the public at www.surfrider.org/blue-water-task-force/chapter/37

Water quality updates are also shared with the local community through social media, weekly press releases, and public presentations and educational talks. As a community-fueled program, the Blue Water Task Force strives to identify problems with beach and coastal water pollution and work towards solutions.

Seeing the Trees for the Forest

As we trek into Maine’s woodlands our focus is often on wildlife — birds, mammals and maybe even reptiles and amphibians under rotting logs. In spring we are also drawn to wildflowers. Yet none of these would exist without the ‘framework’ of trees — the essence of forests and life on earth.

In this workshop led by Richard Jagels, University of Maine, participants will explore how trees evolved over time and how they developed physiological and bio-mechanical adaptations to fill so many ecological and climatic niches. When wildlife sightings may be scarce, knowing how to ‘read’ the trees can greatly increase our enjoyment in the woods, or even our backyards.

To register for this workshop, please contact Michelle at 207-288-1356. This workshop has a $35.00 fee.


Two hour morning session in lecture hall provides basis for afternoon walk on local woodland trail. Topics to be covered include the following:

Evolution – We explore the evolution of trees on land, beginning with tree ferns and ending with broad-leaf hardwoods. As the earth’s climate changed, some forests lost ground to grasslands; and more recently, forests have been curtailed by human activities.

Physiology – Trees process light and moisture in different ways, leading to variations in leaf, stem and crown form and tree position within the forest canopy. Through differences in photosynthetic processes trees adapt to high light or shade, and develop varying branching patterns and life spans.

Biomechanics – Wind, snow, ice and gravitational forces shape trees as they grow. We see the response in the development of reaction wood (the basis for weather sticks), adjustments in strength properties, and production of different kinds of branches. In extreme environments trees develop krumholz form.

Seasonality – Ancient wood fossils reveal non-seasonal growth patterns – like tropical rainforests today. As earth’s climate changed trees adapted to seasonality in various ways. Some, like evergreen conifers, adapted to harsh climates, where competition was reduced. Hardwoods, like maples and oaks, found divergent ways of competing within the same seasonal cues.

Diseases and Air Pollution – Why do some tree species succumb quickly to heart rots while others survive for decades? Why are some tree species very sensitive to ozone while a neighbor species is resistant to ozone but is sensitive to acid precipitation? What insect helps to sculpt ‘wolf’ trees?

Global Climate Change – In the coming decades will Maine’s forests change much? Will the change in Maine be more or less dramatic than in other parts of the U.S. or globe?

Brown Bag Lunch Series - Bats in Acadia and Maine

Until a few years ago, Acadia National Park and mid-coast Maine were home to several species of bats that were present each year from late spring through fall. Five years ago the once common hibernating bat species became inflicted with the cold-loving fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd) or White Nose Syndrome (WNS) marking the start of a precipitous decline in these populations. Prior studies and monitoring provided Acadia with a good historic baseline allowing Maine biologists to assess the nature and severity of the epizootic and begin efforts to identify the activities and important habitats of remnant bat populations. Results of our recent studies are presenting new facts on how bats are using habitats, the distances and movements between habitats, the conservation measures to be adopted into Best Management Practices, and the discovery that bats hibernate along Maine’s coast.

Attend October’s Brown Bag Lunch Series, October 20, 2016 and learn about the bats of Mount Desert Island and surrounding areas. Bruce Connery, Acadia National Park biologist shares how the new information is guiding current investigations and management activities, and how Maine’s conservation efforts are likely to be different than those prescribed for areas south of Maine.

Bring your lunch. No registration is required. Group meets at 12 Noon – 1 p.m. Follow signs on campus.

Land-Potential Knowledge System (LandPKS)

We are developing and implementing a global, open-source, digital platform that provides people with the tools and knowledge needed to assess their land's potential to be productive, resilient, and healthy. This knowledge and the submitted crowdsourced data on soil, vegetation, and crops are open for all to utilize.

Philly Unleaded Project

We launched the Philly Unleaded Project to obtain more precise information about lead levels in our tap water than currently required by law. The Environmental Protection Agency’s Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) mandates monitoring for lead in water at a small number of high-risk homes and ensuring that there is no severe and widespread contamination. A water utility’s compliance with the LCR, however, offers no guarantee that lead-in-water levels at individual homes are not high or even extremely high. Our goal is to offer residents at all homes (high-risk and not) the opportunity to test their tap water.

Lead exposure can irreversibly harm childhood brain development as well as the development of fetuses and infants dependent on reconstituted formula. This testing will be coordinated by Philly Unleaded Project, a citizen-led coalition of Philadelphia residents concerned about the potential hazards of our drinking water. We are an independent, not-for-profit, and impartial alliance seeking to find accurate answers about the quality of the water in our homes.

Households interested in participating in the testing will be sent a kit containing three bottles. After a period of six hours of not using your water (overnight works best), residents will be asked to fill each water bottle at different intervals over the course of a few minutes. Residents will also be asked to check their water service line to find out if it might be lead or copper.

The water will then be sent to Virginia Tech for testing - the same lab used to uncover the Flint water crisis. Results will be shared publicly (but anonymously) with news media, Philadelphia Water and individual residents who participated in the testing.


AfriBats seeks to mobilize both amateur and professional sightings to fill gaps in our understanding of bat distributions by sharing photos and records whenever bats are encountered in Africa. Data will be used for scientific research and informed conservation actions.

To contribute, create an account on iNaturalist and add your observations. Be sure to include coordinates where the sightings were made along with the species identification (if known). If you don't know, just enter "bats" and the AfriBats community will help with identification. Records need not be new—any photos or records of African bats are welcome!

Cloudy with a Chance of Pain

Cloudy with a Chance of Pain is a national smart phone study that seeks to address the age-old question of whether the weather influences pain symptoms. It is open to people who live in the UK, are aged 17 or over, own a smart phone and have experienced pain for at least the last three months.
The citizen science project invites people from all over the world to analyse our participants data and submit their own hypotheses on whether they can see any correlation between pain and weather.

Mosquito Byte!

A very simple smart phone app (for Android or iPhone) that allows a user to report a mosquito bite. The user is rewarded with a fact about mosquitoes, and the bite report is displayed in (almost) real time on a map of the world. The more people use it, the more we know about when and where there are biting mosquitoes.


WomSAT is a new resource for communities to record sightings of wombats across the country. Australia's unique wombats are in crisis - Their numbers are declining and your help is needed to protect them by recording where you see wombats and their burrows in your local area. We are particularly interested in the incidence of mange in the population and where it occurs and where it does not occur. in the longer term we will use this information to aid the development of a nation-wide mange management plan.

Cat Tracker- Diet Study

Cats are known for their hunting prowess, researchers have estimated that they are killing billions of small mammals and birds every year. We want to figure out just how much and what outdoor cats are eating while they roam. To accomplish this, we will analyze samples of hair and cat food for isotopes of carbon and nitrogen with your help.

Cat Tracker- Personality Study

Many people say that their cats have distinct personalities. Thanks to research done by a group from both the U.S. and the U.K. a personality questionnaire for cats was developed by using information from other animals and a collection of 52 different traits. We've adapted this survey and are using it to gain a better understanding of personality in cats everywhere. You can help us learn more about why cats do the things they do!

Streamkeeper Streamside Meetup

A monthly event held every 3rd Thursday of the month.

Phenology Data Collection

Virginia Key North Point - Upon completing the restoration process of the VKNP beach, a protected area, we have been monitoring the growth and development of what we planted. We are interested by what our data can tell us regarding phenological changes occurring in Miami - an area many scientists consider especially vulnerable to many environmental threats. In conjunction with Project Budburst, we hope to contribute data that scientists can use to better understand the changes happening around us.

Project BudBurst - A third-party, nationwide initiative by which we log our phenological data. Participants make careful observations of the timing of leafing, flowering, and fruiting phases of plants (plant phenophases) at each season of the year.

Miami Lizard Watch

There are many species of lizards in Miami, but only seven species are native. We are logging observations of lizards throughout Miami-Dade County in an effort to examine how different lizard species live together, or outcompete one another.

Tookany Creek Streamkeepers

TTF Streamkeepers are volunteers who monitor a creek near them each month to collect data about changes in water quality, erosion, and creekside vegetation. This citizen science effort is funded by the William Penn Foundation‘s Delaware River Watershed Initiative, which supports organizations implementing stream restoration and green infrastructure projects, and informs municipal stormwater permits and public investments, using monitoring data gathered through aligned, science-based efforts.
The Academy of Natural Sciences and Stroud Water Research Center lead this watershed effort and guide us as we train and mobilize citizen scientists.

Part of an initiative across the Delaware!

Mission: Starlight (UV protection)

Your mission is to protect astronauts from the effects of harmful UV light. Experiment with different materials to discover which blocks UV light the best. Tell us about your results to receive a mission completion certificates and to unlock a secret video featuring British astronaut Tim Peake.
This global experiment will remain open so you can take part anytime.

National Geographic's Giant Map of Colorado

Teachers know how important it is for students to understand Colorado geography and characteristics. They want the next generation to be familiar with landmarks such as Mesa Verde and Rocky Mountain National Parks, the location of cities and boundaries, as well as the physical landscape of the state. The giant state map program is designed to encourage geographic learning through physical movement and games, teaching place names, physical geography, and cultural geography as well as map reading skills. Based on the national giant traveling map program featuring continents and the Pacific Ocean, National Geographic created a giant map of each state to travel to schools, libraries, and museums. The Colorado Geographic Alliance, hosted by the University of Colorado Colorado Springs, supports professional development for geography educators across the state. The giant map – a great resource for teachers - is now available.

Invasive Mosquito Project

The Invasive Mosquito Project (IMP) is a public education and national mosquito monitoring program at the USDA that partners local professionals with high school teachers and community educators (summer camps, naturalists, gardeners, scouts, etc.) to teach about mosquito-borne disease and public health, provide teachers with educational materials that meet Next Generation Science Standards, and create community outreach opportunities that benefit mosquito control/public health agencies. The IMP website (www.citizenscience.us) provides connections, resources, and information. Partnered citizen science is different than the typical crowd sourced citizen science because the expertise, experience, and enthusiasm of a professional or expert in the field supports the educator. The yearly mosquito species collection data will be used to generate mosquito species distribution maps for each year and cumulative distributions for each species.

Backyard Bark Beetles

Backyard Bark Beetles is a citizen science initiative aimed at producing and maintaining a large-scale, long-term bark beetle monitoring program. Our trapping activity is easy, fun, effective, and utilizes items found in the everyday household (2L bottle, hand sanitizer, etc.).

This activity can be completed by anyone, anywhere. It is especially useful as a hands-on activity to complement in-school lessons focused on topics like native/invasive species, forest health, environmental stewardship, etc. and has been used in courses spanning multiple disciplines (e.g., environmental science, entomology, ecology, etc.).

Our website (www.backyardbarkbeetles.org) is easily accessible and contains all the information needed to participate (informational handouts, instructions, etc.). Also, teachers: a narrated lesson on bark & ambrosia beetles is available that can be modified for in-class use.

Once we receive your beetles, they will be identified and promptly added to the interactive map, which can be found at bottom of the project's homepage (www.backyardbarkbeetles.org). On this map, you can view pictures and read information about the beetles you (and fellow citizen scientists!) have collected. Almost instant feedback!

With this program, we can learn where populations have become established and track newly invasive species, all while engaging the public (i.e., citizen scientists) in real-world scientific research. Help us understand what kinds of bark beetles are in YOUR backyard!

Additional information & participant feedback can be found on our Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/backyardbarkbeetles/) and Twitter (https://twitter.com/BackyardBeetles?lang=en) pages.

Questions? Send them to lab@backyardbarkbeetles.org.


This project involves the use of smartphones to evaluate the aquatic habitat quality, including the river banks, riparian zone and the main channel itself. The used is required to answer a short questionnaire based on the site they want to evaluate (rivers, streams, lakes or estuaries), and to take up to four photographs of the site with the smartphone's camera. The data is sent to the scientists throught via web, directly from the phone. The user wins points and awards for their help!

The Great Sunflower Project

The Great Sunflower Project has three programs. The Safe Gardens for Pollinators program which uses data collected on Lemon Queen sunflowers to examine the effects of pesticides on pollinators. The Pollinator Friendly Plants program which is designed to identify the key plants to support healthy pollinator communities. And, the Great Pollinator Habitat Challenge which allows citizen scientists to evaluate and improve gardens, parks and other green spaces for pollinators.

Some bee populations have experienced severe declines that may affect food production. However, nobody has ever measured how much pollination is happening over a region, much less a continent, so there is little information about how a decline in the bee population can influence gardens.

The Great Sunflower Project makes it easy to gather this information. Find a plant you know (or a Lemon Queen Sunflower), observe it for 5 or more minutes and record all pollinators that visit, and contribute data online. You can make as many observations as you want while your flowers are in bloom. Plant, Watch, Enter. Repeat. That's it. And, who doesn't like sunflowers?!


EpiCollect is a mobile phone application that allows professional and citizen scientists to gather, submit, and access research data through a central web database. The software is powered by Google Maps and Android, Google's open-source operating system.

EpiCollect was designed for epidemiological and ecological studies but has potential for a number of other fields, including economics, public health, and resource allocation. Individual users can input data (variables, photos, location, etc.) into EpiCollect from their mobile phone, which is synchronized to a central database. An accompanying web application provides a common location for mapping, visualization, and analysis of the data by everyone involved in the study.

Mushroom Observer

Mushroom Observer is a website where you can record observations about mushrooms, help people identify mushrooms they aren’t familiar with, and expand the community around the scientific exploration of mushrooms.

By some estimates less than five percent of the world’s species of fungi are known to science. While things are slightly better for the large fleshy fungi known as mushrooms, it is still a common experience to come across a mushroom that cannot be easily identified in the available books or which doesn’t really fit the definition of any recognized species. This site is intended to address that gap by creating a place for us to talk about and record what we’ve found, as well as connect to the existing literature about mushrooms.

Please do not feel intimidated by the scientific bent of the site. Everyone is welcome to dive in and add their own mushroom observations, upload mushroom photos and make comments on other people’s observations.


OdonataCentral is a website designed to make available what we know about the distribution, biogeography, biodiversity, and identification of Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) worldwide. The photographic records submitted by amateur natural historians and citizen scientists help generate a large database of distributional records. OdonataCentral makes its database available to researchers to dynamically generate maps, checklists, and accompanying data.

International Sea Turtle Observation Registry (iSTOR)

The International Sea Turtle Observation Registry is a database of sea turtle sightings to help sea turtle biologists and conservations track and understand the distribution of sea turtles around the world. You can help!

When you see a live turtle, please report it to the registry. Data will be made available to scientists and managers to improve the understanding of our marine environment.

Norfolk Bat Survey

The Norfolk Bat Survey (www.batsurvey.org) was originally set up with colleagues at the British Trust for Ornithology as a bit of fun, whilst improving local knowledge and interest in bats, but has since enlisted over 800 volunteers. Volunteers sign up and borrow a passive bat-detector from one of 21 centres hosting equipment. Leaving the detector outside at three different locations a night within a 1-km square, bat calls are recorded and saved to a memory card. After three days, volunteers return the detector and post the memory card containing bat recordings to the BTO. The data are analysed using algorithms that help assign bat calls to species and volunteers are sent a report with the results of their survey within a few days of taking part.

Since the start of the project in 2013, volunteers have surveyed 1,146 1-km squares (>20% of Norfolk). This has generated over 1.2 million bat recordings, making this one of the most extensive high-quality datasets for bats from anywhere in the world.

At a local scale, the Norfolk project has improved our understanding of patterns of occurrence and activity of all species from the near ubiquitous Common Pipistrelle (Pipistrellus pipistrellus) to the locally scarce Leisler’s bat (Nyctalus leisleri). This has demonstrated the cost-effectiveness of setting up a network of centres across a survey area of interest from which anyone can borrow a passive detector for a few days. Through our choice of centres, it has given us the opportunity to work with a wide range of communities and organisations that already had their own network of volunteers or members, and in doing so opened up citizen science to a new set of people.

Plans now are underway to set up of a much larger acoustic bat project across southern Scotland, in partnership with the Bat Conservation Trust, National Trust for Scotland and funded by Scottish Natural Heritage to run from May 2016. More broadly, with bat detectors recording more than just bats (e.g. >300,000 recordings of bush-crickets from Norfolk), there is clearly an exciting opportunity for “bat recording” to contribute more widely to biological recording in the future.

Dr Stuart Newson, British Trust for Ornithology

Newson, S.E., Evans, H.E. & Gillings, S. 2015. A novel citizen approach for large-scale standardised monitoring of bat activity and distribution, evaluated in eastern England. Biological Conservation 191: 38-49. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320715002323

Newson, S.E., Ross-Smith, V., Evans, I., Harold, R., Miller, R. & Barlow, K. 2014. Bat-monitoring: a novel approach. British Wildlife 25: 264-269.

Protecting Special Ocean Places

Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Commission Meeting

This presentation will highlight the importance of marine protected areas as management tools to support conservation, socio-economic activities, and coastal/ecosystem resilience. Guest speakers include Dr. Charlie Wahle, Dr. Gonzalo Cid, and Dr. Martha Honey. This evening presentation is free and open to the public. Please follow signs to Moore Auditorium, on the Institute campus.
Dr. Charlie Wahle serves as Senior Scientist in NOAA’s National Marine Protected Areas Center. He is a marine ecologist now working at the science to policy interface of ocean conservation. Recently, this work has focused largely on understanding patterns and implications of human uses of the oceans, particularly ocean recreation in marine protected areas. Between 2010-2012, he served on a detail to help create and implement the US National Ocean Policy. Before joining the MPA Center in 2000, Charlie led NOAA’s national science, education and policy programs for the National Marine Sanctuaries and National Estuarine Research Reserves programs, and represented NOAA and DOC on several major interagency conservation initiatives. In a prior incarnation, Charlie directed Lehigh University’s Stone Harbor Marine Laboratory on the New Jersey shore
Dr. Gonzalo Cid serves as coordinator for international activities in NOAA’s National Marine Protected Areas Center at the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries. Previously, he served as program coordinator for the Office of International Affairs of NOAA-National Ocean Service. Gonzalo has worked for NOAA since 2002 on international issues concerning marine protected areas (MPAs), land-based marine pollution, marine spatial planning, capacity building, bilateral partnerships, and multilateral environmental/marine agreements. A native of Chile, Gonzalo holds a BS and MS degrees in marine biology and oceanography from the University of Concepcion and a PhD in marine policy and coastal management from the University of Delaware. Before joining NOAA, he worked as academic research assistant, and coordinator for UN-based projects.
Dr. Martha Honey is co-founder and Executive Director of the Center for Responsible Travel (CREST), which is headquartered in Washington, DC. Over the last two decades, she has written and lectured widely on ecotourism, Travelers’ Philanthropy, cruise and resort tourism, and certification issues. Her books include Ecotourism and Sustainable Development: Who Owns Paradise? (Island Press, 1999 and 2008) and Ecotourism and Certification: Setting Standards in Practice (Island Press, 2002). She is currently writing a book on coastal and cruise tourism (Selling Sunshine, Island Press, 2015). Previously, Martha worked for 20 years as a journalist based in East Africa and Central America. She holds a Ph.D. in African history from the University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. She was Executive Director of The International Ecotourism Society (TIES) from 2003 to 2006. Martha was profiled in Branded!, Michael Conroy’s book on certification (New Society Publishers, 2007) and was named one of world’s top 10 eco- and sustainable-travel “watchdogs” (CondeNast Traveler, 2008).

Brown Bag Lunch: Wild Seed Project

We invite you to attend our Brown Bag Lunch Series, held the third Thursday of each month. We offer a range of topics to guide present and future generations to a greater understanding and appreciation for nature and the local environment. Come join us! No registration required!

Bring your lunch and learn about the Wild Seed Project: Grass root seed propagation of native plants.

Heather McCargo, the founder and director of the Wild Seed Project, is an educator with 30 years of expertise in plant propagation, landscape design and conservation.

The seeds of wild plants have a different set of needs than those of garden and vegetable species. In this talk, Heather will describe the reproductive life cycle of several different types of native plants and explain how we can change our landscape practices to help support wild plant reproduction and survival. Growing native plants from seed is a different way to interact with our native flora and is an inexpensive way to produce a lot of plants. Heather will explain native seed sowing and out door propagation techniques.

Wild Seed Project is a Maine based nonprofit that works to increase the use of native plants in all landscape settings in order to conserve biodiversity, encourage plant adaption in the face of climate change, and to create pollination and migration corridors for insects, birds and other wildlife.

Climate Change for Beginners

Author Dean Goodwin presents ‘Climate Change for Beginners’ on June 22, 2016 at Schoodic Institute.

The presentation will provide an historical perspective and overview of global warming. The latest scientific evidence regarding the causes of climate change will be described, and the potential consequences for the Earth, and Maine in particular, will be discussed. Steps to finding solutions to slow the rate of climate change will be highlighted. This presentation is free and open to the public. Goodwin will address guests at Moore Auditorium on the Institute campus at 7 p.m.

Dean Goodwin, PhD, is a nationally recognized environmental educator with an honors degree in biochemistry, a post-graduate certificate in science education, and a PhD in mechanistic organic photochemistry. He has more than 25 years of teaching experience at both the college and secondary level, and he currently teaches at The Tatnall School, a private college preparatory school in Greenville, Delaware.

Plants on Maine's Offshore Islands

Join Schoodic Institute June 7, 2016 for a public presentation by Glen Mittelhauser: Maine’s island habitats are experiencing rapid changes. Mittelhauser has conducted research on the flowering plants along the eastern Maine coast over the past 25 years. Come learn how past changes have influenced the flowering plants that currently occur on Maine islands, and gain insights into the potential effects of current and future changes.

This event begins at 7:00 p.m. in Moore Auditorium on the Schoodic Institute campus, and is free and open to the public.

Glen Mittelhauser is the Director of the Maine Natural History Observatory with an office in Gouldsboro, Maine. Maine Natural History Observatory is a nonprofit organization established in 2003 to help further the knowledge and understanding of Maine’s flora and fauna.

Lepidoptera of North America Network (LepNet)

The Lepidoptera of North America Thematic Collections Network (LepNet TCN) will serves as a hub for integrating millions of occurrence records for Lepidoptera. The project is funded by the NSF-ADBC program ($3.2 million, 2016-2020) and includes 27 core museums distributed across the United States. We will accomplish the following goals:
- Digitize 1.7 million adult specimens and 58,524 larval vial records while integrating >1 million existing lepidopteran records, for a total of at least 2.7 million occurrence records.
- Produce high-resolution species exemplar images of 81,000 adult museum specimens representing at least 60% of the 14,300+ North American Lepidoptera species to enhance remote identifications and promote systematic and ecological research.
- Implement computer identification workflow (LepSnap) to exponentially increase capacity for identification of museum specimens and consequently promote imaging additional specimens.
- Develop smartphone applications via LepSnap for student researchers and volunteers to image cataloged specimens and add >160,000 images beyond the high-resolution species exemplars.
- Catalyse novel, data- and hypothesis-driven research advancing our understanding of the wide-ranging factors that influence the evolution and ecology of Lepidoptera and plant-herbivore interactions; within and across taxonomic and functional groups and spatial scales.
- Disseminate rich education-outreach content to students and the public through LepXPLOR.

Caterpillars Count!

Caterpillars Count! is a project that relies on citizen scientists (you!) to help understand some of the most important organisms in our ecosystems—caterpillars and other insects—by conducting surveys of the plants and trees around them. These insects are an important food source for birds and other wildlife, and they have economic and environmental impacts on our forests and crops. You can help us understand how the abundance of these bugs varies from rural countrysides to major urban areas, and from coast to coast.

Your observations can also help us track how the abundance of caterpillars and other insects varies over the seasons. The seasonal timing of caterpillar availability is especially important for birds which try to time their spring migration so that there will be lots of insect food around (caterpillars are an especially tasty treat!) to successfully raise their young.

Finally, you can visually explore the data collected by yourself or others to reveal patterns that scientists haven't even yet discovered!

Check out our project website at http://caterpillarscount.unc.edu


Art history studies mainly original artworks, but often their reproductions, too. Today, these reproductions exist in substantial electronic repositories sometimes amounting to several million items. What can we do to retrieve these reproductions preferably on the basis of various criteria? As the possibilities of a computerized search of these reproductions are still very limited we allocate keywords, known as metadata. This is a most time-consuming operation and one would need a great number of staff members to do this job. We would appreciate your contribution to this game. However, we don't only want something from you but we offer you as well entertainment and at the same time training as you get to know quite a lot about the paintings shown here. In addition to that, you will be able to work with the descriptions you gave us.

Stream Stewards

Stream Stewards is a Citizen Science program designed to engage committed volunteers in monitoring the water quality of streams that flow through First State National Historical Park to Brandywine Creek. Volunteers will learn how to collect scientific data that will be used make recommendations for restoration projects aimed at improving the health of the watershed.


Eterna invites contributors to become RNA scientists. Contributors solve puzzles to design specialized RNA-based medicines and sensors, receive feedback after their designs are built and tested in a lab at Stanford, and work together to build knowledge about how RNA works.

Thirsty for Birds - Thursday's-in-May Birding Event

It’s Spring and time for songbird migration! Join Seth Benz, Bird Ecology Program Director, as he offers tips on birding by sight and sound.
This birding event will meet every Thursday in May in Winter Harbor at Frazer Point, Acadia National Park at 7:15 AM and conclude at 10 AM.
Due to limited space, registration is required. First come, first served.
Registration fee: $20 per trip. Register for all 4 = $65 (a $15 saving).

Turtle Observer Program

The western pond turtle, Actinemys marmorata, is a federally listed vulnerable species. These are the only fresh water turtles native to California, and they can be found around Phoenix, Lagunitas, and Alpine Lakes in the Mt. Tamalpais Watershed.

MMWD has enlisted the help of volunteers to protect this vulnerable animal by monitoring habitat conditions, recording their behavior, and educating the public during the spring when they are most vulnerable. Volunteers have collected valuable data on native and non-native turtles that is helping to direct the management of these species.

Wisconsin Bird Monitoring

The Wisconsin Bird Conservation Initiative (WBCI) recognizes the need for sound bird monitoring programs, and recently its Research and Monitoring Committee identified several key bird groups whose populations previously were not adequately monitored in the state. To fill these gaps and help identify species at risk, three new statewide surveys that focus on owls, nightjars, and secretive marshbirds were initiated in the past several years.

Volunteers can participate in one or more of the surveys.

Wisconsin Frog and Toad Survey

The primary purpose of the WFTS is to determine the status, distribution, and long-term population trends of Wisconsin's twelve frog and toad species. The WFTS began in 1981 and is now the longest running acoustic frog and toad monitoring project in the world.

There are two ways to volunteer:

Route monitoring is used to record frogs and toads at specific locations throughout Wisconsin. Volunteers visit 10 spots along predetermined routes 3 times each year and take note of the frogs and toads they hear calling. These routes are limited to about 2 routes per county.

Phenology surveys help monitor frog breeding seasons in relation to fluctuating spring weather conditions. Volunteers select 1-2 sites to monitor throughout the spring and early summer and monitor them repeatedly for frog and toad calls. Phenology surveys are open to an unlimited number of volunteers.

Balloon Breakdown

We are essentially redoing a study that the balloon industry performed many years go. Our interest in doing this experiment is to acquire more data on latex in the environment. Our hope is that in presenting the project in this way, we can teach children about composting using materials they already enjoy.

Have you ever wondered what happens to a balloon after it pops? At first a broken balloon might not seem to be as interesting as one that’s twisted into a funny shape, but then we wondered, what happens to a balloon after it pops?

Rubber balloons are made from latex. Latex comes from trees. Wood and paper come from trees. Do balloons break down in the environment like wood and paper do?

We want to find out what happens to balloons as they biodegrade, or decay and become absorbed by the environment. We want to learn how long it takes for them to break down. And we’re curious if there are ways to make them break down faster.

While some experiments are quick, this is a long-term project. It will be quick to set up, and simple to keep track, but this experiment won’t be finished overnight, or even in a few weeks. We're going to compost balloons and determine the length of time needed, under different conditions, for the balloons to break down fully.

Wisconsin Turtle Conservation Program

The main goals of the WTCP are to catalog species' statewide distributions more thoroughly and to document high turtle mortality locations along roads in order to promote effective management and conservation of Wisconsin’s 11 turtle species.

The WTCP was initiated in response to the increasing trend in highway collisions of migrating turtles and vehicles. Our ever-expanding dedicated volunteer base makes projects like these possible and allows for more efficient ways in which WDNR employees can productively manage turtle numbers.

Volunteering is easy! When you see a live turtle or a turtle that has been hit on the road, use our online or paper form to report it. Photographs are also welcome.

FaceTopo #first1K

We're building a massive facetree from all of the 3D face data we're gathering from diverse Users ages 14+ around the globe! Create your own private account to join the Facetopo community. As one of Facetopo's #first1K faces you'll see how your face correlates with the facetree!

Spruill Farms Conservation Project

This is a conservation project with an ongoing initiative to document biodiversity on our 115 acre farm, which has 1500 feet of frontage on the Albemarle Sound, the largest freshwater sound in the world. The farm has rich biodiversity which is threatened by sea level rise coupled with the conversion of this huge fresh water estuary to becoming brackish or salt water. Help us build a biodiversity database which will have wider benefit than just for our farm project.

Urban Buzz

At any given moment we’ve got animals living under our feet – some of them for 17 years at a time. An underground universe populated by mysterious creatures, digging… feeding… emerging.

Sometimes their underground homes get paved over, or flooded, or have a bucket of bright green toxic sludge poured on them. Scientists want to learn more about what happens to cicadas when they’re down there for so long – so they need your help. Go out with your students, parents, kids, grandparents, friends, dogs, friend’s dogs and collect some dead bugs and send them to us! (Yes, you heard that right.)

Cicadas are sensitive to changes in their environment, especially temperature and the availability of trees.

As more people populate the planet… we build cities and homes and those come with roads and sidewalks and pollution. Have you ever noticed that the sidewalk is hotter than the grass? The cicadas noticed that, too. These rising temperatures are sometimes called an “urban heat island” – which sounds like a lovely place to visit, right?

Researchers are studying how cicadas are responding to environmental changes associated with urbanization (humans building more buildings and paving more land) by measuring the wonkiness (“abnormalities and asymmetry”) in cicada wings and legs.

Aquatic Salamander Monitoring at Tremont Institute

Great Smoky Mountains National Park is the Salamander Capital of the World, with higher diversity of salamanders than anywhere else of similar size. To monitor the salamander populations of Walker Valley, where Tremont Institute is located, we have artificial salamander habitats, or Salamander Hotels, placed in six streams. Using a set protocol, citizen scientists check each hotel for salamanders and identify, measure, and release any salamanders found.

Phenology Monitoring at Tremont Institute

Phenology is the study of the timing of natural events – in particular, life cycle events such as leaf out, migration, flowering, or mating. Since many of these events are tied to temperature, phenology can be a powerful way to study the effects of climate change. While we expect to observe changes in the phenology of the trees, wildflowers and birds over time, we are specifically interested to see how these changes affect species interactions. We have 8 phenology plots that are visited weekly by citizen scientists. Volunteers and participants become deeply connected to these small plots of land and become conservation advocates, invested in the future of the project.

Development and Deployment of Habitat Suitability Models under Current and Future Climate for Regulated Invasive Plants in Wisconsin

Invasive plants negatively impact both natural and managed ecosystems. Improving the efficiency of existing monitoring efforts combined with training citizen scientists to monitor for invasive species offers promise at improving detection and eradication.

Earth Force’s Keep It Clean – Neighborhood Environmental Trios (KIC-NET)

KIC-NET (Keep It Clean – Neighborhood Environmental Trios) engages youth in improving urban waterways. Through partnerships with government agencies, businesses, schools, and local parks, students explore stormwater runoff in their neighborhoods and take action to improve stormwater management.
Students participating in KIC-NET use science, technology, engineering, and math skills to solve real-world environmental challenges.

Using monitoring tools and processes, students test local water quality to gather data. They are testing factors like dissolved oxygen, pH and phosphate levels, temperature, and turbidity. They then work with city engineers and STEM professionals to learn what their data indicates, how stormwater management works, and how human activity contributes to runoff.

From this investigation, students assess the most pressing environmental issue affecting their community’s resiliency, research that issue, and engineer and execute a sustainable plan.

Midwinter Bald Eagle Survey

The Midwinter Bald Eagle Survey takes place during the first two weeks of January each year. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) coordinates the Midwinter Bald Eagle Survey, in which several hundred individuals count eagles along standard, non-overlapping survey routes. Nationwide counts of eagles were coordinated by the National Wildlife Federation from 1979 until 1992, when the Bureau of Land Management's Raptor Research and Technical Assistance Center assumed responsibility for overseeing the count. Responsibility for count coordination shifted to the National Biological Survey (1993-1996) and later to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, Snake River Field Station. In April 2007, the USGS established a partnership with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to maintain the long-term, national coordination of the survey, data analysis, and reporting. USACE will assume responsibility for coordinating the national survey, organizing the results, maintaining the long-term database, and jointly compiling, analyzing, and reporting survey data gathered with USGS following previously used methods (Steenhof et al. 2002) in 2010 and 2015.

Long-term Monitoring Program and Experiential Training for Students (LiMPETS)

LiMPETS (Long-term Monitoring Program and Experiential Training for Students) is a citizen science program designed to monitor the coastal ecosystems of California and help youth develop a scientific understanding of the ocean. LiMPETS monitors the biology in rocky intertidal and sandy beach ecosystems and aims to provide publicly accessible, scientifically sound, long-term data to inform marine resource management and the scientific community.

The LiMPETS network provides authentic, hands-on coastal monitoring experiences that empower teachers, students and the community to conduct real science and serve as ocean stewards.

LiMPETS has always operated in three regions, so if there is a way to reflect that, it would be great. Santa Barbara, San Francisco and Monterey Bay.

Dolphin & Whale 911 Smartphone App

The Dolphin & Whale 911 app will enhance accurate and timely reporting of stranded marine mammals in the Southeastern U.S.
NOAA Fisheries is faced with numerous challenges to enhance the protection, conservation, and management of marine mammals. One of the main challenges is the lack of public awareness about how to report stranded marine mammals. When the public is unaware of how to contact their local Stranding Network, response can be delayed, compromising the animal’s chance of survival and/or limiting the amount of valuable data collected from dead animals. By providing valuable information on smartphones, including a colorful species identification guide, the public will know who to call and what to do when they find a sick, injured or dead marine mammal, thus contributing to marine mammal conservation.

Broodmapper: Honey Bee Development and Citizen Science

The Ohio State University OARDC is investigating the interactions between fungicides and miticides and their effect on honey bee brood survival and development. As a part of that study, Broodmapper is used to determine the cell contents using photographs of combs from experimental colonies.

Mapping Application for Penguin Populations and Projected Dynamics (MAPPPD)

MAPPPD is a one-stop shop for information on penguin abundance and distribution in the Antarctic that integrates citizen science, expert biological field surveys, and satellite imagery to provide data required for Antarctic decision support and conservation assessment. Tens of thousands of tourists go to Antarctica each year; their observations on the presence and absence of wildlife is critical to informing models of biogeography and our understanding of species range shifts through time. Antarctic stakeholders can use MAPPPD to search and select sites of interest, get estimates of abundance in areas of interest, and explore how these abundance estimates are predicted to change with time.

The Invasive Mosquito Project: A Public Education Tool

This classroom project helps high school teachers meet national education requirements and students learn about mosquitoes, public health, and safety. One of the main goals of the project is to transform teachers and students into citizen scientists. The Invasive Mosquito Project provides educational materials for teachers and students. As part of data gathering, students collect mosquito eggs around their houses. After a week, upon the presence of eggs, students bring the mosquito eggs to class and choose to raise ¼ of the eggs to adults following the protocol and safety measures provided in the lesson plan. The remaining eggs are sent to USDA. Classes have the opportunity to assess local, regional and national mosquito distribution data and to determine if there is an increased risk of particular pathogens in their community based on the presence of certain mosquito vector species. In addition to the public education component, another goal of the IMP project is to monitor invasive mosquito species in the United States. The project uses a new partnered approach to citizen science given each classroom is paired with mosquito and public health professionals that support the lesson plans and data gathering by, for instance, confirming the students’ mosquito identifications.

Promoting Native Bee Health and Pollination Services on Diversified Organic Produce Farms

This project was developed in cooperation with an engaged group of farmers to understand native bee community health and pollination services on long-term organic and transitioning produce farms.

Project Budburst on the Tongass National Forest

The Tongass NF represents 80% of the public land in southeast Alaska. The Tongass NF's Conservation Education and Interpretation staff are teaming up with Project Budburst to ask volunteers and students to help monitor seasonal plant changes. Eight species are being tracked in Ketchikan, and one species is being tracked in Juneau with efforts to expand the program pending.


Project designed to document the occurrence and timing of Harmful Algal Blooms, spatial distribution of toxin producing cyanobacteria with genus/species identification, and development of bloom forecasting and HAB vulnerability in water bodies.


When NASA's Juno mission arrives at Jupiter on July 4, 2016, new views of the planet will be sent back to Earth, courtesy of its color camera, called JunoCam. The public will act as a virtual imaging team, participating in key steps of the process. Amateur astronomers are invited to submit images of Jupiter from their own telescopes. These views are the basis for online discussions about what JunoCam should image as it passes over the planet. After Juno arrives at Jupiter, the public will process the images to create color pictures.

A General Aviation Citizen Science Study of Harmful Algal Blooms

Help develop an early warning system to alert communities of ensuing algal bloom along the US coastlines.

Marine Mammal Sightings Data - Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

Specially trained citizen scientists with NOAA Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and National Park - volunteers use sightings forms and the Spotter Pro app to record and upload current marine mammal sightings in the Santa Barbara Channel and in sanctuary and park waters. observations include weather, behavior and presence absence information for sightings. Serves as an important resource for the West Coast Region Sanctuaries Whale Aware collaborative that works to track whales near shipping lanes where they are at risk of ship strikes and provides long-term photo-ID of blue and humpback whales as well as general patterns of cetacean distribution in this part of the Southern CA Bight.

Right Whale Sighting Advisory System

The Right Whale Sighting Advisory System (RWSAS) is a NOAA Fisheries program which was designed to reduce collisions between ships and the critically endangered North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) by alerting mariners to the presence of the right whales. These reports are obtained from a variety of sources including aerial surveys, shipboard surveys, whale watch vessels, and opportunistic sources (Coast Guard, commercial ships, fishing vessels, and the general public).

Flying Squirrels of Southern California

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is partnering with the San Diego Museum of Natural History, University of California at San Diego and the U.S. Forest Service to organize and work alongside citizen scientists in the Big Bear and Lake Arrowhead communities in the San Bernardino Mountains to study an insular population of flying squirrels. Our objective is to develop habitat models that will permit mangers to compare occupancy rates between the developed and undeveloped areas of the forest. Citizen scientists will be deploying motion sensitive cameras and bait stations at various locations to monitor the presence/absence of flying squirrels. Citizen scientists are responsible for the establishment, maintenance and data management of individual stations (sample points).

IHO Crowd Sourced Bathymetry Pilot Project

The International Hydrographic Office (IHO) is coordinating a Crowd-Sourced Bathymetry (CSB) data gathering proof of concept project using a trusted partner model for collecting data. The IHO Data Center for Digital Bathymetry (DCDB) has teamed with Rose Point Navigation Systems to automatically log and submit bathymetric data (longitude, latitude, depth, and time) acquired from vessels operated by professional mariners and recreational boaters. Operators now have the option to enable the crowd-sourced bathymetry collection in their existing Rose Point electronic charting and navigation software.

The assembled data are sent to the IHO DCDB hosted at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information in Boulder, Colorado, where it will be made available to the public via an interactive web map service. This data pathway is currently being developed so that automated data input (and data exports) into a standard database is established.

The ultimate objective of this CSB project is to make it easy for every mariner to contribute to the global IHO DCDB bathymetric database and to make these data readily accessible for a range of uses, including nautical charting and global digital datasets such as the General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO).

The Great Backyard Bird Count

The next count is being held February 17-20, 2017

The Great Backyard Bird Count is an annual four-day event during which bird watchers count birds to create a real-time snapshot of where birds are located around the world.

Scientists and bird enthusiasts can learn a lot by knowing where birds are. Unfortunately, no single scientist or team of scientists could hope to document the complex distribution and movements of so many species in such a short time.

Anyone, from beginning bird watchers to experts, can participate in the The Great Backyard Bird Count. It takes as little as 15 minutes on one day, or you can count for as long as you like during each day of the event. It’s free, fun, and easy, and it helps the birds. In addition, yearly data collection makes the information more meaningful and allows scientists to investigate far-reaching questions.

Hosted by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, National Audubon Society, and Bird Studies Canada.


Based in Australia, Seagrass-Watch recruits volunteers around the world to assess and monitor this ocean plant, which is an important indicator of the health of coastal environments. The project has participants at some 259 sites across 17 countries.

Working with a local coordinator, participants collect quantitative data on seagrasses and their associated fauna by means of simple, yet scientifically rigorous monitoring techniques. At least one participant at each monitoring event must have passed a Seagrass-Watch training course or have a degree (or similar) in environmental/marine science and be able to demonstrate competency in Seagrass-Watch methods and protocols. The information collected is used to assist the management of coastal environments and to prevent significant areas and species being lost.

Seagrasses, the only flowering plants that can live underwater, are the main diet of dugongs and green turtles, and provide a habitat for many, smaller marine animals, some of which, like prawns and fish, are commercially important. They also absorb nutrients from coastal run-off and stabilize sediment, helping to keep the water clear.

The Seagrass-Watch program has a simple philosophy of involving those who are concerned, and includes collaboration/partnerships between community, qualified scientists, and data users, such as environment management agencies.

RNA World

RNA World is a distributed supercomputer that uses Internet-connected computers to advance RNA research. This system is dedicated to identify, analyze, structurally predict, and design RNA molecules on the basis of established bioinformatics software in a high-performance, high-throughput fashion.

The RNA World project is based at the Rechenkraft research facility located in Germany.


Explore, share, and contribute photos of animals around the world. Animals and Earth is a resource for photos of all species, their behavior, habitats, and conservation efforts.

There are several ways you can participate.

Option A: Find photos or issues you care about by browsing our photo collection of animals and earth photos. Gather a photo collection, create a blog, and start your own conservation effort using our content

Option B: Grab your camera and help document the flora and fauna of your place on earth.

Option C: Help identify animals and places on our site by adding photo locations and Latin names for animals photos that are not identified yet. Post photos to websites, blogs and social networks promotes awareness and conservation.


WildObs (from "wildlife observations") participants capture memorable wildlife encounters and put them to work. Record your encounters for your own studies, or enjoyment. Use these records to develop your own wildlife calendar for the year. Maintain and grow your life-list, learn about new species and connect with nature.

Join the WildObs community via your Android or iPhone and use technology to help you connect with nature.

As a wildlife community, WilObs participants help each other find the nature (for a photograph or close encounter) and we learn about the species in our neighborhoods. WildObs is collaborative wildlife enjoyment. It can help connect each other to wildlife.

Additionally, WildObs is a proud partner of the National Wildlife Federation's Wildlife Watch, and works with a number of other scientific studies to extract citizen science from recorded encounters.

Wildlife Sightings - Citizen Science

Wildlife Sightings is a free service that enables projects leaders to publish, organize, and manage their own wildlife sightings data.

Wildlife Sightings helps eliminate the technical barriers and costs to non-profit organizations and educators wishing to conduct their own wildlife surveys. That way, nature lovers, conservation groups, eco-tourism business, and educators can focus their energy on what they love most -- citizen science!

Educators and non profit groups can create and manage their own citizen science class activity or projects with easy to use free online tools. Create a citizen science project in minutes and avoid costly development costs.

Documenting wildlife sightings contributes to science, engages community participants/students and strengthens environmental community efforts.


Phylo is a game in which participants align sequences of DNA by shifting and moving puzzle pieces. Your score depends on how you arrange these pieces. You will be competing against a computer and other players in the community.

Though it may appear to be just a game, Phylo is actually a framework for harnessing the computing power of mankind to solve a common problem -- Multiple Sequence Alignments.

A sequence alignment is a way of arranging the sequences of DNA, RNA or protein to identify regions of similarity. These similarities may be consequences of functional, structural, or evolutionary relationships between the sequences. From such an alignment, biologists may infer shared evolutionary origins, identify functionally important sites, and illustrate mutation events. More importantly, biologists can trace the source of certain genetic diseases.

Traditionally, multiple sequence alignment algorithms use computationally complex heuristics to align the sequences. Unfortunately, the use of heuristics do not guarantee global optimization as it would be prohibitively computationally expensive to achieve an optimal alignment. This is due in part to the sheer size of the genome, which consists of roughly three billion base pairs, and the increasing computational complexity resulting from each additional sequence in an alignment.

Humans have evolved to recognize patterns and solve visual problems efficiently. By abstracting multiple sequence alignment to manipulating patterns consisting of coloured shapes, we have adapted the problem to benefit from human capabilities. By taking data which has already been aligned by a heuristic algorithm, we allow the user to optimize where the algorithm may have failed.

All alignments were generously made available through UCSC Genome Browser. In fact, all alignments contain sections of human DNA which have been speculated to be linked to various genetic disorders, such as breast cancer. Every alignment is received, analyzed, and stored in a database, where it will eventually be re-introduced back into the global alignment as an optimization.

Let's play!


MySwan is a citizen science project for people who love swans. Just record your black swan sighting on the interactive map, and you can make a valuable contribution to research on the behavior and movement of swans.

After you submit your sighting, you'll get an instant report about the swan, with interesting information about its history and recent movements.

Journey North

Journey North invites you to join in a global study of wildlife migration and seasonal change. Share your local observations with people across North America. Track the coming of spring through the migrations of monarch butterflies, robins and hummingbirds, the budding of plants, changing day length and other natural events. Predict when plants will emerge and bloom with Journey North Tulip Test Gardens. Track changes in day length to find ten Mystery Classes hidden around the globe. Explore weekly news updates, migration maps, photos, video clips, live cams, lessons, and other resources. Journey North exemplifies best-practice instruction and is one of the nation's premiere citizen science projects.

Pollinators.info Bumble Bee Photo Group

Bumble bees are important pollinators, and science needs YOUR help to conserve them. You can contribute to our knowledge of bumble bees and their lives all over the world. Your contribution will tell us about which bumble bees live where, the flowers they visit, and when they're active during the year.

The photo group is administered by Athena Rayne Anderson, a doctoral candidate in Ecology at the University of Georgia, and author of the website.

Citizen Sort

Video games have the potential to do more than entertain. Citizen Sort is taking advantage of this potential by designing video games that make doing science fun.

Citizen Sort is a research project at the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University in New York. Students from Syracuse University drew, colored, programmed and coded three unique citizen science games. They are Forgotten Island, Happy Match, and Living Links.

Happy Match is a twist on the classic matching game. Players will classify photos of animal, plant and insect species that scientists took live in the field. Each round of the game has a different question and players will drag the animal, plant or insect photo into one of the photo answers along the bottom. Scientists wrote the questions in Happy Match based on information they want to know. By classifying the photos, you'll these help scientists as they study the natural world.

Forgotten Island is a point and click adventure game. Players take on the role of a lost adventurer with a secret past. As the player explores the island they meet a suspicious robot spouting orders to re-classify the falling photographs of plant, animal or insect species. The player will also solve puzzles and explore diverse locations from icy peaks to fiery volcanoes.The more classifications a player does, the more money they earn buy items and solve the mystery of Forgotten Island.

Living Links is a fast-paced image classification game between deep learning-based AI and human.

Citizen Sort was partially supported by the US National Science Foundation under grant SOCS 09-68470.

Save the Tasmanian Devil

The Roadkill Project was launched in 2009 to help determine how significant the threat of roadkill mortality is to Tasmanian devil populations, particularly those populations already decimated by Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD). The Roadkill Project aims to continue to monitor the threat of roadkill mortality and the spread of DFTD and to try to reduce Tasmanian devil roadkill. Involving the public helps to greatly extend our limited resources.

Anyone who is using Tasmanian roads can help by reporting any Tasmanian devil roadkill they see.

Marine Debris Tracker

The Marine Debris Tracker mobile application allows you to help make a difference by checking in when you find trash on our coastlines and waterways. Data you submit is available to download online and you also have access to mapping all data, worldwide. Marine Debris Tracker is a joint partnership of the NOAA Marine Debris Division and the Southeast Atlantic Marine Debris Initiative (SEA-MDI), located within the College of Engineering at the University of Georgia.


CyberTracker Conservation is a non-profit organisation that promotes the vision of a Worldwide Environmental Monitoring Network. Our ultimate vision is that smart phone users worldwide will use CyberTracker to capture observations on a daily basis.

CyberTracker is the most efficient method of gps field data collection. You can use CyberTracker on a Smartphone or handheld computer to record any type of observation. CyberTracker, which requires no programming skills, allows you to customize an Application for your own data collection needs.

Comparing the Behaviors of Wild and Captive Native Songbirds

This project gives participants a chance to observe bird behaviors of wild birds and compare with behaviors of birds in captive settings. Participants of this project will observe native songbirds at bird feeders. They will fill out an ethogram provided with the observations they have made. The next time the participant visits a zoo or nature center with native captive birds, they will fill out another ethogram. The directions on how to use each ethogram will be provided with it.

This project was designed with educators in mind as an assignment to go along with zoo field trips. T

It was also designed based off the native songbird aviary of the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium. However, it can be adapted for other facilities with captive songbirds.

Independent Generation of Research

IGoR facilitates scientific research by amateur scientists and science enthusiasts. Anyone (not just professional scientists) can propose their own research questions on the IGoR site. Then, other interested people can share ideas, skills, or time to address the question. In addition, a growing number of professional scientists have agreed to help answer users' questions about the users' research projects.

Some people may have science questions that they cannot answer on their own. Other people may have technical skills (e.g. electronics or microscopy, gardening or photography, and many others) that would be useful for addressing those questions. Still others may have the scientific training to design a sound study.

By working together and pooling skills and ideas, people of any experience level could carry out original, independent research. For example, do you want to decipher what scallops see with their bright-blue eyes? Do you wonder how mushrooms take shape? Or are you curious about how the plants in your garden behave? What do you want to discover?

Smithsonian Transcription Center

The Smithsonian Transcription Center engages the public in making our priceless collections more accessible. We work hand-in-hand with Digital Volunteers to transcribe historic documents and collection records to facilitate research and excite learning in audiences everywhere. Participants have the chance to transcribe a diverse array of collection materials drawn from Smithsonian holdings in science, history, art, and culture.

Indigo V Expeditions

Are you a sailor looking to do something good for the ocean? Consider becoming a citizen oceanographer! Participants collect and filter plankton from seawater, record pH, temperature and salinity of the water sample in question. The data is part of our large, robust ocean health monitoring program called The Indigo Project.

We are putting reliable and sustainable data collection into the hands of the blue water cruiser, transforming ordinary yachts into in situ ocean health monitoring platforms that will allow for the scientific preservation of our oceans and seas.

Wisconsin Bat Program

In general, bats are difficult to study because they are nocturnal, fast fliers, roost in inconspicuous places and can move great distances in short periods of time. As such, lack of information on basic biology and ecology is one of the greatest limitations to conservation of bat species.

There are three ways that you can participate in this project:

1) Report sick or dead bats. With the spread of White-Nose syndrome, which can be fatal for bats, it is important that we track bat mortality.

2) Monitor bat roosts during the summer. Bat roost monitoring is simple and can be an enjoyable experience. Monitors identify bat roosts and sit outside the roost entrance in the evening to count the bats as they emerge. Bats will start to exit the roost just after sunset, and will emerge one or two at a time making counting easy. The bats will continue to exit for about 40 minutes. How often a roost gets counted is up to the volunteer, however the program appreciates at least two counts- one in early June and one in late July.

3) Conduct acoustic bat surveys in Wisconsin. Volunteers are trained to use handheld ultrasonic detectors, or bat detectors as they are affectionately called. The system consists of a detector that records the ultrasound, a PDA that displays the bat calls on a graph of frequency over time, and a GPS unit that tracks the route taken and pinpoints each bat call. Data is saved onto the PDA and analyzed in the office. Just like birds, bat species have different calls from each other. By looking at the frequency, shape and other characteristics of calls, the WBP can identify the species of bat that was recorded.

Wisconsin Rare Plant Monitoring Program

The Wisconsin Rare Plant Monitoring Program gives plant enthusiasts an opportunity to conduct surveys for rare plants around the state. The information these volunteers collect is used to assess plant population trends during state and national conservation efforts.

Program participants are trained in surveying techniques, including how to accurately estimate large plant populations, assess habitat condition, and use GPS coordinates to locate and mark rare plant populations. Plant identification training will not be provided, so volunteers should be reasonably familiar with the plants in their monitoring area.

All volunteers are required to attend a 1-day orientation and training session in the spring or early summer. Following the training, volunteers will complete at least one rare plant monitoring survey annually.

Seabird Ecological Assessment Network

The Seabird Ecological Assessment Network (SEANET) is a citizen science program that brings together interdisciplinary researchers and members of the public in a long-term collaborative effort to identify and mitigate threats to marine birds. SEANET was initiated by the Tufts Center for Conservation Medicine, in collaboration with the Lloyd Center for Environmental Studies in Massachusetts, during Autumn 2002. Since this time, the project has expanded to beaches throughout New England, New York and New Jersey and more recently, to the southeastern US, with beaches in South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. SEANET volunteers conduct year-round beached bird surveys in order to identify and record information about bird mortality along the east coast of the United States. Data collected by hundreds of SEANET volunteers are used to examine the spatial pattern of bird carcass deposition and how it varies across time. These surveys provide baseline information about bird mortality and can help to detect mass mortality events due to oil spills, algal toxins, and disease outbreaks. Marine birds can serve as indicators of ecosystem and human health; monitoring the threats they face and their mortality patterns can teach us about the health of the marine environment.

ScienceCache: Geocaching for Goals

ScienceCache is a geocaching mobile app that connects the public to places where scientists have questions. Anyone can navigate to a site, take pictures and answer questions posed by scientists about plants, animals, water, or geology. The data is then uploaded to a project database where the scientist can access it. The pilot project on huckleberries and their pollinators will begin in Glacier National Park summer of 2016. One goal of this framework is to allow 'easy entry' for scientists into public data collection and outreach. Scientists use a website to set up routes, including 1 or more sites with the location coordinates, hints and photos to help people find the location, the questions to ask and descriptions of how to answer the questions. The initial version will work on iphones. Features of the app include the ability to work outside of cellular service. Funding and development of the app is a partnership between computer scientists at the Fort Collins Science Center, research ecologist, Dr. Tabitha Graves, and the Community for Data Integration.

2016 National Parks BioBlitz - St. Croix

The St. Croix BioBlitz will focus on identifying as many species as possible in all taxonomic groups. The St. Croix BioBlitz will span 24 hours and occur along the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway as it flows through Minnesota and Wisconsin Interstate State Parks.

2016 National Parks BioBlitz - Colonial Insect Blitz

This bioblitz will be a day long event looking at a specific species of pollinating insects. We plan on having an evening moth component as well. The park is recruiting county and urban school districts for middle school participation as part of the Director's Call to Action. This purpose is to observe and identify as many species as possible within one day. It is the intent that this begins an annual effort to inventory as many insects in the park to develop an inventory of insects in the park using citizen science.

Geothermal Case Studies and Exploration

Detailed exploration case studies, such as Beaumont and Foster (1990, 1991, 1992), which were completed for oil and gas plays, will give operators an accessible portal for gathering clean, unbiased information with which to explore for geothermal drilling prospects. Providing a database of these case studies with each case study broken down into queriable properties makes this information even more powerful in planning future exploration efforts in new areas.

The goal of this effort is to develop a template for geothermal case studies in a crowd-sourced platform to allow for contributions from the entire geothermal community. Information collected for the case studies includes historical information regarding exploration and development in an area and current information about reservoir characteristics and facility production. The initial focus is on populating case studies for developing and operational geothermal areas throughout the world that can then be used as a basis for discovering new areas, and guiding efficient exploration and development of those areas.

I See Change

iSeeChange is an unprecedented national climate reporting project that uniquely combines citizen science, using public media to reach people and cutting edge wx data collection methods. Built as a crowdsourced wx almanac for a national user base, iSeeChange also connects to radio audiences on climate related issues in their daily work and play through their stories.The project will build a citizen science corps by giving participants a chance to report from their own experences and opportunities to connect to experts. User generated reports include text, photos, and stories. NASA will be a key partner in the next phase by providing SIF and CO2 data for user generated observations of related phenomena on the ground.

Asteroid Mappers

Help NASA identify craters and other terrain on the asteroid Vesta

Mars Mappers

Help NASA identify craters and other terrain on Mars

Mercury Mappers

Help NASA identify craters on Mercury

Environmental Archaeology at Smithsonian Environmental Research Center

Work with scientists and students to excavate sites, preserve artifacts, and collect environmental data to understand the ways that people have changed the land over the past 200 years.

Classical Biological Control of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB)

The BMSB is an introduced insect that is indigenous throughout Eastern Asia, and it is a serious pest of fruits, vegetables, and legumes. Our Citizen Science activities include having individual citizens participate in the research by allowing traps to be set on their properties and collecting BMSB in their houses or businesses.

Wildlife Health Event Reporter

The Wildlife Health Event Reporter is a web-based application created to record wildlife observations by citizens concerned about dead or sick wildlife. Early detection of disease events that affect wildlife is often difficult to achieve. There must be observers in the area to take note of the event, and have knowledge of what to do with that information, as well as beat scavengers to the evidence. To help address this need, the Wildlife Data Integration Network (WDIN) developed WHER. After wildlife disease events are recorded in WHER, these observations are joined with other wildlife sightings
and are viewable in tabular reports or on a map, enabling people to see where similar events are happening.

Citizen Science Insect Monitoring

Insect emergence is a fundamental process in streams and rivers, because it represents a key life stage for aquatic insects and provides an important prey resource for terrestrial (e.g., birds, bats, and lizards) and aquatic consumers (e.g., fish). Studying insect emergence can lead to fundamental insights about the life history of insects, for example by identifying the specific times of year when emergence occurs. The number of insects emerging from a river is a function of larval population abundance in a river, so quantifying insect emergence might also be a useful proxy for standard benthic monitoring of insects; benthic monitoring in Grand Canyon is extremely challenging because of swift currents, deep water, and daily hydropeaking. In 2012 we started collaborating with commercial river guides (http://www.gcrg.org/) and Grand Canyon Youth (http://www.gcyouth.org/) to quantify insect emergence throughout the 240 mile long segment of the Colorado River in Marble and Grand Canyon. Each night in camp, guides put out a simple light trap to collect flying insects. After one hour, the light was turned off, the sample poured into a collection bottle, and some notes were recorded in a field book. After the conclusion of the river trip, guides dropped off samples and field notes at our office and we processed the samples in the laboratory.

Monitor Change

Monitor Change is a simple and elegant visual citizen science concept developed by USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center scientist, Sam Droege, to monitor environmental and social change using iPhones, photo-stitching, and time lapse. Droege's idea has lots of applications to the type of work that ecologists, foresters, land managers, and environmental citizen groups do and provides an easy (and actually information dense) way of tracking long-term changes using volunteers using the smart phone that many carry in their pocket. The concept is broad and is meant to be applicable to any location you would like to create uniform documentation of change over long or short periods of time without having to install a permanent camera.

Invasive Plant Atlas of the MidSouth

Invasive weedy plants are a widespread problem throughout the United States. Their growth is often widely dispersed, with little scientific ability to predict why they occur in a given location. In addition, historical human activities such as urbanization, agriculture, and forestry have a marked effect on the distribution and spread of invasives. This integrated project will quantify relationships of weed distribution and spread with land use, then use that information directly in educating agriculture stakeholders, natural resources managers, and other interested parties on potential human-induced opportunities for invasive species spread. The Invasive Plant Atlas of the MidSouth (IPAMS) will provide information on the biology, distribution, and best management practices for forty weedy plant species. Outreach and extension activities include developing training programs for volunteers to identify and report invasive species using IPAMS, developing an efficient Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) system for invasive plants, developing best management practices workshops, and developing an online mapping system. Research activities include conducting systematic regional vegetation surveys to assess the distribution of key invasive plants, developing models for predicting the occurrence of target species based on land use and cover, and evaluating the relative effectiveness of professional versus volunteer surveys.

Adopt a Pixel

Adopt a Pixel is a citizen science program that engages the public in collecting data, in this case landscape photographs, for scientific research. The science community has easy access to Landsat satellite data but has limited resources for acquiring ground reference photographs to verify land cover type. The goal of Adopt a Pixel is to acquire ground-based photographs to improve satellite data interpretation for operational and research science. Photographs from volunteers provide scientists with ground-based landscape data that would be too expensive or time consuming to acquire by other means. You can adopt a Landsat pixel by taking photographs of it that will help scientists interpret data from the new Landsat satellite. We want you to take a series of landscape photographs and make a few simple observations. Volunteers can share their land cover photographs and participate in the program by visiting the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center Adopt a Pixel interface (adoptapixel.cr.usgs.gov). Images show the terrain from a single point facing North, South, East, West, Up, and Down to give a clear view of landscape features in all directions. Field observations include land cover classification and any notable comments about conditions, patterns, or changes.


Quantifying coastal habitat utilization with smartphones! Understanding and managing dynamic coastal landscapes for beach-dependent species requires biological and geological data across the range of relevant environments and habitats. It is difficult to acquire such data; many data collections focus on either the biology or the geology, are collected by non-specialists, and lack observational uniformity. iPlover is an app that addresses these difficulties, and simplifies and facilitates consistent data collection, management, and enables direct data input into research models of habitat utilization. iPlover was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center and the USGS Center for Integrated Data Analytics. It is used by trained and vetted personnel to record information about habitats on coastal beaches and the environment surrounding them. iPlover uses the sensors on the smartphone to simplify and facilitate consistent data collection and data management. iPlover supports a long-established network of partners working to address ongoing impacts on plover populations, such as habitat gain or loss due to storms.

North American Baldcypress Swamp Network

Volunteers can help scientists understand the effects of climate change on baldcypress swamps. Rising levels of carbon dioxide have been linked to increases in temperatures in North America, and scientists need to understand better how well natural wetlands can pull gases from the atmosphere. You can help scientists at the USGS Wetland and Aquatic Research Center who are studying production levels in swamps to better understand if swamps can store the carbon that is present in the atmosphere.

Cyclone Center

The climatology of tropical cyclones is limited by uncertainties in the historical record. Patterns in storms imagery are best recognized by the human eye, so we need your help analyzing these storms.

American Woodcock Singing-ground Survey

The American Woodcock Singing-Ground Survey, conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, exploits the conspicuous courtship display of the male woodcock. The survey consists of numerous routes in the eastern half of the U.S. and Canada, which are surveyed in the spring. Counts of singing male woodcock along the routes provide an index to woodcock abundance, and are used to estimate woodcock population trends for states, provinces, management regions, and the continent. The survey is the major source of information considered in the annual setting of woodcock hunting seasons. The Singing-ground survey, in its present form, began in 1968 and has continued once a year to present day. There are approximately 1,500 Singing-ground Survey routes randomly placed throughout the heart of the woodcock breeding range in Canada and the United States. These routes were placed across the landscape, covering all habitat types. It is one of three surveys used to monitor woodcock population status in North America and it provides managers with an index to the relative woodcock population size. The survey takes advantage of the conspicuous breeding call of male American woodcock that can best be described as a “peent.”

pH Pro

Collect pH coastal data easily with a device that links to smart phone. pH photometer will deliver 0.01 pH accuracy, and it includes salinity and temperature probes all at a low cost to allow citizen scientists access. This device is being interfaced with a smart phone app and ultimately a website to allow transfer and visualization of data for scientists, students, and citizen scientists.

Tweet Earthquake Dispatch

Tweet Earthquake Dispatch uses social networks to support earthquake response and report information about related hazards. Through the TED system, the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Earthquake Information Center analyzes data from social networks to detect earthquakes within seconds of their occurrence. TED harvests real-time tweets through a continuous connection to Twitter. The system applies a query parameter to reduce the stream to tweets that contain the keyword earthquake in several languages. For each tweet filtered by keyword, TED archives the creation time and text, the Twitter user location, the Twitter tweet ID, and the time the tweet appeared in the TED database. Around the clock, TED also ingests seismically derived earthquake information from the USGS’s near-real-time internal global earthquake stream. TED archives the earthquake time, region, magnitude and hypocenter (latitude, longitude and depth). It also records the source of the scientifically derived earthquake information. TED detects two to three earthquakes a day, on average. Especially in regions with few seismometers, TED reports often come in before traditional seismic networks detect an earthquake, giving seismologists early warning. TED sometimes detects earthquakes entirely missed by USGS’s automatic processing system, thereby increasing the number of felt events known to the agency. In addition, the tweet text and attached images sometimes offer a rapid qualitative assessment of an earthquake’s impact.


MMOWGLI stands for Massive Multiplayer Online Wargame Leveraging the Internet. It is a message-based game to encourage innovative thinking by many people, connected via the Web. It has been used to study a number of topics, such as how the Navy can prepare for the future of energy......starting in 2021 and beyond.

The MMOWGLI project was originally sponsored by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) for the United States Navy. The goal of the project is to explore the potential of a Massively Multiplayer Online War Game Leveraging the Internet (MMOWGLI), with a variety of themes, to expand engagement in military and non-military strategy development for complex geopolitical problems. The platform is designed to support large numbers of distributed global players working together on idea generation and action planning, with an eye towards surfacing innovative outlier strategies. Several dozen games, workshops and courses have used the MMOWGLI platform.

Purple Loosestrife Volunteers

People living at many latitudes in North America, Eurasia, and Australia are volunteering to help assess purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) in their regions. The program is part of Dr. Beth Middleton's project to compare the role of purple loosestrife in its native and invasive habitats. Purple loosestrife is native to Eurasia but invaded northern North America after accidental introduction in the 1800s. This species may be reducing the value of infested wetlands for wildlife, although this claim is debated. The results of the study will help in efforts to control and predict the future spread of this species. Growing numbers of people are volunteering to help in Australia, Canada, Turkey, and the United States. The data measurements include documenting details about your site location, measuring the height and numbers of loosestrife, and making a few environmental observations.

2016 National Parks BioBlitz - Natchez Trace BioBlitz and Wildlife Weekend

This event is geared more towards public engagement and education regarding the biodiversity in the park. The BioBlitz is also coordinated with the Parkway's Wildlife Weekend where we will offer a wildlife education program and exhibits from partner groups for the public. Experts on taxa will lead walks with public visitors to collect as many species are available and document data in iNaturalist. The BioBlitz is a event that is conducted in partnership with Mississippi State University and the Geographic Alliance of Mississippi.


eMammal is a system for collecting, storing, and sharing camera trap data. The system is designed not only for scientists, but also for anyone who wants to join in the fun and discovery of camera trapping through citizen science. Professional and volunteer camera trappers use our software to look at pictures, identify animals, and upload them to the Smithsonian Data Repository for review and storage. These data are useful for addressing important scientific and conservation questions, and the pictures provide a unique view into the hidden world of wildlife.

Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) Program

The Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) Program provides a central repository for spatially referenced biogeographic accounts of nonindigenous aquatic species in the USA. It includes verified occurrences, distribution maps, and species profiles for freshwater nonindigenous aquatic animal and plant species. Citizens can report a nonnative species through an online reporting form.

U.S.-Mexico Border Early Warning Disease Surveillance for Dengue and Chikungunya

DGMQ, Skoll Global Threats Fund, and the University of Arizona are collaborating to develop a mobile app to allow community members to report symptoms of illness, and day-biting mosquitos, to monitor the potential emergence of zika, dengue, and and chikungunya in the U.S.-Mexico border region, and provide education to participants. Project planning began in February of 2015, and the app will be available to the public in the early summer of 2015.

Operation Dragon Fire

Operation Dragon Fire (ODF) bridges the gap between data overload and meaningful and actionable information. As a clearinghouse or data marketplace for disaster response, ODF will provide a means to identify, aggregate, validate, and analyze data from multiple sources, and access to applicable information via multiple channels. With ODF, participating entities, including government at all levels, non-profits, response organizations, first responders, private sector industry, corporations, technology platforms, and the public can make faster, smarter decisions, with information provided by a preferred and trusted source. ODF strives to create an environment where unified, timely, and reliable information is available before, during, and after emergencies ODF will serve as a data conduit, connecting the public and private sectors, to encourage information sharing, coordination, and collaboration across the response community. Project kickoff was in June 2014.


openFDA allows users to explore more of FDAs information assets for public consumption. It supports FDA's transparency goals by building cross-agency capabilities to manage data as an enterprise asset and subsequently provision those assets for public consumption.

FDA GenomeTrakr

The GenomeTrakr network is the first distributed network of laboratories to utilize whole genome sequencing for pathogen identification. It consists of public health and university laboratories that collect and share genomic and geographic data from foodborne pathogens. The data, which are housed in public databases at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), can be accessed by researchers and public health officials for real time comparison and analysis that promises to speed foodborne illness outbreak investigations and reduce foodborne illnesses and deaths. To date there are almost 50,000 pathogen genomes in the database.


As part of the White House’s Precision Medicine Initiative, the FDA took a new approach in advancing precision medicine by enabling a collaborative community and supporting informatics platform: precisionFDA. Through precisionFDA, FDA is intent on building a strong community contributing toward a standards-based approach for ensuring the accuracy of genetic tests incorporating NGS-based technologies.

DC/Baltimore Cricket Crawl

The annual Cricket Crawl is a call to citizen scientists, artists, naturalists and scientists for an evening sound census of the late summer crickets and katydids singing throughout local areas in Washington District of Columbia (DC), Arlington (VA) and Baltimore (MD). This is a citizen science pilot project in which participants listen for the calls of crickets and katydids and document their observations. Volunteers are asked to venture out between dusk and midnight to random locales throughout the city in order to make their observations. The data from observations is then aggregated and assessed in an annual report.

NYC Cricket Crawl

The annual Cricket Crawl is a call to citizen scientists, artists, naturalists and scientists for an evening sound census of the late summer crickets and katydids singing throughout local areas in New York City. This is a citizen science pilot project in which participants listen for the calls of crickets and katydids and document their observations. Volunteers are asked to venture out between dusk and midnight to random locales throughout the city in order to make their observations. The data from observations is then aggregated and assessed in an annual report.

Delaware Shorebird Project

The Delaware Shorebird Project involves a dedicated team of scientists, local volunteers, researchers and birders working to mitigate the threat to our shorebirds. Since 1997, they have researched the populations and health of migratory shorebirds. Their research is vital to an international network that supports and directs shorebird habitat protection and management plans. You can be a part of this important work, helping to preserve this awe-inspiring natural cycle. Volunteers assist researchers in gathering data during an intense 5 week field season in May-June of each year. Volunteers should plan to dedicate 3 or more days to the project during this period.

California Brown Pelican Citizen Science Survey

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is partnering with Audubon and Cornell Lab of Ornithology to launch the first ever citizen science survey for California brown pelicans across the Pacific coast! The survey will take place during a two hour window from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. May 7, 2016 across more than 100 sites in Washington, Oregon, and California, and will help conservation professionals collect important data on the distribution and abundance of California brown pelicans across the Pacific coast.

National Wildlife Refuge System eBird Tracker

In collaboration with Cornell Lab of Ornithology and National Audubon Society, many national wildlife refuges now have an eBird Trail Tracker kiosk where visitors can check which birds are currently being seen in the area, learn more about those birds and add their own sightings. You may also post observations on the national eBird website.

Quake Catcher Network

The QCN is a project that enables seismologic recordings by tapping into the vast network of computing of personal computers, laptops, and smart phones. Volunteers can connect small USB seismic sensors to their computers or use sensors internal to laptops or smart phones to record earthquakes. Data is then collected by a software application that sends seismograms back to a central server. The volunteers can then log in and see what earthquakes they have recorded through the project website.

2016 National Parks BioBlitz - Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt National Park will focus on finding and identifying as many small mammals and vegetation as possible in the Peaceful Valley Ranch over a 24 hour time frame.

Biodiversity of Alabama

This project serves to record observations of all organisms found in Alabama, one of the most biologically diverse states in the United States. This diversity is a product of Alabama's warm, moist climate, its great geologic diversity, and its rich evolutionary past. With more than 4,533 documented species, Alabama ranks fifth among states in terms of overall species diversity, and is first among states east of the Mississippi River. The large western states of California, Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico lead the nation, and fellow southeastern states Georgia (sixth) and Florida (seventh) trail Alabama. Alabama harbors 64 types of terrestrial ecosystems, including 25 forests and woodlands, 11 wetlands, and 7 glades and prairies. The state also supports 77,000 miles of rivers and streams and several dozen marine ecosystems.

Bleach Patrol

The world’s coral reefs are threatened by the increased frequency of wide-spread bleaching events. Corals that experience thermal stress sometimes “bleach,” turning white as they expel symbiotic algae living in their tissue. In order to better understand coral bleaching, scientists need to know when and where corals are bleached and where reefs appear stressed.

The “Bleach Patrol” are citizen scientists, surfers, divers, and general enthusiasts working together to map out the extent of global coral bleaching. Anyone with a smartphone or internet access and enthusiasm for being part of a global scientific campaign can help!

The project is a collaboration between the World Surf League, the social networking app goFlow, and scientists at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. Our goal is to compile a global, constantly updated data set of coral bleaching and reef health.

UC Santa Cruz Arboretum Phenology Walk

Be a part of a national effort to monitor the effects of climate change! Phenology is the timing of life cycle events, for example: when plants first bloom, birds migrate, and insects hatch--it's like nature's calendar. Changing phenology is a is a hot topic in climate change research because it's a key indicator of climate change.

The Arboretum Phenology Walk gathers data on seasonal changes in plants including when they leaf out, flower and form fruit. Help us monitor 18 permanently marked California native plants while touring the beautiful Native Plant Garden. Your data will be uploaded to the USA National Phenology Network’s database for use in research, policy and land management.

Virginia Working Landscapes

Virginia Working Landscapes is a program of the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute that promotes conservation of native biodiversity and sustainable use of working lands through research, education and community engagement. Each year we train citizen scientists to monitor wildlife (birds, plants, pollinators, salamanders, mammals) throughout 15 counties in Northern Virginia.

Plant Census at Smithsonian's Global Change Research Wetland

Scientists have been studying the marsh at the Global Change Research Wetlands for nearly 30 years to track the impacts of carbon dioxide and nutrients on plant growth. Citizen scientists work in the marsh to count and measure all of the plants in the experimental plots and work in the lab to analyze samples.

State of the San Lorenzo River Symposium: History and Ecology of

Come learn about the history of the San Lorenzo River Lagoon and the current science on how the lagoon works, water quality and quantity, and fish and wildlife. There will be presentations from local experts, information stations from local agencies and community groups, and an interactive tour of the lower San Lorenzo River.

Event Info:
Saturday, May 21st, 10:00am - 1:00pm (doors open at 9:30am), Optional Lagoon Tour 1:15-2:15pm
Louden Nelson Center Auditorium, 301 Center St, Santa Cruz, CA 95060
Free street parking is available

Is Ash Falling?

Is Ash Falling? project is a database module and web interface allowing the public and Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) staff to enter reports of ashfall in their local area in real time and retrospectively following an eruptive event. Users browsing the AVO website during eruptions will be directed towards a web form allowing them to fill in ashfall information and submit the information to AVO. The ashfall report database will help AVO track eruption clouds and associated fallout downwind. These reports from the public will also give scientists a more complete record of the amount and duration and other conditions of ash fall. First-hand accounts of ashfall will support ashfall model development and interpretation of satellite imagery and will improve ashfall warning messages. The online form will also free up resources during exceedingly busy times during an eruption, as most individuals currently phone AVO with their reports.

Coastal observation And Seabird Survey Team (COASST)

The Coastal observation And Seabird Survey Team (COASST) is a citizen-science program established to identify the carcasses of marine birds found on beaches along the coast of the Pacific Northwest. COASST is a project of the University of Washington in partnership with state, tribal and federal agencies, environmental organizations, and community groups along the coasts of Oregon, Washington and Alaska. COASST believes citizens of coastal communities are essential scientific partners in monitoring marine ecosystem health. By collaborating with citizens, natural resource management agencies and environmental organizations, COASST works to translate long-term monitoring into effective marine conservation solutions.

Specifically, trained COASST volunteers conduct surveys for beached birds on the same stretch of coastline each month. Each bird carcass is measured, identified, photographed, marked, and left in place for potential re-find on subsequent surveys. Beach morphology, visitors use and presence or absence oil is also recorded.

COASST data have created a baseline, or the 'normal' pattern, for beached bird mortality. Armed with this information, we can detect unusual events such as increased mortality due to low food availability, weather, harmful algal blooms, oil spills, or other factors.

Perhaps most importantly, COASST data can be used to identify long-term changes in the status of our resident marine bird populations.

First Flush

First Flush is a storm drain monitoring program where volunteers collect water samples from storm drains during the first major rainstorm of the winter season. Samples are collected from urban storm drains for analysis of bacteria, metals, nutrients, and suspended solids. Field measurements are also collected for conductivity, pH, temperature and water clarity. The goal of the program is to characterize the quality of water flowing into the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary during the first major rainstorm of the winter season.

Image Detective

Use your geography skills to geolocate Astronaut photography of Earth! If you have always wanted to associate those amazing photographs of our beautiful planet taken from space with their locations on the Earth, Image Detective is the perfect tool for you! By doing so, you will help to locate hundreds of thousands of images and also enhance your geography skills at the same time. You can gauge how high your skill level is by accumulating points as you submit each image, then checking out the "Who Has High Score?" icon on the front page.

Whale Alert West Coast

The West Coast collaboration was conceived by the five national marine sanctuaries of the West Coast, Conserve.IO, and Point Blue Conservation Science, in coordination with the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), to reduce the number of ship collisions with whales. West Coast national marine sanctuaries encompass 12,843 square miles of marine protected areas around the Channel Islands, Cordell Bank, Greater Farallones, Monterey Bay and Olympic Coast. Sanctuaries use a multi-pronged approach to reducing the risk of whale ship strikes and have committed to activities in research and monitoring, policy and management collaborations, and education and outreach. To learn about new and continuing initiatives led by West Coast sanctuaries and partners, visit the sanctuary website dedicated to reducing ship strike risk to whales. Sanctuaries are host to numerous threatened and endangered whale species such as blue, humpback, fin, sperm, and western North Pacific gray whales among others. These migratory whales rely on the highly productive waters located in the West Coast sanctuaries supplied by the California Current System.

Marine Debris Monitoring and Assessment Project (MDMAP)

Partner organizations and volunteers conduct shoreline monitoring according to the published NOAA Marine Debris Monitoring and Assessment Project survey techniques. Survey data that is uploaded to the MDMAP database contributes to our understanding of the distribution, types, and abundance of debris in the marine environment, in order to guide policy development, education and outreach, and research initiatives.

The GLOBE Program

GLOBE, the Global Learning and Observations to benefit the Environment Program, is a worldwide program that brings together students, teachers, scientists and citizens to promote science and learning about the environment. Through a hands-on approach to inquiry, participants are encouraged to engage in local investigations that cover five core fields: atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, soil (pedosphere), and Earth as a system. Observations made locally are submitted to the GLOBE data and information system, and can be accessed freely online. These measurements are combined with readings at automated stations to create a worldwide resource for conducting scientific inquiry; some measurements serve as ground truth for NASA satellite data products (e.g., clouds, soil moisture). The GLOBE data and information system contains over 130 million measurements from more than 10 million students in 113 countries around the world since its operation begun in 1995. Beginning in 2016, GLOBE has expanded its participation outside of the formal school setting to include individual citizens of all ages.

Did You See It? - Report a Landslide

Did You See It? (DYSI) - Report a Landslide is a website developed by the USGS Landslide Hazards Program that asks anyone who saw a landslide anywhere in the country to report their observations. These observations will build a much larger and more complete database that will help scientists gain a clearer picture of how landslides affect the entire United States. Every year, landslides cost the nation 1 to 2 billion dollars in damage. Falling rocks, mud, and debris flows are one of the most common and sometimes deadly hazards faced by all U.S. citizens, yet there is still a lot we do not know about how and why they happen. Now, scientists at the USGS are asking the public to help them track landslides to better understand how to protect lives and property.

System for Mapping and Predicting Species of Concern

The purpose of SMAP-SOC is to provide BLM natural resource managers with an application to model the current and future distributions of freshwater species of concern (SOC), across large management regions. These models will be based on occurrences from both crowdsourced data and detections using environmental DNA (e-DNA). These occurrences will then be related to Earth observations and other spatial data so distributions can be predicted across landscapes.

Florida Keys Water Watch

The University of Florida IFAS Monroe County Extension developed Florida Keys Water Watch, a community-based volunteer water quality monitoring program to promote awareness of the importance of water quality, reduce nonpoint source pollution, and involve students and citizens to monitor coastal habitats from man-made canals to bays to beaches. Florida Keys Water Watch teaches volunteers to test a site of their choice for dissolved oxygen, pH, salinity and temperature after attending a 4-hour workshop.

The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis Project (ARIA) Damage Validation Project

The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis Project at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the California Institute of Technology develops algorithms and a system to automatically respond to natural disaster events and rapidly produce decision support information, using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), Global Positioning System (GPS), and seismic data. The ARIA Damage Validation Project combines change detection maps derived from SAR data and optical data using human brains through a mobile-friendly web interface. The crowdsourcing produces improved version of damage detection maps decreasing the number of false positives.

The Delaware Bay Horseshoe Crab Survey

The Delaware Bay Horseshoe Crab Survey was founded in 1990, and received government support beginning in 1999. Volunteers collect data on Horseshoe crabs through beach surveys, providing critical information for scientists and policymakers about Horseshoe crab populations in the Delaware Bay. Data from the survey has helped the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) set protocols for commercial fishing. Limuli Labs, a company that relies on horseshoe crabs to support medical research and practice, provides funding for the project website.

Volunteer Cattail Monitoring Project

Cattail populations are changing due to hybridization of two or three species in the United States. This project provides volunteers the opportunity to document the kinds of cattails in any location based on the plant morphology.

Measuring Broadband America’s FCC Speed Test App for Android and iOS: Crowdsourcing Mobile Broadband Performance

The Federal Communication Commission’s Measuring Broadband America Program resulted from a recommendation in the National Broadband Plan to improve the availability of information for consumers about their broadband service. The FCC works with industry, academia, public interest organizations and others to develop open and transparent ways to measure broadband performance.  The FCC Speed Test App is a crowd-sourced smartphone app that measures mobile broadband performance throughout the United States. Volunteers share information about their handsets and operating systems, and the app measures the speed and performance of their broadband connection.

Shoreline Debris Monitoring

Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary (OCNMS), funded by a grant from NOAA’s Marine Debris Program, initiated shoreline debris monitoring in 2012 following NOAA’s Marine Debris Shoreline Survey Field Guide methods published in 2012. OCNMS volunteers originally initiated shoreline debris monitoring in 2001 using data categories standardized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Ocean Conservancy. Heightened interest in shoreline debris data associated with concerns about materials originating from the March 2011 Japan tsunami coincided with release of the new NOAA methods, which prompted significant modification of OCNMS’ shoreline debris monitoring program.

Shoreline debris data will be used to document temporal, spatial, and composition patterns in debris deposition on Washington’s coastline, and to the extent possible to identify changes in debris types and volumes associated with the March 2011 tsunami debris.

In 2012, new shoreline debris monitoring methods were initiated at 6 sites on the outer coast of Washington state. By 2014 there were nine coast sites and seven sites on the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The goal for FY 2015 is to continue this monitoring effort and expand the effort to teachers and their students within walking distance of coast sites.

Neighborhood Nestwatch

Neighborhood Nestwatch is a citizen science program that teaches citizens about the migratory birds in their backyards, while collecting hard-to-get data about urbanization impacts on wildlife. What makes Neighborhood Nestwatch so effective and scientifically robust is the face-to-face interaction between participants and Smithsonian scientists when we visit their backyards to band birds every spring. Neighborhood Nestwatch provides both a powerful educational experience and a unique platform for important scientific research.


OpenTreeMap is a collaborative platform for crowdsourced tree inventory, ecosystem services calculations, urban forestry analysis, and community engagement. Funded in part by grants through the USDA Small Business Innovation Research program, OpenTreeMap encourages community groups, non-profit organizations, governments, and local citizens to work together to map and explore the urban forest. Members of the public can search existing tree data by species and other search filters, add new trees, edit tree data, upload images, or leave comments. OpenTreeMap uses the i-Tree software developed by the US Forest Service to calculate and display the ecosystem benefits generated by urban trees. OpenTreeMap is available as open source software or a subscription service, and there are over thirty-five OpenTreeMap sites available worldwide.

Lunar and Planetary Mapping and Modeling Project

The web portals produced by the Lunar and Planetary Mapping and Modeling Project provide interactive online tools that allow anybody with an Internet connection to search, view, and analyze the immense database of images and digital records collected from a variety instruments aboard a number of spacecraft studying a growing number of worlds. The project, which is magaged through SSERVI at NASA Ames developed at JPL, provides a platform for anyone to conduct in-depth analyses. These insights are used to support mission planning and planetary science for upcoming exploration and science missions to planetary bodies. The Lunar Mapping and Modeling Project is funded through NASA Science Mission Directorate and Human Exploration Operations Mission Directorate. The project works with NASA Challenge programs in order to engage the global software development community through contests and hackathons to come up crowdsourced solutions to develop new tools and enhance existing tools for planetary data visualization and analysis. The project is also charged to provide the public with tools that will facilitate their better understanding of and participation in the process of selecting sites for future exploration.

Greater Atlanta Pollinator Partnership: A model for urban pollinator conservation

Global pollinator populations are in decline for a variety of reasons including habitat loss, pesticide use, and climate change. The Greater Atlanta Pollinator Partnership (GAPP) was initiated in 2011 because of the rapid loss of habitat and increase in pesticide use caused by the housing boom of the 1990s and early 2000s. Over this 20-year period, approximately 400,000 acres of green space were lost. Goals of the GAPP are to encourage restoration and development of pollinator habitat at a landscape scale that is ecologically significant; consequently, we designed our project to focus on an area within a 25 - mile radius around downtown Atlanta, Georgia. This comprises nearly 1.2 million acres of potential pollinator habitat and includes all major public lands in metropolitan Atlanta and thousands of individual residences. Within this area, efforts focus on restoring pollinator-friendly habitat and educating the public through formal and informal opportunities. Key components of the GAPP include using native species when available, rescuing native plants from construction sites, controlling invasive species, establishing community gardens, citizen science projects, conservation, education, research, and website development. The GAPP website (http://gapp.org/) is critical to our online garden registration and mapping so we can track garden establishment, assess habitat development trends including identifying where corridors are developing or where more effort is needed, provide online educational materials, and provide focus to the effort through a newsletter. Through the GAPP, Bombus pensylvanicus, a rare and declining species, has been documented in a community garden in downtown Atlanta. This indicates even rare species can be conserved in urban environments if the appropriate species are planted. Funding for the Greater Atlanta Pollinator Partnership is limited, so synergy through partnerships is the key to success.

iCoast- Did the Coast Change?

The iCoast - Did the Coast Change? web application asks volunteers to identify changes to the coast by comparing and tagging aerial photographs taken before and after storms. Your contributions help USGS scientists improve the accuracy of USGS coastal change prediction models and vulnerability assessments that support pre-storm planning and post-storm rescue, recovery, and mitigation efforts. It is also a great educational tool for teaching students and even coastal residents about coastal hazards.

Forecasting Harmful Algal Blooms in California

This project involves development of California HAB forecasting application to inform when and where toxic blooms of algae occur to better inform management decisions. The project generates nowcast and forecast products routinely and in a pre-transitional demonstration of operational predictions of toxigenic blooms and domoic acid toxins along the central California coast by merging: 1) ecological/statistical models to 2) existing hydrodynamic model simulations (ROMS), 3) enhanced satellite imagery (MODIS-Aqua with DINEOF), 4) and community (Cal-HABMAP)/crowdsourced (JellyWatch and Marine Mammal Center) observations. Highly reliable data on marine mammal strandings from domoic acid (DA) toxicosis are provided by the Marine Mammal Center (TMMC) and serve as an important source of matchups for broad geographic attribution of the DA events. These near real-time validation data are provided by our collaboration with the JellyWatch and TempBreak communities to populate crowdsourced observations with marine mammal stranding data that serve as a proxy for offshore DA events. A close partnership has been established with NOAA’s National Ocean Service (NOS) and the National Weather Service (NWS) to test the new data product in an environment suited towards serving as the operational center.

North American Breeding Bird Survey

North American Breeding Bird Survey

Florida Microplastic Awareness Project

Citizen scientists are collecting coastal water samples and filtering them to look for the presence of microplastics (using a microscope). They are also helping to educate stakeholders about the sources of and problems caused by microplastics in order to encourage people to read labels to avoid purchasing plastics when non-plastic alternatives are available, and to recycle/reuse as much as possible.

Georgia Adopt-a-Stream

Georgia's Environmental Protection Division has 4 programs engaging citizens in watershed work and education: Rivers Alive, Adopt-A-Stream, Project WET and River of Words. The Adopt-A-Stream program organizes and provides resources to trainers, volunteer citizen scientists and state organizations helping them perform water quality monitoring around the state.

Students' Cloud observations On-Line

The S'COOL Project involves people (ages 5-99) in real science, taking and reporting ground truth observations of clouds to assist in the validation of NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments. CERES is an important tool for scientists who study how atmospheric moisture affects our weather and climate. The observations made by S'COOL help to provide another piece of the puzzle. The project, which began in 1997, is coordinated with a trio of low Earth orbit satellites that carry CERES instruments. S'COOL was developed from the beginning in coordination with teachers who sought a safe, simple and cheap way to unite students with NASA. In 2008 technology advances enabled S'COOL to accept observations from citizen scientists anywhere in the world. Beginning in 2016, S'COOL is integrated with GLOBE cloud observations.

Autoimmune Citizen Science

Our goal is to bring the autoimmune community together in a scientific way, such that it will change the way that autoimmune disease is treated in healthcare today. The massive online community that has formed around chronic illness is ample evidence that something is wrong. Forums and Facebook groups provide immense value in that they connect people with autoimmune disease together and allow them to provide support and share information, but we want to go one step further and organize it all. Right now, everyone is on their own journey, communicating only bits and pieces of it in small posts here and there, which quickly disappear in the noise.

Data aggregation for autoimmune diseases has never been done at this scale and we’re excited to provide a resource to facilitate that. Users will record symptoms, treatments, and results using the Autoimmune Citizen Science mobile application. We plan to then aggregate that data and share it with our users so that they can see (anonymously) what is working for other people with similar symptoms.

Microbial Inheritance in Seeds

Plants are not just plants - rather, a plant is a host to thousands of species of symbiotic bacteria and fungi that reside on its surface and inside its roots, stems and leaves, greatly impacting its overall health and functioning. The plant microbiome plays a fundamental role in a plant's ability to acquire nutrients, resist diseases, and tolerate drought, herbivores and other environmental stresses. Plants are experts at regulating their microbiome, as part of its adaptive responses to environmental conditions. They can pick up new microbes from the environment or break ties with microbial symbionts to increase their chances of survival. For example, associating with a particular species of endophytic fungi can mean the difference between life and death during drought conditions.

Similarly, seeds are not simply packets of plant genes, but also propagules of the plant-symbiotic microorganisms, passing along diverse bacteria and fungi to their offspring. Seedborne "microbial inheritance" allows plant species to maintain beneficial relationships with microbes across plant generations, which is particularly important in agriculture, where the vast majority of our crops are annuals or biennials, dying back every year or so. We can consider the plant microbiome as a more fluid, adaptable form of plant inheritance than plant genetics. The acquired microbial associations that increase the fitness of the plant are the most likely to be passed along in seeds. Thus, seeds are a good place to look for beneficial plant microbes. To make things more complicated, pathogens can 'hitch-hike' across plant generations via the seed. Seed companies often treat their seeds against pathogens as a precaution of spreading disease. But at what cost? What benficial microbes are are we losing by disinfecting seeds against pathogens?

This research project seeks to uncover the hidden world of seedborne microbial inheritance, focusing on open-pollinated corn. How efficient is this form of transmission? How are we affecting microbial inheritance through our farming practices? Can we link desired plant traits (e.g. drought tolerance or disease resistance) to the presence of particular seedborne microbes?

How to participate

The simplest way to participate in this project is to grow and send in open-pollinated corn seeds! We are building a database of seedborne microbes from a growing diversity of corn seed samples - dent, flour, flint, sweet, and popcorn (over 80 samples so far!). We are using cutting-edge DNA sequencing technology to identify the entire population of seedborne bacteria and fungi in each sample. The goal is to look for overall trends between seedborne microbes and corn variety type, traits, and growing practices. If you are looking for a source of seeds, I would recommend growing the Cascade Ruby-Gold flint corn variety from Carol Deppe's Fertile Valley Seeds - Carol is the original breeder. You can also order it from Adaptive Seeds, who is also participating in the project. This particular variety has been most characterized in the project so far, so it will be informative to see how it grows in more locations and farming systems. If you have your own variety that you have been stewarding, that's great too!

Another way to participate is to conduct your own experiments, and send in seed samples from different treatments or selections. For example, perhaps you have been saving seeds of a particular corn variety from plants that do well in low irrigation conditions. You can send in seeds from the better-performing plants, and also seeds from the worse-performing plants, and see how their seedborne microbes are different, to identify candidate beneficial microbes. Another example might be a controlled field experiment where you use a special amendment (say, a microbial inoculant) and are testing how well it performs against a control treatment. You can send in seeds from the control and the treatment, and see how that affected the seedborne microbes. If you decide to go this route, please contact me (seedmicrobes@gmail.com) to plan out experiment details.

Sending in your seed samples

A seed sample should represent a particular harvest or selection of seeds from a corn variety that you grew in a single season. Because we are interested in how we affect microbial inheritance through time, we encourage you to also send in samples from any previous years you grew them, and also samples from original seed sources - unless you sourced seeds directly from me or participating seed companies Adaptive Seeds (adaptiveseeds.com) or Carol Deppe’s Fertile Valley Seeds (http://www.caroldeppe.com/Seed%20List%202015.html) because we already have seed microbial data from those sources. Each sample should contain a representative 20-50 seeds. Visit the website for more details (www.microbialinheritance.org/network/seedsample). To receive microbial community data from your seed samples, please fill out the online Seed Sample Submission Form for each seed sample. After filling out the each form, you will receive an email with ID number to include along with your seed sample, in addition to the mailing address where to send the sample.

The covering sense of OVER

The preposition 'over' has long been studied by linguists since it has some semantic features which pose lots of problems for contemporary theories of polysemy and solving those problems might help realize how semantic networks are organized in the mind of a language speaker.

Having studied most influential studies on the subject matter, we came up with our own experiment design. We found one specific sense of 'over', namely its covering sense, of a particular interest as in most studies it hasn't yet deserved much attention and its semantic peculiarities have not been properly explained. We designed a survey which aims to specify those peculiarities and now we need to find some English speakers who, by taking part in the survey, could help us collect the necessary data for further analysis.

Roadkill Survey for Road Bikers

Roadkill Survey for Road Bikers is a project that attempts to find out where wildlife live and how they move in relation to roads.

Wildlife is often lost due to accidents with cars and trucks. Identifying the types of wildlife that are often killed will give clues to wildlife distributions, activity, and responses to climate change.

The Biodiversity Group

We are currently seeking research assistants to join our field team in Ecuador studying the conservation ecology of reptiles and amphibians.

While Ecuador is a relatively small country—it’s roughly the size of Arizona—it stands as the third most diverse country in the world for amphibians (510 species) and is seventh for reptiles (430 species), making it a herpetologically mega-diverse region. Due to the severe deforestation taking place in addition to many other pressures on Ecuador’s fauna, TBG research program aims to study, document, and preserve these rich and unique communities of reptiles and amphibians found within the country’s diverse array of ecosystems.

As we are now in our 8th year working in Ecuador, we have study sites encompassing both the coastal forests in western Ecuador and the Amazon rainforest on the eastern side of the Andes Mountains. The work that research participants will be involved with will primarily consist of conducting night surveys for reptiles and amphibians (however other taxa such as invertebrates are also of interest), animal data collection, and lab work. Lab work consists of more detailed information such as scale counts (for reptiles) and other morphological information, animal measurements, screening for chytrid disease (amphibians), preservation (only when necessary), and acquisition of DNA samples. Diagnostic photographs of all animals will be taken. Other tasks include animal handling and general note taking and data organization

Volunteer participants will gain valuable research experience, contribute towards our mission in conservation ecology, and will have an unforgettable experience that provides the opportunity to study the most biologically diverse region of reptiles and amphibians in the world. For 2013 we now have expeditions scheduled in Western Ecuador for February 2-13 and FeBruary 16-27 and in Amazonian Ecuador for June 2-13.


Nonmarine ostracods, tiny crustaceans with an excellent fossil record, are common in aquatic ecosystems. The Ostracod Metadatabase of Environmental and Geographical Attributes (OMEGA) facilitates access to global geographical and environmental distributional data for nonmarine ostracods, supporting applications in biodiversity auditing, biogeography and the calibration of species as fossil proxies for past environmental and climatic change. Citizen Scientists can help improve accuracy and coverage of datasets by adding, correcting and validating the geographical coordinates of localities.

Citizen Science

Citizen Science is an online flash-based computer adventure game in which the player is a young adult who becomes concerned about the health of a local lake threatend by eutrophication. Based at Lake Mendota in Madison, WI, the player's goal is to restore the lake. By focusing on the ecological needs of Lake Mendota as well as the surounding community, the game is able to bring together real-world issues and scientific practices.

Citizen Science encourages students to connect ecology content to civic action. It is designed to introduce questions like, "What can I do to change things?" The purpose of Citizen Science is to help players develop a conceptual understanding of lake ecology while giving them experiences of confronting pressing ecological issues, conducting scientific inquiry to address these issues, and taking action in the (virtual) world to affect change.

Citizen Science was developed for upper-elementary school and early middle school students. It is intended to be implemented as part of a class curriculum.

Spot A Ladybug

Did you ever wonder how ladybugs got their spots?

I am working with a extremely interesting type of ladybug called the Harlequin ladybug, or Harmonia axyridis. This ladybug can vary in the way they look with respect to both color (they can be red, orange, yellow, and black) and spot number (they can have anywhere from zero spots to twenty-two spots).

This projects uses citizens to understand what these ladybugs look like across continents! Knowing how the Harlequin ladybug's look varies will help determine, genetically, how so much variation exists.

Where is the Elaphrus Beetle?

Dan Duran, assistant professor in Drexel University’s Department of Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science, has just embarked on a search for the marsh ground beetle, which also goes by the Latin name for its genus, Elaphrus.

It is found along muddy stream banks in temperate regions like ours. It's an effective "indicator species" because it's adversely affected by run-off, like road salts and agricultural chemicals--that make it into a stream without being visible.


nQuire-it is a platform to join, create, and share citizen science missions with people around the world. There are three kinds of missions: Spot-it allows people to spot and share things around us; Sense-it links to the Android Sense-it app (available on Google Play) to capture data from any mobile device sensor; Win-it missions set science challenges.

Global Whale Tracking with Happywhale

With your help, Happywhale tracks individual whales throughout our world's oceans. We believe that whale watching guides, naturalists and passengers are vital to our understanding of whales. Scientists can only be in one place at one time; by harnessing the power of millions of whale watching enthusiasts, we can expand our scientific knowledge exponentially.

Our platform empowers whale watchers to photograph whales and tell their stories.

First, review our instructions on how to take whale ID photos. Next, get out there and photograph whales. Last, submit your whale photos at happywhale.com. We'll run your images through our ID system built in collaboration with scientists at Cascadia Research Collective and Allied Whale. If we find a match, we'll tell you what we know about your whale. If you are the first Happywhale contributor to see a whale, congratulations! We'll let you know that too.

We welcome you to submit images from past whale sightings. Submitting older photos is a great way to start building your account and will give us valuable historical data on whales.

As each of your whales is spotted around the world, we'll send you updates. You can track your whales on your personal Happywhale page. As our site and functionality grows, you'll be able to stay in touch with team members around the globe. You'll also discover how your data is being used by scientists.

What stories will your photos tell?


PANOPTES (Panoptic Astronomical Networked Observatories for a Public Transiting Exoplanets Survey) is a citizen science project which aims to build low cost, robotic telescopes which can be used to detect transiting exoplanets.

Due to the simplicity and low cost (an individual PANOPTES unit is targeted to cost about $5000 USD), a PANOPTES "unit" can be reproduced quickly and easily by students or amateur scientists. In this way, many units can be deployed at many different sites to provide continuous and redundant sky coverage. PANOPTES is designed from the ground up to be a citizen science project which will involve the public in all aspects of the science, from data acquisition to data reduction.

The philosophy behind the PANOPTES hardware and software design is to use as many commercial off the shelf (COTS) parts as possible as these are generally inexpensive and easily acquired. In addition, the PANOPTES design is kept as simple as possible as this makes the build process easier and means that the final product is more reliable.

With PANOPTES, you too can help discover exoplanets! Join us!

International Quake Catcher Network (QCN)

In this Citizen Seismology project named Quake Catcher Network (QCN), everyone can become a citizen seismologist and share data with the community in order to better understand the earthquakes and their effects.

Participants will improve their earthquake preparedness, increase the number of seismic sensors especially in urban areas, where risk is high and spatially heterogeneous.

Volunteers will not only contribute data, but will help to better understand the earthquake phenomenon.


**NEWS- We have android and iOS app for "CyanoTracker". Please install it for easy posting the reports".
We are looking for citizen scientists to report Algal Blooms in their neighborhood pond/lake.
CyanoTRACKER will address a significant environmental issue important to inland waters, namely, Harmful Algal Blooms or popularly referred by other names "Toxic Algae", "Algal Bloom ", "Red Tide", "Cyanobacteria" and "Blue Green Algae".
Studies have shown that the cyanobacteria produce neurotoxins which has resulted in large amount of fish kills, pets and cattle death and gastro-intenstinal problems in human beings. Further studies are linking the cyanotoxins to dementia, alzheimer's and ALS.
These cyanobacteria look like green scum and can form on any open water which are rich in nitrogen, phosphorus via pollution with appropriate warm temperature.

Follow us on Twitter - https://twitter.com/CyanoTracker or Facebook - http://on.fb.me/2508NDJ or
visit http://cyanotracker.uga.edu/services.htm for more details.

Trees Please

Trees Please is a project designed to engage Hamilton’s lower city neighbourhoods in air monitoring and urban tree health assessment. Starting in two neighbourhoods, Beasley and Beach Strip citizen scientists will do an inventory of the urban forest, building an interactive database for community members to access and contribute to through the word wide web.

We will provide workshops and expertise in urban forestry data collection, stewardship, and tree care.

We aim to promote tree plantings with local neighbourhood organizations, the City of Hamilton and provide guidance for tree selection and success!

The inventory data collected will be analyzed and compared with air quality data collected through Environment Hamilton’s INHALE and BAM air monitoring programs. With these data sets we will identify the areas in most need of trees to reduce air particulate and improve the health and livability of our city!

White-throat Song

We’ve been studying changes in the song structure of white-throated sparrows since 2002 and have found several interesting patterns. Now, we’re trying to measure how these patterns change over time and space.

Here's where you come in! Recording sparrows over a broad geographical area is extremely time consuming and expensive. We’re hoping to recruit participants to help us collect recordings of male white-throated sparrows.

Volunteers can be from anywhere within the range of the species, but we are especially interested in recordings from Eastern Ontario eastward to the Atlantic provinces, and across the northern tier of states in the US from Wisconsin to Maine.

We're happy to get recordings from all regions at all times of year (pre-migration, migration, and breeding are all fine).

For more information about our project or how to get involved, please see our website.

AirVisual: The Air Pollution Monitoring Project

Unhealthy, polluted air is a ubiquitous, invisible threat that is responsible for 200,000 premature deaths every year in America alone. The NRDC estimates that about 81 million Americans live in areas that fail to meet national air quality standards for particulate pollution (PM2.5).

Particulate matter, abbreviated as PM2.5, is a term used for particles found in the air; including dust, soot, dirt, smoke and liquid droplets that are 2.5 micrometers in size, or less. These particles are so small that they can be absorbed into the bloodstream upon inhalation and cause a variety of adverse health effects.

We tend to assume the air we breathe indoors is safe, yet indoor air quality is frequently worse than outdoors due to high confinement and a variety of indoor sources.

We are calling on interested participants to help determine sources of air pollution both indoors and out. Use the AirVisual Node to discover factors that influence air quality and then download the data from the device to validate your conclusions.

Scientific findings will be posted on our website, airvisual.com, (with credit to you) in order to grow awareness of air pollution sources in the home, office and classroom.

You can also make your air quality monitor a public outdoor station, connected to our monitoring platform (airvisual.com) and crowd-sourced air pollution map (airvisual.com/world) to fill in gaps in government air quality data.

Have an interesting idea for using the device that would contribute to our understanding of air pollution? We want to hear from you!


When a vessel accidentally discharges cargo at sea, or when oil spills occur, or when plastics or any floating marine debris is cast adrift on the ocean, it will eventually arrive on shore. In most cases affected landowners, neighborhoods, small communities, or municipalities will be the first to notice the accumulation of flotsam and jetsam on local beaches. We have developed a mobile phone application to simplify the recording, mapping, and networking of observations. The app works anywhere but is tailored for wildlife and objects found on shore or near the coast. The main objectives of the project are to:
1) Promote citizen science,
2) Develop baseline data,
3) Analyze change over time,
by facilitating the recording, sharing, and networking of credible shoreline observations including wildlife, beach cast animals, and marine debris with geo-tagged observations and photos. The browser based app is available at www.beachobserver.com and is also available for download from iTunes.

Citizen CATE Experiment

The Citizen CATE Experiment will use a fleet of telescopes to observe the total solar eclipse of 21 Aug 2017. As the shadow of the moon travels across the continental USA, citizen astronomers from more than 60 sites will take images of the brightness of the inner solar corona. While the totality phase of the eclipse will last only 2 minutes at each site, the combined Citizen CATE Experiment data set will reveal for the first time how this part of the solar atmosphere changes during 90 minutes. New scientific results about the dynamics of the magnetic fields and plasmas in this part of the solar corona will be derived from the data, and the image sequence will provide a beautiful perspective of the solar eclipse as never seen before.

School of Ants

School of Ants Australia aims to document the diversity, distribution and diet preferences of Australia?s dominant ground foraging ants; those ubiquitous little black ants that infiltrate homes, backyards, parks and schools.

Uncover a world of ants at your own feet, in your backyard, school or park. By becoming a citizen scientist you can help us locate damaging invasive species, compare and contrast species of common little black ants across the country, and add important records to our understanding of ant biodiversity. Records like this are crucial in our understanding of how the ranges of organisms change with our changing climate and landscapes.

Ants are ubiquitous in Australia. They occupy every habitat and landscape across all States and Territories (excluding Antarctica). Their sensitivity to disturbances of many sorts means they can be used as bioindicators of landscape health, reforestation and mine site recovery. They are important predators, pest controllers and soil engineers, but can also become pests themselves.

Ants also move around with humans all the time, so finding out what ants are where can help us pinpoint problem ants before they cause problems for humans, our environment or agriculture in Australia. The Red Imported Fire Ant, the Yellow Crazy Ant, Electric Ant and the Argentine Ant are examples of introduced ants that have become problematic.


WildPaths is a volunteer citizen science project to monitor road crossings in their neighborhood, through tracks, roadkill and live sightings. The goal of the project is to use the data to better direct our local efforts with future development so that we can maintain crucial connections between core wildlife habitats.

Cosumnes River Water Quality Monitoring

El Dorado Trout Unlimited (EDTU) is continuing its State Water Resources approved monitoring program for the Cosumnes River in 2016. The Surface Water Ambient Monitoring Program has used volunteer citizen scientists to gather high quality data since 2000. The program is successful because it adheres to strict quality control/quality assurance procedures, provides training, and has guidance from a Technical Advisory Committee. The data gathered is stored in the Water Resources Database CEDEN, accessible on line.

In 2016 we will continue to monitor key parameters of the river and take structured observations of habitat and species present. Information gathered is part of a watershed assessment, in preparation for restoration work. Trout Unlimited is known for collaborating with partners to create innovative, win/win solutions that support communities and river health.

Participants do river monitoring, photography, data analysis/management, outreach and program materials development. You may see our volunteers working near the river once a month; they're the ones with the Trout Unlimited T-shirts and clipboards!

Thirsty for Birds? Thursdays-in-May Bird Event

It’s Spring and time for songbird migration! Join Seth Benz, Bird Ecology Program Director, as he offers tips on birding by sight and sound.
This birding event will meet at Frazer Point, Acadia National Park at 7:15 AM and conclude at 10 AM.
Due to limited space, registration is required. First come, first served. Registration fee: $20 per trip. Register for all 4 = $65 (a $15 saving).


How do babies learn language? In order to answer that question, we need to know more about babies' environments. What do they see? What do they hear?

We have a large corpus of videos of babies and toddlers going about their days. Need your help to analyze these videos. This project does not require any special expertise, just an interest in how babies learn and develop.

Spring Nature Fest

A part of Citizen Science Day, which happens every spring, the Spring Nature Fest features various activity stations set up with citizen science projects for attendees to learn about and try out to see if it is something they want to commit to.
Enjoy a morning of Nature fun with games, activities and citizen science challenges. Free fun for the whole family!

NYU Baby Sleep Study

This study is looking at sleeping and digestion in babies to characterize normal development, so that parents have better (scientifically-informed) advice about how to manage their baby’s sleep and eating. We also hope to discover early signs of developmental disorders that could help other babies in the future. So far, there are over 850 babies enrolled with 1.2 million sleep events, 2.1 million feedings, and 1.3 million diaper changes logged.

Parents, after signing up and consenting to the study on the project website, record their baby's sleeping and eating activity plus other observations through the phone app, Baby Connect. Parents can contribute their baby's data for any length of time, although more data are better; several weeks or two years, it's helpful either way.

The goal is to create an extensive data base to learn about sleep and neurological development. When data come from a very large number of participants, in some cases, scientists can find patterns that would otherwise be undetectable. Every parent's data contribution will be valuable, when combined.

Queen Quest

Queen Quest is a bumble bee queen phenology project. It is a joint effort between UNL’s Bumble Boosters team, University of Minnesota’s Bee Squad, and citizen scientists to track first instances of bumble bee queen sightings in the spring. Little is known about the long-term and cyclical effects of climate on bumble bee populations. A key project objective is to determine the relationship and long-term impacts of climate on bumble bees.

The scientific objectives of the Queen Quest program are to:
1) Determine the phenology of spring bumble bee queen emergence.
2) Determine which flowers bumble bee queens visit in the early spring.
3) Determine long-term climate impacts on bumble bee populations and distribution in North America.

Share a flood observation

If you've seen a flood, no matter how big or small, old or recent, share it at floodcrowd.co.uk!
We've had observations of large floods from Kendal...
...and small pools in Watford
All these observations are important as they can help researchers understand the environment better. The records are forming an online database which will be available to all researchers and stakeholders.

Butterflies of Kyrgyzstan

Kyrgyzstan’s Butterflies at Your Fingertips!

Central Asia is internationally known as a biodiversity hotspot, and perhaps no other country here symbolises that more than Kyrgyzstan. This application has been designed to introduce you to the world of butterflies while encouraging you to submit new information through citizen science. Every identification you make gives local scientists in Kyrgyzstan more data that helps them make informed decisions about conservation measures.


▪ Photographs of more than 60 species of butterflies. This number continues to climb as users submit new information!

▪ A section on the natural history of each species will give you information on when and where you might find them, as well as a better understanding of their life cycle.

▪ The “My Collections” feature allows you to build a virtual collection of the butterflies you have seen.

▪ The “Citizen Science” feature lets you help scientists determine if identifications by other users are accurate.

▪ An included map gives accurate location data for each species and is searchable by species and date.

▪ Frequent app updates add user submitted content like new images, map locations, and new species.

100 For Parkinsons

Can a smartphone unlock new discoveries in Parkinson’s?

You can join a global movement to learn more about your health, support people living with Parkinson’s and help change healthcare.

You’re invited to become a citizen scientist, tracking ten aspects of your health that are important to you for 100 days using the uMotif platform on your smartphone or tablet. Everyone will track their sleep quality, mood, exercise, diet and stress levels. Then it’s up to you to choose another 5 aspects of your health that are most important to you.

In return, you can share your experiences and see how everyone else taking part in the study is benefitting on the 100 For Parkinson’s website. The data you’re donating will contribute to academic research approved by a committee led by the Cure Parkinson’s Trust, helping to unlock new discoveries in Parkinson’s.

This is a world-first people-centred project of this size and scale in healthcare and open to everyone, whether you have Parkinson’s or not.

You can be a part of it!
Simply visit www.100forparkinsons.com, download the uMotif app from the Apple App Store or Google Play, choose “I would like to register” and enter code 100FP.

OK Amphibian Disease Testing

The Herpetology Department of the Sam Noble Museum seeks Oklahoma K-12 teachers and students (or homeschoolers) to participate in a new initiative to sample for the amphibian infectious disease, chytrid, in Oklahoma. The word chytrid is short for chytridiomycosis, a fungal disease that infects the keratinized structures on amphibians, such as skin and tadpole mouthparts (keratin is also present in your hair, skin, and nails). There are two forms of virulent chytrid: Batrachochytrium dendrobatis (Bd) infects frogs and salamanders and Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bs or Bsal) infects only salamanders. This study will focus on frogs, because Bs has not yet been found in the US. Bd however, is found in every state in the US, but very little is known about how common the disease is among frogs in Oklahoma. This is where you all come in! Request a FREE kit today and receive the necessary field supplies, plus a teacher packet containing worksheets, lesson plans, and background information.

ELMO | South African Elasmobranch Monitoring

The Southern African coastline is known for its outstanding diversity in marine wildlife. 204 out of 1188 known Chondrichthyans (sharks, rays, skates & chimaera) occur in Southern Africa, making it the 4th most diverse hotspot for these species.

Although the conservation of Elasmobranchs is gaining rising public concern, smaller sharks and rays are often in the shadow of widely 'adulated' charismatic sharks. Several species of catsharks, rays and skates - many of which are endemic to Southern Africa - make up a large portion of the bycatch in South African commercial fisheries. Many Elasmobranchs are also targeted directly for products like shark cartilage, liver oil, leather, teeth, jaws as well as ray wings and shark fins.

Monitoring Elasmobranch populations can be difficult and costly. There are however, a number of people, who encounter sharks, skates and rays on a regular basis: Anglers, divers, snorkellers, skippers, the occasional beach visitor and basically anyone, who reads the news or surfs the internet. And they can deliver two different types of data:


Some sharks and all skates lay leathery eggcases either directly into the sand or they attach them to tough underwater surfaces such as rocks, corals or kelp. Storms, currents or predators can loosen these eggcases and wash them ashore. These mermaids' purses have characteristic shapes that differ in each species and their abundance and distributions can be used for long-term monitorings.


People who spend time in or close to the water regularly encounter sharks, skates or rays. These direct observations can help with the identification of species-distributions and important habitats. Sightings do not always have to be recorded first-hand, but can be extracted from photographs or news articles. Historic photographs are of specifically high value as they can be an indication of changes in size and abundance of species.

ELMO serves as an interactive database that can be accessed and utilized by everyone. All data is illustrated in an interactive map that can be used to explore our Elasmobranch populations. Furthermore we administer the original information in datasheets, which can be obtained directly from us for projects that promote Elasmobranch conservation and awareness campaigns. We are working closely together with other citizen science projects and data bases to make sure your contributions reach out as far as possible.

We also provide a number of resources, which can be used privately or for educational purposes. Please feel free to download our Eggcase ID guide or visit our Resources page to access more information material on South African Elasmobranchs.


A series of games and puzzles, allowing players to take learn about and take part in quantum error correction research.

Users are given puzzles to solve. They need to come up with a method that gets high scores as much as possible. This can then be used to protect real-life quantum computers against noise.


NatureWatch is a community that engages all Canadians in collecting scientific information on nature to understand our changing environment.

NatureWatch hosts the following nature monitoring programs in Canada, with more to come in the future:

FrogWatch: Learn about Canada’s favourite amphibians while helping researchers and zoos monitor the health of frogs population and frog habitat.

Ice Watch: Do you live near a pond, lake, or river that freezes over each winter? The dates when ice appears and disappears provide important information about patterns in Canada’s climate. Join our network of citizen scientists who have been tracking changes in winter ice conditions over many years.

PlantWatch: The blooming times of Canada’s most easily-recognized plant species help scientists to track changing climate trends and their impacts. If you love to garden or have an eye for flowers, please help PlantWatch and its network of volunteer provincial coordinators monitor Canada’s changing natural environment.

WormWatch: Worms might gross some people out, but at
WormWatch, we think worms provide an exciting way to teach kids about the importance of soil and the organisms that live in it. And the kids agree with us. If you’re a teacher, guide or scout leader, or someone with a bunch of kids to amuse on a sunny afternoon, get out your shovel and your smartphone and give WormWatch a try.

Mark My Bird

Our team of researchers, based at the University of Sheffield, are taking 3D scans of the bills of all of the world’s bird species from museum collections. The 3D scans are incredibly detailed but before we can use them they require a process called landmarking. Landmarking involves placing points on features of the bill that are common to all specimens. We can use the landmarks to mathematically describe the shape of bills so that we can compare and test how they differ among species. By landmarking our 3D images you can contribute to real science. The digitised data will help us to understand how and why the 10,000 species of birds diversified.

Hoyt Arboretum Terrestrial Orchids

Volunteers can help:

-Prevent local extirpation (removal) of historic population of uncommon orchids (Orchidacea Spiranthes).

-Research best restoration treatments for Spiranthes in Tualatin Mountains and create management protocol for the Hoyt Arboretum.

-Improve natural habitat for Spiranthes in Hoyt Arboretum population and increase population count of Spiranthes (total number of plants).

-Increase native prairie species and specific Spiranthes cohorts for ecosystem health.

-Decrease invasive species.


Life has evolved over millions of years. Yet evolution can produce dramatic change quickly! The coat color of gray squirrels, which occur over much of eastern North America and are introduced around the globe, is a good example. Today most are indeed gray but two centuries ago most were apparently black. How could evolution change this species so profoundly and so quickly?

Help us explore this question at SquirrelMapper where you can: contribute observations of squirrels from your own neighborhood, test hypotheses about why squirrel color varies geographically, directly measure natural selection on squirrel coloration by participating in our "squirrel hunt" exercise, view the geographical pattern of morphs across the gray squirrel's range. Together we can crack this nut!


Snails and slugs Living in Metropolitan Environments (SLIME) is a citizen science project that aims to catalogue the biodiversity of terrestrial gastropods (land snails and slugs) in Los Angeles County and throughout Southern California.

The Natural History Museum’s collection of land snails includes thousands of specimens from locations throughout the Los Angeles basin and spans the last 100 years. However, not much is known about this mollusk biodiversity today, especially within the cities of Southern California. That’s where citizen scientists come in!

We’d like you to help us complete the first citizen science snail survey focusing on urban Southern California by finding snails and slugs and, either
1) collecting them and bringing them to the Museum or,
2) taking photos and emailing them to us or uploading them to the SLIME iNaturalist page.

With this information we hope to identify the species that call the urban areas of Southern California home, those that are new to the area, and those that haven’t been able to survive the changes that urbanization has made to their homeland.

Southern California Squirrel Survey

The Southern California Squirrel Survey is a citizen-science based research program to catalog the occurrence of squirrels in the greater southern California region.

Although squirrels are well-known to people, they are often overlooked. Not many people realize that eastern fox squirrels are not native to California. Similarly, the decline of the native western gray squirrel has gone unnoticed.

The aim of the Southern California Squirrel Survey is to learn more about the distribution and behavior of these species, as well as the many other understudied species in our regions, such as the northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus), eastern gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis), lodgepole chipmunk (Tamias speciosus), and Merriam’s chipmunk (Tamias merriami).


Most Early Childhood Development (ECD) assessment tools start by filling a questionnaire designed by ECD experts. Call this the "external expert driven" approach: an external expert --- the questionnaire designer --- is assumed to know best what and how to measure ECD.

Baby CROINC (CROwd INteractive Clustering) takes a different, citizen science oriented, approach which is based on these assumptions:

1) Each parent is an expert on the ECD of her/his child(ren)

2) ECD is too complex to be captured by any single questionnaire

3) Algorithms can help parent explain and understand ECD differently

Biological Records Centre

The BRC helps the recording community to publish atlases, data and other online resources to provide essential information which informs research, policy and the conservation of our heritage of wildlife.

National Bat Monitoring Programme

Bat numbers in the UK have declined dramatically over the last century. While some species have started to show signs of recovery in recent years, bats still face many threats to their survival so it is vitally important to monitor how our bat populations are faring. You can help to monitor the UK's bats by taking part in one or more of our surveys and observing these fascinating mammals in your local area.

Sparrow Swap

People who monitor bluebird nestboxes can collect eggs of house sparrows and donate them to the collection at the NC Museum of Natural Sciences. Participants can opt to receive painted wooden eggs to swap into nests to keep house sparrows committed to the nest attempt instead of disrupting any other nests. Participants monitor nest boxes and report the outcome of the egg removal or egg swap. Eggs in the collection will eventually be analyzed for contaminants as part of research to determine whether house sparrow eggs are useful bioindicator of human exposure to environmental contaminants.

Here is an instructional video about the Sparrow Swap Project: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ig9SVdsg7G8&feature=youtu.be

Once you register for this project, you should immediately see an orange list under "How to participate in this project". While you are there, go ahead and PRINT out the Data Sheet and the Project Instruction and WATCH our Instruction Video. After you have completed these things, you should be ready to go!

Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions at nc.museum.collection@gmail.com.

You can also find us on Facebook for more information at www.facebook.com/sparrowswap !

Open Insulin Project

A team of biohackers is developing the first open source protocol to produce insulin simply and economically. Our work may serve as a basis for generic production of this life-saving drug and provide a firmer foundation for continued research into improved versions of insulin.

Some of the articles about us:

Popular Science - www.popsci.com/these-biohackers-are-making-open-source-insulin

Vice - motherboard.vice.com/en_ca/read/after-92-years-biohackers-want-to-finally-make-cheap-and-generic-insulin

Season Spotter

We invite you to join Season Spotter, where you can help with an ongoing climate change research project. We have over 250 digital cameras mounted on towers and platforms across North America (and beyond) taking continual images of vegetated landscapes including forests, grasslands, and croplands. The result is images – a lot of images – that provide a unique record of how plants respond to seasonal change including the timing of leafing, flowering, and fruiting.

While some of the images can be categorized by using automated algorithms, humans are much better at tasks involving visual skills such as pattern recognition. That’s where you come in. A little bit of your time can further research to better understand how the natural world responds to changing climate. Help us classify landscape images so that we can produce forecasts that will be useful for a wide range of purposes, including in agriculture, conservation, tourism, and public health.

"Stick Out Your Tongue" - Saca La Lengua

‘Stick Out Your Tongue’ (‘Saca la Lengua’) is a citizen’s science project that aims to study the mouth’s microbiome and its possible relationship with our environmental characteristics and lifestyle.
This project has involved the public at different levels. Stay in touch with the project, train yourself in bioinformatics... our next project participation phase will be released soon.

Picture Pile

In Picture Pile you can help science solve global problems like climate change and hunger by sorting with other players picture piles!

The sorting works quite similar to the popular dating app Tinder. You see an image and the game asks you a question like “Do you see tree loss over time?”. You can now answer by dragging the image to the right to say “yes” or left for “no”. In addition if you are unsure you can swipe the image down to say “maybe”.

Volunteer Science

Volunteer Science allows people from all over the world to play online games, take surveys, and donate their data to social scientists. By participating, you give scientific researchers the data they need to answer today's most important research questions.

Each game takes two to five minutes and you don't have to sign up to play. A short game can have a lasting impact.


In CrowdMag project, NOAA explore whether digital magnetometers built in modern mobile smartphones can be used as scientific instruments. With CrowdMag mobile apps, phones all around the world send magnetometer data to NOAA. At NOAA, we check quality of the magnetic data and make data available to the public as aggregate maps and charts. We have two long-term goals: 1) Create near-real-time models of Earth's time changing magnetic field by combining crowdsourced magnetic data with real-time solar wind data. and 2) Map local magnetic noise sources (for e.g. power transformer and iron pipes) to improve accuracy of the magnetic navigation systems.

Les Herbonautes

This french site offers you to participate in the creation of a scientific database from millions of plants of photos of the french herbaria.
In exploring these plants and their labels to determine when and where it was collected. The data you find are valuable elements to learn more about biodiversity and measure and predict erosion.

FLOW Program

FLOW, which stands for Follow and Learn about the Ocean and Wetland, is Amigos de Bolsa Chica’s Citizen Science Monitoring Program. This is an exciting opportunity for members of the community to learn more about coastal ecology, to participate in the collection of scientific data and to get involved in environmental quality monitoring efforts. Anyone interested in participating of this program is encouraged to sign up for training to become a volunteer!

Plan Prediction

This project will enable cognitive scientists to conclude whether or not the 'Plan Prediction Foundation''s internet app can learn to predict, with statistically significant accuracy, which plans different types of people will favor - in ANY problem situation.

Previous tests with prototype versions showed that it correctly predicts any individual's favored plan at least 70% of the time. But such performance should greatly improve after many people have used the app in order to contribute their sincere, personal judgements, thereby 'teaching' the app to become, hopefully, more accurate.

If and when this occurs, the app will continue to be made freely available for everyone to use. This should make much socially-sensitive planning around the world more empathetic due to the app's cognizance of different kinds of people's contrasting beliefs and priorities.

Specifically, participants run the app which asks them to select a sample situation and to score its plans both on twelve criteria and for overall desirability (there are no right or wrong answers). All serious users' scores then become part of a now richer, cloud-based, group-specific data set. The latter, hopefully, enables the app to forecast group-specific, plan scores more accurately.

Biodiversity PEEK

Biodiversity PEEK (Photography Engaging and Educating Kids) is a citizen science program designed to actively engage local, disadvantaged, public school children with their local overlooked habitats and wildlife through site-adaptable, hands-on, outdoor exploration, digital photography, and the contribution of real scientific data on an online database. Ask us about our new Biodiversity PEEK preK-8 STEAM curriculum that is inquiry-based and project based learning formed around the Next Generation Science Standards.


SPARCnet (Salamander Population and Adaptation Research Collaboration Network) is a regional collaborative network designed to meet scientific and educational objectives associated with understanding the effects of climate change and land use on salamander populations. We would like you to collect woodland salamander monitoring data using one of two methods: natural cover surveys or cover board surveys. Sampling salamanders is cheap, easy and fun!

Seeking All Southern California Stinkbugs!

Help create a portrait of California stinkbug diversity and distribution by submitting your observations. Get help using a field guide to some of the stink bug taxa found in Southern California available at http://www.inaturalist.org/guides/887. Smartphone users can use iNaturalist apps, or use the Riverside NatureSpotter app (available free online for iPhone and Android devices); or upload data and image files directly to the project site. Hosted by the City of Riverside's Metropolitan Museum, verification of observations will be carried out by Museum staff, UC-Riverside Entomology personnel, plus other entomologists and iNaturalist users.

Most stink bugs are large, easy to photograph, and their egg masses are conspicuous. As observations accumulate, iNaturalist creates a checklist of observed species for the project. These observations may also provide early detection of the spread of introduced pest species, such as the Brown Marmorated Stinkbug (Halyomorpha halys).

Whale mAPP

Whale mAPP is a collection of GIS-based web and mobile tools used by researchers and citizen scientists to contribute observations for scientists studying and mapping human impact on marine mammals.

Record and visualize ocean-based trips.

Track marine mammal sightings.

Choose from a list of species in your region and submit photos of your observations.

Visualize and explore your contributions through Whale mAPP web.

Manage and visualize your collected data.

Explore what other citizen scientists have contributed.
Download your data – for research or for fun!

The WQI Project

The WQI (Water Quality Index) Project is a guided citizen science curriculum. It encourages learners to investigate water quality in their community, consider water challenges around the world, and share their findings with other students around the country. The WQI Project is ideal for a classroom or group setting.

Each WQI Project kit provides everything learners need to investigate water quality issues, and everything facilitators need to lead a successful investigation. In purchasing the kit you will receive login information for thewqiproject.org where you will have access to the exclusive student data map and online resources. The curriculum includes 5 lessons and assessment mechanisms built by certified science educators. The WQI Project aligns to Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core State Standards.

Monarch SOS

Monarch SOS is a field guide created by Naturedigger, LLC in cooperation with the Monarch Joint Venture. It is the first monarch app developed by scientists which covers monarch identification in all life cycle stages, confusing look-alikes and numerous milkweed species (monarch's larval host plants), frequently encountered in North America.

The public can now use the app to participate in data collection for monarch research projects, like the Southwest Monarch Study and the Monarch Larva Monitoring Project, and do their part to conserve this iconic species.

Veterans of monarch research and conservation have contributed their expertise to Monarch SOS to make it a useful tool for monarch conservation. With guidance from the MJV and their citizen science partners, Monarch SOS is a valuable tool for collecting accurate data, which will increase the understanding of monarch butterflies with the help of citizen scientists.

Cape Citizen Science

Cape Citizen Science is a project to engage the public in a survey of plant pathogens in the Fynbos of the Cape Floral Region in South Africa.

Landscape Watch

Landscape Watch is a new project to map landscape changes in Hampshire over the last eight years. The objective is to characterise the county’s landscape on two dates by analysing pairs of aerial photos, and thereby identify the changes that have taken place in the landscape between these dates. The project will produce the first detailed maps of landscape in the county, together with associated statistics.

Since citizen contributions are central to the production of our results, we will give the maps back to you, the citizens. That way, anyone with an interest in the changes will benefit. Following the completion of the Hampshire maps, the project aims to expand to other areas.


The PopClock is a citizen science project in which volunteers are helping University of Vermont and University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science scientists study how forest trees are responding to rapidly changing climatic conditions. PopClock volunteers are collecting ground-based observations of spring leaf emergence and fall color change of two poplar species—balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera) and quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides). They submit these observation to one of our partner organizations--National Phenology Network (NPN), Project Budburst, and Plant Watch. Scientists are using these observations to create maps of “green-up” and “green-down,” which they will combine with genetic information to identify areas where trees are most and least adapted to climate change. In fall 2015 and spring 2016, a small group of PopClock volunteers are also working with scientists to examine the use tiny remote sensors to measure forest phenology; this work includes an an all-expenses-paid trip to Vermont to learn about the sensors! PopClock is part of a larger research grant funded by National Science Fund. Please visit our website for more information; note our website includes a link for an application to join our special team of volunteer working with the remote sensors (due Sept 1 2015).

Reading Nature's Library

Reading Nature's Library is a citizen science project where anyone can help the Museum catalogue the fossil collection.

The collection is broken down into projects, such as fossil corals. New projects will be added over time as we photograph the collection.

It's free to join and take part, and you'll be helping make the amazing collection available to everyone!

Once you've signed up you can share your favorite images with friends and family, or see if they can help with any hard to read labels.


HerpMapper is a cooperative project, designed to gather and share information about reptile and amphibian observations across the planet. Using HerpMapper, you can create records of your herp observations and keep them all in one place. In turn, your data is made available to HerpMapper Partners – groups who use your recorded observations for research, conservation, and preservation purposes. Your observations can make valuable contributions on the behalf of amphibians and reptiles.

Wildbook for Whale Sharks

The Wildbook for Whale Sharks citizen science program allows any member of the community to be involved in collecting important identification data on whale sharks. Citizen scientists across the world can take a photo of the spot patterns on the skin of a whale shark and enter the photo into this Wildbook. Wild Me (http://www.wildme.org) and the global whale shark research community will then use this photo as a way to identify the whale shark, determine their movements and if they have been seen in the same area before.

Wildbook for Whale Sharks is available for people to access around the world, so any shark sighting can be reported into the Library as an encounter. We have actively set up partnerships for this citizen science program in Indonesia, Mexico, Mozambique, Seychelles, Maldives, Galapagos, Belize, Honduras and Philippines, with many other countries interested in being involved. The Library currently holds over 50,000 photos and has received submissions from 4800+ people and 100+ researchers who have photographed whale sharks in 46 different countries.

Our citizen science project provides huge potential to increase the interest in science and conservation among community members using the unique combination of a flagship species (whale sharks) and the latest technology (the on-line data collection system used within Wildbook). It also provides the opportunity and skills for community to be involved in the natural resource management of their local area. Wild Me believes that the combination of awareness raising and capacity building among our community and, in particular, youth is a vital part of our marine environment’s future.

South Texas Wintering Birds

Contribute your observations to a database for the state of Texas. Whether you are on a large private ranch, small yard in the city, or public nature area -- if you go birding, we need your sightings. Help us better understand the richness, abundance and changes in bird life in Texas!

Wild Pollinator Count

Australia has lots of wild insect pollinators that are often overlooked. European honey bees get a lot of attention because they are an adaptable, generalist forager, which means they are happy to visit almost any flower, in most climate zones. They are also a social species, so their hives are easy to domesticate and manage.

However, many native insects also contribute to pollination in crops and gardens all around the country. We still need to do a lot of research to identify all our insect pollinator species, understand their ecology and how they are affected by human activities. So far, we know that Australia has around 2,000 native bee species, all of which are important pollinators. We also know there are a couple of thousand butterfly, wasp, fly, moth, beetle, thrips and ant species, some of which are documented pollinators. Unfortunately, we don’t have a lot of information on the ecology of many of these insects, what flowers they pollinate, or where they are found.


A real-time, online checklist program, eBird has revolutionized the way that the birding community reports and accesses information about birds. Launched in 2002 by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and National Audubon Society, eBird provides rich data sources for basic information on bird abundance and distribution at a variety of spatial and temporal scales.

The observations of each participant join those of others in an international network of eBird users. eBird then shares these observations with a global community of educators, land managers, ornithologists, and conservation biologists. In time these data will become the foundation for a better understanding of bird distribution across the western hemisphere and beyond.

PlatypusWatch - Gold Coast

PlatypusWatch is a community-based program that aims to document where platypus occur to identify where conservation actions are needed – now and in the future – to protect this very special animal.

PlatypusWatch on the Gold Coast is a key component of a statewide platypus monitoring program coordinated by Wildlife Queensland and supported by the Gold Coast Catchment Association and the City of Gold Coast.

Ornate Rainbowfish Project

The ornate rainbowfish, Rhadinocentrus ornatus, (also known as the soft-spined sunfish) is a unique and beautiful native freshwater fish found in only a few locations in the Greater Brisbane/Redlands region including the larger sand islands of Moreton Bay, and with a patchy distribution through coastal creeks from Byfield, Queensland to Nambucca, New South Wales.

Its distribution has contracted as a consequence of urban and rural development and exacerbated by altered hydrology and water quality. Habitat alteration and urban development are still having negative impacts in several areas. Extensive sampling in rivers and streams of the south-east Queensland mainland over the last few years has yielded relatively few individuals.

The sad tale is that every time we lose a population of ornate rainbowfish from a creek system we are effectively losing a very unique group of fish forever.

In 2010 Wildlife Queensland Bayside Branch commenced a collaborative project to find these beautiful fish. Recent surveys by members of WPSQ Bayside Branch have located three additional populations in the Redland district within a creek systen already known to have fish. Hopefully as more streams are surveyed other populations will be located.

Quoll Seekers Network Project

Australia has four species of quoll: the spotted-tailed, the northern, eastern and western quoll. The spotted-tailed quoll and the smaller northern quoll are both found in Queensland.

Spotted-tailed quolls are mainland Australia’s largest native marsupial carnivore.

About QSN
Quoll Seekers Network (QSN) was established to raise community awareness of quolls in Queensland, gather information on quoll populations, and help people enjoy living alongside quolls. Networking with other organisations is a key component of Wildlife Queensland’s operations and communications strategy.

QSN in Action
QSN collects data on quoll populations, threats and conservation initiatives to better understand how to support their continued existence in Queensland.

Network members contribute in many ways - helping out at Quoll Discovery Days, writing articles for our publications, fundraising, office support, and assisting with our education program. Above all, members help to raise the profile of quolls in the broader community.


Seagrass-Watch is a global scientific, non-destructive, seagrass assessment and monitoring program devised by Australia scientists.

Since its beginning in 1998, Seagrass-Watch has expanded internationally with monitoring occurring across 17 countries at approximately 260 sites including sites at Noosa, Moreton Bay and the Gold Coast.

Scientists at the Seagrass-Watch Head Quarters based at the TropWater Division of James Cook University in Townsville have developed scientifically rigorous protocols for seagrass assessment. They work with the likes of Wildlife Preservation Society of Queensland (WPSQ) to develop and expand the program, and to ensure that the program is producing data of high quality.

Seagrass-Watch in Moreton Bay
Moreton Bay supports eight seagrass species totalling about 25,000 ha which occur in intertidal and sub-tidal areas. In collaboration with then Queensland Parks & Wildlife Service (now Department National Parks, Recreation, Sport and Racing) and Seagrass-Watch HQ, WPSQ (Bayside Branch) established six monitoring locations in Moreton Bay during 2001. There are now 20 locations, some with multiple sites.

Why are seagrasses important – why do we monitor?
The benefits of seagrasses are many, they:
* buffer and filter nutrient and chemical inputs
* stabilise coastal sediments
* provide food and shelter for many organisms
* are nursery grounds for commercially important prawn and fish species
* store carbon 35 times faster than rainforests
* lock carbon in for thousands of years.

Despite these significant benefits 50% of Australia’s seagrasses have been destroyed by dredging and pollution. And, when exposed to air, the sediment beneath seagrass releases greenhouse gases.


Mangroves and tidal saltmarshes are amongst the most endangered marine wetland habitats worldwide.

‘MangroveWatch’ is a program that has been established to address the urgent need to preserve and protect threatened tidal wetland ecosystems as well as addressing both scientific and environmental management needs.

This new monitoring program targets estuarine and coastal systems where there are mangroves, saltmarsh and saltpans. Like Seagrass-Watch the program uses a partnership between community volunteers and scientists.

Why Mangrove Watch?
* Learn about mangroves in your region
* Discover the many benefits of mangroves
* Explain misconceptions about mangroves
* Monitor changes to mangroves and river health
* Help with surveys of estuary condition
* Join a mangrove rehab team
* Get advice and training from specialists


eShark surveys have been rigorously developed through collaborations with divers, statisticians, biologists and experts in the field of citizen science. eShark depends on collaborations with interested parties around the world to facilitate data collection. If you would like to obtain a snapshot picture, an ongoing monitoring program in your area and contribute to this overall picture contact us.

eShark is a project that aims to evaluate how shark and ray populations have changed through time. eShark uses scuba diver's observations to census shark populations around the world. Scuba divers possess valuable information because they census areas that fishers don't- like coral reefs, seagrass beds, and pinnacles. Divers are also extremely valuable for monitoring no-take zones and Marine Protected Areas- where fishing is prohibited.

Tom Hawkins - Stegostoma fasciatum
With overwhelming evidence that shark populations have declined dramatically over the last 50 years, there are still places where some shark species are persisting. Identification of these species and areas is an important step in determining the best method for recovery. In a time when the number of no-take zones and fishing restrictions are increasing, there is a need for acquiring data through non-extractive methods. All scuba divers/snorkelers that have been in the ocean can help with this effort.

(Non-Sevengill) Sharks of California

Imported data from the partnership between Ocean Sanctuaries and National Geographic, using their citizen science data collection tool called ''Fieldscope''


DigiVol is an online citizen science project which allows people all over the world to participate in unlocking biodiversity data from a wide range of historic and contemporary museum, herbaria and research collections. Different types of data resources include: museum and herbarium collection labels; the field notebooks of explorers, ecologists and surveyors; hard copy field data sheets; camera trap images; and more. Many people find the digitisation process to be fun, interesting and educational. Have a go and join an expedition today!

Data transcribed in DigiVol has many uses, including:
* understanding the relationships between species (important in determining potential agricultural pests or potential medical applications);
* the distribution of species (for understanding how best to conserve individual species or ecosystems);
* identification of species from morphological or genetic characters (for example being able to identify birds involved in aircraft incidents).

By helping us capture this information into digital form you are helping scientists and planners better understand, utilise, manage and conserve our precious biodiversity.

This data, once captured, becomes available through a broad range of mechanisms that make it accessible to the scientific and broader communities. These mechanisms include websites such as :
* Individual institutions collections and associated databases
* The Atlas of Living Australia
* The Global Biodiversity Information Facility


FeralScan (www.feralscan.org.au) is a community website that allows you to map sightings of pest animals and record the problems they are causing in your local area. FeralScan will have direct benefits to farmers, community groups and individuals managing pest animals and their impacts.

Laptop and iphone FeralScan views
FeralScan is freely available and can be used by farmers, local communities, Landcare groups, local government, pest controllers, schools and individuals anywhere in Australia. Data entered into FeralScan can be used to help coordinate on ground control to address the problems pest animals are causing in your local area and across the country. FeralScan provides lots of useful resources.

Waterwatch Victoria

Waterwatch is about the faces and actions of thousands of Victorians who volunteer countless hours monitoring, planting, communicating and caring for their local creeks, wetlands, groundwater, rivers and estuaries.

Through Waterwatch, groups are supported and encouraged to become actively involved in local waterway monitoring and on-ground action. A network of Waterwatch Coordinators supports local communities across Victoria. These skilled coordinators:
* Provide water quality and biological monitoring training and support to Waterwatch volunteers, schools and a range of community groups
* Support school and community education and provide awareness-raising activities
* Facilitate partnership opportunities around the health of our rivers – between all levels of government, private business and the community

Bird Banding at CCFS

The San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory (SFBBO) is a nonprofit in Milpitas, CA, with the mission to conserve birds and their habitats through science and outreach. For more than 30 years, citizen science volunteers have worked with scientists at SFBBO to capture passerines in mist nets at the Coyote Creek Field Station, a habitat restoration site in Milpitas. They put tiny bands on the birds' legs and collect data on species type, age, weight, health, and other characteristics. SFBBO is looking for people interested in a long term volunteer opportunity. Citizen scientists in the program go through a thorough apprenticeship training process.

Big Seaweed Search

Help us monitor the effects of environmental change on Britain's sealife by exploring the seashore and recording the living seaweeds you find there.

The Big Seaweed Search first launched in 2009. Hundreds of people took part and the data gathered, alongside other research, show that the distribution of seaweeds around the UK is changing.

Now we aim to scale up the survey to collect thousands of new observations and to focus on key environmental issues that need more research.

These issues are:

rising sea temperature rise
the arrival and spread of non-native species of seaweed
ocean acidification (the sea becoming more acidic as a result of absorbing carbon dioxide from the air)
Home to a particularly high diversity of species, the UK is a special place for seaweeds. Unfortunately, seaweeds are not as popular as flowers, butterflies or birds, so fewer people make and submit observations of them.

As a result, we know comparatively little about the abundance and distribution of seaweed species, and how this may change over time.

Understanding more about seaweeds is critical to protecting marine environments.

Anyone can take part and the survey is open all year round.

Purposeful Gaming

Purposeful Gaming is a project that explores how computer games can be used to enhance and preserve historical texts, such as 19th-century hand-written field notes and early agricultural catalogs.

Because these materials cannot be read by Optical Character Recognition (OCR) to produce a usable text document, people must transcribe them from scanned images. Even then, individuals may transcribe the same word differently.

This game uses texts that have been read by two different OCR programs. Each time the programs interpret a word differently, that word is fed into the game, and the player is asked to supply a transcription. Eventually, when enough people have typed the same word, the game can create consensus about the correct spelling. These corrections are then sent back to the digital library that holds the texts, where they can be incorporated into the original OCR transcriptions to make them more accurate.

Every word that you type is improving a text document that will become searchable and readable!

Play a game. Save a book.

Weed Biological Control

Through collecting and aggregating information on the known distribution, availability and redistribution methods of weed biological control agents, the Weed Biological Control Project will help to enhance community knowledge and adoption of biological control and enable its benefits to be enjoyed by more people and its impacts to be better understood.

The project is funded by the Federal Government and States through Department of Primary Industries (Victoria), the NSW Department of Primary Industries, the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture and the South Australian Research and Development Institute. The Atlas of Living Australia is a key partner, as the developer and host of this website.


ClimateWatch was developed by Earthwatch Institute with the Bureau of Meteorology and the University of Melbourne to understand how changes in temperature and rainfall are affecting the seasonal behaviour of Australia's plants and animals. The first continental phenology project in the Southern Hemisphere, ClimateWatch enables every Australian to become a citizen scientist, collecting and recording data that will help shape the country's scientific response to climate change. You can record anywhere, anytime - from a jog around the block all the way to a camping trip.

Earthwatch has established almost 60 ClimateWatch trails in partnership with local governments, botanical gardens, environmental education centres and universities across the country. Walking a trail is a great way to involve your family, friends, students or colleagues in discovering your local environment while contributing to important research.

ClimateWatch is an authentic learning experience that can be incorporated into school excursions, corporate CSR strategies or local events.

The ClimateWatch system provides:
* An opportunity for educators to introduce their students to phenology, biodiversity, and climate change.
* A greater understanding, while raising public awareness, of the response of Australia's biodiversity to climate change;
* An online system for collecting, storing, interpreting and reporting indicators of biological responses to climate; and
* The ability to predict and monitor changes in native and pest species distributions and to test their sensitivity to climate.


iNaturalist.org is a place where you can record what you see in nature, meet other nature lovers, and learn about the natural world. It is also a crowdsourced species identification system and an organism occurrence recording tool. You can use it to record your own observations, get help with identifications, collaborate with others to collect this kind of information for a common purpose, or access the observational data collected by iNaturalist users.

From hikers to hunters, birders to beach-combers, the world is filled with naturalists, and many of us record what we find. What if all those observations could be shared online? You might discover someone who finds beautiful wildflowers at your favorite birding spot, or learn about the birds you see on the way to work. If enough people recorded their observations, it would be like a living record of life on Earth that scientists and land managers could use to monitor changes in biodiversity, and that anyone could use to learn more about nature.

That's the vision behind iNaturalist.org. So if you like recording your findings from the outdoors, or if you just like learning about life, join us!


Effective management of sharks starts with an understanding of their population status, which will ultimately instruct their future conservation.

Through SharkBase we are building a global network of shark observers collecting vital information about the abundance and distribution of sharks and rays worldwide.

(*Includes all sharks, rays, and chimaeras)


Einstein@Home uses your computer's idle time to search for weak astrophysical signals from spinning neutron stars (also called pulsars) using data from the LIGO gravitational-wave detectors, the Arecibo and Parkes radio telescopes, and the Fermi gamma-ray satellite.

Einstein@Home is a World Year of Physics 2005 and an International Year of Astronomy 2009 project supported by the American Physical Society (APS) and by a number of international organizations.

Einstein@Home volunteers have already discovered more than 70 new neutron stars, and we hope to find many more in the future.

Our long-term goal is to make the first direct detections of gravitational-wave emission from spinning neutron stars. Gravitational waves were predicted by Albert Einstein in 1916, which have been directly detected in September 2015. This observations opened up a new window on the universe, and ushered in a new era in astronomy.

Birds and Berries

We are seeking photographic observations of wild birds feeding on berries and other fruits. We prefer the bird in the act of consuming the fruit, but we also welcome the bird perched on or near the fruiting plant. The fruiting plants can be wild or cultivated, native or invasive. No feeders please. We prefer birds and plants within North America, especially California. If possible, please identify the bird or the plant or both (an additional identification can be included within the comments section). If multiple birds or plants are shown in the photograph, please specify which bird was eating which plant.

If you have no photographs to submit, please help us make others' submissions "Research Grade" by verifying identifications of the birds and plants in photographs.

Birds are around us every day. We encounter berry species in the fruits we buy, the plants in our yard, and when we're out in nature. We know there's a connection between them - many birds use berries as a food source, especially in the fall and winter months in North America and many of these plants rely on birds to disperse their seeds. Yet we do not know nearly enough about this relationship, particularly all of the species involved. Please help us collect this information!


The CrowdHydrology mission is to create freely available data on stream stage in a simple and inexpensive way. We do this through the use of crowdsourcing, which means we gather information on stream stage or water levels from anyone willing to send us a text message of the water levels at their local stream to collect spatially distributed hydrologic data. These data are then available for anyone to then use, from Universities to Elementary schools, interested in studying hydrologic data.

Report Florida Lionfish

Enter your lionfish sighting or removal data online at MyFWC.com/Lionfish or on our Report Florida Lionfish app.

Long term marine ecology project

Australia’s south eastern coastline is home to an array of unique and fascinating marine life. These organisms have adapted and acclimatised to temperate (cold water) conditions. However, climate change modelling predicts that Australia’s surrounding oceans will warm by 1–2 ⁰C by 2070, with the south east coast of Australia expected to feel the greatest effects due to increased strength and penetration of the East Australian Current (EAC).

– the EAC pushes warm water from the tropics, i.e. around the Great Barrier Reef, southward into the temperate waters found along the south eastern coast. This strength varies in season–

As a consequence to this predicted increase in ocean temperatures, there is mounting evidence suggesting that the geographic range of tropical and temperature coastal fish species will shift to higher latitudes (in this case further South), in response to warming trends. For example, ongoing studies around a coastal town called Merimbula (37°S) have recorded over 50 species of tropical fish which are aided by the warmer water and stronger EAC during Summer/Autumn. It is only when the warm water recedes and cold water replaces it, do these tropical fish die. With the predicted changes, these tropical fish are expected to survive through winter and compete with temperate fish species.
In addition to this, structurally important and unique macroalgae (e.g. bull kelp Durvillea potatorum) are predicted to have dramatic temperate fish range shifts. Preferring temperate conditions, increased ocean temperatures are predicted to radically move macroalgae distribution poleward. Warm ocean temperatures influence the health of macroalgae, often leaving large populations vulnerable to disease and wave action. Macroalgae provides important habitats for a number of temperate fish and invertebrate species throughout their life cycles, with predicted poleward shifts, species that require macroalgae habitats will either adapt or follow macroalgae range shifts.
Acknowledging these predicted changes, community members are establishing a long term monitoring program to record any annual and seasonal changes in fish diversity and macroalgae health. This would also include recording sea surface temperature.

Acknowledging these predicted changes, community members are establishing a long term monitoring program to record any annual and seasonal changes in species diversity and macroalgae health. This would also include recording sea surface temperature.


1.Establish a monitoring programme that will build valuable data, recording biodiversity and changes over time

2.Monitor annual and seasonal changes in fish and invertebrate diversity and macroalgae health

3.Create and maintain an ongoing training program that improves interested community members knowledge about local marine life and improve their identification skills

4.Create an identification/education guide of the target fish and invertebrate diversity and health indicators on macroalgae.

5.Establish frequent monitoring of nominated sites and expand the number of survey sites over time

6.Encourage university involvement and/or grants


1)Timed snorkel: using a recording template (that will have a list of key fish), participants will note down any fish/invertbrate species they observed and an estimated abundance. They will also note down any macroalgae discolouration.

2)Un-timed snorkel/SCUBA: using a slate and waterproof paper, particpants will note down/photograph as many species as they can during their recreational snorkel/SCUBA dive.

3)Video footage: working with local fisheries, underwater video footage of offshore habitats (e.g. urchin barrens, rocky reefs) has been made available to the community working group.

Can't get to the location to help out? Then maybe you can help answer some of our projects questions (if you can, please join the project and follow the contact prompts);

1) What data should we be aiming to record;

- Species wise: Should we aim to create a total species list and record as much of the biodiversity as possible OR create a targeted species list that aims to record indicator species of fish, invertebrates and macroalgae?

- Health: What is the best way to record the health of macroalgae?

- Abiotic parameters: we have access to temperature data loggers, but what other parameters should we look to record? E.g. depth, water clarity, tide, swell height etc

New to working with underwater video footage has created a few questions:

2) What would be the best way to utilise the video footage ? Footage shows macroalgae and fish species inhabiting habitats at different depths. (NOTE: original thoughts was to take snapshots of the footage and overlay randomised dots/points over the image. Dots/points that are over macroalgae would be highlighted and those that aren’t over macroalgae would be left alone)

3) Is there an online tool or free software to analyse video footage?

4) What would be the best way to standardise video analysis? Note: video footage will be from the same sites taken at different times of the year.

Columbia Basin Water

We are collecting rain and snow samples to develop a water balance for the region based on the isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen in the water molecule. This is part of a larger project that is evaluating the past, present, and future of water resources in the Columbia Basin.
More information on the project can be found here: http://janicebrahney.weebly.com/columbia-basin.html and here: https://www.instrumentl.com/campaigns/janicebrahney/

National Plant Monitoring Scheme

We are a habitat-based plant monitoring program that collects data to provide an annual assessment of plant abundance and diversity.

Our volunteers are assigned a random but convenient 1km area to monitor. Monitoring involves recording the plant species present in that plot of land.

What Do Birds Eat?

We (Douglas Tallamy's lab in the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware) are collecting photo contributions to an ongoing research project about avian diets-- in a nutshell, we are trying to figure out "what birds eat"!

If you have any photos of birds holding insects or other arthropods (spiders, etc.) in their bills, please consider submitting them on our site. Thanks to everyone who has already contributed!

Bugs In Our Backyard

Bugs In Our Backyard is an educational outreach and collaborative research program, providing project-based learning opportunities for K-12 students-- or anyone! The core activity for Bugs In Our Backyard takes advantage of the bugs in your own backyard, schoolyard or neighborhood. Students become citizen-scientists by surveying this diversity of insects and plants. How much insect diversity can you find? How does insect diversity vary over time? How does insect diversity vary across geographic and urban scales? These are some of the questions that can be asked. The survey targets are “true bugs” (what entomologists call Heteroptera) in the eastern US, but activities are designed to be open-ended. Everyone is welcome to get involved. Let’s expand what we know about about insect diversity across rural and urban landscapes!

BioB is part of an NSF-funded research program at Colby College, which will also provide students with insight into the practice of science. Our goal is to engage students with biology by making them citizen scientists. Get involved in ecological surveys of local bugs and their host plants! Produce data to contribute to a growing community database. Connect to the biological diversity in your own backyard!

A series of modular activities on different life science topics, such as biodiversity, growth and development, invasive species, genetics, insects, evolution, urban ecology and statistical analysis, are also being produced. These modules can be scaled to the needs of different classes and grade-levels or used over multiple grade-levels. For older students, survey data are available to be used in hypothesis-testing or exploratory analyses. Teachers are encouraged to modify the activities to their own needs and share success stories.

Truckee River Guide

Truckee River Guide is an interactive field guide to the plants and wildlife of the Truckee River, and a community wildlife mapping project.

Did you know that there is no complete species list for the Truckee River region of California and Nevada? The Truckee River is an important resource for the people that live in our community, and also an important resource for wildlife. With an ongoing drought and a changing climate, it is important to keep records of the species that live in our region, so that we can recognize and monitor change as it happens. You can help, by taking photos and submitting observations of plants and wildlife to Truckee River Guide.

The Truckee River Guide website is a free community resource intended to provide information to the public about the species that live in the Truckee River region of California and Nevada.

NOVA Evolution Lab

In NOVA’s Evolution Lab (pbs.org/nova/labs), phylogenetics—the study of the evolutionary relationships between species—is explored in depth as players evaluate similarities in the traits and
DNA of species and conduct their own investigations in a virtual tree of life. Along the way, players can watch short animated videos that explain the evidence of evolution and illustrate it with specific examples.

The Evolution Lab contains two interactives, Build A Tree and Deep Tree, that were developed by the Life on Earth project based at Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Life on Earth is a NSF-funded project led by principal investigator Chia Shen, director of the Scientists’ Discovery Room (SDR) Lab. Shen’s team, including lead developer Florian Block and collaborators around the country, worked for several years to find the most effective ways to make the tree an open-ended space to explore how life formed and continues to evolve.

The Banished Beetle Project

The Banished Beetle Project is a citizen science initiative designed to increase awareness of burying beetles and their importance to the environment. Collecting data on burying beetle species is beneficial in order to determine the presence of the endangered American burying beetle (ABB). The American burying beetle only occurs in six states, including Oklahoma. There has never before been a chance to involve citizen scientists in this research effort until now! I have developed methods that enable teachers and young children to go outside and perform experiments that will add to larger pool of data that will significantly improve research efforts towards the conservation of this troubled species.

Mourning Warbler Song Mapper

The Mourning Warbler Song Mapper is a citizen science project that will map the songs of males during spring migration.


LabintheWild tests your abilities and preferences. At the end of each experiment, you will see a page with your personalized feedback, which lets you compare yourself and your performance to other people around the world.

By participating, you contribute to research on people's similarities and differences and help improve users' experience when interacting with technology. We believe that research should be done in collaboration with people—people like you from all over the world who are interested in learning about themselves and helping research. With your help, we can, for example, compare the website preferences of people from different countries, or analyze what user interfaces should look like if optimized for the most interaction abilities of certain age groups.

Gotham Whale

Gotham Whale monitors marine mammals in the waters around New York City. We work primarily on board the whale watching vessel, The American Princess. We enlist other on-the-water observers to report sightings of whales, dolphins, and seals in the area.


BUGSS stands for Baltimore UnderGround Science Space. We are a community lab for amateur, professional, and citizen scientists and a place to be curious about biotechnology and have fun responsibly.


Our mission is to promote citizen science and the public access to biotechnology. Our organization serves the greater New York area through education outreach, events and community involvement in science. To this end we created a community biotechnology laboratory in Brooklyn, New York, which hosts public hands-on courses and supports scientific inquiry for students, teachers and the curious individual with a focus on molecular and synthetic biology.


Started in 2008, the mission of DIYBio is to encourage an active and safe community of do-it-youself biologists. At the core of our mission is to improve the public's understanding of biotechnology.

Our website maintains a list of global DIYBio events and local organizations, bio-safety practices, and more!

Bay Drift

Our project is poised to answer four research questions: Where do Miami’s currents move water? What are Miami’s marine debris sources? What are the most common types of trash found in Miami's waterways? How can we prevent trash from entering our waterways?

To accomplish this, we use social media to crowdsource hypotheses regarding our research questions. Then drift cards are cut and painted by community members. Once prepared, the drift cards are deployed from five coastal sites. Organized cleanups around the county, in conjunction with partners, are our primary means of collecting the cards. We also deploy GPS drifters to track debris paths. The analyzed data is used for targeting debris hotspots to install educational and interpretive signage. It also provides scientists with data useful for understanding current patterns.

This project was formally known as Trash Detectives.

Counter Culture Labs

Come help us build a new community lab for the East Bay, focused on DIY biology and citizen science. A place to explore, learn, work on fun projects, tinker with biology and other sciences. Open to biotech professionals, scientists, and citizen scientists of all stripes. Be part of our community of creative thinkers, hackers and mad scientists!

Connecticut Turtle Atlas

With approximately 58 percent of the world’s 335 turtle species threatened with extinction, turtles are the most endangered vertebrate group in the world. The Bruce Museum in Greenwich invites people to help map the distribution of turtles with the Connecticut Turtle Atlas Citizen Science project.

The unassuming turtle is seldom on the mind of most people, but they are a top priority for many conservation biologists. Turtles can play key ecological roles, serving as both predators and prey, contributing to the cycling of nutrients, and acting as seed dispersers.

Anyone interested in turtles or the outdoors can participate, including families, children, individuals, and classrooms. Participants in this Bruce Museum Citizen Science initiative will collect data on all turtle species found throughout the state as they help scientists track turtle distribution and abundance. The project runs from April through November on an annual basis.

The state of Connecticut is home to twelve native turtle species that inhabit our woodlands, wetlands, and even the waters of Long Island Sound. The primary threats to turtles in the state include habitat loss and traffic-related highway mortality. Worldwide, turtles are negatively affected by threats such as collection for food and pets, disease, and changing climates, as well as habitat loss and fragmentation.

The goals of the Bruce Museum’s Connecticut Turtle Atlas include developing a public understanding of turtle ecology, promoting ways in which people can help turtles, and gathering research-quality data for use in publication and sharing with scientists.

Participants will learn about the wonderful diversity of turtles and their benefits to the ecology. No experience is required, all that is needed is access to a smart phone, camera, or a computer with the iNaturalist.org platform. Using the iNaturalist smartphone app, volunteer scientists can gather information that will be used to map distributions, identify important habitats, locate areas of nesting abundance, and detect roadways with high traffic-related mortality. In addition, the Bruce Museum will provide opportunities to assist with other aspects of turtle research and fieldwork.

Citizen Science harnesses the passion of the public to become amateur researchers, which helps not only with the gathering of important data on a wide scale but also with inspiring a new generation of future scientists. Citizen Science provides fun and interesting projects with real-world implications, breaks down barriers between society and scientist, opens discussion on STEM subjects and current events, shares research outcomes, and acknowledges participants’ important contributions.

Track a Tree

Are you are a regular visitor to your local woodland? If so, Track a Tree needs your help to record the spring timing (or phenology) of the UK’s woodland trees and the flowering plants that grow beneath them. Track a Tree aims to find out how much woodland species vary their seasonal timing, and how tree leafing affects the flowering of plants on the woodland floor.

We need volunteers to become citizen ecologists and record trees in their local woodland during spring, visiting on a weekly basis if possible. Track a Tree recorders are asked to monitor their chosen trees from before they budburst until they come into leaf, so the key recording period is usually between March and May. Track a Tree monitoring involves selecting a tree (or trees!) and revisiting it throughout spring to record its leafing stage and monitor the flowering plants beneath it.

As spring temperatures rise the leafing of trees is getting earlier and we are interested in testing whether woodland flowers can keep up with this change. With the help of citizen ecologists monitoring trees across the UK, we can see whether woodlands in warm parts of the country do as well as those from colder areas.

The Track a Tree project would suit anyone who regularly visits their local woodland; individuals, families, education groups… all are welcome to take part! Download the field guide from our website, get recording and share your observations to see how they compare with the rest of the UK.


Our Mission:
We believe that innovations in biology should be accessible, affordable, and open to everyone.
We’re building a community biology lab for amateurs, inventors, entrepreneurs, and anyone who wants to
experiment with friends.

What We Are:

- a complete working laboratory and technical library for entrepreneurs to cheaply access equipment, materials, and co-working space,

- a training center for biotechniques, with an emphasis on safety

- a meeting place for citizen scientists, hobbyists, activists, and students

The Microbiome and Oral Health

Help researchers learn more about the normal bacteria in the mouth!

You may Qualify if you:
• Are able to collect samples from yourself
• Have NO active dental disease
• Have NO chronic medical conditions

What is the Time Commitment?
• Six 2.5 hour office visits at UCSF
• Daily sample collection by you at your home (~30 minutes per day) for 28 days
• A free dental examination (no xrays) and a free dental cleaning
• A maximum of $245

UK Ladybird Survey

The Ladybird Survey aims to facilitate the recording of all the UK's ladybirds. Help us understand the ecology of native UK ladybirds by sending in your observations.

The invasion of the harlequin ladybird (Harmonia axyridis) threatens Britain's native populations. If you want to know more about this species in particular, or want to record sightings, please have a look at the Harlequin Ladybird Survey website.


TreeKIT works with volunteers to map street trees on dozens of blocks in East Harlem, NYC.

Southwest Monarch Study

The Southwest Monarch Study is a Citizen-Science program dedicated to monarch butterfly research and conservation in the Southwest United States including Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, western Colorado and the California deserts. We provide training to help citizen scientists tag monarchs on their migration and to grow and monitor monarch habitats.

The Dental Arcade Game

Are you fascinated by forensic science? This project is run by a real life forensic anthropologist, and is about teeth. It is designed to gather information about your age, ethnicity and the teeth you have in your mouth, to see if what we think we know about when teeth erupt is accurate.

At the moment, if an unknown body is found, forensic scientists (forensic anthropologists and forensic odontologists) examine the teeth and work out how old the person was when s/he died by noting which teeth have erupted, and comparing this to reference data. This data then gives the scientist an age range, which can help the police narrow down the list of possible people that the body could be. The problem is that this data is out of date, and there is lots of variation between populations.

That's where YOU come in. We can improve this data set by getting as many people as possible to complete our survey. That way, we can build up a mega-database of ages and tooth eruption and ethnicities, and build up a really useful bank of data for scientists to use in the future.

Monitoring an Invasive Seaweed

We need your help to track the changes in abundance of an invasive seaweed, Gracilaria vermiculophylla. Native to Asia, G. vermiculophylla was introduced to the Southeast via the oyster trade back in the 1990's. Scientist studying G. vermiculophylla are trying to determine how the seaweed is changing southeastern estuaries where it is most prolific, and here is how you can help!

An informational sign is placed on the Jay Wolf Nature Trial Dock, a high-traffic area adjacent to a mudflat where G. vermiculophylla can be found. The sign, along with educating the public about the invasive seaweed, instructs passersby to take a photograph with a camera or phone and to then share the photograph with us using social media or email. A bracket is installed adjacent to the sign to designate where the camera or phone should be placed, allowing us to guarantee that all photographs are taken from the same location. The photographs will be compiled in a time lapse series, which will be used to better understand seasonal changes in G. vermiculophylla populations. The time lapses will be available for viewing by the public through the project’s blog.

Drug discovery from your soil

Creating a new medicine is a team effort involving scientist and medical professionals from a wide variety of fields. In 2010, researchers with the University of Oklahoma’s Natural Products Discovery Group redefined the notion of what “team” meant when they launched their popular Citizen Science Soil Collection Program. Through this program, volunteers from across the United States have helped by donating soil samples from their own backyards, which OU investigators are using to obtain fungi that make special compounds known as natural products. Natural products are the source of many lifesaving drugs that are used today by doctors around the world.

Beats Per Life

What is the secret to a long life? The heartbeat of some animals may hold a clue. We are consolidating reports of the heart rate and lifespan of as many vertebrate species as possible. Our goal is to integrate the data from various sources into a single database, where they can be more readily accessible.

Measuring the vitamin C in food - a global experiment

Take part and share your data with thousands of students from around the world. Test your fruit and vegetables for vitamin C using simple kitchen equipment and household items.
This global experiment will remain open so you can participate anytime.

Crystallisation – a global experiment

Collaborate with thousands of students from around the world by taking part in this experiment.
Follow the instructions to grow your own crystals. By taking part we want you to help us answer the question: What are the best conditions for growing the biggest crystals?

Water - a global experiment with hydrogels

Thousands of people all over the world are taking part in Water: a global experiment with hydrogels. Pupils explore the effects that hydrogels – a man-made product – has on the water cycle before sharing their results with other classes across the globe. Not only are all the activities engaging but they also support learning and curriculum coverage. So why not make it part of your lessons?

Climate Change at the Arctic's Edge

You’ll measure evidence of global warming near Churchill, a small town on Hudson Bay that’s on the front line of climate change. Help researchers as they learn all they can about this fragile environment. If you join one of the summer or fall teams, you may don waist-high waders to take water samples and assess the abundance of the fish and frogs that make these northern wetlands their home; you’ll also help monitor the health of the tree line by examining tree cores, which allow researchers to reconstruct tree life histories (to date, the oldest living tree this team has found dates from 1643).

Explore Boston's Urban Forest

As a volunteer, you'll pioneer the work of Earthwatch's Urban Forest Project. In Cambridge, we will be comparing our findings with those of a study done five years ago. The objective of the project is to draw statistical comparisons over time that will allow city officials to relate changes in the urban forest (tree species and size) to changes in environmental conditions (road traffic density, height of surrounding buildings, and surface composition).

Identify the cloud

Share photos of unusual cloud types and formations, and help identify other people's cloud pictures.

FreshWater Watch

FreshWater Watch is Earthwatch's global research project which aims to involve at least 100,000 people in a program to research and learn about fresh water. The purpose of FreshWater Watch is to safeguard the quality and supply of fresh water, our planet's most precious and vital resource.

Participants have the opportunity to become citizen scientists and take an active role in scientific data gathering. As a citizen scientist, you will join a global community working together to promote freshwater sustainability.

Fastest lift

The aim of this project is to identify the lift with the top speed in your area. To take part in this mission, you will need an Android device (phone or tablet) and the Sense-it app.

Noise map

Noise around us can increase stress and make it difficult to concentrate. This project will help you map your surrounding noise, compare it to other places and decide whether you live in a noisy environment.

Climate Change and Caterpillars

On this Earthwatch Expedition, you’ll search the forests of Costa Rica for caterpillars and take specimens to the lab for state-of-the-art chemical analysis and observation. Prepare to be dazzled by the array of shapes and colors that caterpillars come in, most of which serve as natural defenses against their predators. You may even find a new species—it’s happened before.

Shark Conservation in Belize

To protect sharks and their habitat, we need to know where they spend their time. This study is the first of its kind—while we have evidence that sharks do better in marine reserves, we have no idea how long a decimated population will take to recover in a brand-new reserve. That’s one of the insights that will come out of this research. The scientists are also looking for insight into how well Belize's marine reserves foster sharks, so you'll help implant transmitters in sharks to track where they go. Essentially, researchers will know marine reserves are working if sharks spend more time inside their borders than outside.


Endeavorist is a growing network of likeminded and forward thinking individuals with a passion for curiosity. Our goal is to facilitate research, from citizen science to the world's next breakthrough. Build a community, fund ideas, seek help, and get the money and attention you need, in one place.

Amazon Riverboat Exploration

You’ll journey aboard a restored, remodeled, air-conditioned vessel from the Rubber Boom era. You’ll travel for two days along the Samiria River into the heart of Peru’s fabled Amazon region. There, in the Pacaya-Samiria National Reserve, you’ll discover a flooded forest whose waters run from the Andes Mountains to create a delicate wilderness. You’ll also have the opportunity to meet and work with the Cocama people from a nearby village. With your help, Earthwatch and the Cocama will develop management plans to protect both the needs of the Cocama people and the wildlife of the Samiria River basin.


Help scientists build a taxonomy of the world's faces!

Facetopo is a global citizen science project to map diverse faces of the world. Download the Facetopo App (Free) and use your iOS or Android smartphone or tablet device to create a 3D selfie and donate your facial data to the Facetopo database. Our goal is 10K faces. The Facetopo database is private and secure.

Facetopo is for adult faces age 14+. Under age 18 requires parental approval to create a user account.

Nina Valley EcoBlitz

High school students, scientists, teachers, and support crew working together to discover and document the biological diversity of the Nina Valley

Qualitative Understanding of Ecosystem Services Tool

This will be a test run for gathering citizen science inputs on what ecosystem attributes are valued for contributing to cultural well being. Beneficiaries of these final ecosystem service attributes will be classified using the EPA''s Final Ecosystem Goods and Services Classification System (FEGS-CS). User engagements with nature as a particular beneficiary type doing a particular activity in a specified ecosystem type will be ranked and the contribution to their overall well-being assessed. Inputs will be used to generate heat maps of where cultural value is being generated by ecosystem services. User identified locations will also serve as geo-caches where other users can find things in nature that other community members value.

International Drought Experiment

The goal of the International Drought Experiment (IDE) is to implement a highly coordinated, multi-site drought experiment requiring (in most cases) only a moderate investment of time and resources by investigators. This coordinated, distributed experiment will allow for the quantification of the impacts of four-year extreme drought across a wide range of terrestrial ecosystems based on a common experimental design and a comparable suite of measurements.

The primary goals of IDE are to: (1) assess patterns of differential terrestrial ecosystem sensitivity to drought, and (2) identify potential mechanisms underlying those patterns. IDE will significantly expand the scope of past drought experiments by including as broad a range of ecosystem types as possible, ensuring that these experiments are accessible to as many investigators as possible, and overcoming the limitations of past drought experiments (i.e., lack of coordination, differences in approaches and methodologies, etc.).

Reverse The Odds

In Reverse The Odds, you help the Odds – colorful creatures whose world is falling into decline. By completing mini puzzle games and upgrading their land, you can restore the Odds back to their lively selves.

But it’s not just the Odds you’re helping. We've incorporated the analysis tumour image analysis into the game. So as you play, you're helping to analyse important data for a huge bladder cancer study.

You’re analysing in the same way researchers do, but because there are a lot more of you, we can get through data much more quickly, freeing up more of our researchers valuable time and unveiling clues about cancer sooner.


myObservatory is an information management system useful with virtually any type of data. The platform allows users to easily implement and manage rigorous and exact data collection, even for casual and citizen users. The platform allows you to:

1. Identify your area of interest (anywhere on the globe) and map those locations using GIS mapping tools for easy reference

2. Harvest public information (such as local, regional, and global data)

3. Collect your own data through field observation tools, sensors, automatic location tagging, and customizable collection forms

4. Use quality assurance tools ensure data is valid as it comes in, with customizable tests bringing rigor to the data acquisition process
Multi-level user access control makes it easy to work with others

5. Share and collaborate with others about what you learn

Visit our site to sign up, or contact us if you have any special needs or questions! We have plans fitting every need, from $10/month and up, or we can work with you for a custom arrangement.


Mark2Cure allows anyone that can read English, regardless of background, to help in the process of biomedical discovery. Scientific literature is growing at a rate of more than 2 new articles every single minute. It is hard for scientists to know what to read and to read everything that is relevant. Mark2Cure works by teaching citizen scientists to precisely identify concepts and concept relationships in biomedical text. This is a task that anyone can learn to do and can perform better than any known computer program. Once these tasks are completed, advanced statistical algorithms take the data provided by the volunteers and use it to provide scientists with new tools for finding the information that they require within the sea of biomedical knowledge.


GeckoWatch is a citizen science project to map the fine-scale distribution of nonnative geckos in the United States. The primary interest is in mapping the rapidly increasing range of the Mediterranean House Gecko, Hemidactylus turcius. However, we are interested in all nonnative gecko species.

There are at least 18 species of nonnative geckos that have established populations in the United States. Although many of these species are known only in Florida, others are showing up with increasing regularity in multiple states. At the most extreme end is the Mediterranean House Gecko, which has established populations in at least 24 states in the U.S.

To undertake any research on these nonnative geckos, scientists must first understand where these geckos occur. As we learn about the rapidly changing distributions of these nonnative geckos, we can then ask:

1. What are the impacts of these nonnative geckos on our native species?

2. What makes some species successful colonizers?

3. What are the likely routes of colonization?

Observations from citizen scientists are essential to answering these questions and allowing us to learn about the biology of these nonnative geckos.

NOVA Cybersecurity Lab

The Cybersecurity Lab is a game designed to teach people how to keep their digital lives safe, spot cyber scams, learn the basics of coding, and defend against cyber attacks. Players assume the role of chief technology officer of a start-up social network company that is the target of increasingly sophisticated cyber attacks. In the game, players must complete challenges to strengthen their cyber defenses and thwart their attackers.

The Cybersecurity Lab is a great resource for STEM educators who want to teach their students best practices for staying safe online and introduce them to computer science principles and the architecture of online networks.

Yukon Marine Life Survey

9-1-16 Update:

"Ocean Sanctuaries is pleased to report that the Yukon Marine Life Survey has identified and confirmed 11 genera of invertebrates using hi definition photography on the artificial reef Yukon, a 366 ft. long Canadian warship sunk off the coast of San Diego in 2000, to act as a marine life aggregator, a goal it has been extremely successful at in the intervening 15 years on the bottom.

See here for more info: http://oceanspaces.org/community-group/citizen-science-oceanspaces/news/yukon-marine-life-survey-progress-report

Ocean Sanctuaries now offers an opportunity for San Diego divers to contribute to a citizen science survey of the abundant marine life that has accumulated on the Canadian destroyer 'Yukon' since its sinking off the coast of San Diego to be an artificial reef in 2000.

15 years ago, in 2000, the City of San Diego in collaboration with the San Diego Oceans Foundation, purchased, cleaned and deliberately sank a 366 foot-long Canadian warship called the Yukon to act as an artificial reef and attract local marine life, a task at which it is been spectacularly successful.

In the 15 years that the Yukon has been sitting on the bottom off the coast of San Diego, it has attracted dozens of species of local marine life as well as a revenue-generating attraction for tourist divers from around the world.

The first scientific study of the marine life on the Yukon was undertaken in 2004 by Dr. Ed Parnell of Scripps Institution of Oceanography in collaboration with the San Diego Oceans Foundation. It utilized data gathered by local citizen science divers to generate an initial baseline study of the marine life species on the ship. 1

It too, will utilize local divers as citizen scientists to systematically gather data about the marine life species that have accumulated on the ship since 2004.

The Yukon lies in 100 ft of water and is considered an advanced dive and should not be attempted except by those who have the proper training.

SCARAB (Scientific Collaboration for Accessible Research About Borers)

This is a citizen science project to help track the spread of invasive beetles, such as the polyphagus shothole borer (PSHB), to better understand factors leading to their spread and how to manage them.

Missouri Stream Team Volunteer Water Quality Monitoring

The Missouri Stream Team Volunteer Water Quality Monitoring program trains volunteers across the state to monitor streams and collect biological, physical, and chemical data.

There are four levels of training: Introductory Level, Level 1, Level 2, and Level 3. Each level needs to be taken sequentially since each class builds on the previous one. At the Introductory Level workshops you will learn about watersheds, how to measure stream discharge, and how to use the macroinvertebrates in the stream to assess the water quality. After you complete the Introductory Level Workshop and submit data at your chosen monitoring site, you will be eligible to attend the Level 1 Workshop. At this workshop, you will learn about water chemistry and get a review of macroinvertebrates. After the completion of this workshop you will get the chemical kits and other equipment to chemically monitor water quality. The Level 2 workshop is the Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QAQC) workshop. The Level 3 is an audit where Program Staff will come out to your monitoring site and verify techniques.

Fidget Widgets

Goof Off While You Work? You Might Be Doing Way More Than You Think.

Ever notice how people play with a thing — pen, paperclip, stress ball, magnets, marker, etc. — while lost in thought as they work? Maybe you do it too. There’s a powerful link between the hand and the brain. Research shows that our feelings, thoughts, and body are very much interconnected.

Our Fidget Widgets project is exploring this behavior and the opportunity for small, tangible, digital interactions to tap into what happens while people fiddle with objects as they work. Think of a Fidget Widget as a new kind of productivity tool aiming to subtly enhance your creativity, or give you focus, or decrease stress just when you need it.

Our study requires lots and lots of participation.

What we’ve learned so far is that people strongly desire surprisingly specific experiences in their hands. We're using a tumblr page to collect examples of items and materials and ways in which people fiddle with objects while at work. Only with many submissions will patterns emerge. These patterns will provide valuable insights into how people use objects to self-regulate their internal state as they work and will inform just where we go next.

Welsh Sea Watchers Project

The Sea Watch Foundation is looking to recruit enthusiastic individuals with a keen interest in Welsh whales, dolphins and porpoises to become part of the Welsh Sea Watchers project. The Welsh Sea Watches Project is a new initiative with that aims to develop a network of reliable volunteers throughout Wales to assist in data collection and further understanding and public awareness of the amazing cetacean species that can be seen off Welsh coasts. Volunteers will take part in a variety of tasks and gain experience in cetacean surveying and species identification, as well as public awareness work and social networking.
‘Sea Watchers’ will assist the Wales Development Officer and Sightings Officer in a number of tasks including but not limited to

• Organising and conducting regular land based watches for cetaceans

• Organising, attending and assisting during Sea Watch events

• Representing Sea Watch during public talks and school visits

The Welsh Sea Watchers project is an on-going project; volunteers may apply throughout the year. Due to the nature of the project, it is advisable that applicants are already resident in Wales, as accommodation cannot be provided.

Desirable skills/qualifications

• Background in education or marine biology

• Driving license and use of own car

Duration/minimum commitment
Welsh Sea Watcher volunteers should ideally be active all year around with a minimum commitment of 4 hours per month.

This is a flexible, part-time positions; volunteers are expected to organise their own time and work independently (with guidance from the Welsh Development Officer).

URI Watershed Watch

The URI Watershed Watch (URIWW) is a volunteer water quality monitoring program that works with local communities to assess water quality, identify sources of pollution in water and provide information about water leading to more effective management of critical water resources. Led by trained scientists, URI Watershed Watch helps citizen scientists gather detailed, quality assured monitoring data. We focus on long-term monitoring of RI's fresh and salt water resources including lakes, ponds, streams and coastal waters. We provide training, equipment, supplies and analytical services tailored to organizational needs to help communities use information locally.

Project ScumScan

Our citizen science group in LA has been measuring water quality along the river as well as capturing water samples. We're trying to measure the base biodiversity of the river system by getting a census of all of the species we've been sampling. This will help indicate the overall health and diversity of the river system.

River Instream Flow Stewards

The River Instream Flow Stewards program helps people to collect and use streamflow data in Massachusetts. RIFLS, as it is known, began in 2002 in response to concerns that many small streams were flow-stressed and that these impacts were not being documented. RIFLS staff work with partners to collect high quality streamflow data, to better understand the causes of unnatural streamflows, and to inform and support policy and actions that restore and maintain environmental flows.

Wisconsin's Water Action Volunteers

Water Action Volunteers (WAV) is a statewide program for Wisconsin citizens who want to learn about and improve the quality of Wisconsin’s streams and rivers. The program is coordinated through a partnership between the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and the University of Wisconsin – Cooperative Extension.

Volunteers collect data on water chemistry, water clarity, and other aspects of stream health.

Stream Team

The goals of Channelkeeper’s Stream Team Program are to collect and disseminate data to measure the health of local streams; identify and abate specific sources of pollution to these streams; measure trends or changes resulting from pollution prevention efforts; and foster environmental stewardship in our community by providing a rewarding outdoor volunteer opportunity for local citizens.

Stream Team is one of Channelkeeper’s longest running and most successful programs, which to date has educated and engaged more than 1,000 volunteers in helping us conduct monthly water quality sampling. Each month, Stream Team volunteers test common water quality parameters at at 47 stream sites in the watersheds of the Goleta Valley, Carpinteria Valley and Ventura River. Volunteers use portable meters to test in-stream parameters such as temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, and conductivity. In addition, samples are collected that are later analyzed in the laboratory for bacteria and nutrients. Visual observations such as weather conditions, algae coverage, water clarity, odors, and trash are also recorded on standardized datasheets. We follow rigorous Quality Assurance/Quality Control protocols that are based on a Quality Assurance Project Plan approved by the State Water Resources Control Board.

Our Stream Team data is used by government agencies to inform pollution prevention programs and water resource management decisions. We’ve identified numerous pollution hot spots and sources through Stream Team sampling and have worked cooperatively with the relevant government agencies to get these problems cleaned up. Our ultimate goal is cleaner, healthier water and a more environmentally responsible citizenry that is actively engaged in addressing the pollution problems plaguing our waterways.

Madison Stream Team

Since 2010, the Madison Stream Team has been collecting water quality data in the Madison Watershed to gain a better understanding of resource conditions, and to help direct future management decisions. To prepare for data collection, Stream Team members go through a one day technical training in early summer. Then, each member dedicates one day in July, August, and September to conduct monitoring on one of their assigned streams.

In all, the Madison Stream Team is responsible for collecting data on 7 streams in the Madison Watershed. This data is then used to inform the Madison Conservation District, and other local organizations, about the condition of the streams in the Madison. This helps these organizations to determine areas that may have room for improvement, and can help identify potential project sites for the future.

Play to Cure: Genes in Space

Help researchers cure cancer.

The problem:

We know that faults in our genes can lead to cancer cells forming. This can be linked to the amount of genes in our cells - sometimes we have more and sometimes we have less.

It can take years for scientists to analyze all of their genetic data, but with thousands of citizen scientists playing Genes in Space, the process is greatly accelerated.

How it works:

First, you plot a galactic route. In the context of the game, you're choosing your flight path, but these “space coordinates” are actually a visualization of DNA data, and you're showing our scientists where the genetic variations are which may lead to cancer.

Then you collect Element Alpha, a mist like substance that can be traded for ship upgrades. It actually represents the same DNA data that has just been mapped – which means our scientists have two perspectives on the same sample, from one player.

And we’ve added an asteroid field. This makes the gameplay more engaging and challenging. You need to dodge or shoot a multitude of asteroids to complete a stage.

Each data sample is analyzed multiple times for accuracy. Don’t worry about making mistakes - the more people who use Genes in Space, the more accurate the results will be and the faster data can be translated into new ways to beat cancer.

Butler County Stream Team

The Butler County Stream Team is a volunteer group that studies local water quality on the second Saturday of each month - March through November. We conduct two kinds of testing, chemical and biological.

Chemical- Volunteers collect water samples from set locations around the county from rivers and streams. The water samples are then tested by volunteers at our water quality lab for the following parameters: nitrates, total phosphorous, bacteria, conductivity, total dissolved solids, pH, turbidity. We are always interested in more interested citizen scientists helping with this lab work. It typically takes about 3 hours, on the 2nd Saturday each month.

Biological- In 2014 we started looking at benthic macroinvertebrates (AKA creek critters) to provide a fuller picture of the health of the water. This is conducted 2-3 times per year at specific sites within the county, although not on a set day.

Other happenings: We have numerous events both for education and of course for fun throughout the year. These include a data sharing potluck in February, kayak floats, trips to floating wetland projects and water treatment plants, and classes on macroinvertebrates and rain barrels.

Waccamaw River Volunteer Water Quality Monitoring

Water quality monitoring at multiple sites along the Waccamaw River in North and South Carolina. The project is a partnership between the Waccamaw Riverkeeper and the Waccamaw Watershed Academy. Multiple parameters including turbidity, nutrients, bacteria, DO, pH, conductivity, salinity, and temperature are measured at each site twice per month throughout the year.

The program is now entering its 10th year and we track all data online for a comprehensive look at changes and patterns. Data is also reported to local stakeholders and state regulators.

All sampling is completed by volunteers and the Waccamaw Watershed Academy helps to provide supplies and testing meters as well as volunteer training.

Volunteer Monthly Monitoring

At 6 am on the third Tuesday of the month, volunteers meet their partners at their assigned sampling locations along the Charles River. Volunteers collect a water sample in the sterile bottle provided and measure the water temperature and depth. Volunteers then deliver their sample and data sheet to the assigned drop-off location and collect materials for the next month's sampling event.

Check out the list and map of our sampling sites: http://www.crwa.org/field-science/monthly-monitoring/sampling-sites

IDAH₂O Master Water Stewards

The IDAH2O Master Water Steward program participants attend an 8-hour workshop which combines classroom instruction and hands-on field work.

A certified Master Water Steward then can adopt a stream location to conduct regular monitoring of habitat, biological, chemical and physical assessments. Stewards upload all data collected to an interactive HIS website that is publicly available. Another focus of the program is to educate citizens on the science behind water quality and to help them understand streams, rivers and lakes systems. Youth involvement and K-12 participation (formal and after-school enrichment) is also strongly supported.

Leaf Pack Network

What is the Leaf Pack Network®?

A Hands-On Stream Ecology Investigation Based on Real Science!

Science involves more than simply collecting data. Science is also the process of communicating and sharing results, initiated through inquiry.

The Leaf Pack Network® is an international network of teachers, students, and citizen monitors investigating their local stream ecosystem. Through the Leaf Pack Experiment, monitors use tree leaves and aquatic insects to determine the health of their stream and to understand its ecology.

Individuals participating in the Leaf Pack Experiment and Leaf Pack Network® engage in the full process of designing an experiment, conducting research and communicating their results. Leaf Pack can also easily be implemented into any curriculum and fulfills many state and national science standards. Watch your students become empowered and energized learning about their local watershed!


The C-BARQ (or Canine Behavioral Assessment and Research Questionnaire) is designed to provide dog owners and professionals with standardized evaluations of canine temperament and behavior. The current version consists of 100 questions describing the different ways in which dogs typically respond to common events, situations, and stimuli in their environment. The C-BARQ is simple to use, and can be completed by anyone who is reasonably familiar with a dog's typical, day-to-day behavior. On average, it takes from 10-15 minutes to complete.

The aim of the C-BARQ project is to collect behavioral data on pet dogs from citizen scientists all over the world. To date, we have collected more than 30,000 records for more than 290 different breeds and mixed breeds of dog, but the more dogs and owners who contribute to the project, the better. The ultimate goal is to understand the sources of behavioral diversity in dogs.

The C-BARQ is also available to veterinarians, behavioral consultants, researchers, shelters, breeders, and working dog organizations with an interest in screening dogs for the presence and severity of behavioral problems.

Emotional Load of Calls

Assist in research investigating the evolutionary and ethological foundations of dog-human relationship. Dogs, like other animals, communicate through vocalization. They communicate their needs and desires, and they can also communicate their emotions.

The Emotional load of calls is a 30 minute survey, with two optional pauses after 10-minute intervals. You will hear human and dog calls, and your task is to mark the sound sample based on the caller's emotional state and intensity

Canid Howl Project

Come listen to the enchanting, haunting sounds of wolves, coyotes, and dogs, and help us better understand and conserve these species.

Analysing these recordings is difficult and time consuming. It's easy to make mistakes, and mistakes can change the conclusions that we draw. But here's where you can help! By having hundreds, even thousands of volunteers giving their own analysis of the canid howls, we can investigate the role of these sounds, and understand more about the social behaviour of the whole range of canid species and breeds.

You can also donate your dog's howl for the project.

Pets Can Do

Participate in the University of Lincoln's animal behavior, cognition and welfare research by participating in surveys or, if you live nearby, signing your dog up for their dog research programs.

Pet owners and non-pet owners from all over the world can participate by filling out surveys about topics such as: separation anxiety in dogs and self-disclosure with dogs. The survey list is updated regularly with new surveys.

If you live in the area, you can sign your dog up to take part in one of their research programs, found in one of three categories: observational, behavior/training tasks, or training skills practicals.

Night Cities

Since 2003, the astronauts have been taking photos from the International Space Station. Many of these images have been published on the websites of participating agencies or the Twitter accounts of the astronauts. However, most of the images taken by astronauts have not been published remaining on archive without being shown to the world. We have added a section to this gallery dedicated to displaying more than a thousand examples of images of cities at night. However, there are still hundreds of thousands of images on file to discover. You can help.

Light pollution causes serious problems. Its effects can be measured from the inside of our bedroom to hundreds of kilometers away. The light destroys the essence of the evening darkness. Humans have an ancestral fear of the dark, but too much light produces very negative effects on the ecosystem and our health.

Satellite images help us measure and compare large illuminate areas. With the colors of the images taken by astronauts on the International Space Station, we can measure the efficiency of lighting in many cities on the planet.

We need volunteers to help us sort the pictures and identify the locations of the images to create maps of light pollution. It will help governments and local authorities to make the right decisions to reduce light pollution.

Transparency Life Sciences

Transparency Life Sciences is an open innovation drug company that crowd sources improvements to clinical trial protocols. Join TLS's network and improve drug development research by contributing your expertise or experience. Researchers, clinicians can help by making recommendations to clinical trial protocols or suggesting alternate uses for pharmaceuticals. Patients and families can help by making recommendations for protocols that fit their needs.

Featured tools:

1) The Protocol Builder is a crowdsourcing survey tool. By answering a few questions you can help improve clinical trial protocols.

2) Indication Finder for researchers only, users can help identify potential new applications for stalled pharmaceuticals.

Floating Forests

Floating Forests asks you to help us uncover the history of Giant Kelp forests around the globe. Most algae and animals that live on the seafloor can only be sampled by SCUBA divers or dredging up samples from the deep. This kind of data requires a ton of (really fun) effort to collect, but it means we’re limited in our knowledge of changes in their abundances through time. But Giant Kelp is amazing - it can grow up to a foot a day and forms lush canopies that can be seen by some of the earliest satellites man put into space!

Wissahickon Creek Watch Program

The WVWA is looking for a dedicated group of volunteers to help monitor the health of the Wissahickon Creek and its tributaries! The Citizen Scientists will be trained in water quality monitoring, primarily using visual assessments. Each volunteer is assigned a 1-­2 mile section on public land from the headwaters in North Wales to Fairmount Park. They will submit data for algae cover, animal observations, erosion, percent shade and a myriad of other indicators of stream health. Additionally, there will sub-­group of Creek Watchers known as the “Wading Team” that will take samples from the stream to determine the amount of nutrients, dissolved oxygen and water temperature. The WVWA held training sessions in July and monitoring will begin in August. The dates of the next training sessions are to be determined.

Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center

Collecting samples of aquatic insects from the remote Grand Canyon segment of the Colorado River is challenging and extremely expensive. We seek citizen scientists to help us collect samples of the adult life stages of aquatic insects that are emerging from the Colorado River in Grand Canyon using simple light traps that are set out each night in camp. We will provide sampling gear and notebooks.

Health Data Exploration Project

Individuals are tracking a variety of health-related data via a growing number of wearable devices and smartphone apps. More and more data relevant to health are also being captured passively as people communicate with one another on social networks, shop, work, or do any number of activities that leave “digital footprints.” Self-tracking data can provide better measures of everyday behavior and lifestyle and can fill in gaps in more traditional clinical or public health data collection, giving us a more complete picture of health.

We at the Health Data Exploration project are creating a Network of innovators in PHD to catalyze the use of personal data for the public good. This Network will bring together companies, researchers, and strategic partners to strategize, coordinate, and experiment with using PHD to understand health.

We need the help of citizen scientists to take this project forward. How do you think personal health data can provide insights into health? What would make you more willing or less willing to share your own data? What concerns or suggestions do you have?


Nature’s best kept secret is a wonder molecule called RNA. It is central to the origin of life, evolution, and the cellular machinery that keeps us alive.

In this Lab you’ll play the role of a molecular engineer by solving RNA folding puzzles. Then take your skills to Eterna, where you can design RNAs that could be at the heart of future life-saving therapies.

This project is part of the NOVA Labs platform


Help scientists analyze brain blood flow movies - are blood vessels flowing or stalled?

One symptom of Alzheimer’s that has been known since the discovery of the disease is reduced blood flow to the brain, but until now, nobody knew why. That is why this aspect of the disease, which likely contributes to cognitive problems and accelerates injury to brain cells, has remained untreated.

New specialized imaging techniques have allowed Cornell University researchers to discover a potential cause of the reduced blood flow. This suggests new treatment approaches that could slow progression of the disease to delay, or even prevent, the onset of symptoms, and possibly restore some cognitive function when symptoms are present.

However, understanding the molecular basis of the process, and homing in on the specific pharmaceutical targets using current methods could take decades, limited primarily by the need for extensive manual image analysis. Crowdsourcing this analysis to citizen scientists could reduce that time to just a few years.

Personal Genome Project

The Personal Health Genome is a global community interested in creating an open access database for genomic, trait and health data. In addition to genomic data, the project is interested in studying genome and environment interactions as well as other aspects of the human experience.

Visualizing Health

When it comes to our bodies, data abounds. We all have a blood pressure, weight, cholesterol levels, A1c, BMI, and more. We have risks, too. We might have or be at risk for cancer, or heart disease, or have a higher risk of experiencing a side effect of a medication or treatment than someone else.

In theory, this data can help us make better decisions about our health. Should I take this pill? Will it help me more than it hurts me? How can I reduce my risk? And so on.

But for individuals, it’s not always easy to understand what the numbers are telling us. And for those communicating the information – doctors, hospitals, researchers, public health professionals — it’s not always clear what sort of presentation will make the most sense to the most people.

That problem is the inspiration behind Visualizing Health, a project of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Michigan Center for Health Communications Research. This site contains 54 examples of tested visualizations – that is, graphic displays of health information that we’ve evaluated through research among the general public. Our objective was to create a gallery of beautiful and easy-to-make-sense-of graphs, charts, and images that effectively communicate risk information. Health data that makes sense.

Natural North Carolina

North Carolina is a beautiful place! With the huge variation in habitat types - from the mountains to the piedmont to the coastal plain - our state boasts a grand diversity of plants, animals, and fungi. Just look around. You likely encounter hundreds of species in your daily life, and many just beyond your front door!

Scientists at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences document the species in our great state and share the things we learn with you in our Museum exhibits. But, we can't be everywhere at once! We need YOUR help. By photographing and reporting the wildlife you see in your everyday life to Natural North Carolina, you can help us learn more about the species that call North Carolina home. You will also help us create an atlas of North Carolina's flora and fauna that you can use to identify the natural things you see in your local area. And all you have to do to help is snap a photo of something in nature and tell us where and when you took it. Easy!

So, get outside! Snap a few photos. Become a citizen scientist by submitting your photos to Natural North Carolina. Together, we can discover the wonders of North Carolina and learn more about our amazing state.

BC Cetacean Sightings Network

Twenty-three species of cetaceans and sea turtles have been recorded in the waters of British Columbia, Canada. Many of these populations are 'at-risk' and under-studied.
The B.C. Cetacean Sightings Network (BCCSN) collects sightings of cetaceans and sea turtles in the waters surrounding British Columbia, Canada using a network of citizen scientist observers. Our observer base is diverse, from interested citizens to lighthouse keepers, ecotourism professionals, mariners and recreational boaters. Anyone can participate and reports are made via an on-line form, toll free number, email, or supplied logbook. Look for our smartphone app, WhaleReport, available now for free download from the iTunes and Google Play stores.

Exploring a Culture of Health: Visualizing Health

Health data can be confusing. Designing visuals for health data and risk information is a useful tool for communicating this information. But how best to design these visuals? Visualizing Health examines different ways to visualize data.


Photos taken in disaster situations and other humanitarian crises by different people on the ground can potentially be a powerful resource for the response teams. In fact, the information we gain from these images can be crucial to provide humanitarian aid not only in the immediate response effort, but also in future recovery and preparedness work.

Unfortunately, the manpower needed to process the incredible number of photos coming out of these situations makes this duty impossible for a single organization. Therefore we are turning to the crowd and looking for volunteers to help us rapidly extract meaningful, relevant and structured data from these photos.

This is why we launched the GeoTag-X platform, which gathers a series of pilot projects (for example, the Emergency Shelter Assessment project) covering different disaster related events. GeoTag-X asks people to analyse the photographs associated with each event by answering some short and strictly structured questions.

Our final aim is to have an open source tool and associated analysis questions that can be taken by anyone working in an humanitarian crisis and quickly and easily adapted to their needs. To do so, we need as many volunteers as possible to help us assess GeoTag-X’s suitability as a tool in disaster response.

Sea Star Wasting Disease

Experiments suggest that most sea stars now harbor a virus or bacterium that is making them sick. Although most stars may now be infected, we are trying to understand why they die in higher numbers at some locations than others.

We will use the citizen science data to identify whether there is a temperature threshold or some other environmental conditions associated with outbreak and non-outbreak sites. The most valuable data for us is to know what percentage of stars are sick and dead at particular sites and to verify your diagnosis of 'sick' with a photo.


Nanocrafter invites you to become a citizen scientist in the field of synthetic biology! As you solve puzzles to progress through the game, you'll learn about DNA biochemistry and how DNA strand displacement can be used to build computers, gears, walking constructs, and more! Compete in challenge levels that let you submit creative solutions to problems ranging from casual to highly technical. Review the solutions that others submit, team up to come up with even better solutions, and help scientists forge the future of synthetic biology!

Check out our game video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IaQEQ8Tiu_0

Follow us on twitter: @nanocrafter

Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nanocraftergame

British Columbia Bat Watch

Bat Watch is a citizen science initiative to monitor bat populations over the long-term. Given the spread of White Nose Syndrome (WNS), a devastating disease that is killing bats during hibernation, monitoring bat populations is more important than ever. Since WNS has not yet reached British Columbia, assessing populations annually will allow biologists to detect drastic changes in populations providing an early detection of WNS. Anyone in British Columbia can participate in the BC Bat Count if they know of a roost sites of bats. This might be an attic, barn, shed, bat-house, cave or mine.

Blue Catfish Watch

Show us your blue catfish catch! Collaborate with scientists at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center to help us track the expanding range of the non-native blue catfish into the upper Chesapeake Bay and into Delaware Bay and the Delaware River.

Native to the Mississippi, Ohio and Missouri Rivers, blue catfish were introduced to Virginia for sport fishing beginning in 1974. Since introduction, these non-native top predators have expanded their range into many of Maryland’s tributaries, including the Nanticoke, Patuxent, Choptank, Susquehanna and Sassafras Rivers. Due to their large size and adult predatory feeding behavior, blue catfish are consuming many native fish species, such as white perch, largemouth bass, American shad, river herring and menhaden. Knowing where and when these catfish are being caught is an important part of understanding their rising impact on the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. Remember that it is illegal in Maryland, Virginia, and Delaware to transport and release live blue catfish.

Identifying Blue Catfish
Blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) have a bluish-gray body and a deeply forked tail. Unlike channel catfish, they do not have spots on their body. One feature that distinguishes blue catfish from other catfishes is the prominent straight edge on their anal fin; other catfishes, including the similarly colored white catfish, have a rounded anal fin (see pictures on website).

Be A Smithsonian Archaeology Volunteer

Join the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) Archaeology Lab as we excavate two sites on SERC property this summer! Work with scientists and students to excavate sites, preserve artifacts, and collect environmental data to understand the ways that people change the land has changed (or not) over the past 200 years.

We request that volunteers serve at least one day, but more days are encouraged! No experience is necessary and training will be provided. This opportunity is suitable for families with older children (13+ directly supervised by a parent/guardian, 16+ may be able to work without having a parent/guardian present)and groups. Volunteers will be working outside and some bending and kneeling is required.

For people who wish to become more deeply involved with the program, we offer a research citizen science track, where volunteers will pursue semi-independent research and may even publish their findings in professional journals. This opportunity is only available to people aged 18+. Research Citizen Scientists must commit to a minimum of 10 hours per month for at least 4 months.

All volunteer activities occur on Wednesdays on the campus of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, MD.

Pieris Project

The Pieris Project is a citizen science initiative designed to collect morphology and genetic data on a single species - the cabbage white butterfly (Pieris rapae) - from across its entire range, including your backyard! The small cabbage white butterfly is a great species to study how organisms adapt to new environments, because this butterfly has invaded many parts of the world within the last two centuries and is now found on nearly every continent. With your help, and only with your help, we can create the world's most comprehensive butterfly collection that will allow us to learn how the cabbage white has adapted to new environments as it expanded across the globe. This type of data will be critical to understanding how species may respond to environmental changes, such as climate change and habitat destruction.


Infinome studies the complex relationship between your genes and lifestyle to discover the balance between nature and nurture. Anyone can participate by linking their wearable activity tracker and/or 23andMe account. The Infinome website links to millions of biomedical research papers to help users understand their genome, and provides visualizations of their exercise data.

Infinome has also launched a mobile app to help users log their diets. The app uses artificial intelligence to identify the food on their plate, and log calories.

Dark Skies ISS

Right now there are around 1.800.000 images at the Johnson Space Center database (The Gateway of the Astronauts). Around 1.200.000 images were taken aboard the ISS (date 20/02/2014). However the number of the classified images is much smaller and there is no archive of georeferenced images. There is a project to classify the day time images (Image detective). But, the techniques that are used in this project are not useful for the classification of night time images. The reason is that the patterns on Earth are not the same during the day and night. This is why another technique is needed to classify these night time images.

Our main objective is to study the light pollution that came from the cities. We want to stop the waste of energy and the destruction of the mighty ecosystem.

Your collaboration it is really important because algorithms cannot distinguis between stars, cities, and other objects (i.e. moon). Thus, we need your help to assess the light pollution in our world!

Planet Mappers: Mercury Edition

Map the surface of Mercury by marking and measuring craters and linear surface features in images from NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft.

By mapping craters across the planet, we can start to piece together the global crater population and figure out what these new images are showing us about the solar system’s inner-most planet.

Asteroid Mappers: Vesta Edition

Help us map the surface of asteroid Vesta using images from NASA' Dawn spacecraft. Measure the sizes and positions of craters and other surface features.

Why do we care about craters? Craters can tell us a lot about what’s happening on a planetary surface. One of the main uses of craters is to tell ages. The age of Vesta’s surface is really important to know, because it was probably one of the very first objects to fully form in the solar system.


BiodiversiTREE is an experimental forest on the campus of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, MD. In fall of 2013, staff and volunteers planted more than 20,000 trees in 75 plots. Some of the plots have one species, some have 4 species, and others have 12 species. Over the next 100 years, professional and citizen scientists will collect data to better understand the impacts of forest biodiversity on environmental factors such as tree growth, insect diversity, and soil quality.

We are seeking volunteers to help us maintain our forest and to help us collect data! No prior knowledge is required. This opportunity is suitable for people age 16 and over. Younger volunteers (under the supervision of a parent or guardian) will be considered on a case by case basis. Volunteers will be working outside and this work involves a lot of kneeling and bending. Volunteers must come to the SERC campus in Edgewater, MD to volunteer.


Malaria is a prevalent disease in poorer countries, where it infects 216 million people and kills 650,000 each year, mostly African children under 5 years old [WHO]. Plasmodium falciparum is the parasite responsible for malaria and it continues to evolve resistance to available medication.

We urgently need to discover new drugs which target NEW proteins in the parasite. The FightMalaria@Home project is aimed at finding these new targets.

Donate your computer power to aid in antimalarial drug research. Run through the BOINC platform.


If you've ever wondered what your child is thinking or what it's like inside your newborn's mind, you're not alone.
The single most amazing computational engine known to mankind is your child's mind.

We're hoping to learn more about how babies and children learn by enlisting the help of their most dedicated and curious observers: their own parents!

By participating in a quick online activity with your child and submitting a webcam recording of his/her responses, you can contribute to our collective understanding of the fascinating phenomenon of children's learning.

In some experiments you'll step into the role of a researcher, asking your child questions or controlling the experiment based on what he or she does.

Traditionally, developmental studies happen in a quiet room in a university lab. Why complement these in-lab studies with online ones? We're hoping to...

...Make it easier for you to take part in research, especially for families without a stay-at-home parent

...Work with more kids when needed--right now a limiting factor in designing studies is the time it takes to recruit participants

...Draw conclusions from a more representative population of families--not just those who live near a university and are able to visit the lab during the day

...Make it easier for families to continue participating in longitudinal studies, which may involve multiple testing sessions separated by months or years

...Observe more natural behavior because children are at home rather than in an unfamiliar place

...Create a system for learning about special populations--for instance, children with specific developmental disorders

...Make the procedures we use in doing research more transparent, and make it easier to replicate our findings

...Communicate with families about the research we're doing and what we can learn from it

Open Research Exchange

The world’s first open-participation research platform for creating health outcome measurements.

Patients Like Me

Patients Like Me is an opportunity for patients and medical experts to communication and improve healthcare. Individuals and experts can share and compare experiences such as treatments or symptoms. Individuals track their health, learn more about different treatments, or connect with individuals with similar conditions.

Health eHeart Study

The Health eHeart Study is the first of its kind - an electronic clinical research study that will gather long-term information about participants' health and behaviors with the latest technologies.

The goal of this study is to hone in on more specific predictors of heart disease by taking into account each person's unique profile in relation to our constantly evolving world.

We need people of all ages and from all backgrounds to tease out the reasons behind heart disease. The only criteria is that the participants are 18 years and older. We are looking to enroll up to 1 million participants worldwide.

A.T. Seasons

The A.T. Seasons project brings together different parks and organizations that are actively monitoring seasonal changes in plants and animals (phenology) along the Appalachian Trail. Using Nature’s Notebook or our customized mobile app observers at all levels will be contributing to a comprehensive dataset with the goal of understanding the relationship between phenology and climate change along the Appalachian Trail. Get Involved today!

A.T. Seasons is your opportunity to help track the unfolding of important life cycle events each year along the iconic Appalachian Trail, linking your observations with others from Georgia to Maine. By observing and reporting seasonal changes of plants and animals you will help build the foundation to understanding and protecting the scenic & natural beauty of the trail corridor.

Cat Tracker

Cats are mysterious, dangerous and far more unpredictable than one might expect from an animal that is theoretically, domesticated. Some of the mysteries of cats relate to where they go and what they do; this is especially true of cats that go outdoors. We open our doors. They leave. Just where they go, we can’t be sure. Or rather we couldn’t be sure, until now. With your help, we’re investigating the movement of domesticated cats across the landscape. We want to know: Where do they go? What are they eating? What do they bring home, microbially speaking?

The Winnower

The Winnower is a scholarly publishing platform that provides traditional scholarly publishing tools (DOI, typesetting, archival, and Altmetrics) to traditional and non-traditional media including blogposts, reddit AMAs, class essays, grants, theses, reviews, responses to RFIs, lay summaries, journal clubs, citizen science projects and other new media so that it counts for the scholarly record and the scholar’s career. We’ve been live for ~2 years and have 1220+ publications from universities and individuals around the world.


PressureNet is a network of crowdsourced weather sensors. We automatically collect atmospheric pressure measurements using barometers in new Android devices. We're sharing this live data with scientists and researchers to improve weather forecasting. Soon we'll provide you with a weather forecast based on everyone's live, shared data!

We're going to make new weather models using the data that PressureNet automatically collects - these models should produce forecasts that are significantly more accurate than any other method! Since the data is collected using smartphones, we can gather way more data about the atmosphere than ever before.

Until we make forecasts, PressureNet shows you the raw data. The pressure data is displayed in graphs so that you can see both your own data as well as other regions' graphed over time. We've just added animations as well, so you can watch storms moving across a region. Furthermore, you can now report what the weather is where you are! Current weather conditions automatically refresh every twenty minutes to keep it accurate.

PressureNet has been featured on BBC World Service, Wired Science, and MIT Technology Review.

Clean Air Council Climate Tracker

The Clean Air Council Climate Tracker, developed in partnership with Code for Philly, is developing mobile sensors that can be mounted to city buses and bikes and report pollution and climate-related in real time to be shared as Open Data, for use by app developers and researchers.

With this data being openly available, app developers can empower citizens to avoid areas of high pollution, while also demonstrating the local effects of climate change. Researchers will be able to use an unprecedented level of data to study the effects of climate change on microclimate.

This data will be linked with OpenTreeMaps to demonstrate trees' impact on microclimate, as well as quantify their capacity to mitigate the effects of climate change in an urban setting.

Disk Detective

NASA astrophysicists need your help finding new planetary systems. At Disk Detective, you'll view 10-second videos of images from NASA telescopes and help us decide if they might be stars with dusty disks where planets form and dwell. The best candidates you find get followed-up with other telescopes so we can learn more about how planets are born.

L.A. Nature Map

The L.A. Nature Map hosted by the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles is an interactive map that displays local plant and wildlife observations.

Our Southern California region is a hotspot for urban biodiversity. With your help, we can show Angelenos and the world the diversity of nature all around us. You can contribute to this citizen science project by sending photos of plants and animals.

The L.A. Nature Map is created in collaboration with iNaturalist.

RASCals (Reptiles and Amphibians of Southern California)

RASCals is designed to improve our knowledge of native and non-native reptiles and amphibians in southern California. This region is home to 22.5 million people and has experienced dramatic urbanization and habitat modification. We need your help in documenting reptiles and amphibians throughout the region so that we can examine how various species have responded to these habitat changes. We are interested in native and non-native species and in observations in all types of habitats, from relatively pristine habitats to heavily modified, urban habitats, such as backyards, schoolyards, and urban parks. This project is conducted in collaboration with iNaturalist.

American Meteor Society - Meteor observing

Join the American Meteor Society community and contribute valuable and precise data relating to meteor shower and fireball observations. The AMS App allows witnesses of fireball meteors to log details about their observation using the mobile device. Sensors in the phone provide an accurate means to record the location of the observation as well as the azimuth and elevation values for the start and end points of the meteor. Using this data the AMS can accurately triangulate fireball meteors and plot their orbits to determine their celestial origins. The APP also provides a means to log observations from meteor showers. Simply start your observing session and then each time you see a meteor point to that place in the sky and swipe your finger on the screen in the direction the meteor traveled. Observation data is uploaded to the AMS website, available under your profile there and shared with the scientific community. The AMS App also provides a useful meteor shower calendar with star charts and moon conditions for all major and minor showers throughout the year.

Monitor Change: Fire Monitoring

Inspired by the USGS's Sam Droege (the man behind monitorchange.org), we have a couple projects to turn park visitors into a remote sensor network! It's simple: Put up a sign asking people to set their cameras or phones in an angle bracket, take a photo, and post it with a hashtag to Twitter, Instagram, or Flickr. Then we harvest the photos and create timelapse views of change over time.

The Fairchild Challenge- Citizen Science


Birdeez is the easiest way to identify, collect and share bird sightings. The goal of this project is to educate you about the birds in your area while you contribute sightings that will be used for scientific understanding of bird migration, bird populations and climate change.

Currently Birdeez is available as an iPhone application at www.GetBirdeez.com/ but soon we we will be online and on different phone platforms as well.

Every bird counts, so help us help them by collecting and sharing sightings.


Visionlearning is a digital resource for science students and educators. Visionlearning contains free open access lessons covering a range of STEM topics. There is a Classroom feature where students can bookmark modules and glossary words for future reference and where teachers can assemble the materials into a learning management system. We also welcome professional scientist and educators to contribute to our learning materials.

Our Radioactive Ocean

It has now been 5 years since the release of radioactive contaminants from Fukushima and we are now seeing the evidence on the west coast of North America. Help scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution reveal the ongoing spread of radiation across the Pacific and its evolving impacts on the ocean.

Clarification for fundraising costs: shipping is about 20% of the cost, the other majority is for the cesium extraction steps in the lab, radioactivity detection and data processing, along with managing the web site and database.

There are 3 ways to support us:

1) Help us reach our goal by donating to sample an existing site. Simply click on "HELP FUND A LOCATION" and choose to support one of the many sites that are underway

2) Someone can propose a new sampling site. Click on "PROPOSE A LOCATION" and see what is involved. We are trying to get spread of locations up/down coast. With a donation or fundraising of $100 we'll set up a fundraising webpage, add that page to our website, and send you a sampling kit once your goal has been reached. Fundraising amounts are generally between $550 (WA, OR, CA) and $600 (BC, AK, HI). Differences reflect increased shipping charges to some areas.

3) We also seek funds for general capacity building and public education activities at CMER: http://ourradioactiveocean.org/support ($20 minimum donation)

The Cave Pearl Project

The Cave Pearls have grown into a robust Arduino based underwater logging platform, that is easy to assemble from preexisting components, which can be adapted to many other environmental monitoring applications. The datalogger itself is open-source, with parts, code, build instructions, etc. available at: http://edwardmallon.wordpress.com/2015/10/24/diy-arduino-logger-build-instructions-part-1/

And we recently added step-by-step instructions for an Arduino UNO based version that can assembled on a breadboard in as little as 20 minutes: http://edwardmallon.wordpress.com/2015/12/22/arduino-uno-based-data-logger-with-no-soldering/
We have been using this simple logger in an environmental monitoring course to help students learn how to program the Arduino to support sensors & communication. When connected to a USB cable, this logger can act as a simple data acquisition system, displaying sensor data from real time experiments using the new graphing function built into the free Arduino software.

Public Laboratory Remote Field Logger Electronics

Public Lab is working to make water quality information more accessible for communities everywhere. The Mystic River in Massachusetts flows from the Mystic Lakes in Winchester and Arlington, through Medford, Somerville, Everett, Charlestown and Chelsea, and into Boston Harbor, and has supported a long history of economic progress in one of the most densely populated urban areas of New England. Today, the Mystic faces serious water quality problems, shared by urban water bodies around the world: pollution from leaky sewer pipes, waste disposal sites; excessive nutrients and discharges of raw sewage; fuel hydrocarbons; and road salt. Portions of the watershed often fail to meet state bacteria standards for swimming and boating, and its Alewife Brook subwatershed is one of the most contaminated water bodies in Boston. The Mystic River watershed received a ‘D’ from the US EPA on its 2012 water quality report card.

Several organizations are engaged in water monitoring projects for the Mystic, but the high cost and ‘closed data’ nature of current technology severely limits the scope of current efforts, and makes data sharing difficult.

Our main focus at first is on developing open hardware alternatives to the current most common water quality monitoring sensors, which measure temperature, conductivity, and water depth.


GoViral is a free and real-time online Cold & Flu surveillance system administered by researchers at New York University. Participants will get a Do-It-Yourself flu saliva collection system that they can keep and use at home if they are feeling sick. All samples will be analyzed at a central laboratory that checks for 20 different viral infections. GoViral participants will get their own laboratory results (not including NY state participants) and, through the aggregate data, be able to see what infections and symptoms are going around near them so they can take appropriate public health measures and understand when something might be abnormal. The data will be used for research purposes only.

Snapshots in Time

Snapshots in Time is a long-term Citizen Science project aimed at mobilizing people to monitor the timing of Spotted Salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) and Wood Frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) breeding throughout the respective ranges of these species. The purpose of this project is to use the data collected by on-the-ground citizens year after year to investigate possible effects of climate change on the timing of reproduction. Determining changes in the timing of breeding is very important, not just for these species, but also for others that use the same habitat. The results of this project could allow us to inform land managers and development planners of important areas for conservation and to look deeper into what other species in these ecosystems may be negatively affected by climate change, including some endangered species.

This is what is commonly referred to as a phenology project. Phenology is the study of periodic events in a plant or animal's life cycle, such as breeding or migration, and how the timing of these events are influenced by changes in the climate. Phenology allows us to understand variations in breeding times, even in limited geographic areas or specific sites, to develop a range-wide picture of any shifts in the timing of breeding.

Our objective is to collect your data long-term, so those that choose to participate in this project are encouraged to do so at the same sites year after year when possible.

This effort will focus on populations found throughout their range in North America. Both of these amphibians breed following heavy rains during winter to spring that flood woodland depressions and various other types of ephemeral (short-lived) ponds or wetlands that lack fish. These can include areas such as lime-sink ponds in karst regions or pools in the floodplains of streams.

Both species migrate en mass to breeding sites when weather conditions are appropriate from winter to spring depending on where you are within their range. Spotted Salamanders and Wood Frogs often share the same breeding sites and breed simultaneously—with breeding typically occurring earlier for southern populations (i.e., winter) compared to more northerly populations (late winter–early spring). During most of the year (when not at breeding sites), Spotted Salamanders live in burrows and/or under large logs in forest habitats. Wood Frogs are terrestrial and reside in leaf litter-carpeted forests away from water where their coloration affords them excellent camouflage.

We request that you submit field observations for either species, including any information related to: 1) Migrations of adults to/from breeding pond sites; 2) Observations of adults at breeding ponds; 3) Observations of egg masses; 4) Observations of larvae (Spotted Salamander) or of tadpoles (Wood Frog), and 5) Whether metamorphs were observed leaving the wetland. We are betting the wetlands you monitor become spots (no pun intended!) that you regularly visit well into the future (or continue to visit if you are already doing so…).

We have prepared datasheets for the information we desire from your observations and also have an identification sheet for each species. One data sheet should be used for each observation. For example, if you heard Wood Frogs on one date, that is one observation. If you see tadpoles the next time you visit the wetland, you would use a separate data sheet. We request a photograph for each observation so that we can confirm identification.

Encountering Wood Frogs and Spotted Salamanders (or evidence of these species) in the field is always exciting. Rolling a pond-side log to see the bright orange spots of a plump Spotted Salamander or hearing the duck-like chuckling sounds of a sizeable Wood Frog chorus are always memorable natural history experiences. With this study, you can make your observations count toward a scientific review of these species’ breeding patterns. This will benefit our knowledge of these animals and also provide you an opportunity to better acquaint yourself with the amphibian life in your own backyard while doing your part for conservation.

Consider participating in Snapshots in Time... it will be a great experience for all ages!

OSF SciNet

Problem: Scientific citations are frequently constrained by terms-of-use or within proprietary systems making it difficult to see connections in the literature.

Solution: OSF SciNet uses the open source Citelet extension to crowdsource a free, open, and comprehensive metadata dataset of scientific citations and corresponding references to unlock the citation network.

Impact: The dataset generated through this project will make it easier to see the connections in the scientific literature and to promote open science.

The NOVA Cloud Lab

Covering some 70 percent of Earth's surface, clouds play a key role in our planet's well-being. But how do they form, why are there so many types, and what clues can they give us about the weather and climate to come? Try your hand at classifying clouds and investigating the role they play in severe tropical storms. Featuring NOVA-produced videos and real feeds from NASA Earth Science satellites, this Lab challenges you to classify clouds and investigate the role they play in severe tropical storms.

This project is part of the larger NOVA Labs platform.

The NOVA Energy Lab

For something we use every day, energy is a pretty mysterious concept. This lab from NOVA investigates what energy is, how it can be converted into useful forms, and why some sources are running low. In our Research Challenge, you'll use scientific data to design renewable energy systems for cities across the U.S.—and compete with others to see whose designs can produce the most power.

This project is part of the larger NOVA Labs platform: www.pbs.org/nova/labs


LepiMAP is the African butterfly and moth mapping project. LepiMAP is a joint project of the Animal Demography Unit and Lepidopterists' Society of Africa.

LepiMAP is a project aimed at determining the distribution and conservation priorities of butterflies and moths on the African continent. This project is building the 21st century distribution maps for Africa's butterflies and moths. LepiMAP is the continuation of SABCA (the Southern African Butterfly Conservation Assessment)

Anybody, anywhere in Africa can contribute to this awesome Citizen Science project! And we need YOUR help!!

Hour of Code

The Hour of Code is an opportunity for every student to try computer science for one hour. During Computer Science Education Week (Dec. 9-15), we're making history and recruiting 10 million to join in and do the Hour of Code.

You can also participate in the Hour of Code all year-round. Tutorials will work on browsers, tablets, smartphones, or "unplugged."

MIT's Friday After Thanksgiving Chain Reaction

What is the Friday After Thanksgiving Chain Reaction? A grand event that could only happen at MIT! Participants link their chain reaction devices together forming one mega chain reaction – set off at the end as the event's thrilling culmination.

More than 1,500 people attend this fun-for-all-ages "extreme" event!

Making a chain reaction allows people to explore their own creativity and see how their unique contraptions relate to a larger whole. No matter how unique the devices, inevitably, with a little string and duct tape, they all work together beautifully.

How does it work?
Join the fun as a spectator or, even better, as a participant! Participants must register in advance to create their own contraptions and bring them to Rockwell Cage .
Can anybody do it?
Of course! Participants range from Girl Scout troops to artists and engineers, from MIT clubs to high schools and family teams. Teams have come from as far away as Michigan and California!

Tangaroa Blue Foundation

Tangaroa Blue Foundation coordinates the Australian Marine Debris Initiative (AMDI), a network of volunteers, communities, schools, indigenous rangers, industry bodies and government organisations. The objectives of the AMDI are to remove marine debris from the environment, collect scientific data on what is removed, track to the source wherever possible, and engage stakeholders to find practical ways to stop those items from entering the environment in the first place.

Poo Power! Global Challenge

The entire planet is poo-luted. Dog waste in our cities is a problem for the environment, particularly our waterways. People are also part of the environment and by not picking up after our dogs, we are potentially polluting ourselves. That’s crazy!

Around the world, different countries have varying success in encouraging dog owners to ‘scoop the poop’ and use a combination of awareness campaigns and fines.

Where are the dogs going in your local area? Are there ‘hotspots’ where dogs like to poo in the same place? Are they near environmentally sensitive areas like rivers and creeks? Maybe these hotspots could be useful as sources of biogas energy using Poo Power!?

Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to map dog poo ‘hotspots’ at your local parks and public spaces. Once uploaded onto the Global Poo Map (allow between 24-48 hours), as a class/group discuss the scientific, social and environmental issues and compile some recommendations into a letter to your local Government representative.



SENSR is a tool to create, share and manage a citizen science project running on mobile devices to harness the power of citizen scientists.

SENSR provides a simple and easy way to obtain a custom data collection application running on mobile devices for your project.

If you are running a grassroots project for science, education, environmental conservation, community monitoring, or other reason, and are seeking ways to expand citizen scientists' participation in contributing data, SENR can help you create a mobile data collection tool for your project.

It is part of a research project at Carnegie Mellon University. Please try out if you are seeking ways to harness citizens' power of data collection.

Plate Watch

Volunteers hang settlement plates off docks in Alaska for three to nine months. Each plate is then surveyed for invasive species and redeployed. The survey involves photographing the fouling species attached to the plate and collecting specimens of new or target species. Training is available and settlement plates are provided.

IceWatch USA

As an IceWatch USA™ volunteer, you observe a water body in your area over the winter, and report on weather (snow, precipitation, ice cover, as well as wildlife activity. In as little as ten minutes, your observations help scientists analyze climate change and other environmental factors as well as how people can adapt to those changes. The IceWatching season begins every year on the day of fall and ends with your last ice coverage and/or last snowfall.

Pennsylvania Senior Environment Corps

The Senior Environment Corps (SEC) program engages volunteers mostly aged 55 and over. SEC volunteers are engaged in numerous activities from water quality monitoring, stream habitat assessment, storm-drain stenciling, environmental education, community gardening, wildlife surveying, marking abandoned oil and gas wells, and cleaning up parks and trails.

Since 1997, SEC volunteers in Pennsylvania have contributed over 2,000,000 hours, and their contribution is estimated to be of value to the state at over $3 million per year. Coming into 2014, SEC volunteers are active in 20 counties across Pennsylvania, and will soon be expanding into to more areas.

Watch the Wild

Watch the Wild™ needs your help. As a Watch the Wild™ volunteer, you observe and report the "wild" in your community, from trees and plants to lakes and streams to weather and wildlife activity. In as little as ten minutes, your observations help us to understand how our eco-systems are changing and helps us to adapt for the future. Your observations will be entered into a database and shared with interested scientists.

Quantum Moves

The Quantum Moves game was born out of the dilemmas and questions the quantum physics researchers at Aarhus University confronted with when they took the challenge of building a quantum computer in the basement lab of the university.

Confident that the human brain is able to do better than even the most advanced computational machines available in the world, the CODER team decided to create the "Quantum Moves" game and invite everyone to play and get the chance to do front-line quantum physics research.

The idea behind the game is simple: every time you play, your mouse movements are simulating the laser beams moves used in the real quantum lab to transport the atoms onto the right pathways.

Your goal is to achieve the best scores in "QComp" and "Beat AI" labs, which translate the most difficult scientific challenges, and thus help science make a step forward towards building a quantum computer.

Field Photo Library

A photo taken in the field helps scientists and citizens to document changes in landscape, wildlife habitats, impacts of drought and flood and fire, and so on. This Geo-referenced Field Photo Library is a citizen science and community remote sensing data portal, where people can share, visualize and archive field photos in the world. Users can upload, edit, query and download geo-referenced field photos in the library. All photos are also linked with satellite image series images (MODIS), so that people can see the changes over time.


MicroBlitz is citizen science on a vast scale. Our super-sized, Western Australia wide environmental survey will underpin cutting-edge research into the biodiversity and health of our changing environment. How? By digging into the soil and looking at the smallest building blocks of WA's ecosystems - microbial DNA.

By working together with our community of MicroBlitz citizen scientists across the state, our research team at the University of Western Australia (UWA) will create what we call a baseline map.

The map will be a crucial point of reference that can be shared and used to monitor, manage and ultimately protect WA's precious environment. We're talking about data with the potential to inform a host of environmental initiatives and programs of local, national and global significance.

It's free, easy and fun - simply register online and we will send you out a sampling kit/s. We are particularly interested in connecting with people outside of the metropolitan area to help us create a complete picture of microbial activity across Western Australia.

Cyber Citizen

Cyber Citizen is a research initiative at Michigan Tech University aimed at creating mobile and web-based tools to facilitate scientists and citizen participation in scientist-led environmental and social research projects.

The project has two apps available:

Lichen AQ - uses lichen to track air pollution which helps federal land managers.

Mushroom Mapper - records and analyzes mushroom habitats.

More apps on the way...

App users either upload their data to a publicly accessible database or directly to the researchers' project website.

Darwin for a Day

Darwin for a Day is a web application that allows you to explore the Galapagos Islands through Google Street View and document its unique plants and animals. When you see an animal or plant you’d like to catalogue, you can describe it by creating an observation. You can just enter your best guess at what it is (i.e. “bird”) or enter in the scientific name, if you know it!

All of your observations will be shared with the iNaturalist community & the Charles Darwin Foundation, and will contribute to research of the Galapagos Islands.

NatureWatch NZ

NatureWatch NZ is a citizen science project dedicated to exploring and discovery New Zealand's biodiversity. If you see an unusual or interesting bug, plant, or any other species, take a photo of it, upload the photo to NatureWatch NZ, and learn all about it. The NatureWatch NZ online community will ID your species for you. You can also help others to ID their photos, and you can join (or create!) projects about the species and places you're most interested in.

Together, we're documenting what's living in NZ so we can understand NZ nature better, and have fun while we do it.

NatureWatch NZ is the New Zealand part of the amazing global iNaturalist network. Thanks iNat!

Harvard Forest Schoolyard LTER

The Harvard Forest is part of a national network of sites that supports K-12 teachers and students in hands-on ecological research.

In the Harvard Forest Schoolyard LTER program, teachers learn about and initiate ecology research in their classrooms and schoolyards. Students learn to collect data on important long-term ecological issues and processes. Student data are then shared on the Harvard Forest website.

[From the Harvard Forest website]


Moths are incredibly diverse, are ecologically important as plant eaters, pollinators, and food for songbirds. How will climate and other large-scale ecological factors affect moths?

Three components - choose any or all:

1) Moth Math - analyze over five years of moth phenology data, correlate with weather, find patterns. (Best for high school AP Bio or undergraduate intro bio, high school and undergraduate math).

2) Take photographs of moths at your porch light and upload to Discover Life, either our pre-selected "Dark Dozen" http://www.discoverlife.org/darkdozen and upload to Twitter or Instagram @darkdozenmoths (or if eager, photograph any other moths you find at your site and upload to an album on www.DiscoverLife.org).

3) Help us identify moths that you and others have uploaded, so that photographs become data. Participants can compare moths at their own site with moths from other sites, to answer their own original questions and do real science.

Fern Watch

Help Track the Health of Redwood Forests

In 2008, League scientist Emily Burns discovered that the height of the most common plant in the coast redwood forest is affected by how much rain and fog fall in the woods. Western sword fern (Polystichum munitum) has tall fronds in wet redwood forests and much shorter fronds in dry forests. For this reason, sword fern is an important indicator of climate change and we are studying these ferns to detect drought in the redwood forest.

Just by monitoring the ferns on the forest floor, you can help League scientists learn how changes in climate may be affecting redwood forest habitats. You can help us track changes in these ferns in your local forest by photographing and taking measurements of ferns through our Fern Watch Project on the free iNaturalist App

Study Adélie Penguin breeding

From November to January, classrooms take part in a virtual field study of Adélie Penguins as they breed, brood and rear their chicks in Antarctica. Photos of selected penguin families from Cape Royds Antarctica are posted to the website for students to follow on a daily basis. Weather data, event journal and background information about penguins is also provided. Students keep a field notebook gathering and analyzing their own data about each penguin family using the same process of the field biologist. This real time, long term activity provides students a window into the harshness of Adélie penguin life and the work of field scientists. Predation, competition and environmental challenges all affect the penguin’s ability to raise chicks. Witnessing these events themselves helps students begin to understand the world around them and the remote location of Antarctica. This project offers a real time daily field experience with outcomes we cannot predict.

NextGen Pika Patrol

A student citizen science effort to gather baseline data on the current distribution of pikas, pika habitat and collect pika scat. Teachers may register to participate with their students.

Amphibian Conservation and Education Project

The Amphibian Conservation Education Project aims to empower educators, students, and individuals to become involved in amphibian conservation efforts.

Through this project, participants will become field scientists by analyzing water quality and testing amphibians for the disease, Chytrid Fungus. Collected data is then used by local herpetologists (scientists who study reptiles and amphibians) to gain a better understanding of the species of amphibians being affected by the disease and where Chytrid is being spread.


Botanists in the UK have teamed up with game development company Team Cooper to design a social media game that uses real genetic data from the common ash tree, Fraxinus excelsior, and from the Hymenoscyphus fungus to find out what makes some trees less susceptible to it.

Fraxinus presents players with multiple rows of colored leaves, where each color represents one of four DNA nucleotides and each row represents the genetic information from a different ash tree sample. Players are challenged to compare chunks of genetic code between the various fungus samples, as a means to search for genes that could be important in the disease. Players will also match genetic patterns from the Hymenoscyphus fungus to learn more about how it spreads.

Notes from Nature

Most natural history collections are housed in museum cabinets, where they are not easily available to citizens and researchers. The Notes from Nature transcription project addresses this problem by digitizing biological collections one record at a time! Help museum staff and scientists by transcribing the labels and ledgers that have been meticulously recorded and stored over the past century. In many cases these are the only historical records of species distribution available. Join us in unlocking this important information - take some notes from nature!

Lake Meade PA Environmetal Education Initiative

A community environmental education program focusing on incorporation of Best Management Practices (BMPs)for controlling lake pollution and storm water runoff. Funded by a PA DEP mini-grant 13-0026.

Test the Fairness of US State Quarters

If you flip a quarter many times, it should land heads up just about as often as it lands tails up, assuming the coin is fair. But with so many different state designs, it's not clear that all U.S. quarters are fair. Help us check by taking a few moments to flip some quarters and report the results below.

Reef Check Tropical EcoDiver Training

Become certified to conduct your own Reef Check surveys and take an active role in conserving your favorite coral reefs. This course is designed to teach you everything you need to know to conduct full scale Reef Check surveys. In this program you will learn all about the globally standardized Reef Check methodology as well as how to identify key indicator fish, invertebrates and substrates selected by Reef Check for global monitoring and conservation of coral reefs! This course will allow you to join the Reef Check monitoring team and assist in underwater surveys around the world.

Water Quality Monitoring

Dinoflagellates emitting bioluminescence make us happy.

It means San Diego’s water does not have harmful levels of toxic chemicals that can harm plants, fish and bugs. And it’s one of the tests we conduct during our monthly water quality monitoring events.

Coastkeeper has monitored San Diego’s waterbodies since 2000. We use the data collected by our volunteers to identify polluted waters and reduce sources of pollution. San Diego’s local government agencies have limited resources and they monitor infrequently, providing only a snapshot of water quality. Data collected by Coastkeeper volunteers increases the amount available so regulators can assess more comprehensive water resources data to make more effective decisions on how to reduce sources of pollution.

Coastkeeper staff and its crew of trained volunteers (we train more than 100 volunteers each year) currently collect and analyze water samples that are analyzed for basic chemistry, nutrients, bacteria, and toxicity from nine out of 11 watersheds in San Diego County on a monthly basis. To ensure that our data meets the highest quality standards possible, Coastkeeper follows a rigorous quality assurance and control plan and standard operating procedures that have been approved by our state regulatory agencies.

To our knowledge, we are the largest volunteer-based water quality monitoring program in the state. Through this program, we create community involvement and stewardship by educating the public on the importance of good water quality in our coastal and inland waters. It adds the scientific data component to Coastkeeper's work. We are tremendously grateful to the volunteers and partners who share our passion for keeping our waters clean and healthy.

MPA Watch

In 2012, San Diego's Marine Protected Area (MPA) network went into effect. To help assess the effectiveness and functions of our MPAs, the region will undergo a 5-year review in 2015, looking at ecological impacts and human use.

To collect a robust data source for human use of our protected areas, we are training up citizen scientists to conduct visual transects of our MPAs in San Diego County.

During training, all participants will learn how to take a transect during an MPA Watch assessment and receive the data sheets and information you need to participate. We are asking volunteers only to document human uses of our MPAs. Data collection is done following state-wide methods and protocols.

All information will be used in the future assessment of our MPAs in San Diego and helpful in understanding how human use has changed since their implementation.

The Secchi Dip-In

The Secchi Dip-In is a program of the North American Lake Management Society (NALMS). The purpose of the society is to foster the management and protection of lakes and reservoirs for today and tomorrow.

The Secchi Dip-In was created to enable volunteers to submit water clarity measurements to an online database and see how their data compare on a variety of scales- regional to international. The program has also been utilized for volunteers to begin monitoring efforts and to increase monitoring efforts within their communities.

The Dip-In is an ongoing experiment in using trained volunteers to gather data every year. Secchi Dip-In participants include trained monitoring volunteers and individuals who are interested in citizen science or enthusiastic about lakes. We encourage anyone interested in the health of their lake or watershed to get involved with the Secchi Dip-In.

Caribbean Lionfish Response Program

The Caribbean Lionfish Response Program (CLRP) was developed using a bilateral marine management strategy. This two-fold program approach includes Information and Education (I&E) and Lionfish Location and Removal. This Program has been running successfully since October 2009.
The goals of the CLRP are:

Educate local divers, fishermen, local schools, tourists and the general-public on the urgent Lionfish crisis and how each can contribute to help resolve this rapid growing invasive issue.

Safely and efficiently search and remove Lionfish across the USVI territory by placing trained divers in the water.


PhotosynQ is a platform allowing people to collaboratively solve difficult research questions, both at the locally and globally, using sensors which connect to your cell phone. The MultispeQ, our first sensor, measures important parameters of photosynthesis in plants and algae in a non-destructive way, quickly and inexpensively. These measurements provide a detailed picture of the health of the plant and are used for plant breeding, agricultural extension services, and plant scientists to improving plant efficiency and to identify novel photosynthetic pathways for energy and crop research.

Anyone can propose a project on the PhotosynQ website (www.photosynq.org), and anyone else can contribute data, ideas, analysis, and discussion to that project. There are researchers and citizen scientists around the world already running projects through PhotosynQ which you can contribute to. Once you join the platform, find an open project and contact the project lead to join, or design your own project!


Help Stanford University scientists studying Alzheimer's, Huntington's, Parkinson's, and many cancers by simply running a piece of software on your computer.

The problems we are trying to solve require so many calculations, we ask people to donate their unused computer power to crunch some of the numbers.

Pathways: Wildlife Corridors of NM

Pathways: Wildlife Corridors of NM runs a wildlife track and sign monitoring program, documenting "common" species before they become "uncommon". 6 Focal Species include, Black Bear, Elk, Mule Deer, Bobcat, Pronghorn, and Mountain Lion. We monitor transects between the mountain ranges of New Mexico, documenting the movements of these large mammals between the mountains and the river valleys.

Michigan Butterfly Network

The Michigan Butterfly Network (MiBN) is a citizen-science project that seeks to assess the changing population status of our state’s butterfly species, evaluate the quality of Michigan ecosystems, and engage the Michigan public in significant citizen science research. The project was started in 2011 by the Kalamazoo Nature Center, and has grown to include several collaborating institutions and over 30 monitoring sites across the state.

We are actively looking for new partnerships and volunteers across the state in order to expand and grow the network. We welcome engagement in the project - Please contact us!


The MyEnvironment mapping tools provides immediate access to a cross-section of environmental data for any geographical location in the U.S. Users of the official site can choose the location and environmental issue to examine.


Treezilla is a mapping project based in Great Britain that challenges citizen scientists to map every tree in Britain. The mapping interface is easy to use and users can easily add their tree listings and even add photos for others to help them identify species. It’s free to use and the website even offers educational material for inquiry based science lessons.

Ultimately, a more complete map of Britain’s trees will help scientists how certain species are affected by climate change, disease, and patterns of land use. The website even has built in tools to measure how much CO2 is captured and what total economic benefit is gained from the different types of species for a given area.

Every tree added to the mapping system helps, and Treezilla helps make contributing easy. With the focus of the project is to map trees in urban environments – you can even map the trees in your back yard, school, or local park. Go outside, bring a friend, and start mapping trees today!

Michigan Herp Atlas

The Michigan Herp Atlas began in 2004 with the goal of collecting observations of Michigan's amphibians and reptiles (herpetofauna) to better document their distribution and population changes. The data is to be used to best manage and conserve these important indicator species. The Herp Atlas project continues to grow in partners and collaborators demonstrating the effectiveness of this public-private partnership in helping conserve Michigan's herpetofauna. Contributing observations is now easier than ever with an updated online system and recently developed smart phone app.

Great Lakes Environmental Monitoring with Passive Samplers

Great Lakes Passive Sampling is a research project being conducted by the Lohmann Lab at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography. Polyethylene passive samplers are essentially just pieces of plastic that can absorb hydrophobic contaminants from the air or water. To obtain data in many different areas, we depend on a network of volunteers to deploy, recover, and return these samplers to us.

Participating is simple: we can send samplers and other supplies necessary to set up the samplers. You record the date and location where you set up your sampler, and then leave it for 8 weeks. After 8 weeks, you take down the sampler and send it back to us, and we analyze it to see what's present in the air or water at your site.

By deploying polyethylene passive samplers in the water and air throughout the Lake Ontario and Lake Erie region, we can measure levels of persistent hydrophobic organic pollutants and analyze how the amounts of these chemicals change in different locations.

Kinsey Reporter

Kinsey Reporter is a global mobile survey platform to share, explore, and visualize anonymous data about sex.

Reports are submitted via smartphone, then explored at http://KinseyReporter.org or downloaded for off-line analysis.

The Kinsey Institute is exploring new ways to record and describe people's sexual experiences worldwide. We are also exploring new ways for people to be connected while protecting their privacy. We hope to reach people with all kinds of different ideas, beliefs, and experiences, and who might be willing to report on sexual behaviors, regardless of who is involved and where it is observed. By using Kinsey Reporter, you contribute to research on human sexual behavior. We ask you to act ethically, in the role of a good journalist or "citizen scientist." Submit what is true and accurate to the best of your ability.

Ideally, you would submit a report within 24 hours of the event you are reporting. The report can be about yourself or someone else. It is all anonymous. Kinsey Reporter includes surveys about various sexual activities and other intimate behaviors. These surveys cover sexual behaviors and events, sexual health issues, violence reports, public displays of affection, and other unique behaviors and experience. A 'survey' in this case is a report of information shared by many individuals on a topic of interest; it is not based on a random or representative sample of a community or population.

To ensure that reported data is strictly anonymous, you can only select among the provided tags when answering a question. However, contact us to suggest new surveys, questions, or tags.

To protect the anonymity of the reports even in sparsely populated areas, we aggregate reports over time. A report is not published until a sufficient number of reports have been received from the same location, and then all of those reports are recorded with a randomized timestamp. The more sparsely populated your area and/or the higher the geographic resolution you select, the longer the delay until your report appears. Therefore, in a sparsely populated area, you might want to select a lower resolution (e.g., state/region or country), to minimize the delay until your report becomes public.

Interactive visualizations of the data are available on the KinseyReporter.org website. The anonymous data we collect is also publicly available to the community via an Application Programming Interface (API), documented on the KinseyReporter.org website. We welcome your feedback.

Kinsey Reporter is a joint project of the world-famous Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction (KI) and the Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research (CNetS), both at Indiana University, Bloomington.

The VerbCorner Project

Dictionaries have existed for centuries, but scientists still haven't worked out the exact meanings for most words. This is a serious problem if you want to train computers to understand language. If we don't know what words mean, it's hard to teach computers what they mean. It is similarly hard to understand how children come learn the meanings of words, when we don't fully understand those meanings ourselves.

Rather than try to work out the definition of a word all at once, we have broken the problem into a series of separate tasks. Each task has a fanciful backstory -- which we hope you enjoy! -- but at its heart, each task is asking about a specific component of meaning that scientists suspect makes up one of the building blocks of meaning.

You can participate for as little as a few minutes or come back to the site over and over to help code the many thousands of words in English.


Aurorasaurus is the first citizen science project that aggregates relatively rare sightings of the Northern and Southern Lights in order to improve real-time tracking and understanding of the beautiful phenomenon. The Aurorasaurus project allows the public to enter their observations of aurora through their website, as well as on a mobile application platform, in order to better characterize their frequency, location, and rare visual characteristics. We also collect related tweets, map them, and ask users to help verify these as real-time sightings. During periods of high aurora activity, Aurorasaurus sees a significant uptick in public reporting of the phenomenon, allowing the project to ground truth the data being collected by other instruments, and alert registered users in real-time. Informal educational resources are offered as well.


Help map, collect, and correct information about power generation locations around the world. Through placing pins of power generation sources on a map or filling out and reviewing correcting information about these sources you will help make studying power generation impact on the global carbon cycle and climate change reach new levels.

Where's the Elderberry Longhorn Beetle?

Hi, my name is Dr. Dan Duran and I'm an evolutionary biologist and entomologist at Drexel University (Philadelphia, PA) and I need your help finding "Desmond," an Elderberry Longhorn Beetle, formally known as *Desmocerus palliatus!*

This *beautiful* beetle species used to live throughout a large part of eastern North America but in recent decades it appears as if it has declined in numbers. We need your help to figure out if and why this might be true and how we can help them move back into areas they once lived.

The Elderberry Longhorn Beetle is easy to spot with its bold patterns of blue and gold and long antennae. It's so attractive, in fact, that it was chosen for a USPS stamp design in 1999! I can't promise you'll find one, but if you keep an eye out, you might have a chance at seeing one of these impressive creatures. They come out at different times in different places, but June is often a good time to see them.

Dark Sky Meter

The Dark Sky Meter (available for iPhones) allows citizen scientists to contribute to a global map of nighttime light pollution.
Light pollution is a growing problem in urban environments, but now you can help scientists better understand its effects on the environment. The map is also a great help for (amateur) astronomers looking for dark skies.
By utilizing the camera built in to your iPhone, the Dark Sky Meter actually measures ‘skyglow’ and updates the data in real time.

The app also charts weather conditions and cloud cover so you can take readings at optimal times. The app is as easy to use as taking a picture, and is a fun way to learn about your night sky.

The Results are live and visible for everyone on a global light pollution map generated by the app users. Visit darkskymeter.com to see the map. Since this project has no funding or grants the app costs $1 to cover the hosting costs (which is a steal compared to commercially available light pollution meters).

Loss of the Night

How many stars can you see where you live? The Loss of the Night App challenges citizen scientists to identify as many stars as they can in order to measure light pollution. The app is fun and easy to use, and helps users learn constellations as they contribute to tracking of how skyglow is changing over time.

Stargazing is a great activity for young scientists, but this ancient pastime has become increasingly difficult in growing urban areas. Help us understand light pollution, and learn about your own night sky!

You don't need to leave the city to take part. In fact, the app is designed specifically for use in very light polluted areas.

The more stars you observe, and the more often you run the app, the more precise the data for your location will become. As the seasons change so do the stars in the sky, and since there aren't that many very bright stars it is extremely helpful if urban users do measurements in each season.

A day after you have done an observation, you can examine your data at http://www.myskyatnight.com

Detailed instructions for Android: http://lossofthenight.blogspot.de/2014/11/a-step-by-step-guide-to-using-loss-of.html

Detailed instructions for iPhone: http://lossofthenight.blogspot.de/2014/11/a-step-by-step-guide-for-using-loss-of.html

The NOVA Sun Lab

Despite its apparently steady glow, the Sun is a churning mass of superhot plasma that regularly produces powerful flares and storms that can knock out power and communication systems here on Earth. In this lab, watch NOVA videos to explore what makes the Sun so volatile and get access to the same NASA data, images, and tools that scientists use to predict solar storms—so that you can predict them for yourself.

Cascades Pika Watch

Pika are considered to be a sensitive indicator of climate change due to their inability to survive long periods of warm summer weather. Columbia River Gorge pika are of particular interest because they live at a lower elevation than any other pika population in the U.S.

The Cascades Pika Watch engages citizen scientists to locate and map pika populations. Through Cascades Pika Watch, people can help scientists better understand changes in pika populations.

Horseshoe crabs as homes

You are walking along the beach on a sunny spring day. But what is that? Something is moving slowly out of the water. It looks like a large crab, covered in barnacles and mussels. Creepy? Ugly? No, its home! At least for all those critters that live on Horseshoe crabs. Horseshoe crabs have been around for more than 250 million years, unimpressed by dinosaurs and ice ages.

Since then, Horseshoe crabs have played a key role in coastal ecosystems: the eggs are eaten by shore birds, juveniles are food for sea turtles, and adults aerate the ocean floor through their digging activity.

We believe Horseshoe crabs serve yet another important function: as substrate for many invertebrate species such as mussels, barnacles and snails. Many marine species require hard substrates to live on, and such substrates are historically rare on the predominantly sandy beaches of the Eastern US.
In more recent times, docks and boats may offer new opportunities for intertidal species - but what about animals that do not like the tidal influence? Are there even species living on Horseshoe crabs that we have not discovered yet?

Help us decipher who lives on Horseshoe crabs! Take clear pictures of Horseshoe crabs and their critters when you see them on the beach, and tweet them to @horseshoe_homes. Just let us know when and where you saw the crab. That's it. In return, we will identify the animals you discovered on the Horseshoe crab.

With your help, we will be able to address the following questions:
Which animals live on horseshoe crabs? Which region has the highest diversity of animals attached to Horseshoe crabs? When are the crabs most abundant?
Moreover, we will build a valuable resource for school classes, beach walkers and everybody else who ever wanted to know: What is that thing sitting on the Horseshoe crab?

Horseshoe crabs come to the beaches to mate and lay eggs when the tides are highest. This happens at full and new moons. So be on a lookout for them!

Atlas of Living Australia

The Atlas of Living Australia (Atlas) contains information on all the known species in Australia aggregated from a wide range of data providers: museums, herbaria, community groups, government departments, individuals and universities.

The Atlas was initiated by a group of 14 (now 17) organisations—our partners. The intent was to create a national database of all of Australia’s flora and fauna that could be accessed through a single, easy to use web site. Information on the site would be used to: improve our understanding of Australian biodiversity assist researchers to build a more detailed picture of Australia’s biodiversity assist environmental managers and policy makers develop more effective means of managing and sustaining Australia’s biodiversity.

You can participate by submitting a species record, joining an existing citizen science project, digitizing specimen labels, or starting your own citizen science endeavour!


Redmap (Range Extension Database and Mapping Project) is a citizen science project that invites members of the community to spot marine species that are outside of their usual range (or distribution) at various points around Australia. In collecting this information Redmap is generating a database of "out of range" sightings to assess which species are shifting their ranges and whether these shifts are consistent with warming waters. Redmap is hosted by the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (at the University of Tasmania in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.

SOD Blitz

Sudden Oak Death (SOD) is a serious exotic disease that is threatening the survival of tanoak and several oak species in California. By collecting leaf samples during community SOD blitzes and submitting your samples to UC Berkeley diagnostic laboratory, you can help create a detailed local map of disease distribution.

SOD-blitzes inform and educate the community about Sudden Oak Death, get locals involved in detecting the disease, and produce detailed local maps can then be used to identify those areas where the infestation may be mild enough to justify proactive management. You can participating in an existing SOD-blitz or create your own.

Good news: SOD-Blitzes are COMPLETELY FREE thanks to funding from the US Forest Service to the UC Berkeley Forest Pathology Lab!


Welcome to OhDeer! Helping to map deer road casualties throughout Britain (or beyond!) via your Smart Phone.

The six species of deer living wild in Britain are our largest terrestrial mammals, ranging from the majestic red deer, to smaller fallow, roe, sika, muntjac and Chinese water deer. The large rise over the past 40 years in road traffic volumes as well as numbers and distribution of deer has unfortunately led to deer casualties at roadsides becoming an increasingly common sight. The total number of deer-vehicle collisions in Britain is estimated to exceed 42,000 per year, but most are not actually recorded. Information you log using this citizen-science smart phone app will assist our research on numbers and locations of deer accident hotspots.

Creek Freaks IWLA

Young people and adults collect information on stream health and post biological, chemical and physical data, photos and videos on an interactive map. This provides information to the public, to scientists and to conservation groups about local water quality. The Creek Freaks website includes data forms and activity guides to get started monitoring aquatic macroinvertebrates (stream insects and crustaceans), water chemistry, and to take visual observations and physical measurements of the stream and streamside vegetation.

Creek Freaks

Young people and adults collect information on stream health and post biological, chemical and physical data, photos and videos on an interactive map. This provides information to the public, to scientists and to conservation groups about local water quality. The Creek Freaks website includes data forms and activity guides to get started monitoring aquatic macroinvertebrates (stream insects and crustaceans), water chemistry, and to take visual observations and physical measurements of the stream and streamside vegetation.

The Human Memome Project

We want to be able to find correlations between people's ideas, behaviours and aspirations (all of which we are calling memes) and their health, wellbeing and lifespan.

If we can find ideas, memes, behaviours and aspirations that could potentially increase health, wellbeing and lifespan we use this data to create an academic dataset, educational tools and further citizen science and quantified self practices.

We are not just interested in finding associations with increasing average lifespan, or reaching the current maximum lifespan, but finding ideas and behaviours that may be correlated with increasing maximum lifespan as well as maintaining mutual health and wellbeing.

The dataset will be analysed using inter-disciplinary methods including linguistics, bioinformatics, omics, statistics, machine learning, computational modelling, memetics.

We would like to get at least 1000 participants, and many ideas, behaviours and aspirations per person.

I am a PhD student who has so far funded this project personally to following my passions (longevity science, science outreach and empowering people to be healthy, happy and long lived). I would really appreciate if you could take part and share this project with your friends and family.

What we think and do effects how long we will live and could potentially live - let us work together to find the best thoughts and actions to create a better world!

Astro Drone

The Astro Drone game is part of a scientific crowdsourcing project. People who possess a Parrot AR drone can play the game, in which they are challenged to perform different space missions in an augmented reality. Contribute to future space exploration by playing the free Astro Drone game!

The app is more than a game. Players can choose to contribute to a scientific crowdsourcing experiment that aims to improve autonomous capabilities of space probes, such as landing, obstacle avoidance, and docking. The app processes the images made by the AR drone's camera, extracting abstract mathematical image features. These features can neither be interpreted by humans, nor can the original image be reconstructed. However, the features can be used by robots to learn how to navigate in their environment. Players can join the experiment by going to the high score table. If they agree, the feature data is sent over the Internet.

The latest release contains two levels. In the first players learn to dock as well as possible to the International Space Station. In the second level players enact the Rosetta mission from ESA, by avoiding space debris and releasing the Philae lander onto a comet's surface. New levels will be added incrementally with new releases.

Astro Drone is a project performed by the Advanced Concepts Team of the European Space Agency.

Canine Health Project

The Canine Health Project tracks individual statistics on purebred dogs, using the Rat Terrier as a model. Information such as height, weight, date of birth, genotype, number of progeny and list of related individuals are recorded as a reference.

Secchi App

Join seafarers in the global scientific experiment to study marine phytoplankton.

The phytoplankton underpin the marine food chain, so we need to know as much about them as possible. To participate in this project, you'll need to create a Secchi Disk, a tool that measures water turbidity, and use the free iPhone or Android ‘Secchi’ application.

You can take a Secchi Disk reading as often as you wish, every day, once a week, twice a month, or just occasionally. The data you collect will help scientists around the world to understand the phytoplankton.

Join in and help make this the world’s largest public marine biological study.

Planet Four

Planet Four is a citizen science project in which volunteers help planetary scientists identify and measure features on the surface of Mars.

Scientists need your help to find and mark ‘fans’ and ‘blotches’ on the Martian surface, features that indicate wind direction and speed. By tracking these features, you can help planetary scientists better understand Mars’ climate.

All of the images you'll see depict the southern polar region, a little known area of Mars. The majority of these images have never been seen by humans until now.

This is your chance to explore the surface of Mars like never before!

Audubon's Hummingbirds at Home

National Audubon needs citizen scientists to report observations of feeding hummingbirds during spring hummingbird migration, summer and fall migration. A free mobile app makes it easy to report sightings and learn more about these remarkable birds. Participation is free.

Your participation will help scientists understand how hummingbirds are impacted by climate change, flowering patterns, and feeding by people.

You can participate at any level – from reporting a single sighting to documenting hummingbird activity in your community throughout the life of the project. Help scientists document the hummingbirds journey and direct change in the future to ensure these incredible birds do not disappear.

Tag A Tiny

Help the Large Pelagics Research Center improve scientific understanding of large pelagic species by catching, measuring and releasing juvenile bluefin with conventional “spaghetti”-ID tags.

The LPRC initiated its Tag A Tiny program in 2006 to study the annual migration paths and habitat use of juvenile Atlantic bluefin tuna.

As of 2012, 1258 recreational fishermen have helped LPRC to tag 1,645 bluefin, mostly juveniles from 1-4 years old, and some “medium” size fish, nearing 70 inches. All of the records are entered into the Billfish Foundation, NMFS, and ICCAT databases.

Precipitation ID Near the Ground (PING)

The National Severe Storms Laboratory needs YOUR help with a research project!

If you live in the area shown on the map, the Precipitation Identification Near the Ground project (PING) wants YOU to watch and report on precipitation type.

PING is looking for young, old, and in-between volunteers to make observations—teachers, classes and families too! We have collected tens of thousands of observations since 2006, already making PING successful because of your help.

PING volunteers can spend a little or a lot of time making observations. The basic idea is simple: the National Severe Storms Laboratory will collect radar data from NEXRAD radars in your area during storm events, and compare that data with YOUR observations.

Why? Because the radars cannot see close to the ground, we need YOU to tell us what is happening. Scientists will compare your report with what the radar has detected, and develop new radar technologies and techniques to determine what kind of precipitation—such as snow, soft hail, hard hail, or rain—is falling where.

NASA Wavelength

NASA Wavelength is your pathway into a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels - from elementary to college, formal and informal. The resources are developed through funding of the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD), have undergone a peer-review process to ensure accurate content, and are aligned to AAAS benchmarks. NASA Wavelength allows users to find quality resources, as well as to share these discoveries with others through social media, email, and atom feeds.


You’ll learn your dog’s cognitive style by playing fun, science-based games –- an experience that gives you the insight you need to make the most of your relationship with your best friend.

A key aspect of the Dognition methodology is our use of Citizen Science – research that can be conducted by everyone, not just people with Ph.D.s. By gathering this data we can begin to understand more about all dogs, much more quickly and on a broader scale than if scientists had to conduct this research themselves.

Vital Signs Maine

Where are the invasive species in Maine? Where aren’t they? Students, educators, citizens, and scientists are working together to find out.

As part of the Vital Signs community you can help steward the 32,000 miles of rivers and streams, 6,000 lakes and ponds, 5,000 miles of coastline, and 17 million acres of forest that are threatened by invasive species.

Together we are using scientific tools and habits of mind to look for native and invasive species in local habitats. We are sharing what we find and do not find online. We are contributing to a greater understanding of our shared environment.

DIY BioPrinter

Come join our ongoing BioPrinter community project!

Did you know you can print live cells from an inkjet printer? Companies like Organovo are developing ways to 3D print human tissues and organs. But the basic technologies are so accessible that we wanted to play around with them ourselves.

We've built our own functioning bioprinter from a couple of old CD drives, an inkjet cartridge, and an Arduino. We probably won't be printing human organs any time soon, but how about printing a leaf from plant cells? Or add a BlueRay laser to turn it into a miniature laser cutter to print "lab-on-a-chip" microfluidic devices. The possibilities are endless - it all depends where *you* want to take it!

Our community projects are open to anyone, and are driven entirely by whoever wants to show up and participate. This is a great opportunity to come check out BioCurious, and jump into some of the projects going on.

This project has something for everyone, whether it's hardware hacking. programming, Arduinos, microfluidics, synthetic biology, plant biology, cell culturing, tissue engineering - you name it! Everyone has something to learn, or something to teach.

Where is my spider?

By just taking photos and observing spiders, you can help the Explorit Science Center learn about which climates certain spiders live in and track the distribution of spiders over time.

Join the Explorit’s Community Science Project by finding and recording spiders in your home or neighborhood (as many as you can!). Use your camera or smart phone to take a photo of the spider and submit it online to add to our geographical database.

Spiders have long been thought of a useful natural method of pest control, but how will expected temperature changes or other environmental changes affect the spider’s usefulness as pest-killers and their distribution?

We don't yet know how climate change will impact spiders, and in turn impact agriculture such as crops and farms- but when we understand where spiders are living today, we will be better able to predict what may happen to spiders and agriculture in the future.

Birding Aboard

Birding Aboard is a citizen science project organized by a volunteer group of long-distance birding sailors from around the world.

Our mission is to benefit seabird conservation by mobilizing the worldwide boating community to document ocean bird sightings, providing critical and seldom-recorded data on seabird abundance and distribution and on ocean migration routes.

Seabird knowledge is described as a frontier science. For some species, breeding or wintering areas remain unknown. This lack of knowledge is troubling given that BirdLife International estimates that one-third of seabirds are vulnerable or globally endangered due to threats from predators on nesting grounds, some fisheries, and plastics.

Individual boaters can help by reporting and documenting their sightings, which are archived with the eBird global database for use by scientists and conservationists.


ISeeChange is a socially networked weather Almanac for communities to collectively journal their climate experiences -- their observations, feelings, questions, and decisions --- against near-real time climate information.

This groundbreaking environmental reporting project combines citizen science, participatory public media, and cutting-edge satellite monitoring of environmental conditions.

Incubated in 2012 by producer Julia Kumari Drapkin at Colorado public station KVNF Mountain Grown Community Radio via AIR’s Localore project, iSeeChange is poised to expand in 2015. The team will work with media and scientific partners across the country to help audiences document environmental shifts in their backyards and connect to the bigger-picture climate changes transforming all of our lives and livelihoods.

Landmark Trees of India

Landmark Trees of India is a documentation, geography, and monitoring project with a focus on famous, remarkable, and heritage trees of India.
India is a country of superlative population, superlative biodiversity, and superlative environmental variety. These landmark trees can teach us about the landscapes, biodiversity, and people of India and the other nations of the world.


In 2012, scientists in Montreal warned Canadians to expect there will be fewer outdoor skating days in the future.* Their predictions are based on the results of data taken from weather stations across Canada over the last fifty years. In some parts of Canada, they warn there may one day be no more backyard rinks at all. Remember the story of how Wayne Gretzky learned to play hockey on the backyard rink his father made for him in Brantford, Ontario? The scientists’ report says some day that will no longer be possible – at least, not in Brantford.

This prompted a group of geographers at Wilfrid Laurier University to create RinkWatch. We want people from coast to coast to coast to tell us about their rinks. We want you to pin the location of your rink on our map, and then each winter record every day that you are able to skate on it. Think of it as your rink diary. We will gather up all the information from all the backyard rinks, and use it to track the changes in our climate. The RinkWatch website will give you regular updates on the results. You will be able to compare the number of skating days at your rink with rinks elsewhere, and find out who is having the best winter for skating this year.

Marine Metre Squared

Marine Metre Squared (MM2) is an easy way to survey the intertidal community. Monitor a 1m x 1m square patch of your local shore once every season by recording the animals and plants that live there.

Take part in special scientific studies and fun educational challenges such as hunting for pest species, looking for evidence of animals breeding, and measuring seaweed growth.

Help others identify their new finds with the online forum. Submit your own questions and encourage others around New Zealand to take part.

The perfect project for families looking for holiday activities, schools and community groups looking for ways to engage with and improve their local environments.

See the project website for survey protocols, forms and resources to help you with your surveys. Resources are available for both rocky and sandy and muddy shores.

Librería Metagenómica del Ecuador

We are a group of scientists interested in exploring the potential applications of Ecuador’s unique biodiversity. As a first step, we are working to assemble and apply gene libraries collected from around the country.
You can join field trips in Ecuador to collect samples, work in a lab extracting and sequencing nucleic acids, or from home assembling and curating the electronic database.

Science Pipes

Science Pipes is a free service that lets you connect to real biodiversity data, use simple tools to create visualizations and feeds, and embed results on your own website.

SciencePipes allows anyone to access, analyze, and visualize the huge volume of primary biodiversity data currently available online. This site provides access to powerful scientific analyses and workflows through an intuitive, rich web interface based on the visual programming paradigm, similar to Yahoo Pipes. Analyses and visualizations are authored in an open, collaborative environment which allows existing analyses and visualizations to be shared, modified, repurposed, and enhanced.

Behind the scenes, SciencePipes is based on the Kepler scientific workflow software which is used by professional researchers for analysis and modeling. SciencePipes brings that scientific power to new audiences by consolidating the same workflow components used by scientists into pieces that have more intuitive meaning, and by providing components specifically targeted to these audiences.

Because SciencePipes provides tools for original data analyses rather than visualizations of predetermined analyses, it empowers users to develop new and valuable results. Those results can be exposed as dynamic web resources, in web contexts unrelated this site. Finally, because of the generality of the Kepler scientific system upon which this site is built, this online system can be extended to science and engineering disciplines beyond the environmental sciences.

North Mountain Plant Inventory Project

The North Mountain Plant Inventory Project is a collaboration between the Conservation Alliance, the Plant Atlas Project of Arizona, the Phoenix Mountains Preservation Council, and the City of Phoenix.
Our goals are to:
1)improve our scientific knowledge of North Mountain Park flora for land management, scientific, conservation, and educational purposes.
2)to train, engage and educate members of the public as plant stewards
3)to provide a databased plant atlas located on the Southwest Environmental Information Network (SEINET).

Alaska River Watch Program

The River Watch Program is a voluntary asks pilots to report observed river ice conditions. Pilots are asked for reports on what they see along their normal route of flight and at their standard flight level. The purpose of the program is to assist the National Weather Service in providing accurate forecasts, warnings, and navigation information.

The National Weather Service is responsible for monitoring the ice breakup process to identify the potential for flooding due to ice jams. Alaskan rivers are also heavily used for transportation and knowledge of the status of the breakup process is useful for knowing when it is safe to use boats. Reports from observers can significantly increase the information available for these purposes.


uBiome is the world's first effort to map the human microbiome through citizen science.

What's the microbiome? The microbiome are the bacteria that live on and within us. It sounds kind of funny, but all of us are actually covered in helpful germs. Many conditions – from diabetes to depression, asthma to autism -- have been found to relate to the microbiome.

uBiome brings this cutting edge technology directly to consumers for the first time. The more data we collect, the more we can learn about this important area of research. We've been featured so far in Wired, Venture Beat, the Los Angeles Times, Scientific American, BoingBoing, and more.

Magpie Mapper

Magpie Mapper is a smartphone app for recording observations of Magpies, one of the most fascinating and striking birds in the United Kindgom. When you see a magpie, simply log it on the app and your data will be used in our research into how birds are distributed throughout our towns cities and countryside.

With their long tails and impressive black and white plumage, magpies are unmistakable. Magpies are so ingrained in our folklorethat people often greet them with "Hello Mr Magpie!".

Now you can digitally salute a magpie with the Magpie Mapper app!


AirCasting is an open-source, end-to-end solution for collecting, displaying, and sharing health and environmental data using your smartphone. The platform consists of wearable sensors that detect changes in your environment and physiology, including a palm-sized air quality monitor called the AirBeam, the AirCasting Android app, the AirCasting website, and wearable LED accessories. By documenting and leveraging health and environmental data to inform personal decision-making and public policy, the AirCasting platform empowers citizen scientists and changemakers.

American Gut

The Human Microbiome Project and other microbiome projects worldwide have laid an important foundation for understanding the trillions of microbes that inhabits each of our bodies-and how they affect human health. We know that things like diet affect the microbiome, or that obesity is linked to the microbes that live in your gut. Research suggests that microbes may even be associated with autism! However, we need more samples to fully understand how our microbes are linked to health and disease. American Gut gives you the opportunity to participate in the discovery of new scientific knowledge about the microbiome by comparing the microbes in your gut (or in your mouth or on your skin) to those of thousands of participants in the US and elsewhere around the world. American Gut is a project built on open-source, open-access principles. Our data are for the good of scientific understanding and will be shared both with participants and with other scientists.


Help track the health and abundance of the mid-Atlantic scallop fishery!

Researchers at the University of Delaware have developed a new robot-based approach to surveying marine life the ocean floor. They use Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs), which can navigate underwater without direct human control, to take photos of marine life in its natural habitat.

By becoming a SubseaObserver you'll play a roll in ocean conservation by helping organizations such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) make better decisions about how to manage the scallop fishery now and for future generations.

As a SubseaObserver you can name your own virtual AUV and choose what part of the mid-Atlantic you'd like to explore.

SubseaObservers also includes information about scallop biology, how the fishery is managed, how AUVs work and where they're used.


Marblar is unique and fun way to engage in citizen science and exchange ideas across disciplines. Marblar posts research projects in need of creative, real-world applications and they ask YOU to come up with those applications.

Singing up is easy and free and there are new projects added regularly. Projects are posted for three weeks. Through online collaboration, the final solutions are posted for users to vote on and further discuss. Top solutions are even awarded cash prizes!

Project Nighthawk

The call of the Common Nighthawk (Chordeiles minor) was once a familiar sound in cities and towns throughout New Hampshire, where they nested on flat, peastone gravel roofs and fed on insects attracted to city lights. In recent years, nesting nighthawks have disappeared from many New Hampshire towns; in the few places where they remain (including Keene), their numbers have dramatically declined. Biologists are now trying to determine the cause for this precipitous decline.

In partnership with New Hampshire Audubon and in efforts to conserve this state-threatened species, the Harris Center for Conservation Education coordinates volunteer nighthawk surveys on summer evenings in Keene.

Salamander Crossing Brigades

As the earth thaws and spring rains drench New Hampshire, thousands of amphibians make their way to vernal pools to breed. Many are killed when their journeys take them across busy roads. Each spring, the citizen science arm of the Harris Center for Conservation Education (www.aveo.org) trains volunteers to serve on Salamander Crossing Brigades at amphibian road crossings throughout the Monadnock Region of southwestern New Hampshire. These citizen scientists move migrating amphibians across roads by hand during one or more “Big Nights,” keeping count as they go.

Since the program’s inception in 2007, over 600 volunteers have helped more than 31,000 amphibians survive the most dangerous journeys of their lives. In addition, the City of Keene purchased land – previously slated for development – to protect a migratory amphibian corridor that was documented by our volunteers. As our efforts grow, the data our citizen scientists collect could be used for land conservation or road improvements that protect amphibians in other places, too.


Panamath is a free-standing software that can be used to assess number sense - your intuitive recognition of numbers and their relationship. Researchers in laboratories throughout the world have utilized this research tool in studies of number knowledge, mathematical acuity, and learning in general.

Curious? Use Panamath to test your own number sense, read more about the research being done or download the software and adapt it for your own research or educational purposes.

Los Angeles Butterfly Survey

The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County is partnering with Butterflies and Moths of North America (BAMONA) to share data and learn more about L.A. butterflies and moths. Help us find and photograph them in Los Angeles.

We know there are 237 species recorded for L.A, County, but how many can you find?

Utah Water Watch

Utah Water Watch (UWW) is a water quality education and data collection program that seeks to increase awareness about the importance of water quality and promote stewardship of Utah’s aquatic resources.

UWW is a partnership between USU Water Quality Extension and the Utah Division of Water Quality that creates a way for the public to help in monitoring Utah’s lakes and streams. This is a free program for volunteers of all ages to monitor water quality once a month and report the data to water managers.

UWW is a two tier program. Tier 1 collects monthly data for education and base line purposes avaliable to the public and water managers. Tier 2 volunteers have a higher level of training to assist watershed coordinators collect credible data for assessment and monitoring of nonpoint source BMP projects.

Old Weather

Help scientists recover Arctic and worldwide weather observations made by United States’ ships since the mid-19th century.

These transcriptions will contribute to climate model projections and will improve our knowledge of past environmental conditions. Historians will use your work to track past ship movements and tell the stories of the people on board.

Water Isotopes: Hurricane Sandy

Hurricane Sandy is currently moving northward along the East coast of the USA (as of 10/29/12), and is expected to collide with a cold front and move inland across the northeastern USA during the next several days. On Friday, WaterIsotopes initiated a call for assistance in collecting samples of precipitation (both rain and snow) associated with the passage of this system.

The goal is to develop an unprecedented spatial and temporal dataset documenting the isotopic composition of rainwater (and snow) associated with this major storm system. These data will tell us about water sources and cycling within the storm system.

We're hoping to see evidence for changes in water sources to the storm as it first collides with the approaching cold front and then leaves the ocean to traverse the NE USA.

Community of Observers

Get to know the nature of YOUR world! The Fairbanks Community of Observers is to encourage greater public clarity around environmental indicators of climate change in Vermont and northern New Hampshire. Using the website developed by the Fairbanks Museum, we'll collect your quantitative data focused on the life cycles of specific birds, butterflies and wildflowers that are sensitive to environmental change as well as seasonal weather data that is characteristic to our region.

The Community of Observers is for individuals, families, clubs, groups and schools. It is designed to encourage citizen scientists to gain a deeper understanding of the cycles and patterns that characterize our region through the seasons, and how the habitats that depend on these cycles might be affected by global climate shifts.

What's the Score at the Bodleian?

The Bodleian Libraries are enlisting the help of the public in order to improve access to their music collections. Over four thousand digitized scores, mostly piano music from the nineteenth century, many of which have illustrated covers, have now been made available online.

By describing these images, you will not only be helping to provide access to this valuable but hitherto 'hidden' collection, you will also be facilitating future research into popular music of the period and the wider social function which it performed during the Victorian age.

Geo-Wiki Project

The Geo-Wiki Project is a citizen science network that hopes to improve the overall quality of land use and land cover maps across the globe. They host a variety of projects, all of which use their online Google Earth Application to enlist citizen scientists to improve spatial data. By comparing global land use and land cover data to the aerial photography that appears in Google Earth, you can help improve the validity of important data that is being used to solve important global problems.

Geo-Wiki supports a variety of projects that tackle issues that include climate change, the bio-diversity of plants, and the viability of changing agriculture.

They even have developed mobile apps that allow you to ‘ground truth’ data by adding your own photographs of what’s near you.

Bat Detective

Bat Detective is an online citizen science project which allows visitors to the website to take part in wildlife conservation by listening out for bat calls in recordings collected all over the world.

By sorting the sounds in the recordings into insect and bat calls, bat detectives will help biologists learn how to reliably distinguish bat 'tweets' to develop new automatic identification tools.

Bats use lots of different types of sounds, from singing to each other to find a mate, to using the echoes from their tweets to find their way around. Usually bat sounds are inaudible to humans as they are too high for us to hear, but special 'time expansion' ultrasonic detectors convert these sounds to a lower frequency, and visitors to the Bat Detective website can listen to these unique recordings and help distinguish different sounds.

One out of every five species of bats is threatened with extinction and better automatic identification tools are desperately needed to quickly process vast amounts of sound data collected by volunteers from the bat monitoring programme iBats who survey bat populations each year.

Bats are found all over the world from local parks to pristine rainforests and monitoring their population trends provides an important indicator of healthy ecosystems. Developing new tools that allow biologists to interpret population trends from sound will allow bats' tweets to act as a way to track environmental change.

Bat Detective was developed at University College London, Bat Conservation Trust, Bat Life Europe with the Citizen Science Alliance.


ZooTeach is a website where teachers and educators can share high quality lesson plans and resources that complement the Zooniverse citizen science projects. Citizen science offers a unique opportunity for any person, of any age, of any background to get involved and make a contribution to cutting edge science. Here at Zooniverse headquarters we believe that getting students involved in citizen science offers educators a free, easily accesible and inspiring opportunity to bring real science into the classroom.


SatCam lets you capture observations of sky and ground conditions with a smart phone app at the same time that an Earth observation satellite is overhead.

When you capture a SatCam observation and submit it to our server, it helps us to check the quality of the cloud products that we create from the satellite data. In return, we send you the satellite image that was captured at your location, anywhere in the world! SatCam supports the Terra, Aqua, and Suomi NPP satellites.

SatCam was developed at the Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison .

NASA JPL's Infographics

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) needs you to take complex scientific data and images and turn them into informative graphics to convey a simple and easy to understand messages! The JPL’s newest venture is called JPL Infographics, and they need your help to create and post your very own creations of scientific graphic art.

All of the resources are at your fingertips, including high-resolution images, 3-D models, fact sheets, and loads of other data build your very own Infographics. You can browse the numerous of other user creations to get inspired and then upload your creation online!

This is a really fun and challenging project and your work will be used to educate and inform others on the goings on of cutting-edge space exploration. So fire of both sides of your brain and create some educational space art!

Brown marmorated stink bug locations

The brown marmorated stink bug is an invasive insect species that has become an damaging pest of a wide variety of fruit, vegetable, grain, and ornamental crops. This stink bug species also enters homes and can be a nuisance pest. Our webpage allows citizens to report the presence and severity of this stink bug species in their home, yard, farm, or commercial nursery.


The Meteon Network is an ambitious collaboration in Italy to make scientific data from over 400 weather nationwide stations available in an easy to understand visual interface. You can now join in this groundbreaking work and gain access to loads of real time data. You can even add your own data and share analysis among the many members of the network.

The Meteon Network also employs several newer, more human centric, data products including something they call ‘weatherness’, among others, that are normalized to an easy to understand scale. All of these, and several other more traditional weather related measurements, are all displayed in real time on the Network’s interactive mapping application.

This kind of nationwide effort to monitor, analyze, and give citizens a more complete picture of weather may serve as a model for others to follow. Now is your chance to get involved in a trailblazing project and get into weather today!

Public Laboratory Balloon and Kite Mapping

This DIY mapping tool was the first developed by Public Lab, as part of the Grassroots Mapping project. Citizens use helium-filled balloons and digital cameras to generate high resolution “satellite” maps of areas such as in the Gulf Coast and Gowanus Canal. Although this tool has been in use for two years, components of the kit -- kite and balloon design, the rig, the camera -- continue to evolve as they are adopted in new places and adapted for new purposes. Besides the aerial mapping tools, Public Lab has also developed MapKnitter.org, an online tool for stitching aerial images into maps.

Public Laboratory Infrared Camera

Infrared photography can help in assessing plant health, and has been used on satellites and planes for agricultural and ecological assessment primarily by vineyards, large farms and large-scale (read: expensive) research projects. By creating and open-sourcing a low-cost near-infrared camera and working with wetlands advocates, farmers and environmental activists, the Public Lab community has begun to explore grassroots uses for this powerful analytic technique.

Desktop Spectrometry Starter Kit

The Public Lab spectrometry project is an open source community effort to develop low-cost spectrometers for a range of purposes. All open spectrometry hardware and software efforts are welcome here!

> Link: https://publiclab.org/wiki/spectrometry

(pictured is an experiment which built on the kit to attempt to identify different oils based on their fluorescence)

Join in by:

Reading about goals and asking great questions:

> Link: https://publiclab.org/wiki/spectrometry#Frequently+Asked+Questions

Building a basic spectrometer using one of our starter kits

> Link: https://publiclab.org/wiki/desktop-spectrometry-kit-3-0

Trying (and suggesting improvements on) our community-made how-to guides:

> Link: https://publiclab.org/wiki/spectrometry#Activities

Building on others’ work; hack and remix the kits to refine and expand them:

> Link: https://publiclab.org/wiki/spectrometry#Upgrades

The Desktop Spectrometry Starter Kit 3.0, is our most recent “reference design” incorporating some community improvements while balancing low cost and relative ease of construction. We have not yet met all our intended goals for this design, which is still at an exploratory phase: build on this design by adding a sample holder, attaching a light, or incorporating it into an experiment -- so we need your help!

The National Map Corps

The National Map Corps enlists volunteers to collect and edit data about human made structures in an effort to provide accurate and authoritative map data for the USGS National Map and US Topo Maps. Using aerial imagery and base layers from The National Map, volunteers are editing 10 different structure types including schools, hospitals, post offices, police stations, and other important public buildings in all 50 States as well as Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.


Help tackle invasive plant species!

The Environment Agency, the Nature Locator team at the University of Bristol and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology have joined forces to help combat the spread of the UK’s most problematic invasive, non-native plant species.

We need your help to find them and record them.


AgeGuess is a simple on-line citizen science project and game where people can guess your age based on the face photos you link/upload. You will also be guessing other people’s age and comparing your results with others. By participating in AgeGuess you will create a first of its kind research data set for the study of human aging.

AgeGuess investigates the differences between perceived age (how old you look to other people) and chronological age (how old you actually are) and their potential power as an aging biomarker. Some of the specific topic we would like to address include: 

- Perceived age as predictor (biomarker) for age at death. Are people who look older than they are more likely to die early?

- Is 60 the new 50? We know that nowadays the average 60 year old is capable of doing things that fewer people of the same age where able to do 50 years ago. Is this difference also reflected in how old they look?

Please visit the intro page of our website for more information about these and other topics, such as: are there times when one ages faster, is perceived age heritable, and at what age are you best at guessing. Don’t hesitate to contact us if you have other ideas that you would like to help us explore.


This smartphone app will help you explore habitats in your area and easily monitor wildlife populations by logging locations, photos, and responding to form questions all with the ease of your smartphone.


Roadkill smartphone app for citizen scientists that will help you monitor wildlife roadkill patterns in your area by logging locations, photos, and responding to form questions all with the ease of your smartphone.

Tracking ring-billed gulls

More than 10,000 ring-billed gulls have been marked near Montreal, Quebec with individually coded bands to track their movements throughout their annual cycle. We are more specifically interested by their post-breeding dispersal and their fidelity to their colony. Repeated observations of individuals also allow us to estimate annual survival. This is part of a larger study that aimed at understanding the behavior and population dynamics of these birds within an integrated management framework.

New England Basking Shark and Ocean Sunfish Project

The New England Coastal Wildlife Alliance (NECWA) invites beach walkers, boaters, fishermen, and divers to report their sightings and send in their photographs of basking sharks and ocean sunfish seen in our New England waters. Your data will help scientists monitor the local populations and better understand their migration patterns.

Sevengill Shark Identification Project

Update: 2-15-16: This database is now accepting photographic documentation from citizen science divers in South Africa-- see link below for more information:


A citizen science project which allows local divers photo document encounters with Sevengill sharks (Notorynchus cepedianus). The Sevengill Shark Sightings is a portal through which data is entered into the 'Wildbook' pattern recognition algorithm program.

Two pattern recognition algorithms are used to analyze the freckling patterns of each shark to determine which animals are returning each year.

Sevengill Shark Zero Data Project:

Didn’t see any Sevengill sharks on your dive today at La Jolla Cove (or False Bay, Cape Town)? No problem – – we still need your data!

‘Zero data’ is an important concept in long-term population studies in a fixed location with a single species: it’s also called ‘Presence/Absence’ data, meaning, we still want to know when you did *not* see a certain species in a given location, because it tells us a lot about why that particular species may or may not be present at certain times of the year.

The portal can accessed through our main website at http://sevengillsharksightings.org/.

And, it goes without saying, of course, if you *did* see some sevengill sharks, we certainly accept your photographs!


Or go directly to the Zero Data portal here:


Snapshot Serengeti

At this very moment in Serengeti National Park, 200 cameras are flashing throughout the night, in corners of the park where tourists never go.

These are camera traps -- remote, automatic cameras that take pictures of passing wildlife - and the Serengeti Lion Project is conducting the largest-ever camera trap survey to better understand the Serengeti ecosystem. The camera traps capture over 1,000,000 images of wildlife each year, capturing the grandeur of the wildebeest migration and rarely seen species from aardvarks to zebras.

Help to transmit these photos by satellite from the Serengeti to the U.S., where they can be analyzed to advance science and conservation. Join this unprecedented initiative to bring cutting edge technology to the wilds of Serengeti, and you'll get first access to witness the Serengeti Live on your computer.


Australia's national crowdsourced koala map, plotting the locations of koala populations in the wild, points of impact, causes of death and injury. Become a member of KoalaTracker.com.au to view the map, search the database, see the library of member images available for use in non-commercial projects. Learn more about the koala and how you can really do something to save it before it is too late.


The chloroplasts inside plant cells appear to "clump" together during bacterial infection; this can be devastating for plants and seriously compromise crop yields. We need your help to classify plant cell images by their "clumpiness" in order to further this research.

Helping us to classify the images will give insights into the progression of bacterial infection in plant cells.


ZomBee Watch is a citizen science project sponsored by the San Francisco State University Department of Biology, the San Francisco State University Center for Computing for Life Sciences and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. ZomBee Watch was initiated as a follow-up to the discovery that the Zombie Fly Apocephalus borealis is parasitizing honey bees in California and possibly other areas of North America.

ZomBee Watch has three main goals.

1. To determine where in North America the Zombie Fly Apocephalus borealis is parasitizing honey bees.

2. To determine how often honey bees leave their hives at night, even if they are not parasitized by the Zombie Fly.

3. To engage citizen scientists in making a significant contribution to knowledge about honey bees and to become better observers of nature.

You can help in finding out where honey bees are being parasitized by the Zombie Fly and how big a threat the fly is to honey bees. So far, the Zombie Fly has been found parasitizing honey bees in California, Oregon, South Dakota, Vermont and Washington. We are teaming up with citizen scientists (like you!) to determine if the fly has spread to honey bees across all of North America.

Dragonfly Migration

We need your help to better understand dragonfly migration in North America. Although it spans three countries and has been documented since the 1880s, North American dragonfly migration is still poorly understood, and much remains to be learned about migratory cues, flight pathways, and the southern limits of overwintering grounds. Become part of an international network of citizen scientists and help monitor the spring and fall movements of the 5 main migratory species in North America, or report on these species throughout the year at a pond or wetland of your choice.

Did You See it?

"Did You See It?" is a new crowd sourcing initiative launched by the U.S. Geological Survey's Landslide Hazards Program to collect data about the occurrence of landslides within the United States.

Landslides are a serious geologic hazard common to almost every State in the United States.

The information will not only help scientists better understand the causes of landslides, possibly leading to improved disaster mitigation strategies, but also serve as public resource to educate citizens about potential risks in their communities.

MIT Climate CoLab

In the Climate CoLab, you can work with people from all over the world to create proposals for what to do about climate change.

Inspired by systems like open source software and Wikipedia, MIT’s Climate CoLab relies on crowdsourcing to generate, and gain support for, creative new ideas to address global climate change. Activity in the CoLab is organized through a series of on-line contests, on a broad set of subproblems at the heart of the climate change challenge. Topics include increasing the efficiency of energy use, decarbonizing energy supply, changing social attitudes and behavior, adapting to climate change, and geoengineering.

The public is invited to participate by submitting, commenting, collaborating, supporting, and/or voting for proposals. Experts review the proposals and after a judging and public voting process, top proposals are connected with those who can help implement them.

Check out the SciStarter feature of the Climate CoLab: http://scistarter.com/blog/2013/08/stop-collaborate-and-vote-mit-climate-colab .

Tiger Nation

Love tigers? Then connect to wild lives: follow real wild tigers and their cubs, while we keep an eye on them in their jungle homes.

Using cutting-edge ID technology, everyone, guides, naturalists, photographers, conservationists and visitors can all help with your photos and sightings, helping us keep an eye on their last strongholds, and supplying unending dramas in the lives of our wild tigers.

Tiny Terrors Project

The Tiny Terrors Project needs volunteers to monitor the invasive insect species of adelgids that attack both hemlocks and Fraser firs (the most popular Christmas Tree in North America).

Although barely visible to the naked eye, adelgids and their effects on trees can be detected by citizen scientists. Tiny Terrors is calling on you to help them identify both healthy and infected trees all across the Eastern United States.

Data collection is easy once you have identified an area that contains hemlock or Fraser fir, and you can submit your observations online.

Not only are both tree species valued for their beauty, but because of their numbers, they provide wildlife habitat and are an important source of lumber. Your help can help researchers find potentially resistant trees and aid in developing genetically resistant trees to restore forests.

The Tiny Terrors Project is based out of the North Carolina State University Forest Entomology Lab and was created for the Alliance for Saving Threatened Trees.


FreeGeek is a nationwide movement that harnesses the power of volunteerism to recycle, rebuilt, and re-sell used computers for the economically underprivileged.

Volunteers receive comprehensive training about how to take apart and rebuild computers as well as how to test and install operating systems.

No formal background in science or computers required, all ages welcome!

World Community Grid

World Community Grid, an IBM philanthropic initiative, was created in 2004 to support humanitarian research on health, poverty, and sustainability. Through World Community Grid, hundreds of thousands of volunteers from around the globe have donated unused computing power from their computers and Android devices to help scientists make discover important advances to fighting cancer, AIDS and malaria; and developed novel solutions to environmental challenges, including new materials for affordable solar energy and more efficient water filtration.
As a volunteer, you simply install a non-invasive application on your device and get on with your day. When your device has spare power, it connects to World Community Grid and requests a virtual experiment to work on. And scientists gets several steps closer to life-changing solutions.


Petridish allows citizens to support science by directly funding independent and small -scale research projects. While this is a somewhat non-traditional citizen science project, funding is an important part of science, and Petridish allows science lovers everywhere to truly make a difference and support innovative science.

Similar to other crowd funding style websites, Petridish lets you browse projects and donate online to the research projects of your choice. Each project has a variety of donation levels with enticing rewards for each level. Typical rewards included souvenirs from the field, acknowledgement in journal articles, chances to join researchers in the field, dinner with a famous researcher, and even naming rights to new species!

You can explore projects by both research subject and reward type. After you donate, share your involvement and information about the project through Facebook and Twitter and help projects gain momentum and reach their goals.

Lowell Amateur Research Initiative

Lowell Observatory is proud to announce the Lowell Amateur Research Initiative (LARI). This program seeks to pair the ever-growing and technically sophisticated amateur astronomy community in exciting research projects with Lowell astronomers.

A passionate researcher, Percival Lowell always sought to communicate new ideas and the joy of astronomy research to the public. In that same spirit, LARI brings together professional and amateur astronomers in a way that affords interested amateurs an opportunity to participate in cutting-edge research and potentially make significant contributions to science. Amateurs can help Lowell astronomers in their work and help create dedicated research teams. LARI will expand Lowell Observatory's education and public outreach missions, and promote greater awareness of astronomy and related sciences.

Currently, Lowell astronomers are conducting several projects that would benefit from the participation of amateur astronomers. These projects span a broad range of technical skills and knowledge from taking very deep images of galaxies to monitoring small stars for transient events to data mining. 

Citizens in Space

Citizens in Space, a project of the United States Rocket Academy, plans to fly citizen-science experiments on fully reusable suborbital spacecraft that are now being developed by US companies.

Citizens in Space has acquired an initial contract for 10 flights with XCOR Aerospace, the Mojave, California-based company that is developing the Lynx spacecraft. It expects to acquire additional flights from XCOR and other companies in the future.

Citizens in Space is currently training three astronaut candidates to fly as operators. It will select and train seven additional astronaut candidates over the next 12 to 24 months. Citizens in Space is also inviting citizen scientists to build 100 experiments to fly on those flights, which are expected to begin in late 2013 or early 2014.

In addition to the general call for experiments, Citizens in Space will offer a cash prize for certain experiments deemed to be of special importance.

Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation

Adventurers and Scientist for Conservation is a unique initiative that helps create working reationships between scientists and adventure athletes to perform some truly unique research. Projects have been created all over the world and by groups of all kinds. The project even provides training for adventurers to become adventure-scientists.

The exciting benefits from these projects are numerous. Adventurers benefit by contributing to meaningful conservation research in areas that they visit. Additionally, scientists benefit from attaining inexpensive data that would have been previously hard or impossible to acquire. By no means, however are these adventure research projects limited to avid adventurers and professional scientists. Programs can be created anywhere for any age group. The goal of the project is to train and inspire the next generation of citizen scientists. In short, Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation will help you create a project, recruit participants, and start an Adventure Science project near you!


Leafsnap is a series of electronic field guides developed by researchers from Columbia University, the University of Maryland, and the Smithsonian Institution. The free mobile apps use visual recognition software to help identify tree species from photographs of their leaves, and contain beautiful high-resolution images of leaves, flowers, fruits, petioles, seeds and bark. Leafsnap turns app-users into citizen scientists, automatically sharing images, species identifications, and geo-coded stamps of species locations with a community of scientists who will use the stream of data to map and monitor the ebb and flow of flora. The Leafsnap family of electronic field guides aims to leverage digital applications and mobile devices to build an ever-greater awareness of and appreciation for biodiversity.

Target Asteroids!

Target Asteroids! is a citizen science project which engages amateur astronomers in observations of potential asteroid spacecraft targets. The purpose is to collect data (e.g., astrometry and photometry) on asteroid targets to better characterize them as well as engage amateurs in the mission and encourage interest in STEM education and careers. OSIRIS-REx team members work with amateur astronomy groups to provide guidance, monitoring and collection of data.

Shad watch

Invasive species are a growing global concern because of their negative impacts on ecosystem functions and biodiversity. American shad are an andaromous (ascend rivers from the ocean to spawn) fish native to the Atlantic coast of North America that were deliberately introduced to the Sacramento River, CA, in 1871. The species has now spread to additional Pacific coastal rivers, and have dramatically increased in abundance in the some systems like the Columbia River.

Despite their prevelance in the Pacific northwest, basic information about the ecological effects of shad on native species remain unknown. A first step towards gaining an understanding of the species impacts requires knowing where they continue to be found.

Illinois RiverWatch

The Illinois RiverWatch program engages citizen science volunteers in stewardship, education, and science for Illinois rivers. By becoming a trained volunteer, you can help collect a variety of quality ensured data and help contribute to statewide biological monitoring efforts. There are over 1,500 volunteers already monitoring streams in the state, but there are still more streams waiting to be claimed!

The training process involves attending a workshop that will help train volunteers in data collection and give you all the tools you need to monitor a stream of your choice. Soon, you will be a true citizen scientist and take part in collaborative efforts to keep Illinois’ streams clean and beautiful, sharing your data with other organizations, state agencies, and private interests.

SHArK Project

**Project still under development**

The Solar Hydrogen Activity Research Kit (SHArK) Project gives you the tools to discover a storable form of solar energy.

Solar energy is the only option for producing the renewable carbon-free power needed to power the planet. However, because the sun doesn't shine at night, it is critical that we develop a method to store the energy for night. Producing hydrogen from sunlight and water is an ideal solution to the storage problem.

The SHArK Project uses the process of photoelectrolysis, whereby certain metal oxides are used with solar energy to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Currently, no known stable material is capable of efficiently and inexpensively photoelectrolyzing water with visible light. There are, however, millions of untested compounds that might.

This is where students can take the reigns and contribute to real and meaningful science. The SHArK project provides inexpensive kits that include software, laser pointers, and LEGOs® to allow students a fun and engaging way to explore chemistry and contribute potential solutions to the world’s energy problem.

Harness the power of the sun with the SHArK Project!


eButterfly is a citizen science project that helps document butterflies in Canada. By creating a user profile and documenting observed butterflies, citizens can help scientists better understand butterfly distribution in Canada. Users can also track which butterflies they have observed on a dynamic map application, and share photos with the eButterfly community.

The 2,045 eButterfly records of over 170 species help the Canadian Facility for Ecoinformatics Research at the University of Ottawa's Department of Biology better understand how butterflies adapt to environmental change. Eventually, the data you collect will help contribute to the preservation of Canada’s great biodiversity.

Tucson Bird Count

The Tucson Bird Count is an annual project in which volunteers collect data on the abundances and distributions of bird species from hundreds of sites in the Tucson area.

Volunteers can participate in two programs: 1) The annual Route Program, in which participants count individuals of all bird species, and 2) the quarterly Park Monitoring Program, in which groups adopt an area and spend four mornings a year counting birds at that area.

The data collected will help researchers monitor the status of the Tucson area bird community over time, identify land use practices that are succeeding at sustaining native birds, and investigate the ecology of birds in human-inhabited landscapes. Data and analyses, including distribution maps for most species counted in the Tucson Bird Count, are publicly available on the project web site.

The Tucson Bird Count (TBC) is a cooperative project begun by members of Tucson's science, conservation, and birding communities.

WorldWide Telescope Ambassadors

Do you have an Astronomy Story to tell? Create interactive, narrated tours about your favorite astronomical objects in WorldWide Telescope, and share them with the world.

UF Native Buzz

Solitary bees and wasps in your own backyard!!!

Native Buzz is a citizen science project created by the University of Florida (UF) Honey Bee Research and Extension Lab. Our goal is to learn more about the nesting preferences, diversity and distribution of our native solitary bees and wasps, share the information gained and provide a forum for those interested in participating in the science and art of native beekeeping (and wasp-keeping!).

Here at University of Florida Native Buzz you can keep track of your own native buzz nest site and see the results of other participant’s nest sites.

The River Otter Ecology Project

River otters are ideal ambassadors for habitat preservation and restoration since they are charismatic carnivores reliant on healthy watersheds to thrive. The River Otter Ecology Project strives to build understanding and shed light on the conservation status and ecology of the North American river otter and the ecosystems they inhabit in the San Francisco Bay Area. Our work will serve to fill key gaps in the biology and ecology of these elusive but important aquatic carnivores while also directly engaging the public in their conservation through field-research, environmental education and strategic restoration partnerships.


Osprey Watch is a project of the Center for Conservation Biology for birdwatchers across the nation to help identify osprey nests and observe osprey behavior. The project hopes to acquire data across a large enough spatial scale in order to address three pressing issues associated with aquatic ecosystems: climate change, depletion of fish stocks, and environmental contaminants. Ospreys are great indicators of the health of aquatic ecosystems as they are sensitive to small changes in fish populations and water quality.

OspreyWatch has almost 500 Osprey Watchers monitoring almost 800 nests across North America, Europe, and Australia. Ospreys are incredible birds of prey and viewing them in the wild can be an amazing experience. And it may be easier than you think. Many osprey nest in man made objects and might even be right outside your backdoor. There are also many nests viewable online through web cameras.

So grab a camera, some binoculars, and locate a nest near you to add photos and descriptions to OspreyWatch’s interactive map. You can even find other nests in your area and help monitor and add updates to nesting activity.

North American Bird Phenology Program

The North American Bird Phenology Program, part of the USA-National Phenology Network, was a network of volunteer observers who recorded information on first arrival dates, maximum abundance, and departure dates of migratory birds across North America. Active between 1880 and 1970, the program was coordinated by the Federal government and sponsored by the American Ornithologists' Union. It exists now as a historic collection of six million migration card observations, illuminating almost a century of migration patterns and population status of birds. Today, in an innovative project to curate the data and make them publicly available, the records are being scanned and placed on the internet, where volunteers worldwide transcribe these records and add them into a database for analysis.

Olympic Marmot Monitoring

Olympic National Park needs teams of volunteers to hike locations within the park to record up-to-date information about the declining number of Olympic marmots.

This is timely information that is vital to our understanding of this endemic mammal and its future. Most of the sites would not be visited without the help of volunteers.

Field days will consist of hiking, surveying, or both depending on your destination. Volunteers must be capable of traveling and camping in remote areas, navigating to areas off-trail, and traversing steep slopes and scree.

We will conduct volunteer research again this summer to learn what is happening to the marmot populations from year to year. This program is supported by donations through Washington's National Park Fund.

If you'd like to sign up for this year's program, go to http://www.nps.gov/olym/naturescience/marmot-volunteer-information.htm to get started. Investigate what a marmot monitor does and figure out if this is a task that is right for you. Identify which area of the park you'd like to survey.

Ancient Lives

Ancient Lives allows citizen scientists to help transcribe ancient papyri texts from Greco-Roman Egypt. The data gathered will help scholars reveal new knowledge of the literature, culture, and lives of Greco-Romans in ancient Egypt.

The 1,000 year old transcripts were originally found by researchers in 1896 in the city of Oxrhynchus, often called the ‘City of the Sharp-Nosed Fish’. Over the next decade, over 500,000 fragments of papyri were uncovered and the collections stands today as largely unstudied. That is why Ancient Lives needs your help to measure fragments and transcribe Ancient Greek characters.

The project is a collaboration between researchers at Oxford University and several other international groups.

Planet Hunters

Planet Hunters is a project from Zooniverse where citizen scientists help astronomers identify new planets.

Through data taken from the Kepler Spacecraft, citizens are helping scientists identify stars with possible planets in the Cygnus constellation. The Spacecraft takes brightness data every thirty minutes from over 150,000 stars so there is a lot to look at.

When planets pass in front of stars, the brightness of that star dips, which shows up on the light curves taken from Kepler. These patterns are not always easily recognized by computer algorithms, and in many cases, the human brain is actually more capable of identifying brightness dips.

PHOWN, Photos of Weaver Nests

The aim of PHOWN is to study variation of colony sizes of weavers, to map their breeding distribution, and to study these aspects in relation to climate change. This is achieved with the help of citizen scientists submitting photos of weaver nests or colonies.

Some feral populations exist throughout the world, and may be included in PHOWN. Species include the true weavers, bishops and widows, queleas, social weavers, sparrow weavers, buffalo weavers, malimbes and fodies. Sparrows are not included.

Weavers are often common species, and often found near human habitation. This makes them easy to study. Some species are of conservation concern and for some the nest has not even been described yet!


FieldScope is a community web-mapping tool that promotes student engagement as citizen scientists and involves them in learning through mapping. By combining easy data integration with powerful mapping visualization, FieldScope is on the cutting edge of community mapping.

The application is accessed online and is requires no installation. Students are able to upload field data photos and other media as well as collaborate with other students and scientists, and perform analysis on existing data. There are many rich projects to choose from, including mapping water quality in the Chesapeake Bay, investigating watershed dynamics, and mapping rivers and streams in the National Parks.

With students able to contribute and interact alongside scientists, meaningful science is sure to happen!

Be a Martian

Help scientist improve maps of Mars and participate in other research tasks to help NASA manage the large amount of data from the Red Planet.

Users create Martian profiles and become "citizens" of the planet. In the map room, citizens can then earn Martian credits by helping place satellite photos on Mars’s surface, counting craters, and even helping the rovers Spirit and Opportunity by tagging photos with descriptions.

The highly interactive website is rich in content and contains other informational videos and mapping applications for citizens to tour Mars and get to know every nook and cranny of its rocky surface.

Become a Martian, explore Mars, have fun!


Spy on nature, and contribute to science. Share photos and observations through SciSpy and you're contributing to research initiatives that rely on amateur participation. Created by Science Channel (Discovery), SciSpy enlists paticipants to document the natural world of their backyards, parks, cities, and towns. Photos and observation data are tagged and stamped with date, time and location information and will hopefully provide helpful information to track migrations, changes in the natural environment, seasonal trends and more.

Moon Mappers

Help NASA identify craters on the Moon

Solar Storm Watch

You don’t have to be a science expert to be a brilliant solar stormwatcher. Help scientists spot explosions on the Sun and track them across space to Earth. Your work will give astronauts an early warning if dangerous solar radiation is headed their way. And you could make a new scientific discovery.

Explore interactive diagrams to learn out about the Sun and the spacecraft monitoring it. The STEREO spacecraft is scientists’ latest mission to study the Sun and space weather – not clouds and rain, but how solar storms change conditions in space and on Earth.

Solar Stormwatch isn't just about classifying data. You can talk to other members on our forum, sign up for our space weather forecast from Twitter, and learn about the latest discoveries on our blog. You can also see how solar storms affect Earth at our Flickr group Aurora chasers, featuring beautiful photos of aurora.

if you’d like to know more about what you’re looking at, then explore our beautiful and interactive zoomable diagrams to find out about the Sun and the STEREO spacecraft monitoring it. And check out our scientists’ profiles too.


THE BROAD PICTURE: The aim of MammalMAP is to update the distribution records of all African mammal species. Through collaborations with professional scientists, conservation organisations, wildlife authorities and citizen scientists across Africa, we consolidate all reliable and identifiable evidence (camera trap records, photographs) of current mammal locations into an open-access digital database. The database software automatically generates online distribution maps of all recorded species which are instantly visible and searchable. The information consolidated within MammalMAP will not only yield crucial information for species conservation policies and landscape conservation policies, but provides an excellent platform for educating the public about African mammals and their conservation challenges.

WHY MAMMALMAP IS NECESSARY: In Africa, our knowledge of mammal distribution patterns is based largely on historical records. However, the last three centuries have seen extensive human-modification of African landscapes with the associated conversion, compression and fragmentation of natural land. With further land development presenting a likely reality for the future, the effectiveness of mammal conservation efforts depends on ecological records being updated so that they accurately reflect mammal distribution patterns in the 21st Century. With MammalMAP we plan to conduct these ecological updates over the coming years, by mapping the current distribution of mammal species (including marine mammals and small mammals) across Africa.

HOW MAMMALMAP CONTRIBUTES TO CONSERVATION: The conservation benefits of this research are multiple. First, the comparison of these updated distribution records with both historical and future records will enable the detection of species’ distribution changes in response to human-related and climate-related habitat changes. These change detections will assist the guidance of continent-wide conservation policies and decision making processes. Second, the research will promote and facilitate interdisciplinary and international collaboration amongst scientists and conservation practitioners, with potential benefits to the advancement of conservation science. Finally, both the project input stage (data collection) and output stage (data dissemination) will offer interactive, dynamic and widely applicable education tools suitable for both formal and informal education sectors.

THE WHERE AND THE HOW OF MAMMALMAP: The area of interest for MammalMAP is the whole of Africa. To achieve this we collaborate with scientists, conservation organisations, wildlife authorities and citizen scientists across the continent. Our methods involve consolidating evidence of mammal occurrence in a given location (camera trap records, photographs and other reliable records) into a digital database hosted by the Animal Demography Unit (ADU) at the University of Cape Town. In time, we will use the records in the database to generate distribution maps for all recorded species, in the same way that the ADU has done for birds, reptiles, frogs and butterflies.

LA Spider Survey

In order to conduct a large-scale survey of urban spiders, we need the help of the public. We are asking people to collect spiders in their homes and gardens, fill out a simple data sheet about their collection, and send or bring the spiders and forms to the Natural History Museum.

In spite of their importance and abundance, we do not know much about the spiders in Los Angeles. There are no truly large collections of urban spiders from this area, as most collectors concentrate on studying natural areas.

As an important international port, new species of spiders from various parts of the world are always being accidentally introduced into the Los Angeles area, and some of these have established breeding populations. We need to know how widespread these introduced species have become, and how they have interacted with the native spiders. Also, we want to know how urbanization and the loss of natural habitat has affected populations and distributions of naturally occurring spiders.

Genetics of Taste Lab

The Genetics of Taste Lab is a unique venue for both citizen science AND crowdsourcing health data
-We connect our community to research that is relevant to their lives.
-We conduct research to answer real public health questions and publish in peer-reviewed scientific journals.

This research is led by Nicole Garneau, PhD (ngarneau@dmns.org) and is made possible by the Science Education Partnership Award program at the National Institutes of Health.

Bumble Bee Watch

Bumble Bee Watch (www.BumbleBeeWatch.org) is a collaborative effort to track and conserve North America’s bumble bees. This citizen science project allows individuals or groups to: 1) Upload photos of bumble bees to start a virtual bumble bee collection; 2) Identify the bumble bees in your photos and have your identifications verified by experts; 3) Help researchers determine the status and conservation needs of bumble bees; 4) Help locate rare or endangered populations of bumble bees; 5) Learn about bumble bees, their ecology, and ongoing conservation efforts; and 6) Connect with other citizen scientists.

Find out more at http://www.bumblebeewatch.org/contents/about/

Mountain Watch

Mountain Watch is an ongoing trail-side citizen science program that tracks plant development, aka phenology, of a small set of alpine and forest plants In the Eastern Appalachian mountains and other Northeast areas.

AMC is also a partner with the USA National Phenology Network, the National Park Service, and the Appalachian Trail Conservancy in the
AT Seasons project, the new endeavor to track plant and animal development along the AT corridor. Similar to AMC’s Mountain Watch, AT Seasons (www.usanpn.org/appalachian) will provide much needed information on climate impacts at upper elevations.

These citizen science programs are components of the Appalachian Mountain Club alpine ecology and climate science research being conducted in the Northeast mountains.

General teaching material on phenology can be found here: https://www.usanpn.org/education


Based in the Seung Computational Neuroscience Lab at Princeton University, Eyewire investigators are solving the mysteries of the brain with the help of the public.  Over 225,000 people around the world have played what has been called a “3D neuroscience coloring book” — a puzzle game anyone can play without having any knowledge or experience in the field of neuroscience. 

Eyewire researchers aim to eventually map the human brain, but for now they are starting with the retina.  Players map the connections between retinal neurons, helping researchers understand how neurons process information.  Players have already helped researchers understand how a mammal can detect motion, which has remained a mystery — until now.  Eyewire researchers hope their work can lead to advances in blindness therapies, the development of retinal prosthestics, and other benefits.

Trumpeter Swan Watch

By 1900, Trumpeter Swans were extirpated from their nesting and wintering areas in Central and Eastern North America. Their historic migrations to southerly wintering sites were totally destroyed. In recent decades wild nesting populations of Trumpeters have successfully recovered or have been restored. Many swans migrate to separate wintering areas, but others winter near their northern breeding areas. An unknown number are pioneering southward where they are beginning to establish use of more southerly wintering sites.

Little is known regarding the numbers and groupings of southward migrants east of the Rocky Mountains, the location and characteristics of the sites they are pioneering, the duration of use, or problems they may be encountering. By providing information through Trumpeter Watch, observers can help document the changing distribution of migrating and wintering Trumpeter Swans and help identify potential new southerly migration and wintering sites.

Citizen Science Academy

The first of its kind, the NEON Citizen Science Academy Online is intended to be a complete professional development resource for educators and will include online courses, modules, tutorials, and a virtual community of practice. Our initial efforts have focused on professional development courses for formal and informal educators. As of Winter 2014, we have five courses available to educators with more in development.

NEON Citizen Science Academy Online courses are 30-day, graded, self-paced, and semi-facilitated with 5 – 7 stand-alone units that have stated learning objectives, background content, readings, discussion forums, classroom learning activities, assignments, and self-assessments. They are offered using the Moodle course management system.

Through a collaboration with the Colorado School of Mines Teacher Enhancement Program, optional graduate level Continuing Education credits are available. There is a $35.00 registration fee for each online course.

In addition to online courses, we are developing online resources for educators to use for their own learning or in their teaching. The resources will include a combination of videos, tutorials, and downloadable instructional materials.

Trumpeter Watch

Researchers at the Trumpeter Swan Society need volunteers to report their sightings of Trumpeter Swans in the Yellowstone and Rocky Mountain regions.

Why? By 1900 Trumpeter Swans were extirpated from their nesting and wintering areas in Central and Eastern North America. Their historic migrations to southerly wintering sites were totally destroyed. In recent decades wild nesting populations of Trumpeters have been successfully restored in several northerly states and Ontario. An unknown number are pioneering southward where they are beginning to establish use of more southerly wintering sites. Little is known regarding the numbers and groupings of southward migrants, the location and characteristics of the sites they are pioneering, the duration of use, or problems they may be encountering.

By providing information through Trumpeter Watch, observers can help document the changing distribution of wintering Trumpeter Swans and help increase this vulnerable swan population.

Caspian Tern Research

Caspian Tern is the world's largest tern and it also among the most naturally occurring cosmopolitan species of on the planet. We are interested in using crowd sourced photos and observational records of Caspian Terns in order to explore questions about their patterns of movement and distribution. All images and records are of interest, but we are especially interested photos of Caspian Terns that are carrying fish in their bill or photos of Caspian Terns in the company of other animal species. We especially prize photos or records of resighting Caspian Terns marked with bands, rings, or other types of field-readable tags.


WeSolver was created to define and address the most important problems that face human beings. It was made for everyone, a gift to the solvers in the world and anyone can help in any way they are willing to.

There will be many ways to participate in the site itself from creating, reading, promoting, linking, sharing and policing content. WeSolver will be open and transparent to everyone while respecting any individuals wish to remain anonymous should they so choose. Hopefully people will find new connections and relationships between seemingly different problems and solutions inspiring experimentation and innovative approaches.

How can we possibly solve the many problems that face us as a species without using every available asset to do so? How can we leave this work in the hands of experts or governments or any other organization to solve on their own? It would be foolish to ignore the potential solutions which come when everyone is invited to the table. Our common future depends on it.

Digital Fishers

Got 60 seconds to help shape ocean science?

We’re looking for a few volunteers to help analyze deep-sea videos— seconds at a time. We invite you to participate in ocean science research (no experience required!) via Digital Fishers, a new “citizen science” website. By playing Digital Fishers you’ll help researchers gather data from video, and unveil the mechanisms shaping the animal communities inhabiting the deep.

Digital Fishers was developed by Ocean Networks Canada together with the University of Victoria’s Centre for Global Studies (CfGS) and funded by CANARIE. Co-investigator Dr. Rod Dobell leads the involvement of CfGS with additional support from eBriefings.ca.

Greater Prairie Chicken Project

The Iowa Department of Natural Resources needs your help to ensure that Greater Prairie Chickens remain in Iowa. All you have to do is submit your sightings.

Greater Praire Chickens were once abundant in central and eastern United States; however, their numbers have dwindled since the 1800s.

Project organizers are looking for information about how prairie chickens are distributed in Southern Iowa regions, including Adair, Madison, Adams, Union, Clarke, Taylor, Ringgold, Decatur and Wayne Counties.

Ruffed Grouse Drumming Survey

The ruffed grouse is a forest species widely distributed across New York State. While some grouse are found in more mature forests, the greatest population densities are in younger-aged forests. These preferred habitats are declining as most of New York State's forests grow older, thus resulting in a decline in grouse numbers since the 1960s.

Turkey hunters in pursuit of that wary gobbler in the spring are ideally suited for monitoring ruffed grouse during the breeding season. The characteristic sound of a drumming male grouse is as much a part of the spring woods as yelping hens and gobbling toms.

DEC currently monitors grouse populations in the fall through the Cooperator Ruffed Grouse Hunting Log where hunters record the number of birds flushed per hour of hunting effort. The Ruffed Grouse Drumming Survey survey provides a harvest-independent index of grouse distribution and abundance during the critical breeding season in the spring.

British Trust for Ornithology The Nest Record Scheme

The BTO's Nest Record Scheme (NRS) gathers vital information on the breeding success of Britain's birds by asking volunteers to find and follow the progress of individual bird nests.

The data collected are used to produce trends in breeding performance, which help us to identify species that may be declining because of problems at the nesting stage. These trends are published on the BTO website and are updated every year. NRS data also allow us to measure the impacts of pressures such as climate change on bird productivity.

Anyone can be a nest recorder. Some people watch a single nest box in their back garden while others spend hundreds of hours finding and monitoring nests in the wider countryside.

Milky Way Project

The Milky Way Project aims to sort and measure our galaxy. We're asking you to help us find and draw bubbles in beautiful infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope.

Understanding the cold, dusty material that we see in these images, helps scientists to learn how stars form and how our galaxy changes and evolves with time.

American Kestrel Partnership

Now's the time to set up your American Kestrel nest box! This bird's population is experiencing long-term declines in North America, and existing data are insufficient for understanding the causes. The American Kestrel Partnership is an international research network designed to generate data, models, and conservation plans for kestrel habitat and populations at large spatial scales. The Partnership unites the data-generating capacity of citizen scientists with the data-analysis expertise of professional scientists by promoting research collaboration among citizen scientists, universities, government agencies, conservation organizations, schools, and businesses. The Partnership also fosters long-term conservation values and appreciation of science by engaging the public with hands-on research experiences.

New Horizons Icehunters

The goal of this project is to discover Kuiper Belt Objects with just the right orbit and just the right characteristics to make them eligible for a visit from the New Horizons mission. At this time, the space probe has enough fuel in reserve to allow up to two different objects to be visited.

This is where you come in. To find these icy KBO targets we need your help poring over thousands of ground based images, taken specially for this purpose using giant telescopes. Hiding within these images are undiscovered slow-moving Kuiper Belt Objects, asteroids zipping through the foreground, and millions of background stars.


The Flusurvey is an online system for measuring influenza trends in the UK.

In contrast to traditional surveillance methods, the Flusurvey collects data directly from the general public, rather than via hospitals or GPs. This is particularly important because many people with flu don't visit a doctor so don't feature in traditional flu surveillance.

Each week, participants report any flu-like symptoms they have experienced since their last visit. If you have no symptoms, this only takes a few seconds. We provide participants with regular updates on the epidemic, all the latest news and advice about flu.

This year, for the first time, we are coordinating with similar surveys in 9 other European countries, letting us monitor flu as it spreads across the continent. You can find out more on the "Join in" tab.

Western Monarch Thanksgiving Count

The Western Monarch Thanksgiving Count (WMTC) is a citizen-science project designed to census the size of overwintering monarch colonies. As the name implies, it is conducted over a three-week period around the (American) Thanksgiving holiday in November and December by a large number of volunteers. The project is currently coordinated by Mia Monroe and Emma Pelton with the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation.

Thanksgiving Day Western Bird Count

Count birds within a 15-foot area, anywhere in the Western states, for one hour on Thanksgiving Day; you decide the hour and the location.
Last year 431 counters in the eleven Western States and Alaska made 440 counts. They tallied 161 species of birds (plus a lot of mammals and other things, too). The top five species counted in these states were House Sparrow (1), Dark-eyed Junco (2), House Finch (3), Black-capped Chickadee (4) and European Starling (5). As predicted, the Pine Siskin dropped out of the top five last season, but should be more numerous this year. Participants should send in a report even if no birds were seen during the hour.

Winter Wild Turkey Flock Survey

Harsh winter conditions significantly affect young turkeys. New York State Department of Environmental Conservation seeks wildlife lovers in every county to help them observe and count young male and female turkeys (also known as Jakes and Jennies), from January through March.

New Hampshire Turkey Observers

N.H. Fish and Game's winter wild turkey flock survey invites you to help record sightings of wild turkey flocks in New Hampshire from January to mid-March each year. This effort helps biologists assess the impact of winter weather on our turkey population!

Reef Watch

Reef Watch provides free training to community volunteers to monitor temperate marine environments using non-destructive, internationally recognised techniques.

Volunteers generate valuable scientific data that informs adaptive management for conservation of the marine environment.

Reef Watch engages and empowers the community through education, which raises awareness about the marine environment and fosters a sense of stewardship that is vital to the long-term health of marine environments.


Constellation is a platform for different aerospace related projects that need intensive computational power. The platform supports the efforts of participating projects by providing Distributed Computation capability using BOINC (Berkeley Open Interface for Network Computing).

Constellation will send work-units of attached projects to volunteering, idle PCs where the units are processed. The combined power of all volunteering users will help to solve important scientific tasks in fields from astronomy to aerospace-engineering beginning from student up to university projects. The bottom line is to benefit from the generosity of the volunteers and to benefit from the accumulation of different projects, like sharing programming knowledge in distributed computing and influencing the others' simulation by its own solutions.

The platform is an open space for anyone, who is an air and space enthusiast and wants to donate idle computing time or even skill for a sub-project on platform. Applications for sub-project are welcome!

Research Assistant in Tropical Herpetology and Conservation Ecology

We are currently seeking research assistants to join our field team in Ecuador studying the conservation ecology of reptiles and amphibians.

While Ecuador is a relatively small country—it’s roughly the size of Arizona—it stands as the third most diverse country in the world for amphibians (510 species) and is seventh for reptiles (430 species), making it a herpetologically mega-diverse region. Due to the severe deforestation taking place in addition to many other pressures on Ecuador’s fauna, RAEI’s research program aims to study, document, and preserve these rich and unique communities of reptiles and amphibians found within the country’s diverse array of ecosystems.

As we are now in our 8th year working in Ecuador, we have study sites encompassing both the coastal forests in western Ecuador and the Amazon rainforest on the eastern side of the Andes Mountains. The work that research participants will be involved with will primarily consist of conducting night surveys for reptiles and amphibians (however other taxa such as invertebrates are also of interest), animal data collection, and lab work. Lab work consists of more detailed information such as scale counts (for reptiles) and other morphological information, animal measurements, screening for chytrid desease (amphibians), preservation (only when necessary), and acquisition of DNA samples. Diagnostic photographs of all animals are taken. Other tasks include animal handling and general note taking and data organization.

The Sungrazer Project

SOHO is the most successful comet discoverer in history, having found over one thousand eight-hundred comets in over thirteen years of operation! What's even more impressive is that the majority of these comets have been found by amateur astronomers and enthusiasts from all over the world, scouring the images for a likely comet candidate from the comfort of their own home.

Absolutely anyone can join this project -- all you need is an internet connection and plenty of free time!

Golden Eagle Survey Project

Help survey golden eagles in the wild in the blufflands region of southeast Minneosta, western Wisconsin and northeast Iowa during our Annual Wintering Golden Eagle Survey held each January. We are conducting the survey as a part of a project investigating golden eagles that winter in this region. Little is known about their breeding origins, migration and habitat use. Your participation in this project will enhance our understanding of one of North America's largest birds of prey.


If you are a SCUBA diver, we ask that you send us data logged by your dive computer, so we can put it to scientific use! Millions of divers dive all around the world everyday, with state-of-the-art dive computers that log temperature as a function of depth. As a citizen scientist scuba diver, you can help put this information to the use of oceanographers and marine scientists. Send us your dive site location & an export of your dive computer log; or just write up in an email the information you record in your logbook (like surface temperature, bottom temperature, date, time, location, dive computer brand)!

The goal of this project is to channel temperature & location data from divers to scientists. The data collected will be processed by graduate students and will be made available online on our website for anyone to download.


GreenprintMaps presents the urban forest of the Greenprint region – Sacramento, Yolo, Placer, El Dorado, Sutter, and Yuba Counties. Everyone is invited to join us in mapping all of our trees – in parks, on streets, at schools, in parking lots and at home. You can find trees, add trees, ask a question about a tree, and calculate the value of a tree. GreenprintMaps is fun and easy for everyone. Cities can better manage their trees, planners can protect trees, scientists can combat tree pests and diseases, and homeowners can share their tree stories. We hope you’ll help us grow the best regional urban forest in the nation.

Spotted Wing Drosophila*Volunteer Monitoring Network

The goal of the Spotted Wing Drosophila*Volunteer Monitoring Network (SWD*VMN) is to the track the movement and seasonal biology of the spotted wing drosophila (SWD, Drosophila suzukii).

SWD is a recently detected invasive species in the United States and is a potentially significant pest of berries (strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries) and other crops. SWD has rapidly spread throughout the US, and we want to help farmers and gardeners understand WHERE and WHEN this new insect is active.

We are developing classroom tools to use SWD in teaching exercises and are seeking


Play your part and help discover our Universe!
Have a computer? Want to help astronomers make awesome discoveries and understand our Universe? Then theSkyNet needs you!
Your computer is bored. It has spare computing power nearly all the time that could be used to do something cool. So why not let it?
By connecting 100s and 1000s of computers together through the Internet, it's possible to simulate a single machine capable of doing some pretty amazing stuff. That's what theSkyNet is all about - using your spare computing power to process radio astronomy data.

Sing About Science

SingAboutScience dot org has a searchable database which teachers and others can use to find content-rich songs on specific scientific and mathematical topics. Finding and cataloguing all relevant songs is a challenge, however, and volunteers can be used to help with this. Other possible work might entail technical development of the website and assessment of its usability.

New York Horseshoe Crab Monitoring Network

The New York Horseshoe Crab Monitoring Network encourage participants to get involved with the annual horseshoe crab monitoring program on various reference beaches throughout New York’s Marine District. Participants assist with the collection of scientific data that is used to assess the status of horseshoe crabs in NY State, and will help determine the management and conservation of this important species throughout the region.

This data will be used by the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation to assess the status of horseshoe crabs in New York’s Marine District, and to assist with the regional management and conservation of this species through the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission.

If you participate in this educational survey you will be helping to collect data on horseshoe crab spawning abundance, size, sex and tag returns around full and new moon evenings from May to July.

Cornell University Cooperative Extension’s Marine Program is working with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation to develop and organize this project.

WSU Snohomish County Extension Beach Watchers

Beach WAtchers are volunteers dedicated to protecting Puget Sound through research, education and stewardship. Get 100 hours of university caliber training and craft a volunteer experience to give back 100 hours over two years.

Chestnut Mega-Transect

The goal of the Chestnut Mega-Transect Project is to document the current status of American chestnuts along the Appalachian Trail. Using the idea that the Appalachian Trail is really a transect through a unique US ecosystem, TACF trains hikers to identify and count American chestnuts along the Appalachian Trail as divided into approximately 1 mile segments.

Science Hack Day

Science Hack Day is a 48-hour-all-night event that brings together designers, developers, scientists and other geeks in the same physical space for a brief but intense period of collaboration, hacking, and building 'cool stuff'. By collaborating on focused tasks during this short period, small groups of hackers are capable of producing remarkable results. Some Hack Days have a specific focus. There have already been very successful Music Hack Days and Government Hack Days. It's time for a Hack Day focused on science!

Wanted: Lionfish

Bonaire National Marine Park needs your help to control the invasion of Lionfish. Volunteers in the Netherlands Antilles gently attach a marker on dead coral in the immediate vicinity of the Lionfish.

The Indo Pacific Lionfish Pterois volitans/miles is a predatory, venomous fish which has been introduced as an invasive species in the Atlantic Basin. This invasive carnivore can significantly reduce biodiversity of a local habitat and can drive important fish species to extinction, negatively affecting coral reef ecosystems.

WARNING: This project is potentially dangerous. Most of the fish's spines are venomous and can cause extreme pain!

Share Your Heritage

We are inviting members of the public to take digital photographs of specific sculptures and monuments in the City of Brighton and Hove (United Kingdom) as part of a unique project to record the city's heritage.

The process is really simple and your pictures will contribute to a library of 2D and 3D models that will raise awareness of our heritage locally, nationally and beyond.

OPAL Bugs Count

Do you know what bugs are living near you? Take part in OPAL Bugs Count and discover the incredible variety of invertebrates that make their home around us.

Bugs, or invertebrates, are a vital part of our environment. They can pollinate plants, recycle nutrients, and they provide an important food source for birds and mammals.

Find as many bugs as you can in our timed challenges and keep a special eye out for the six Species Quest bugs.

Your findings will help scientists learn more about the distribution of invertebrates across the country and how the urban environment may be affecting them.

STE - Scuba Tourism for the Environment

STE - Scuba Tourism for the Environment is aimed at obtaining information on the Red Sea marine biodiversity state, by collaborating with volunteer dive tourists.

In this way the research can provide the institutions with tools to implement conservation and preservation measures, and at the same time it contributes to the development of ecotourism in the area, providing the tourists with a discerning, active and useful way to increase their naturalistic awareness and recreational value of their holidays.

Project MonarchHealth

MonarchHealth is a citizen science project in which volunteers sample wild monarch butterflies to help track the spread of a protozoan parasite across North America.

The project's mission is to achieve a broader understanding of host-parasite interactions in monarch butterflies and to enhance awareness of monarch biology and conservation through the coupling of citizens and scientists.

Participants either capture monarch butterflies as adults or raise the caterpillars in separate containers until they become adult butterflies. In either case, you will gently tape each butterfly’s abdomen with a sticker to collect the OE spores (helpful instructional videos). Next, you will send the sample, along with a simple data sheet for each butterfly, back to the scientists at the Altizer lab where they will analyze the sample. After the data are compiled, project coordinators will send you the results of your sampling contribution as well as post them on the project results page for the public to see.

Anyone interested in monarch butterflies can participate. MonarchHealth is conducted by people of all skills, ages, and backgrounds including families, retired persons, classrooms, monarch organizations, nature centers, and individuals.

Cascades Butterfly Project

Butterflies are sensitive indicators of climate change because temperature influences the timing of an individual's life cycle and the geographic distribution of a species. Six protected areas in the Cascade Mountains are establishing a program to monitor butterflies to learn how climate is affecting the populations. These include four sites in Washington state: North Cascades National Park, Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, Okanagan-Wenatchee National Forest, and Mount Rainier National Park.

Pika Monitoring

We need people to document where and when they see Pika (smallest member of the rabbit family), hear pika, or see their hay piles.

If you are out hiking in scree fields, this is a great opportunity to contribute.


LiMPETS (Long-term Monitoring Program and Experiential Training for Students) is an environmental monitoring and education program for students, educators, and volunteer groups. This hands-on program was developed to monitor the ocean and coastal ecosystems of California’s National Marine Sanctuaries to increase awareness and stewardship of these important areas.

Two distinct monitoring programs make up the core of the LiMPETS network: the Rocky Intertidal Monitoring Program (grades 9-12) and the Sandy Beach Monitoring Program (grades 6-12). Both programs are designed to provide students with the opportunity to experience the scientific process firsthand. Through research-based monitoring and standardized protocols, students develop their problem solving skills, gain experience using tools and methods employed by field scientists, and learn to analyze data. The online data entry system allows our participants to archive their data electronically and to view and analyze their results over time.

Invaders of Texas

The Invaders of Texas Program is an innovative campaign whereby volunteer "citizen scientists" are trained to detect the arrival and dispersal of invasive species in their own local areas. That information is delivered into a statewide mapping database and to those who can do something about it. The premise is simple. The more trained eyes watching for invasive species, the better our chances of lessening or avoiding damage to our native landscape.

The Invaders of Texas Program supports the creation and perpetuation of a network of local citizen scientist teams who seek out and report outbreaks of selected environmentally and economically harmful invasive species. These teams, coordinated by the Wildflower Center contribute important data to local and national resource managers who will, in turn, coordinate appropriate responses to control the spread of unwanted invaders. The Invaders Program is designed to move the target audience beyond awareness to action on invasive species.

This is your chance to help slow down the spread of harmful invasive species and reduce their ecological and economic damage.


Invasive self-cloning crayfish are on their way to a stream or lake near you!

We need your help to monitor our waterways for the invasion of new species of crayfish. High on our priority list is Marmokrebs, a species that reproduces asexually – making it an extremely successful intruder in pristine ecosystems. Let’s make sure we know exactly where this and many other potentially invasive species are headed!

Take pictures of crayfish and tell us where and when you found it. The goal of this project is to help monitor waters for introduction of new and potentially invasive species of crayfish.

Invasive crayfish have had devastating effects in many freshwater ecosystems across the world, often driving local fish and invertebrate species to extinction. With your help, we can make sure to prevent this from happening here! Thanks in advance for helping us in this important project!


Help identify and catalog the trees in Philadelphia's urban forest! PhillyTreeMap is an open-source, web-based map database of trees in the greater 13-county 3-state Philadelphia region. The wiki-style database enables non-profits, government, volunteer organizations, and the general public to collaboratively create an accurate and informative inventory of the trees in their communities. The project was funded by a USDA Small Business Innovation Research Grant and is in support of the Philadelphia Parks & Recreation's 30% tree canopy goal and the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's "Plant One Million" campaign. As more trees are added to the database, PhillyTreeMap uses the iTree software from the USDA Forest Service to calculate the environmental impact of the region's urban forest. So get outside and add some trees!

Changing Currents

EcoSpark's Changing Currents program introduces grade 8-12 students from across the Greater Toronto Area (Toronto, Peel, Durham, and York school boards) to their area's watersheds. Students get outside, put on hip waders, explore a local river stream, and learn about its importance and quality.

By participating in the program students will:

Use benthic macro-invertebrate bio-monitoring to examine the health of their local river or stream (it's easy!),
Contribute to a GTA-wide study of watersheds, and
Have the chance to take action around what they discover

The American Chestnut Foundation

The American Chestnut Foundation has several efforts underway to help restore the American Chestnut tree. There are many ways to get involved as a citizen scientist:

1. Hiking and counting American chestnuts. We have a few upcoming training events, usually all done by the end of June. We've been concentrating on the Appalachian Trail, but hope to expand the project beyond there.

2. Planting breeding orchards / germplasm conservation orchards of American chestnuts: Involves planting chestnut trees, maintaining the planting, and sending yearly measurements to our central office.

3. Breeding / Harvesting chestnut trees: Involved finding American chestnuts on which to breed, following their flowering, and performing controlled pollinations on the trees through the end of June and beginning of July. Follow-up during harvest in September and October is the final step. Harvesting can be done on it's own without controlled pollinations

4. Participating in the data collection, testing and selection of advanced breeding materials. If one does not want to plant their own orchard, we hope to match interested people with current growers to help maintain and collect data on orchards already in place.

5. Outreach liaison: More of an outreach position, and potentially less of a citizen science position, but we have continuing need for folks to learn about our program and give presentations to various groups - anyone from girl scouts to Audubon groups and Lions' Clubs - anything of that ilk.

Phytoplankton Monitoring

Volunteers are needed weekly to collect water samples and other physical climate measurements, then identify species of phytoplankton under a light microscope while watching for potentially harmful algal blooms (HABs) and signs of environmental disturbance in our marine waters.

Maine Audubon Wildlife Road Watch

The Maine Audubon Wildlife Road Watch is a web-based map and database designed to record your observations of road-side and road-killed wildlife.

There are two ways to participate in the project:

1. Entering random wildlife observations from around the state.

2. Regular route surveying for "Adopt A Road".

Information about where wildlife attempt to cross roads, what animals are involved, on what kinds of roads are collisions frequent, and other data can help inform policy, management, and financial investment in reducing road-kill and habitat fragmentation. Maine Audubon scientists will use the data to improve our collective understanding of where wildlife attempt to cross roads and what we can do to reduce road-kill and increase safety for people and wildlife.

Start contributing your own observations today!

Redwood Watch

Redwood Watch needs volunteers to take photographs of redwood trees and other redwood forest plants and animals and submit them to researchers. Your data will help Save the Redwoods League better understand species distribution within the redwood range.

We do not yet know how climate change will impact the redwood forest in the coming decades, but when we know where redwood forests and their inhabitants do well today, we will be better able to predict where the redwood forests of tomorrow will thrive!

As you walk through the forest, Redwood Watch encourages you to submit observations of plants and animals that live in the redwood forest. Snap a picture and submit it online using the iNaturalist app and the selecting the Redwood Watch project.

The project is a partnership between the Save the Redwoods League, iNaturalist, Google Earth Outreach, and the California Academy of Sciences.


Currently over 50% of the world’s population lives in urban areas. Being continuously surrounded by traffic jams, construction sites and urban events, city dwellers are typically exposed to a considerable amount of noise. NoiseTube facilitate sound measuring at any place and any time through a mobile app which exploits basic smartphone functionalities, namely microphone, wireless connectivity and localisation through GPS. Through these three components NoiseTube transforms already ubiquitous smartphones into highly portable, accessible sound measurement devices, enabling all citizens to measure ambient sound levels whenever and wherever they please.

The NoiseTube website collects all user measurements and visualises them on Google Maps. Given enough measurements for a particular area, we can construct noise maps of comparable quality to those produced by governments today, which are of a very different kind. Indeed, pollution maps are typically created through computer simulations based on general statistics, such as the average number of cars in the city. They are backed up only by limited amounts of sound measurements because current measuring methods are expensive and thus not very scalable. The resulting maps give an average but not at all a complete view on the situation, entirely missing local variations due to street works, neighbour noise &tc.

NoiseTube is user-friendly, free and open source and is used by citizens all over the world, for individual use as well as for measuring campaigns by citizen action groups. It is a tool with which citizens can estimate the quality of their daily environment and how it is affected by their behavior, and as such provides support for awareness-building as well as for undertaking bottom-up, citizen-steered actions to solve local issues.

Mitten CrabWATCH

The Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, working with many partner organizations, has established Mitten Crab Watch as a public reporting and information network to track the distribution, abundance, and status of this invasive species for the US Atlantic and Gulf coasts.

National Tree Benefit Calculator

Trees have more benefits than just the tangible wood products. Trees clean our air, raise property values, reduce energy costs, and redirect stormwater.

You can calculate the non-tangible value the trees in your yard or city produce.

Green Seattle Partnership Forest Monitoring Team

Interested in learning more about forest ecology and plant identification? EarthCorps Science and the Green Seattle Partnership are currently recruiting for the 2011 Forest Monitoring Team. Join a growing group of citizen scientists collecting important data about our urban forests. In 2010, the first year of the program, 15 volunteers established 31 monitoring plots in 25 different Seattle parks. This year help us reach our goal of 100 monitoring plots! Become a part of a program aimed at involving volunteers from the community to collect scientific data on restoration sites throughout Seattle parks.

Project Calliope

Project Calliope is an upcoming orbiting satellite that will convert Earth's ionosphere to music for people to share. Calliope lets people get a sense of how active space is. Calliope will measure the ionosphere for its 12-week life and transmit that data as sonified MIDI data (akin to sheet music) so anyone with a ham radio or web connection can listen to it-- or remix it into their own music compositions. It is planned to launch into orbit in late 2011.


BeeSpotter needs volunteers to go outside with a camera or smartphone and capture quality photos of bees! Researchers at the University of Illinois are trying to better understand bee demographics in the Midwestern states of Illinois, Missouri, Indiana, & Ohio, and they need your help. Your data will become part of a nationwide effort to gather baseline information on the population status of these important pollinators.

BeeSpotter is a partnership between citizen scientists and the professional science community. The project is designed to educate the public about pollinators by engaging them in a data collection effort of importance to the nation.

Penn State Astrobiology Citizen Science Project

We want to study the biogeography of microorganisms by taking water samples from domestic water heaters. Participants will acquire a water sample from their kitchen tap and answer 20 questions. The process will take ~30 minutes. We are recruiting 2-3 households per state. By looking at the genetic differences from isolates of similar microbes from across the globe, researchers are currently trying to understand the degree to which populations of microbes are isolated and whether this isolation suggests an allopatric speciation model for prokaryotes. We are still looking for participants in: AL, AK, DE, DC, KS, KY, ME, MA, NH, NM, ND, RI, SC, SD, TN, VT.

Boise Watershed Watch

Get a snapshot of the health of the Boise River watershed by monitoring water quality! Citizen groups, schools, families, and individuals are invited to participate in this fun event which takes place at numerous sites along the Boise River and tributaries from Lucky Peak to Star. No experience necessary! A knowledgeable trainer will meet you at your assigned location to assist with monitoring.

OPAL Water Survey

The OPAL Water Survey needs citizen scientists in England to record what life they see in local ponds and to conduct simple tests for water clarity and pH. By contributing, you'll help scientists learn more about how polluted lakes and ponds in England actually are.

Animals living in the water can tell us a great deal about how polluted the water may be. Some species struggle to survive in polluted waters, while others are more tolerant. By telling us what life you see in your local pond you’ll discover more about the water's health and contribute to valuable scientific research.

This is one of five OPAL surveys across England to learn more about the state of the environment. Anyone can get involved. The studies are open to all ages and abilities, and your contribution will be important in helping scientists build up a picture of England's natural environment.

Encyclopedia of Life

The Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) provides free, open, multilingual, digital access to trusted information on all known species through its website at http://eol.org. EOL is an international collaboration led by the Smithsonian that works to raise awareness and understanding of living nature.
Citizen Scientists can participate in many ways, from contributing articles, photos, videos and sounds, to creating and using collections, to annotating and curating biodiversity content.

OPAL Soil and Earthworm Survey

The OPAL Soil and Earthworm Survey needs citizen scientists to collect and separate earthworms and to examine the surrounding soil properties.

Earthworms are extremely important and play a vital role in recycling plant nutrients and aerating the soil. By taking part in this survey you'll help improve our knowledge of earthworms and the soils they live in.

Everybody can take part in the soil and earthworm survey - all ages and abilities. It's simple, fun and you'll be contributing towards valuable research.

This is one of five OPAL surveys across England to learn more about the state of the environment. Anyone can get involved. The studies are open to all ages and abilities, and your contribution will be important in helping scientists build up a picture of England's natural environment.

OPAL Biodiversity Survey

The OPAL Biodiversity Survey needs citizen scientists in England to help uncover the diverse range of wildlife in hedges. By contributing, you'll help researchers learn more about the importance of hedges and how we can improve them.

Hedges support many animals by providing them with food and shelter. Berries and seeds are food for birds, while holes beneath the hedge are often home to small mammals. You’ll also discover caterpillars, shieldbugs and many other invertebrates living among the leaves.

By sharing your observations with the project, reseachers can instantly rate the condition of your hedge and offer suggestions on how to improve it.

This is one of five OPAL surveys across England to learn more about the state of the environment. Anyone can get involved. The studies are open to all ages and abilities, and your contribution will be important in helping scientists build up a picture of England's natural environment.

OPAL Air Survey

The OPAL Air Survey needs citizen scientists to record lichens on trees and look for tar spot fungus on sycamore leaves. By contributing, you'll help scientists answer important questions about local air quality and its impacts across England.

Even if you haven't fond any lichens or tar spots, your findings are still extremely useful. Each activity should take no more than 60 minutes.

This is one of five OPAL surveys across England to learn more about the state of the environment. Anyone can get involved. The studies are open to all ages and abilities, and your contribution will be important in helping scientists build up a picture of England's natural environment.

OPAL Climate Survey

The OPAL Climate Survey consists of four ways to help researchers investigate how human activities affect the climate. These include:

Activity 1 - Contrails in the Sky: By looking for contrails (tracks left by planes) in the sky and reporting your results online, you'll help scientists test the accuracy of existing computer models that tell us where contrails should be.

Activity 2 and 3 - Measuring the Wind: In Activity 2, you'll use a mirror and compass to measure the wind direction at cloud height. In Activity 3, you'll use bubbles to calculate the wind direction and speed at our height.

Activity 4 - How the Weather Affects Us: You'll answer simple questions about how hot or cold you feel and the types of clothes you are wearing.

This is one of five OPAL surveys across England to learn more about the state of the environment. Anyone can get involved. The studies are open to all ages and abilities, and your contribution will be important in helping scientists build up a picture of England's natural environment.

Arizona Bald Eagle Nest Watch Program

The Arizona Bald Eagle Nest Watch Program is dedicated to the study and conservation of bald eagles in the Southwest. A corps of paid Nest Watchers monitors the eagles during their breeding season. As many as 16 trained observers, in teams of two, work in the field for the entire nesting season collecting data and protecting nest sites from natural and manmade disturbances.

Although working conditions can be rugged and some eagle territories are in remote locations, nest watchers feel privileged to be a part of the program and develop a special bond with "their" pair of eagles.

The goals of the nest watch program are:

- To protect the desert nesting bald eagles, their nests and nestlings

- To collect data on life history, nesting habits and surroundings of breeding bald eagles

- To provide information for further conservation efforts for bald eagles

- To educate the public about bald eagles

Typically, the Nest Watchers work ten days on and four days off. Most of their time is spent watching the nest through a spotting scope and tracking the eagles with binoculars. Nest Watchers use photos, maps, and grids to record flight paths, perches, feeding stations, and foraging areas. The Arizona Game and Fish Department does not provide any housing; Nest Watchers camp out at the breeding area and provide their own equipment and food.

Nest Watchers wearing official t-shirts and caps also protect breeding area closures by asking people to stay away from the nests and reporting any airspace violations by low flying aircraft. Nest Watchers also provide information about bald eagles to the public.

Mississippi River Nutrient Survey

This proposed nutrient survey of the Mississippi River watershed seeks to glean a better understanding of the distribution of inorganic nutrient sources into the Mississippi River.

By conducting this study, we seek to identify 'hot spots' within which to target follow-up research and engineering efforts aimed at decreasing the load of nutrients introduced into this river - and in so doing, successfully mitigate their consequent effect upon the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem.

Urban Garden Plant Identification

For my Senior Thesis I am researching economic disparity in community gardens. However, I am not a expert on plants. I need some help identifying common garden plants from photos I took of gardens in Atlanta, GA. The photos are only available on Facebook unfortunately, so you need a Facebook account.

The Wildlife Health Event Reporter

Wildlife Health Event Reporter (WHER) is publicly available to anyone to use to report their sightings of sick or dead wildlife.

Individual reports viewed together can lead to the detection and containment of wildlife disease outbreaks that may pose a health risk to people, domestic animals and other wildlife. WHER hopes to harness the power of the many eyes of the public to better detect wildlife disease phenomenon.

Additionally, WHER was developed by the Wildlife Data Integration Network (WDIN), a program of the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Master Watershed Steward

The Master Watershed Steward program trains citizens across the state of Arizona to serve as volunteers in the protection, restoration, monitoring, and conservation of their water and watersheds.

We all live in a watershed, also known as a drainage basin or catchment. Each watershed is defined by an area of land that drains water downhill into a common water body. The health of watersheds is especially impacted as our growing population, and thus our demand for natural resources, increases. Learning to look past political boundaries and view land as divided by natural boundaries helps us better manage resources as a complete, more sustainable system.

As a Master Watershed Steward you can help to improve the health of your watershed. The project's informative, research-based training will give you the knowledge to make better, more informed decisions related to your own land, community and watershed. Master Watershed Stewards are highly trained volunteers working closely with the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension and the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality. Stewards may come from a variety of backgrounds, but all have a passion for our environment! To become certified, Master Watershed Stewards participate in over 40 hours of course and field work to learn the basics of watershed science.

You work with community organizations including watershed partnerships and various state agencies to implement projects throughout Arizona to monitor, maintain and restore the health of our watersheds. Ongoing volunteer projects include: photopoint monitoring in the Tonto National Forest and Saguaro National Park, riparian assessments along urban and preserved corridors, outreach at Arizona Project WET Water Festivals, free private well testing and collaboration with NEMO to develop Watershed Based Plans.

The Master Watershed Steward Program is a partnership of the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension and the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality. Funding provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Clean Water Act and the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality's Water Quality Division.


Join RainLog's network of over 1,000 volunteers that use backyard rain gauges to monitor precipitation across Arizona and in neighboring states. Data collected through this network will be used for a variety of applications, from watershed management activities to drought planning at local, county, and state levels.

All you need to participate is a rain gauge and access to the Internet. Volunteers select a rain gauge, install it at home, and report daily total rainfall amounts through the online data entry form. Volunteers are asked to track daily or monthly precipitation amounts.

Precipitation amounts are highly variable across Arizona due to topography and seasonal weather patterns. This is especially true during the monsoon season, when thunderstorms can produce heavy rainfall that is very localized.

Your observations will provide valuable information to be used in drought monitoring and resource management decision-making.

All data posted by volunteers is available in real-time in maps. These maps are useful in tracking high-resolution variability in precipitation patterns and potential changes in drought status. As more people participate and more information is gathered, the resolution of the maps will improve.

iSpot - your place to share nature

iSpot is a unique website where you can get the help of a friendly community to identify anything living that you have seen in nature. We are based in the UK, but observations from elsewhere are welcome.

You can add an observation to the website, suggest an identification, or see if anyone else can identify an observation for you.

Help others by adding an identification to an existing observation. Your reputation on the site will grow as others with knowledge agree with you identifications.

Ultimately, the data collected on iSpot are added to a central depository of biodiversity data held by the National Biodiversity Network

We have online keys (also available via web browsers on cell phones) that are designed to help you identify certain groups of species.

What are you waiting for? Get outside and make some observations. :)


With your help, OpenSignalMaps is creating a comprehensive database of cell phone towers, cell phone signal strength readings, and Wi-Fi access points around the world. This data is collected via an Android application and uploaded to the project's servers, taking care to use as little processing power and battery life as possible.

You can use the project website to browse the data they've collected, including heat maps that show exactly how strong signal is in any particular area, as well as all the nearby towers for your carrier. And don't worry -- the data is stripped of any identifying information and available on a graphical interface to enable you to make sense of the raw data.

I-90 Wildlife Watch

I-90 Wildlife Watch is a citizen-based wildlife monitoring project that invites motorists to report wildlife sightings along Interstate 90 (I-90) in the Snoqualmie Pass region of Washington. Report wildlife that you see while driving on Interstate 90 from North Bend to Easton in Washington State's Cascade mountains.

I-90 intersects the rugged Cascade Mountains in Washington's Snoqualmie Pass region, which has been identified as a critical link in the north-south movement of wildlife. This area is also the focus of an extensive effort by the Washington State Department of Transportation to improve highway efficiency and make I-90 safer for people and wildlife. The I-90 Wildlife Bridges Coalition, the Western Transportation Institute, and other I-90 Wildlife Watch partner organizations are currently gathering information about wildlife between North Bend and Easton to help inform highway planning at Snoqualmie Pass. With your valuable assistance, we hope to reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions and enhance the safe passage of wildlife in the future.

Creating a Community of Successful Readers

The Community Foundation of North Louisiana is focused on helping improve the reading proficiency of elementary (primary) school students in their community. Historically this region of the country has frequently fallen short of the standards set by the rest of the country and they are looking to InnoCentive’s dynamic Solver community to gain new insights and solutions. Many more details are available within the Challenge. This is an Ideation Challenge with a guaranteed award for at least one submitted solution.


Help scientists recover worldwide weather observations made by Royal Navy ships around the time of World War I. These transcriptions will contribute to climate model projections and improve a database of weather extremes. Historians will use your work to track past ship movements and the stories of the people on board.

Wasp Watcher

Monitoring wasp colonies for invasive beetles that kill trees...WaspWatchers is a citizen scientist program which began in Maine and has now spread throughout Ontario, New England, the Eastern Seaboard and parts of the Midwest (Wisconsin, Ohio and Michigan). Across this broad area, the program’s goal is to… Engage and support the general public and government agencies with discovery and monitoring of their natural Cerceris fumipennis colonies; monitoring for both native and introduced species of Buprestidae beetles including the Emerald Ash Borer. Who are WaspWatchers? They are a combination of enthusiastic government staff, students and public volunteers. An efficient alliance is to utilize professional staff/students to search for colonies and then enlist the public volunteers to ‘adopt’ and monitor the colonies.

Dragonfly Swarm Project

The Dragonfly Swarm Project uses the power of the internet to allow everyone to participate in a large-scale study of dragonfly swarming behavior. Participants observe dragonfly swarms wherever they occur, make observations of the composition and behavior of the swarm, then submit a report online.

Data is compiled from the reports by an aquatic entomologist with a passion for dragonflies. Her goal is to use the data collected from participants for two purposes: 1) to publish data from a massive number of dragonfly swarms in the scientific literature, making this information available to scientists, and 2) to provide information about this behavior to the public. Many people see dragonfly swarms and are curious about what they see. The creator of this project hopes to provide answers to the curious while simultaneously collecting information from eye-witnesses to improve our overall knowledge of this fascinating behavior.

Because any given person has to be in the right place at the right time to see a dragonfly swarm, this project isn't possible for a single scientist to do alone. Collecting data from a large network of people is thus the best way to study dragonfly swarming behavior. Participation requires only curiosity and a few minutes of your time, so keep an eye out for dragonfly swarms in your area this summer and send in your reports!

Thanks in advance for your participation!

California Roadkill Observation System

Volunteer scientists report their observations of roadkill (animals killed after collision with a vehicle) with an easy-to-use form. Roadkill data can be analyzed by observers and will be used to understand where roadkill occurs and the severity of the impact to wildlife species.


"Pericopsis" is a free and collaborative database for the localization and identification of trees. Pericopsis can be consulted and upgraded by everyone using Google map.

The proposed principle is a "Wiki" which means "making it easy to correct mistakes rather than making it difficult to make them". When a contributor identifies a tree he can put the tree name on a map and self evaluate his contribution as: "unsure" or "sure". He can also help another contributor if he is unsure for its tree identification.

“Pericopsis” aims to develop both personal and global knowledge and awareness about the fascinating beauty and diversity of trees. Information sharing will increase common consciousness about the conservation and benefits of trees in our daily environment. The view is that actions for biodiversity conservation need the support of citizen knowledge. Pericopsis is a way to promote this knowledge and to make it visible. Interoperability with other databases is planned for the future.


Participants will engage in community-based water quality reporting, data sharing, and analysis. Get involved in water quality issues in Toronto, Canada.

"Juturna" is a web-based geographic information system that supports the collection, analysis, data sharing and reporting of community collected water quality data. It is currently implemented to support EcoSpark's "Changing Currents" program that links water quality monitoring to environmental and science curriculum in schools. This project addresses requirements of data sharing and monitoring specified in Annex 4 of the Canada-Ontario Agreement. It provides a collaborative mechanism among researchers at York University, the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority and the civil society organization EcoSpark (formerly Citizens Environment Watch) to monitor environmental conditions of local watersheds.

Introduced Reptile Early Detection and Documentation (REDDy)

Several large, non-native reptiles have been introduced in Florida and are now breeding--including Burmese Pythons. REDDy-trained observers learn where to look for these reptiles, how to identify them, and how to report sightings online. Early detection is the key to preventing new species from becoming established and stopping invaders from expanding their ranges.

University of Florida Cuban Treefrog Citizen Science Project

Cuban Treefrogs are not native to Florida, but have become invasive throughout the peninsula and are causing the decline of native frogs--especially in urbanized areas. However, many people report that when they start to manage Cuban Treefrogs around their homes, they begin to see native species return. Participants in this project capture and remove invasive treefrogs around their homes, collect and submit data on these frogs, and monitor for native treefrogs.


EteRNA is the first-ever global laboratory where scientists, educators, students, online gamers, and any human being with a strong interest in unlocking the mystery of life will collectively help solve world's biggest scientific problems.

RNA, or ribonucleic acid, is a substance that our cells use to translate and express genetic information from our DNA. We now know that folding and shape-shifting allows RNA and its partners to control the cell in a predictable fashion. However, the full biological and medical implications of these discoveries are still being worked out.

By playing EteRNA, you will help extend and curate the first large scale library of synthetic RNA designs. You play by designing RNAs, tiny molecules at the heart of every cell. If you win the weekly competition your RNA is synthesized and scored by how well it folds. Your efforts will help us understand, dissect, and control the functional properties of real and designed RNAs from bacteria, viruses, and our own cells. Join the global laboratory!

Colorado Spider Survey

The Colorado Spider Survey (CSS) is a means of gathering critical information about the ecology and distribution of this understudied taxonomic group. Researchers have documented the distribution and species diversity of several groups of insects in the Rocky Mountain region such as ants, grasshoppers, and butterflies. However, information about the distribution and diversity of other arthropod groups in this region is lacking. One group that is particularly understudied is the Order Araneae, or the spiders. Little is known about either the biodiversity of spiders in Colorado or the impact urbanization is having on species distribution in the state. No formal spider surveys have ever been conducted in Colorado.

The survey will be carried out through a series of Spider Identification and Collection Workshops that will be held throughout the state, but particularly in cooperation with the State Park system. These workshops, led by a team of professional and amateur arachnologists (or spider biologists), will train members of local communities in spider biology, morphology, taxonomy, and collection techniques. The specimens will be collected during the next several years by team leaders as well as workshop participants and will be sent to the Denver Museum of Nature & Science for identification and storage. Data from these specimens and from Colorado specimens housed at other collections throughout the country will be compiled and published in an electronic database.

Acoustic Bat Monitoring

Citizen Science Center volunteers assist the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources with their Acoustic Bat Monitoring Program. Volunteers attend a training workshop during the spring where they learn how to use an AnaBat detector, which records bat calls using a personal digital assistant that has a global positioning system to record the location and time. The bat detector translates the bat's call "on the fly" to a frequency that humans can hear. In this way, volunteers can actually hear what a bat call sounds like, while making sure the device is working correctly.

After training, bat volunteers borrow the AnaBat detection system, dubbed the “Bat Monitoring Kit,” for one to three nights to conduct bat surveys of local parks, neighborhoods, lakes and trails. Sometimes volunteers survey areas of their choice and sometimes they are asked to survey specific sites.

Once a volunteer selects a site to survey, they agree to survey that site three times during the season, once in April/May, once in June/July, and once in August/September. Each survey is between one to three hours (a minimum of 1 hour). Surveys begin a half-hour after sunset. Bat monitoring volunteers of all ages are welcome to participate. Volunteers younger than 16 must be accompanied by an adult.

Illinois RiverWatch Network - Stream Sampling

RiverWatch is the only Illinois-wide biological monitoring program that educates and trains volunteers to collect high quality data on streams. Since the program was established in 1995, more than 1,500 individuals have received RiverWatch certification in stream monitoring and have collected an unprecedented amount of information for evaluating Illinois streams. Data collected by volunteers over multiple years allows us to gauge the health and integrity of our streams and helps professionals make informed decisions about water resources, in general.

The program is available to all citizens throughout the state, regardless of level of experience. New volunteers receive training during one of several workshops offered in the spring, while previously trained volunteers are encouraged to attend a review workshop prior to the monitoring season. RiverWatch certification workshops typically last 6-8 hours and consist of a laboratory and field component. During the lab session, a certified RiverWatch Trainer provides an overview of the program and teaches identification of benthic macroinvertebrates. During the field training session, participants visit a local stream where the Trainer demonstrates proper monitoring techniques and explains how to complete the data sheets.

Once training is completed, volunteers may monitor a stream site that they select or that is assigned to them. Citizen Scientists monitor their adopted stream site (a 200-foot stretch of stream) once annually between May 1 and June 30. The final step is to attend a RiverWatch open lab to identify the preserved organisms with a microscope. Labs are hosted throughout the state in July and August, and a Trainer is always present to assist volunteers with identification.

River Source Watershed Monitoring

Watershed Watch increases the understanding of New Mexico's water quality, river ecology and fisheries health through hands-on science in a real-world context. Students gather data on biological, chemical and physical indicators and make presentations to local data users including acequias (irrigation canals), school boards, federal agencies and watershed groups. Students become engaged in environmental studies of issues beyond the classroom to that address critical water issues in local regions.

Glacier National Park Noxious Weed Blitz

We invite Citizen Scientists to participate in our annual Glacier National Park Noxious Weed Blitz each year on the third Tuesday in July (check our web page to confirm date). Citizen Scientists are trained to identify five invasive plants and map their locations with GPS units. The Noxious Weed Blitz is an all-day event where volunteers attend a training presentation in the morning, and in the afternoon, volunteers separate into groups to search for and pull invasive plants along park trails. Species targeted by the program are Spotted Knapweed (Centaurea stoebe), Oxeye Daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare), Houndstongue, (Cynoglossum officinale), St. Johnswort (Hypericum perforatum) and Yellow Toadflax (Linaria vulgaris). The Noxious Weed Blitz provides valuable education to visitors and helps Glacier National Park reduce weed populations along park trails. Participants can use the knowledge they gain to educate friends and neighbors and identify and reduce weeds in their own yards.

High Country Citizen Science at Glacier National Park

High Country Citizen Science participants are needed to conduct back-country surveys to collect data on the number and distribution of mountain goats and bighorn sheep and presence/absence data on pikas, three species of concern in the high country of Montana's Glacier National Park. This contribution will enable the park to more effectively manage these species and their habitats.

Participants attend a one-day classroom and field-based education program to learn about species identification, management concerns, and how to observe and document observations of each species. They also learn how to use field equipment such as spotting scopes, compasses, and global positioning system (GPS) units. Once trained, participants select survey sites from a list of mapped locations and hike to sites to conduct a one hour observational survey on mountain goats and bighorn sheep or pikas. Hiking distances vary between 3 to 15 miles one way. During pika surveys, participants traverse talus (boulder) fields looking under rocks for signs of pikas.

Common Loon Citizen Science at Glacier National Park

The Common Loon Citizen Science Project needs volunteers to conduct surveys at 45 high priority lakes in Glacier National Park to document presence of common loons and observations of breeding and nesting behaviors. Citizen Scientists attend a one-day classroom and field based education program, where they learn about species identification, behavior, management concerns, and how to observe and document loons. They also learn how to use field equipment such as spotting scopes, compasses, and GPS receivers. Hiking distances to the sites range from along the roadside up to fifteen miles. Once they reach the lake, Citizen Scientists observe for one hour and document loon sightings and behavior.

Common Loons are a Montana Species of Special Concern, and Glacier National Park harbors about 20 percent of Montana’s breeding pairs. Loons are susceptible to adverse impacts by human disturbance at nest and nursery sites. The Common Loon Citizen Science Project helps to identify factors that affect nesting success. The contribution of citizen scientists to the long-term record of loon population health is invaluable in providing a scientific basis for management recommendations, especially in regards to issues that may affect loon nesting success and habitat.

North Carolina Sea Turtle Project

The North Carolina Sea Turtle Project trains volunteers to monitor sea turtle activity along the entire coast of North Carolina.

There are a number of ways that your citizen science efforts can help protect sea turtles in North Carolina. Volunteers are needed to:

- walk small sections of beach each morning from May to August to look for turtle tracks and nests
- help guard the nests as they become ready to hatch each evening from July to October
- respond to strandings
- transport injured turtles to rehabilitation centers

All the data collected by the project are organized and disseminated to the state and federal agencies that use the information to make management decisions.

The North Carolina Sea Turtle Project, run by the state Wildlife Resources Commission's Division of Wildlife Management, is committed to monitoring North Carolina's sea turtle population. The project would not be possible without the help of hundreds of volunteers!

Ohio Odonata Society Dragonfly Monitoring

The Ohio Odonata Society needs you to send in photos and specimens of dragonflies and damselflies in Ohio to help advance our understanding of these beautiful creatures.

Volunteers can submit photographs documenting new county or state records of dragonflies and damselflies in Ohio. Once accepted, the photographs will be listed in the project database of nearly 28,000 specimens, published literature citations, and photos.

Many dragonfly and damselfly species simply cannot be identified without placing them under a microscope where detailed examinations can be performed. You can help by collecting and sending in your specimens. The physical collection of living insects is not for everyone, but it is a viable and biologically sound practice if done according to sound scientific principles. Furthermore, some species are very, very, hard to confidently identify from a photo and thus require microscopic examinations. Finally, genetic review in some cases is teaching us that some species are actually two different species!

This is your chance to help promote knowledge and appreciation of dragonflies and damselflies in Ohio!


SKYWARN is a national network of over 300,000 volunteer weather spotters that is managed by NOAA's National Weather Service. The spotters are trained by one of the 122 local National Weather Service Forecast Offices on how to spot severe thunderstorms, tornadoes, hail, and flooding. In some parts of the country, spotters also report snowfall and ice accumulation.

During hazardous weather, such as severe thunderstorms, floods, tornadoes, snow and ice storms, SKYWARN volunteers report what is happening at their location. They are asked to report whenever certain criteria are met such as when one inch of rain has fallen, four inches of snow is on the ground, a thunderstorm is producing hail, or trees have been blown down.

The WildLab

The WildLab engages citizen scientists in bird and other wildlife identification, using mobile phones as tools of scientific discovery. Along with associated curricula and educational activities found on its website, the WildLab is a powerful new way to see the environment.

The WildLab Bird iPhone app includes photographs, audio, and range maps for more than 200 common bird species. The app helps users make correct identifications by leading them through a process of elimination. The application saves each sighting with location and other data, and sightings are logged in the user’s online WildLab account. Files based on a user's sightings can be easily loaded into Cornell Lab of Ornithology's eBird database.

In a pilot program developed with funding from the MacArthur Foundation, more than 500 New York City 5th- through 12th-grade students used iPhones to log thousands of bird sightings from nearby parks and green spaces. Participants in the project increased their knowledge as well as their interest in science careers. All educators involved in the project said they would participate again if it was offered in the future.

The WildLab has also piloted a program with the Cornell Cooperative Extension for horseshoe crab monitoring; this app will be available soon in the app store. Through collaborations with science education institutions around the country, the WildLab continues to develop new apps and will run its in-school bird program this fall.

NASA Ames Space Settlement Contest

This annual contest, co-sponsored by NASA Ames and the National Space Society, is for 6-12th graders (11-18 years old) from anywhere in the world. Individuals, small teams of two to six, and large teams of seven or more (often whole classrooms with teacher leadership) may enter their design for and description of a human colony in outer space.

Submissions must relate to orbital settlements; they may not be on a planet or moon. Settlements must be permanent, relatively self-sufficient homes, not temporary work camps. Designs, original research, essays, stories, models, artwork or any other orbital space settlement
related materials may be submitted.

Grades 6-8, 9-10 and 11-12 are judged separately, except for the grand prize. The single highest scoring team or individual attending will receive the NSS Bruce M. Clark, Jr. Memorial Space Settlement Award for $3,000.

Submissions must be received by March 15.

Picture Post

Picture Post invites everyone with a digital camera to become an environmental monitor. All you have to do is place a 4-inch-by-4-inch wood or plastic post in the ground, with the top at chest-height. Then, resting your camera on the top of the post, take a series of nine photographs: eight to cover a panoramic view of the surrounding landscape and a ninth of the sky directly over the post. Upload your photos to the Picture Post website, and you’ve just helped track our changing environment.

Sponsored by NASA and housed at the University of New Hampshire, the project asks participants to:
1) take digital photographs at a designated Picture Post location in a consistent, sequential order,
2) upload the digital photographs to the Picture Post website,
3) analyze the digital photographs using the image tools on the Picture Post website,
4) continue to take photos on a regular weekly basis, and
5) share digital photographic records with local community organizations dedicated to environmental monitoring and use.

A Google world map on the home page shows the location of all Picture Posts—there are currently about 30 in the Northeastern United States and one in Italy. Participants can set up a “My Page” and collect their favorite panoramas, use tools to help organize and view their own photos, and use applications that help focus their monitoring efforts on certain types of plants or seasonal events.

The organizers encourage participants to place their Posts in areas of environmental interest, such as reforested land, and to work with educational and community organizations to put the data to good use.

Mussel Monitoring Program of Wisconsin

Participants throughout Wisconsin are asked to conduct freshwater mussel surveys. This involved systematic searching for shells and live mussels. Shell specimens and photos of live mussels are often taken from rivers, lakes, or streams.

Over half of Wisconsin's 51 native mussel species (also known as clams) are listed as species in greatest need of conservation, or we need information on where they currently occur. Threats like habitat alteration (dams, silt) and the presence of invasive mussels (zebra mussels) pose major threats to the existence of our native mussels. The Mussel Monitoring Program of Wisconsin would like your help in finding out what mussels occur in your area!


CitSci.org is a platform that supports a variety of citizen science programs using a centralized database to store and deliver science data, with a focus on community based monitoring programs. This platform allows program coordinators to create their own projects and datasheets, manage members, define measurements, create analyses, and even write feedback forms.

Seabird Ecological Assessment Network (SEANET)

Seabird Ecological Assessment Network (SEANET) volunteers conduct beached bird surveys along the east coast of the United States in order to identify and record information about bird mortality. Volunteers examine the spatial pattern of bird carcass deposition and how it varies across time.

The project brings together interdisciplinary researchers and citizen scientists in a long-term collaborative effort to identify and mitigate threats to marine birds.

These surveys provide baseline information about bird mortality and help to detect mass mortality events such as oil spills, algal toxins, and disease outbreaks. Marine birds can serve as indicators of ecosystem and human health; monitoring the threats they face and their mortality patterns can teach us about the health of the marine environment.

This project relies heavily on a working partnership between concerned citizens with an incomparable understanding of local ecosystems and natural phenomena, and scientists with the training and knowledge to synthesize and verify the data generated by local residents. Through this synergistic relationship, scientists exponentially increase the amount and range of data they can access, and residents come to see the larger patterns and trends of which their local ecosystem is a part.

Butterflies & Moths of North America

Butterflies and Moths of North America (BAMONA) is seeking individuals to submit their sightings of butterflies, moths, and caterpillars. BAMONA is a user-friendly web site and database that shares butterfly and moth species information with the public via dynamic maps, checklists, and species pages. Data are updated in real time and come from a variety of sources, including citizen scientists. Individuals can get involved by documenting butterflies and moths in their neighborhoods and submitting photographs for review. Collaborating lepidopterists serve as coordinators and oversee quality control. Submitted data are verified, added to the database, and then made available through the web site.

BAMONA also provides free support to partners. Partner with BAMONA to build local or regional species checklists, to get secure data storage, or to set up a project-specific submission and review process. Or, let us know how we can work with you to create a customized solutions for browsing, searching, and visualizing your data. See http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/partner for details and links to partners.

Colorado River Watch Network

The Colorado River Watch Network supports volunteers who monitor the water quality at strategically located sites across the Colorado River watershed from West Texas to the coast. The network serves as an early warning system that alerts the Lower Colorado River Authority to potential water quality threats.

The network's mission is to encourage and support community-based environmental stewardship by providing citizens, teachers, and students with the information, resources, and training necessary to monitor and protect the waterways of the lower Colorado River watershed.

Volunteer monitors submit data for approximately 120 sites each year, with an average annual total of roughly 1,000 monitoring events reported.

New Jersey Audubon Grassland Bird Survey

New Jersey Audubon Grassland Bird Survey needs volunteers to undertake surveys for grassland birds, such as the Bobolink, Northern Bobwhite, and Eastern Meadowlark, along established routes and in managed grasslands, and to collect data on bird abundance and habitat characteristics.

Participants should have some familiarity with grassland birds and be willing to improve their skills. Additional training in identification and counting methodology will be provided by New Jersey Audubon.

Grassland habitat in the Northeast has been disappearing rapidly due to urban sprawl, and grassland bird declines have been documented in Breeding Bird Surveys from New Jersey.

The purpose of this project is to:

- assess changes in abundance and distribution of grasslands bird

- determine how habitat and landscape characteristics influence grassland birds so that we can implement sound management strategies

New Jersey residents: don't miss this chance to make a difference!

New Jersey Audubon Shorebird Survey

New Jersey Audubon Shorebird Survey needs volunteers to count shorebirds and record information about their behavior in the New Jersey meadowlands.

The survey is aimed at assessing status and changes in populations of shorebirds. The data collected by volunteers will be incorporated into the national database of the Program for Regional and International Shorebird Monitoring, whose overall goal is to monitor trends in shorebird populations.

In addition, the information will help identify areas important to southbound shorebirds, and define shorebird management goals for New Jersey.

New Jersey residents: don't miss this chance to make a difference!

Audubon of Florida EagleWatch

Audubon of Florida's EagleWatch Program seeks volunteers to monitor active Bald Eagle nest sites and help identify potential threats to nesting success.

As a result of Florida’s rapidly changing environment, Bald Eagles currently nest successfully in urban areas. This increased exposure to human activity and the pressure that exposure can put on the eagle population prompted the EagleWatch Program.

EagleWatch seeks information about Bald Eagles, active nest locations, and possible disturbances or threats to nesting activities. The program is designed to educate volunteers in general eagle nesting biology, applicable laws, the identification of nest threats, monitoring techniques, and the verification of previously unrecorded active eagle nests.

This data is compiled and used to assist Florida's Mid-winter Annual Bald Eagle Nesting Survey by documenting both urban and rural eagle nesting activity, successes, and failures. The U.S Fish and Wildlife Service also utilizes EagleWatch data to enhance their conservation and law enforcement efforts.

Texas Turtle Watch

Texas Turtle Watch is a citizen science program developed to study three native turtle species whose population numbers are poorly understood. After volunteers collect numbers and trends over time, the data will directly contribute to an understanding of these native Texas turtle species.

The data collected by citizens plays a critical role in learning more about turtles. By counting the number of turtles they see basking in the sun, trained citizen watch groups of all ages and interests will help scientists create a knowledge base about turtles populations in Texas, which will lead to better conservation efforts and strategies. Additionally, citizens involved in monitoring turtles are provided a unique opportunity to get outside while contributing to science and conservation research.

The three turtle groups of focus are sliders (genus Trachemys), cooters (genus Pseudemys) and softshells (genus Apalone) because these species are frequent baskers. Their basking and nesting behaviors make them more visible than other turtle species.

Through the Texas Turtle Watch program, local citizens of all ages are provided an unique opportunity to explore the world around them while contributing to local conservation efforts. Become a Texas Turtle Watcher today!


SETI, or the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, is a scientific effort seeking to determine if there is intelligent life outside Earth. SETI researchers use many methods. One popular method, radio SETI, listens for artificial radio signals coming from other stars. SETI@home is a radio SETI project that lets anyone with a computer and an Internet connection participate.

Radio telescope signals consist primarily of noise (from celestial sources and the receiver's electronics) and man-made signals such as TV stations, radar, and satellites. Modern radio SETI projects analyze the data digitally. More computing power enables searches to cover greater frequency ranges with more sensitivity. Radio SETI, therefore, has an insatiable appetite for computing power.

Previous radio SETI projects have used special-purpose supercomputers, located at the telescope, to do the bulk of the data analysis. In 1995, David Gedye proposed doing radio SETI using a virtual supercomputer composed of large numbers of Internet-connected computers, and he organized the SETI@home project to explore this idea. SETI@home was originally launched in May 1999.

The SETI@home project hopes to convince you to allow us to borrow your computer when you aren't using it and to help us "…search out new life and new civilizations." We'll do this with a screen saver that can go get a chunk of data from us over the internet, analyze that data, and then report the results back to us. When you need your computer back, our screen saver instantly gets out of the way and only continues it's analysis when you are finished with your work.

Wider Countryside Butterfly Survey

Wider Countryside Butterfly Survey volunteers collect data and support studies on the abundance of butterfly species in the United Kingdom countryside.

Butterflies are unique indicators of the state of the environment because of their rapid lifecycles and high sensitivity to environmental conditions. The volunteer networks and datasets created by this project enable accurate assessment of butterfly trends, allowing researchers to assess the impacts of climate change.

This pioneering study aims to get a representative picture of the status of butterflies in widespread
habitats such as lowland intensive farmland and upland grassland and moorland. Strong emphasis has been placed on making sure that the Wider Countryside Butterfly Survey is both scientifically sound (by using random sampling) and efficient (a scheme with fewer visits to account for the fact that butterfly species are now uncommon across much of the general countryside).

This new scheme runs in parallel with United Kingdom Butterfly Monitoring Scheme, which is very effective at monitoring habitat-specialist butterflies and lowland semi-natural habitats, and the Butterflies for the New Millennium project, which acts as the main source of information on where butterflies live.

Habitat Network

Map habitat in backyards, parks, and schools. Work towards more sustainable landscapes. The Habitat Network lets you draw your landscapes with a beautiful online mapping tool and helps you learn about how to use your outdoor spaces (big or small) to aid birds and other wildlife. Connect to other citizen scientists, solve problems, share your maps and good ideas all while helping to build an invaluable database of habitat data for the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and The Nature Conservancy.

Tree Trackers!

Tree Tracker participants will take part in an exciting training session and then visit specific trees in their neighborhoods to observe and record the life cycle changes in trees. This information can then be used to learn more about changes in climate. Participants upload their observations to the Project Budburst website, which professional scientists then use. Citizen scientists can see recently uploaded observations as well as year-end reports from the professional scientists.

The trainings will happen during the fall and spring of each year and participants will then collect data throughout the year. We encourage anyone interested in the project to get in touch with us so that we can register them for the next available training. Even if you can't make the training, you can still make observations!

Frog Listening Network

The Frog Listening Network trains community volunteers of all ages and backgrounds to collect data about frog and toad populations in west-central Florida. Volunteers learn how to identify amphibians both by sound and by sight.

Volunteers receive free trainings complete with educational materials such as audiotapes and compact discs, CD-ROMs, and full-color field identification cards to help learn each amphibian species and their individual calls. Volunteers also learn how to collect and record frog population data in a way that's fun and easy.

Amphibians are considered "sentinels" of environmental health because of their sensitive skin. Their populations are declining worldwide, so frog and toad populations need to be monitored in Florida. By watching them and keeping track of their populations, we can begin to understand the health of the environment. It is difficult to assemble a professional team to do this, which is why the project relies on the help of volunteers. Although similar to other amphibian monitoring groups across the country, the Frog Listening Network is the only group of its kind in west-central Florida.

Along with additional environmentally important data collected by others, the frog data are compiled into an annual report that is made available for use by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the National Amphibian Monitoring Program. These data help to paint a picture of the health of the environment.

Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project

Volunteers for Operation RubyThroat observe hummingbird migration and/or nesting behavior and share information with peers across North and Central America. The resulting data on hummingbird behavior and distribution are submitted to a central clearing house, analyzed, and then disseminated to scientists through the Operation RubyThroat website.

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds (Archilochus colubris) are the most widely distributed of the 339 species of hummingbirds, occurring in all ten countries of North and Central America. They come frequently to nectar plants and backyard sugar water feeders and are easily observed. Nonetheless, many aspects of the birds’ natural history are not well understood.

Through EarthTrek, Operation RubyThroat seeks data about two aspects of Ruby-throated Hummingbird behavior: 1) timing of migration; and 2) nesting. In addition to providing much-needed baseline information, your data may help show whether these birds’ behaviors are changing, perhaps due to external factors such as climate change, alteration of habitat, and other factors.

Bee Hunt

Bee Hunt participants use digital photography to record and study the interactions between plants and pollinators, following rigorous protocols to ensure high-quality data. The data collected will help provide a better understanding of pollinators' importance in growing food and maintaining healthy natural ecosystems. Bee Hunt is open to anyone, anywhere, whenever pollinators are flying. In North America, depending upon your location, you can start as early as March and go as late as November.

There are four ways to participate in Bee Hunt:

1. Inventory pollinators at your site with photographs
2. Compare species in two patches
3. Provide nesting sites for mason bees and study when they are active
4. Use bowls and soapy water to collect insects for a more complete inventory of species

Bee Hunt is a great way to teach and learn about pollination ecology and other aspects of natural history. Bee Hunt is a participatory science project. It's your research. You are the scientists. By following the project’s methods, you will collect and contribute high-quality data.

Great Swamp Watershed Association World Water Monitoring Day

This is a local, month-long extension of World Water Monitoring Day, during which volunteers in New Jersey's Morris and Somerset Counties will collect basic water quality data from the streams and lakes in the Great Swamp Watershed. The project runs from September 18, the official date of the international water monitoring day, through October 18. The organizers plan to repeat it in the same time frame every year.

World Water Monitoring Day (WWMD) is a worldwide education and outreach program that builds public awareness and involvement in protecting water resources by engaging citizens to conduct basic monitoring of their local water bodies.


Florida LAKEWATCH is a volunteer water-monitoring program that facilitates "hands-on" participation in the management of lakes, rivers, and coastal sites through monthly sampling activities. Participants work with researchers at the University of Florida to collect samples that, when analyzed, will contribute to the understanding of Florida’s water bodies.

All volunteers attend a two-hour training session on how to collect water samples and monitor lakes. As a trained LAKEWATCH volunteer, you will help develop a database of water chemistry for your particular lake, river, or coastal site. These data can then be used to establish trends and develop an overview of how your site fits into the overall picture of Florida water bodies.

Volunteers receive a free newsletter subscription and invitations to free Florida LAKEWATCH volunteer appreciation meetings. Don't miss out!

Project NOAH

Noah is a mobile phone app that allows nature lovers to document local wildlife and add their observations to a growing database for use by ongoing citizen-science projects.

Using the Noah mobile application, users take a photograph of an interesting organism, select the appropriate category, add descriptive tags, and click submit. The application captures the location details along with the submitted information and stores all of it in the species database for use by efforts such as Project Squirrel and the Lost Ladybug Project.

In addition, users can see what kinds of organisms are nearby by searching through a list or exploring a map of their area, all on a mobile phone.

Noah is all about discovering and documenting local wildlife. We work with research groups and organizations to help gather important data and we want you to help by logging recent spottings on your mobile phone. Missions can range from photographing specific frogs or flowers to tracking migrating birds or invasive species or logging the effects of the oil spill.

National Geographic Field Expedition: Valley of the Khans

Imagine an expedition with a field staff of 10,000. How about 100,000? It's possible. Supported by National Geographic Digital Media, "Field Expedition: Mongolia — Valley of the Khans Project" is an innovative, noninvasive archaeological survey of Mongolia’s sacred lands that allows web users around the world to actively participate in an ongoing, real-time scientific exploration. Valley of the Khans is the ultimate citizen science project.

Because of the extensive size of the region of Mongolia being explored, detailed analysis of the terrain is beyond the capability that any single individual can handle. By providing real-time data, satellite imagery, maps and other information from the field directly to web users at home, the Valley of the Khans Project harnesses the analytic power of the collective public to crowdsource the identification of on-the-ground anomalies — anomalies that could indicate sites of cultural heritage. Once candidate locations are pinpointed they will be ground-truthed in real time by the expedition team concurrently working in the field.

Field Expedition: Mongolia also serves a greater technology purpose as well. In addition to guiding potential discoveries and supplementing the limitations of computer-based computational search alone, the data generated by sourcing a massive human demographic could be used to develop human computation concepts that will train computer-vision algorithms and facilitate active machine learning. This is especially relevant in the case of visual analytics where human intuition remains beyond the scope of existing computer object recognition algorithms.

Great Lakes Worm Watch

The Great Lakes Worm Watch needs citizen scientists to conduct earthworm surveys in forests and other habitats anywhere in North America.

Earthworms are not native to the Great Lakes Region; they were all wiped out after the last glaciation. The current population, brought here by early Europeans, is slowly changing the face of our native forests, but very little is known about the distributions of earthworm and earthworm species across the region. While valuable, this type of information is labor-intensive, and it is difficult for researchers to get funding to do this kind of work. Citizen scientists can help.

There are several ways to get involved:

1. Document earthworm occurrences: This involves collecting and sending earthworm specimens with location information to Great Lakes Worm Watch. These specimens will be archived at the University of Minnesota, and the species and location information will be added to the project database.

2. Collect habitat data: Great Lakes Worm Watch would like data from all habitat types, especially natural ecosystems like forests, woodlands, and prairies. In addition, data from habitats dominated by human activity are also of value, such as farm fields, pastures, and parks. Depending on your level of interest and expertise, you can choose to conduct a general or detailed habitat survey. You can use the instructions and data sheets developed by the project coordinators to make the data easily transferable to the database.

3. Conduct soil surveys: In addition to earthworm and habitat data, Great Lakes Worm Watch is also interested in getting data about the soil conditions at sites in which you sampled for earthworms. You can use the instructions and data sheet developed by project coordinators to make the data easily transferable to the database.

Get started! Anyone can make a BIG difference when it comes to containing the spread of exotic earthworms!

Plants of Concern

Plants of Concern (POC) engages a diverse, dedicated group of citizen scientists to monitor endangered, threatened, and rare plants in the Chicago Wilderness region, which includes northeastern Illinois and northwestern Indiana. The program provides this important data to our partners, who use it to conserve and protect native wildflowers, grasses, and other plants that once flourished in our region. Plants of Concern is coordinated by the Chicago Botanic Garden in partnership with local, state, federal, and nonprofit agencies.

The program aims to:

- Train volunteers as citizen scientists to monitor rare plant populations and become conservation advocates

- Monitor endangered, threatened, and locally rare plant species using standardized protocols

- Assess long-term trends in rare plant populations in response to management activities and/or threats to populations

- Provide information on population trends and potential threats to the populations to public and private landowners, land managers, and agencies as feedback to help determine future management practices

Since its ambitious inception in 2000, Plants of Concern has grown and continues to expand. New sites, plant species, and volunteers have been added every year. Volunteer participation is the backbone of the program, and Plants of Concern has thrived because of the dedication and perseverance of volunteers and the collaboration of regional partners.

You can help! The project needs volunteers to help with monitoring rare species in northeastern Illinois and northwestern Indiana.

Bird Conservation Network Survey

The Bird Conservation Network Survey needs citizen scientists to record bird distribution and abundance information for birds in the Greater Chicago region.

Bird monitors can participate at different levels:

- If you have a special interest in a particular site, you can become a regular monitor at that site and keep a year-round watch on the birds that nest, winter, or migrate through that site.

- You may help track changes in nesting populations by conducting point count surveys during the breeding season.

- You may visit a site during the nesting season and record numbers and species of birds just as you would on a Christmas Count.

- If you do not have the time to become a regular site monitor, you can still contribute your sightings.

The Bird Conservation Network has created a set of standardized methods for studying the birds of the Chicago Wilderness region. These methods can serve a variety of research purposes while also allowing birders to participate at different levels of intensity. Participants commit to making five or more visits to the site each year with at least two of those visits coming during breeding season (June). Also, participants should be able to recognize Illinois birds by sight and sound. By general rule, a birder should have about at least three years of experience with field identification of birds in the Illinois area.

The goals of this study are to generate a general picture of bird distribution in the region, to collect data to assist land managers and conservation planners in decision making, and to create a database compatible with other types of habitat data being gathered in the region which can be used by researchers investigating specific ecosystem questions.

United Kingdom Butterfly Monitoring Scheme

The United Kingdom Butterfly Monitoring Scheme needs citizen scientists to monitor and record data about butterflies at specific sites in the United Kingdom. The project's mission is to assess the status and trends of United Kingdom butterfly populations for conservation, research, and quality of life.

Butterflies are unique indicators of the state of the environment because of their rapid lifecycles and high sensitivity to environmental conditions. The volunteer networks and datasets created by this project enable accurate assessment of butterfly trends, allowing researchers to assess the impacts of climate change.

The project is based on a well-established and enjoyable recording scheme. Participants walk a fixed route at a specific site, and record the butterflies they see along the route on a weekly basis under reasonable weather conditions. For data to be most useful, participants will need to walk their routes regularly with very few missed weeks each year and continue this for at least five consecutive years. This effective methodology has produced important insights into almost all aspects of butterfly ecology.

The United Kingdom Butterfly Monitoring Scheme has monitored changes in the abundance of butterflies throughout the United Kingdom since 1976. Over the 32 years of the scheme, recorders have made more than 170,000 weekly visits to 1500 separate sites, walking more than 375,000 km (225,000 miles) and counting more than 12.5 million butterflies! Join the fun!

Dragonfly Monitoring Network

The Dragonfly Monitoring Network is a citizen-scientist program that monitors the health of dragonfly populations throughout the Chicago area. This program represents an important step in collecting data on insect populations and their response to land management techniques.

Volunteers will be trained to collect and submit data each summer from an assigned site. They commit to:

- attendance of one Spring Workshop a year

- learning to identify key dragonfly and damselfly species

Contact information: Craig Stettner email: cstettne@harpercollege.edu

- conducting at least six site visits between late May and late September

- spending one to two hours walking the route during each visit

- submitting data sheets at the end of the season, which are then added to the project database

With your help, the Dragonfly Monitoring Network hopes to gain a greater knowledge of the distribution and abundance of dragonfly and damselfly species in the Chicago region and eventually to expand the network across Illinois and beyond.

Illinois Butterfly Monitoring Network

The Illinois Butterfly Monitoring Network is a citizen-scientist program that monitors the health of butterfly populations throughout northeastern and central Illinois.

Each summer, trained volunteers collect and submit butterfly data from an assigned site. Volunteers commit to conducting at least six site visits between June 1 and August 7, completing four of them before July 20. During the first year they volunteers, participants learn to identify 25 different butterfly species, and they learn another 25 species the second year.

Through analysis of the extensive database generated by citizen scientists, populations trends of species throughout the Chicagoland area are starting to emerge. These results will assist land managers in more effective conservation of the state's butterflies.

Many important sites do not yet have butterfly monitors, and project coordinators continue to look for more volunteers. Join the fun!


ClimatePrediction is a distributed computing project that aims to produce predictions of the Earth's climate up to the year 2300 and to test the accuracy of climate models. To do this, the project needs people around the world to volunteer time on their computers - time when their computers are on but not being used at full capacity.

The project needs you to run a climate model program on your computer. The model will run automatically in the background whenever you switch your computer on, and it should not affect any other tasks for which you use your computer. As the model runs, you can watch the weather patterns evolve on your unique version of the world. The results are sent back to project coordinators via the Internet, and you will be able to see a summary of your results on the website. ClimatePrediction uses the same underlying software, BOINC, as many other distributed computing projects and, if you like, you can participate in more than one project at a time.

Climate change, and our response to it, are issues of global importance, affecting food production, water resources, ecosystems, energy demand, insurance costs, and much else. Current research suggests that the Earth will probably warm over the coming century; Climateprediction should, for the first time, tell us what is most likely to happen.


Collect Gulf Oil Spill data using your iPhone. MoGO (Mobile Gulf Observatory) is an app that turns you and your iPhone into a "citizen scientist" helping wildlife experts find and rescue oiled birds, sea turtles, and dolphins.

The MoGO app allows you to take and submit photos of oiled, injured, and dead marine and coastal wildlife; tar balls on beaches; oil slicks on water; and oiled coastal habitats.

Massachusetts Vernal Pool Salamander Migrations Study

Massachusetts Vernal Pool Salamander Migrations Study needs the public to document, through an online mapping interface, large migrations across roads of amphibians that breed in the state's vernal pools.

The project aims to minimize the impact of roads and traffic on rare and non-game wildlife, while improving highway safety, through cost-effective research, planning, and implementation of partnerships with citizens and communities of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Help contribute data and learn more about proactive efforts to protect rare wildlife in Massachusetts.

Massachusetts Statewide Roadkill Database

The Massachusetts Statewide Roadkill Database needs the public to document any roadkill observations in the state through an online mapping interface.

The project aims to minimize the impact of roads and traffic on rare and non-game wildlife, while improving highway safety, through cost-effective research, planning, and implementation of partnerships with citizens and communities of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Help contribute data and learn more about proactive efforts to protect wildlife in Massachusetts.

Massachusetts Turtle Roadway Mortality Study

This project allows the public to document turtle roadkill observations in Massachusetts through an online mapping interface.

The project aims to minimize the impact of roads and traffic on rare and non-game wildlife, while improving highway safety, through cost-effective research, planning, and implementation of partnerships with citizens and communities of Massachusetts.

Help contribute data and learn more about proactive efforts to protect turtles and other wildlife in Massachusetts.

Camas Citizen Science Monitoring Program

The Camas Citizen Science Monitoring Program seeks to engage high school volunteers in the long-term scientific monitoring of camas lily populations in the Weippe Prairie site of Nez Perce National Historical Park. Students are trained in the classroom and then spend time in the field using data collection techniques specifically designed for this program. Results of the monitoring effort are available to National Park Service managers so that they can make better management decisions based on sound, scientific information.

Camas is an important cultural and natural resource. For the last 7,000 years, camas has been an important part of the Nez Perce history, life and culture, as well as those of many other tribes of the Pacific Northwest. In addition, camas is one of a suite of wetland species associated with seasonal wet prairie ecosystems. However, as a result of recent agricultural conversion, irrigation, flood control, and other land use practices, remaining wet prairies in this region have been drastically reduced. Projected climate change will also impact these wet prairie ecosystems and monitoring camas populations will provide the National Park Service an opportunity to track climate change impacts on park natural resources.

Monitoring of camas and invasive weeds is a unique opportunity to integrate natural resource monitoring with the cultural history of the Nez Perce people. Citizen scientists will use carefully designed scientific procedures and modern technology to collect data, such as the number of camas plants and flowering plants and the presence of invasive species. Components of the program are tied to state science standards, and high school students will work alongside ecologists, statisticians, natural resource managers, and interpretive rangers.

Three local high schools are currently participating each year. This is a unique learning opportunity that students are sure to remember.

Bird Ringing at the British Trust for Ornithology

Bird Ringing at the British Trust for Ornithology is a network of more than 2,500 trained and licensed volunteers in the United Kingdom that ring--or tag--more than 900,000 birds every year.

Bird ringing involves the fitting of small, uniquely numbered metal rings on the legs of birds. By identifying these birds as individuals, researchers can start to understand changes in the survival and movements of bird populations.

Bird ringers come in many types, from individuals working in urban areas to large groups working in a wide geographic area, and can start at any age. Though you definitely don’t need to be a bird expert to ring, it does help if you have some prior bird knowledge. Anyone who wants to participate in the project will need to gain field experience with a qualified trainer.

You’ll no doubt find that ringing is a very satisfying activity. Not only will you be adding to 100 years of data used directly by conservationists, but you will also enjoy the experience of seeing birds close up. Whether you want to train to ring birds in nest boxes, gardens, or a local gravel pit, your contribution is vital to the project's success.

Nest Box Challenge

Nest Box Challenge gives anyone in the United Kingdom the opportunity to monitor the breeding success of birds in Britain's green spaces. Participants register the nest boxes in their gardens or local areas and record what's inside at regular intervals during the breeding season.

Britain's gardens play an increasingly important role in supporting British bird populations and providing food, shelter, and nesting sites. It is therefore vital to keep a close eye on bird populations in rural, suburban, and urban areas.

The information collected can be used to understand more about why some species are increasing while others are declining, and to help researchers find out whether warmer weather and the provision of food can make a difference in the number of chicks that birds are able to raise.

Just a few well-planned visits to the nest can provide useful information. Are you up to the challenge?

Nest Record Scheme

Nest Record Scheme volunteers gather vital information on the productivity of the United Kingdom's birds, using simple, standardized techniques. Participants provide the evidence needed to confirm whether a species in decline is encountering problems at the nesting stage.

Nest recording is one of the simplest citizen science projects at the British Trust for Ornithology in which to participate. Data are analyzed annually, and the results are published in the
"Breeding Birds in the Wider Countryside" report along with information on species’ abundance obtained through other British Trust for Ornithology monitoring schemes. Nest record data are also used to investigate the causes of species-specific trends in breeding success.

The project provides an ideal opportunity to participate in the conservation of Britain’s birds. Whether you can monitor a single garden nestbox or carry out a larger study, your records make a valuable contribution to the project.

Wetland Bird Survey

The Wetland Bird Survey (WeBS) needs volunteer birdwatchers to monitor non-breeding waterbirds in the United Kingdom. The principal aims of the project are to measure population sizes, determine trends in numbers and distribution, and to identify important sites for waterbirds.

Counts are made at around 2,000 wetland sites, of all habitat types. Volunteers make monthly coordinated counts. The principal months of data collection are from September to March, though observations are increasingly submitting data throughout the year.

Volunteers use the so-called "look-see" methodology, whereby the observer, familiar with the species involved, surveys the whole of a predefined area. Data are widely used for a variety of purposes and are presented in the annual WeBS Report.

The Wetland Bird Survey is dependent upon the enthusiasm and dedication of the several thousand volunteer counters throughout the UK. New counters are always needed to cover new sites, particularly habitats such as rivers which are monitored less comprehensively, as well as to replace counters who retire.

Breeding Bird Survey

This project needs volunteers to survey breeding bird populations in the United Kingdom. Join more than 3,000 participants who now survey more than 3,200 sites across the region and monitor the population changes of more than 100 bird species!

Breeding Bird Survey is the main source of population trend information about the United Kingdom’s common and widespread birds. Knowing to what extent bird populations are increasing or decreasing is fundamental to bird conservation, and the status of these populations is an important indicator of the health of the countryside.

Breeding Bird Survey is designed to be a quick, simple, and enjoyable birdwatching experience. Survey sites are randomly selected, 1-km (.6-mile) squares of land. Participants make just three visits to specially selected squares, the first to record habitat and to set up a suitable survey route and the second and third to record birds that are seen or heard while walking along the route. Participants do not need to be world-class birders to take part, but they should be able to identify common birds by sight and sound.

Join today -- all new volunteers receive a free CD of the songs and calls of more than 70 British bird species.


BirdTrack is a free, online and smartphone-based recording tool for birdwatchers to store and manage their own records from anywhere in the world. Everyone with an interest in birds can get involved by recording when and where they watched birds then completing a list of the species seen and heard during the trip.

Exciting real-time outputs are generated by BirdTrack, including species reporting rate graphs and animated maps of sightings, all freely-available online. The data collected are used by researchers to investigate migration movements and distributions of birds and to support species conservation at local, national and international scales.

BirdTrack is year-round and ongoing, making it an ideal project for getting children enthused about birds and migration. Teachers are encouraged to add their school grounds as a BirdTrack site then help their students to record the birds they see and hear.

The success of BirdTrack relies on YOU. Get started today!

Garden BirdWatch

Garden BirdWatch needs citizen scientists in the United Kingdom to gather information on how different species of birds use gardens and how this use changes over time. Gardens are an important habitat for many wild birds and provide a useful refuge for those affected by changes in the management of the countryside. The data gathered in this project enables researchers at the British Trust for Ornithology to monitor the changing fortunes of garden birds.

Some 16,000 participants currently take part in Garden BirdWatch. Participants send in simple, weekly records of bird species that they see in their gardens. This information is either submitted on paper count forms or by using Garden BirdWatch Online. Each participant also supports the project financially through an annual contribution of £15 (approximately $22). In return, participants receive the quarterly color magazine, Bird Table, count forms, and access to advice on feeding and attracting garden birds.

All new joiners will receive a free copy of an exclusive paperback version of the acclaimed "Garden Birds and Wildlife" (normally £14.99).

Puget Sound Seabird Survey

Volunteer birdwatchers with the Puget Sound Seabird Survey gather valuable data on wintering seabird populations in Puget Sound. The project is organized by the Seattle Audubon Society.

During monthly winter surveys from October to April, volunteers identify and count birds from the Puget Sound shoreline using a protocol designed by leading seabird researchers. Volunteers count all species of coastal seabirds including geese, ducks, swans, loons, grebes, cormorants, gulls, terns, and alcids. These data will be used to create a snapshot of seabird density on more than 2,400 acres of nearshore saltwater habitat.

Puget Sound Seabird Survey is the only land-based, multi-month survey in the Puget Sound region.

Orca Project

Orca Project volunteers in Port Townsend, Washington document orca bones for an online bone atlas, assist in orca education with children's groups, take part in assembling a full-size skeleton for display, participate in the design of a new orca exhibit and conduct research on underwater sounds using a hydrophone.

The project’s goals are to improve public awareness of the challenges faced by killer whales--toxic contamination, underwater noise pollution, and diminishing food supplies in the Puget Sound--as well as develop an appreciation for the whales’ remarkable social bonds and communication abilities.

Funded by the Federal Institute of Museum and Library Services, other organizations, and matching funds, the Orca Project will focus on both the transient and resident killer whales seen in the Northwest United States.

The Orca Project will also offer public lectures, free science classes for Olympic Peninsula students, tours of articulated whale skeletons for school classes, hands-on activities for after-school groups, Bring Your Bones Day (a community event with resident experts helping identify and reveal the mysteries of bones), and focused outreach to the maritime and marine community of Port Townsend, Washington.

East Jefferson County Marine Mammal Stranding Network

Volunteers for the East Jefferson County Marine Mammal Stranding Network collect data on dead, stranded, or abandoned marine mammals at selected Washington State beaches. Participants also "pup sit" seal pups while they are being weaned onshore in order to keep curious dogs and humans at a safe distance while the mother seal hunts.

Volunteers sign up to cover particular beaches and are trained to respond and collect vital data that can be used to establish baseline information on marine mammal communities. The data will be used by researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and other organizations.

Smithsonian's Neighborhood Nestwatch

Volunteers for the Smithsonian Institution's Neighborhood Nestwatch in the Washington, DC, area team with scientists to find and monitor bird nests and to record and report their observations.

Participants help capture, measure, and band backyard birds as well as track their presence from year to year. Through annual summer visits to urban, suburban, and rural backyards, participants and their families receive coaching on how to monitor and report data on nests of common backyard birds.

Volunteers also become an important part of a study seeking to determine the effectiveness of informal education experiences.

If you live within 60 miles of Washington, DC, take a naturalist’s journey into the mysterious lives of neighborhood birds, and join more than 200 citizen scientists making significant contributions to our knowledge of backyard wildlife.

Global Telescope Network

Using small telescopes around the world, Global Telescope Network members observe and analyze astronomical objects related to the NASA Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST), Swift, and XMM-Newton missions.

These missions are designed to study astronomical objects through their emission of x-rays and gamma rays. But much can be learned by combining observations over a broad range in the electromagnetic spectrum. So, the Global Telescope Network has been assembled to make observations in the optical range to complement the observations by space-borne observatories.

Members can participate in a number of activities, including gamma-ray burst photometry analysis, surveillance data analysis, and galaxy monitoring, and by donating telescope time. The Global Telescope Network in turn provides involvement for students, teachers, and amateur astronomers in cutting-edge astronomical research. It also offers mentoring in research practices, telescope use, data analysis, and educational resources.


Donate your DNA to science! If you have used genetic testing services such as 23andMe or Navigenics, you can offer your genetic data to DIYgenomics for a variety of medical studies.

DIYgenomics is now recruiting participants for its first study, which will examine the effect of a common mutation on vitamin B metabolism.

In a gene called the MTHFR gene, two small mutations prevent vitamin B9 (or folic acid) from being metabolized into its active form (folate). People who lack this form of vitamin B may develop nutritional deficiencies and symptoms associated with diabetes complications, including damage to blood vessels and nerves. Up to 60% of people may have some form of MTHFR mutation.

DIYgenomics aims to:
--Find people with MTHFR mutations by collecting data from volunteers who have used genetic testing services.
--Ask them to try simple interventions, such as taking over-the-counter vitamin B supplements.
--Ask participants to share results from blood tests performed at commercial labs.

Jug Bay Macroinvertebrate Sampling

Maryland's Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary needs volunteers to collect, count, and identify macroinvertebrates (small animals without backbones) in its streams. The sanctuary is in southern Anne Arundel County, 20 miles east Washington, D.C., and 18 miles south of Annapolis, Maryland.

One indicator of good water quality is a diverse and abundant population of macroinvertebrates. A dip in oxygen levels or a plume of pesticide can make a stream inhospitable to more sensitive animals.

Benthic macroinvertebrates--ones that dwell on the bottom of streams--can reveal much about the health of their watery environment. Since these animals more or less stay put, they are reliable indicators of water quality at each sampling site.

If you like to hike and wade in shallow streams, this project is for you! Monitoring takes place several times a year, and each sampling takes about two hours in the field and another two hours of processing in the lab.

Yuba River Water Quality Monitoring

Volunteers are needed to help the South Yuba River Citizens League, based in Nevada City, California, collect monthly water quality data at 45 different sites in the Yuba Watershed.

We are the leading regional advocates for creating resilient human and natural communities throughout the greater Yuba River basin by restoring creeks and rivers, regenerating wild salmon populations, and inspiring and organizing people—from the Yuba’s source to the sea—to join in our movement for a more wild and scenic Yuba River.

We train participants to use pH and conductivity meters and to conduct dissolved oxygen titrations in the field in order to collect information on the health of their rivers and streams. We also offer volunteers the opportunity to be involved in other monitoring activities, including health assessments of meadows, sampling of benthic macroinvertebrate and algae, surveys of river vegetation, and temperature logging.

Coral Reef Monitoring Data Portal

The Coral Reef Monitoring Data Portal is a new tool designed to support, enhance, and widen the scope of existing monitoring efforts in Hawaii. The data portal was developed and is managed by the Coral Reef Alliance (CORAL). It was created in partnership with and in support of community-based monitoring programs coordinated by the State of Hawaii DLNR’s Division of Aquatic Resources, the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary, Aquanimity Now, the Digital Bus, Project S.E.A.-Link, and other local organizations and agencies, through funding obtained from the Hawaii Tourism Authority (HTA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

According to CORAL’s Hawaii Field Manager Liz Foote, “We wanted to develop a 'one-stop-shop' for community based coral reef 
monitoring in Hawaii. This site was developed in support of current efforts such 
as the University of Hawaii Botany Department and Division of Aquatic Resources' herbivore grazing protocols, and the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National 
Marine Sanctuary's water quality monitoring program. This online data entry and 
reporting system will greatly expand the scope and impact of these monitoring 
efforts, and the associated resources provided on the site will empower and equip 
many more community members to get involved.”


Beach Environmental Assessment, Communication, Health (BEACH) volunteers monitor high-risk Washington state beaches for bacteria. Beaches are considered high-risk when they have a lot of recreational users and are located near potential bacteria sources.

Monitoring can indicate pollution from sewage treatment plant problems, boating waste, malfunctioning septic systems, animal waste, or other sources of fecal pollution. BEACH volunteers monitor for an indicator bacteria called "enterococci." The presence of this bacteria at elevated levels means there is a potential for disease-causing bacteria and viruses to also be present.

BEACH is intended to reduce the risk of disease for people who play in saltwater. The program strives to educate the public about the risks associated with polluted water and what each of us can do to reduce that risk.

State of the Oyster

State of the Oyster Study volunteers help monitor bacterial contamination levels in edible shellfish collected from privately owned Washington state beaches in Hood Canal and throughout Puget Sound

Volunteers collect oyster and clam samples from their beaches at specific times during summer months. Washington Sea Grant arranges for laboratory testing of these samples, which are analyzed for the presence of harmful bacteria or for bacterial indicators of fecal contamination. (Volunteers must cover the lab fees.) Washington Sea Grant then helps participants interpret their test results and, if needed, works closely with them to identify and remedy the sources of observed contamination.

Through the years, State of the Oyster has has helped waterfront residents on more than 300 Washington state beaches learn what makes for safer oysters and clams and how to minimize fecal contamination in their waters.

Bald Eagle Watch

Bald Eagle Watch volunteers monitor various eagle nests across the Colorado Front Range to provide information to biologists on the nesting success of the Colorado Bald Eagle population.

From January to July, Bald Eagle Watch volunteers collect nesting data and record many aspects of the breeding cycle, including courtship, incubation, feeding of nestlings, and fledging of the juveniles.

Colorado is home to many resident and migrant Bald Eagles. This is a fantastic opportunity to continue monitoring the eagle population to ensure it remains viable.

ColonyWatch: Monitoring Colorado Waterbirds

ColonyWatch volunteers monitor colonial waterbirds in Colorado, and resource managers use this information to effect long-term conservation. Anyone who enjoys birds and is concerned with their conservation can be an effective ColonyWatcher.

ColonyWatchers devote anywhere from an hour to several days monitoring a colony. A large colony containing several species may require a number of visits, each of several hours duration. Most of the colonies are small and many can be surveyed in a single visit. Most ColonyWatchers take responsibility for a single colony, but some have adopted up to a dozen.

Anyone who has an interest can acquire the necessary skills, and technical support is always available from the project coordinator and Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory. Become a ColonyWatcher today!

River Bug Hunts

Since 2000, volunteers with Vermont's Black River Action Team have helped to clean up and take care of the Black River and its tributaries.

Among our activities are the very popular River Bug Hunts: Throughout the year, as a way of assessing the overall health and condition of the water, we explore what lives beneath the surface of the river. Larvae of caddisflies, stoneflies, and mayflies are the most commonly used critters for this purpose. We’ll gather aquatic insects from the bottom of the river, sort them by body type, then identify and count them. Over time, we’ll start to get a good picture of the quality of the river.

So grab some simple equipment and your sense of adventure: We're going on a Bug Hunt!

Needed: a wadeable stream with a shallow, fast-moving reach called a "riffle," where the water ripples up and over a rocky bottom. The current should not be too strong to wade, and the rocks should be small enough to pick up and rub off into a plastic dish pan or other small tub. A white dish pan or tub, ice cube trays for sorting, and small scoops such as you'll find in baby formula or powdered drink mixes.

Killer Whale Tracker

The Salish Sea Hydrophone Network needs volunteers to help monitor the critical habitat of endangered Pacific Northwest killer whales by detecting orca sounds and measuring ambient noise levels. Volunteers are especially needed to help notify researchers when orcas are in the Salish Sea, which encompasses the waters of Puget Sound and the surrounding area.

Sponsored by a coalition of organizations, including the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Whale Museum, and Beam Reach Marine Science, the network consists of five hydrophones, each hooked up to a computer to analyze the signal and stream it via the internet.

Even though software is used to distinguish animal from other underwater sound, human ears do a better job of detecting unusual sounds. So volunteers monitor the network from their home computers anywhere in the world, and alert the rest of the network when they hear whale sounds. Sometimes boats or onshore monitors are deployed to study the whales in other ways. Researchers hope to learn more about the uses of orca communications and whale migration patterns.


SoundCitizen is a community-based water sampling network in the Puget Sound area of Washington state. We’d love your help.

SoundCitizen focuses on scientific investigation and knowledge discovery of the chemical links between urban settings and aquatic systems. We study fun compounds (cooking spices) and serious ones (emerging pollutants).

We are staffed by undergraduate students at the University of Washington, whose individual research topics help define the overall scientific aims of the program.

SoundCitizen encourages involvement with citizen volunteers and school groups, who voluntarily collect water samples from aquatic systems, perform a series of simple chemical tests, and then mail samples to the lab to be analyzed for cooking spices and emerging pollutants. Our scientific findings illustrate strong seasonal links between household activities (cooking, cleaning etc.) and the subsequent release of chemical “fingerprints” of these activities in aquatic and marine environments.

Moon Zoo

Moon Zoo invites you to help astronomers count and analyze craters and boulders on the surface of the moon. You will examine images from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, which show the lunar surface in remarkable detail, including features as small as about one and a half feet across.

One aim of Moon Zoo is to provide detailed crater counts for as much as the Moon's surface as possible. The number of craters on a particular piece of the surface tells us how old it is.

Craters can tell us more than just the history of the lunar surface, though. In particular, you're asked to look for craters with boulders around the rim. Boulders are a sign that the impact was powerful enough that it excavated rock from beneath the regolith (the lunar 'soil') and so by keeping an eye out for these we can begin to map the depth of the regolith across the surface of the Moon.

Of course, in exploring the lunar surface who knows what else you might find. We very much hope that Moon Zoo will lead to the discovery of many unusual features.

Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiments (INSPIRE)

INSPIRE volunteers use build-it-yourself kits to measure and record very low frequency radio emissions. These include naturally occurring "sferics" (short for "atmospherics") often generated by lightning and known as "tweeks," "whistlers," and "chorus" as well as man-made emissions.

There is a great deal of scientific curiosity about the nature and generation mechanisms of natural very low frequency radio emissions and how they interact with the Earth's ionosphere and magnetic fields. INSPIRE is taking an active role in furthering the investigation of very low frequency emissions by involving citizen volunteers in its research.

INSPIRE represents a rare opportunity to work with real NASA space scientists on real scientific problems.


COASST (Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team) is a network of citizen scientists that monitor marine resources and ecosystem health at 450 beaches across northern California, Oregon, Washington, and Alaska.

Team volunteers pledge to survey their beach every month. In return, the COASST office pledges to put all of the data together, decipher the patterns across the entire survey range, and give that information back out to volunteers and the communities.

COASST believes that the citizens of coastal communities are essential scientific partners in monitoring marine ecosystem health. By collaborating with citizens, natural resource management agencies, and environmental organizations, COASST works to translate long-term monitoring into effective marine conservation solutions.

Monarch Larva Monitoring Project

The Monarch Larva Monitoring Project enlists citizen scientists to collect long-term data on larval monarch populations and milkweed habitat.

Developed by researchers at the University of Minnesota, the project aims to better understand how and why monarch populations vary in time and space, with a focus on monarch distribution and abundance during the breeding season in North America.

As a volunteer, you can participate in two ways: You can commit to regularly monitoring a specific patch of milkweed or you can submit anecdotal observations. If you commit to regular monitoring, you'll conduct weekly monarch and milkweed surveys, measuring per plant densities of monarch eggs and larvae. You'll also be able to participate in more detailed optional activities, such as measuring parasitism rates and milkweed quality. Your contributions will aid in conserving monarchs and their threatened migratory phenomenon, and will advance our understanding of butterfly ecology in general.

In addition to contributing to an understanding of monarch biology, you'll gain hands-on experience in scientific research. Through this experience, we hope that your appreciation and understanding of monarchs, monarch habitat, and the scientific process are enhanced.

Georgia Adopt-A-Stream

Georgia Adopt-A-Stream needs citizens to monitor and improve the state's streams, wetlands, lakes, and estuaries.

The project goals are to increase public awareness of Georgia's water pollution and water quality issues, provide citizens with the tools and training to evaluate and protect their local waterways, encourage partnerships between citizens and their local government, and collect baseline water quality data.

Georgia Adopt-A-Stream has teamed up with government and non-government groups to provide access to technical information and assistance for citizens interested in preserving and restoring the banks and vegetation along their waterways. This network will help local governments, educate citizens about the importance of protecting riparian corridors, and provide landowners with the information they need to reduce erosion, improve water quality, and provide wildlife habitat with native plantings.

South American Wildlands and Biodiversity

South American Wildlands and Biodiversity needs volunteers to help identify, describe, and protect wildland complexes and roadless areas in South America.

Volunteers will use Google Earth to identify and map existing roads in areas of Argentina, Chile, and Bolivia. Volunteers are needed who have access to Google Earth and are comfortable working on computers.

In addition, field volunteers are needed in South America to visit these areas on the ground and confirm the accuracy of the maps. Some of the more specialized tasks that field volunteers will perform include the use of global positioning system (GPS) and geographic information system (GIS) equipment, as well as recording photographs and notes about the areas visited.

The wildlands of South America present one of the most important reservoirs of biodiversity on the planet. Mapping South American Wildlands is an ambitious project of the Pacific Biodiversity Institute, with Latin American conservation partners, to map all the wildlands in South America, to evaluate their contribution to global biodiversity, and to share and disseminate this information.

This project will first focus on mapping and analyzing the roadless/undeveloped areas in the southern cone countries (Chile and Argentina) using a procedure that the Pacific Biodiversity Institute developed to map the wildlands of the United States in 2001.

Harbor Porpoise Monitoring Project

The Harbor Porpoise Monitoring Project needs volunteers for observations and surveys at locations near Anacortes, Whidbey Island, and San Juan Island, Washington.

The historic range of the harbor porpoise has diminished dramatically in the last 60 years. Surveys of the population are done infrequently and there is inadequate data on the current status of the population.

Participants will help in assessing the feasibility of using passive acoustic monitoring devices to track population status and trends of this species. This may include land-based animal observations and/or handling instruments from a boat.

Western Gray Squirrel Project

The Western Gray Squirrel Project needs volunteers to assist with surveys of this species' population in the Methow Watershed in Washington State.

The western gray squirrel is listed as threatened in Washington State, and the Methow Valley area is home of one of the last three populations remaining in the state.

The main goal for this project is to conduct distribution surveys and relative abundance estimates that will augment work being conducted by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. This effort will further scientific knowledge about gray squirrel distributions throughout the Methow Valley.

Another goal is to conduct outreach to private landowners about western gray squirrel habitat and to educate the local community about the status of, threats to, and conservation needs of the squirrel.

There is potential for this project to lead to further work on western gray squirrels and other aspects of conservation science.

Find the Swallow-tailed Kite

The Center for Birds of Prey needs your help identifying Swallow-tailed Kites.

You can help researchers determine the birds' distribution, monitor population trends, and locate important nesting and foraging sites.

Swallow-tailed Kites have striking black and white plumage with a long, scissor-like tail. They are primarily located in bottomland forests and open habitat.

If you see one, all you need to do is report when and where you saw the bird, as well as any other observation details.

Ancient Tree Inventory

Ancient trees are living relics of incredible age that inspire in us feelings of awe and mystery. They have helped shape our history, and will help shape our future if we let them.

The Ancient Tree Inventory (ATI) is a living database of ancient trees. The ATI began in 2004, as a joint venture with the Tree Register of the British Isles and the Ancient Tree Forum. By December 2015, over 150,000 hand-picked trees had been recorded across the UK.

There are still lots of amazing ancient trees still to be discovered and recorded as they can be found anywhere and everywhere. If you find a tree that is not on the map then please add it and upload an image as well. The growing database will give us a much better understanding of the number of ancient trees across the UK. Recording them is the first step towards cherishing and caring for them.

Nature's Calendar Survey

Nature's Calendar is a survey conducted by thousands of volunteers who record the signs of the seasons in the United Kingdom.

This could mean noting the first ladybird or swallow seen in your garden in spring, or the first blackberry in your local wood in autumn.

If you live in the UK, you don’t have to be an expert to take part, and lots of help is given, including a recording guide which is available to download for free.

This kind of recording has moved from being a harmless hobby to a crucial source of evidence as to how our wildlife is responding to climate change.

Community Aquatic Monitoring Program (CAMP)

The Community Aquatic Monitoring Program works with volunteers to monitor the health and productivity of estuaries and bays in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence.

Volunteers collect biological data from live small fish and crustaceans that are captured with a 30 m x 2 m beach seine and released. These data include the identification of fish and crustacean species; the numbers of fish and crustaceans captured; water temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen; general aquatic vegetation profiles; and sediment and water samples.

With this information, scientists working with government agencies and universities can undertake nutrient analyses, organic loading assessments, and identify changes in the aquatic community structure. With this in hand, identification of cause may be determined and actions put into place to mitigate potential negative impacts.

Loudoun Butterfly Count

The Loudoun Butterfly Count is a one-day event that pairs citizen volunteers with experts to learn about, identify, and count as many butterflies as possible.

In the weeks following the count, the Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy posts the results on its website and sends it to the North American Butterfly Association to be analyzed at regional and national levels.

Butterflies are good indicators of habitat and the health of our environment because they need such a diversity of plants to develop and survive. Areas that are weedy and wild one year will show an abundance of species while a newly planted lawn (a monoculture) or an area sprayed with pesticides will be a wasteland. By participating in the Loudoun Butterfly Count, volunteers not only get to explore the fantastic world of butterflies up close, but they also learn about this amazing web of life in nature.

Loudoun Bird Atlas

The Loudoun Bird Atlas is a citizen science project to establish a comprehensive list of birds in Loudoun County, VA, including their dates of occurrence and distribution. The atlas is unique in that it is county-wide and will collect data year-round for both breeding and non-breeding birds.

Volunteers will use a field card to collect data on the occurrence and distribution of birds throughout Loudoun County. Field data will be collected from spring 2009 through spring 2013. Our goal is to publish a Birds of Loudoun booklet in 2014 with the atlas results and information on Loudoun County’s important bird areas.

Birds play a key role in our ecosystem and are important indicators of the overall health of our environment. Loudoun’s diverse habitats, ranging from forests and wetlands to suburban parks, make this county an important breeding and wintering site for many birds. This atlas project will create a baseline of information that can be used to indicate areas in need of conservation and measure the success of future conservation activities.

Loudoun Amphibian Monitoring Program

Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy needs citizen volunteers to help develop an inventory of amphibian species present in Loudoun County, VA, track populations and trends, and identify areas of critical habitat.

Participants can take part in several projects, including monitoring frog and toad calls, surveying environmental conditions, and assisting individual frogs, toads, and salamanders during road crossings. Participants will also identify and classify individual species that are present in Loudoun County while learning and teaching about their lifecycles.

These studies will provide early warning of declines in population size or occurrence of frogs, toads, salamanders, and newts. In addition, the studies promote public involvement in protection of amphibians and their natural habitats, which include both forests and wetlands, especially the ephemeral vernal pools that are most often overlooked.

Loudoun Bluebird Nestbox Monitoring

Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy needs citizen volunteers to set up and monitor bluebird nest box trails across Loudoun County, Virginia.

Participants can monitor at one of the Loudoun County public trails or at their own home trail. In addition, participants can help build new trails and repair existing ones.

By monitoring the boxes, the Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy can collect information on its native cavity nesters, learn about their lives first hand, and track population trends.

Loudoun Stream Monitoring

Virginia's Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy needs citizen volunteers to identify aquatic insects in local streams. The type and quantity of these insects, called benthic macroinvertebrates, tell a good story about the quality of water in the stream and its surrounding habitat.

Monitoring is done in teams of three or four experienced and novice monitors who follow the Virginia Save Our Streams monitoring protocol. Team members wade into the stream and use collecting nets to capture live aquatic insects in the riffle and pool portions of the stream.

The data are transcribed to a computer database maintained by Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy and are used to prepare water quality reports. Because the same stream sites are sampled year after year, project coordinators are able to report on trends in the health of the streams and aquatic life.

Fossil Finders

The Fossil Finders Investigation is a unique opportunity for students to assist paleontologists in answering the scientific research question: "Do the organisms in the shallow Devonian sea stay the same during environmental changes?"

Students involved in the project will identify and measure fossils in rock samples, enter their data into an online database, and compare their data with the data of other schools. Processing this data will provide students an opportunity to engage in authentic research. Further, students will help scientists at the Paleontological Research Institution reconstruct the geologic past of central New York. Education researchers from Cornell Department of Education and scientists from the research institution will provide teachers and students with resources and online support for fossil identification.

The Fossil Finders project staff and scientists will help in answering questions via the project website and fielding digital photographs of samples difficult to identify. This collaborative effort will involve students in learning about how science is done in the process of learning science content-matter.

Learning about geological concepts, environmental change, and nature of science will occur concurrently with students’ involvement in the Fossil Finders scientific investigation. The Fossil Finders curriculum also encourages classroom field trips to outcrop sites or local natural history museums to supplement the curriculum; however, virtual visits will be made possible through the project website.

Scenic Hudson: Volunteer Herring and Eel Monitoring

The Hudson River Estuary Program and Scenic Hudson are working with citizen scientists to monitor herring and American eel in Ulster County's Black Creek Preserve.

Herring volunteers will observe the creek to see if, where, and when spawning runs occur. Those interested in eels will use nets and trap devices to catch juvenile glass eels, which are counted, weighed, and released unharmed.

Data may help biologists discover why populations of these important fish are declining.

The Shark Trust: Great Eggcase Hunt

The Great Eggcase Hunt is a Shark Trust citizen science recording project, which encourages people to get out on the beach and look for mermaid's purses (the eggcases of sharks, skates and rays) and then record what they find!

An eggcase (or mermaid’s purse) is a tough leathery case that protects the embryo while developing. Each eggcase contains one embryo which will develop over several months into a miniature version of the adult. There are over ten species of skate and ray, and only a few species of shark in UK waters that reproduce by laying eggcases. Eggcases varies in shape, size and features - these differences allow us to identify which species they came from. Once the juvenile has emerged, the much lighter empty eggcases can wash ashore be found amongst the seaweed in the strandline. We’re also keen to hear about eggcases that are seen in-situ while snorkelling or diving!

In recent decades, several species of shark, skate and ray around the British coast have dramatically declined in numbers. The empty eggcases are an easily accessible source of information on the whereabouts of potential nursery grounds and will provide the Trust with a better understanding of species abundance and distribution.

Thanks to public recording, the Trust now has an extensive database of eggcase records, which continues to provide crucial information about the distribution of British sharks, skates and rays (elasmobranchs).

The Shark Trust is building upon the existing project, which represents one of the UK’s most popular marine volunteer recording programs, and encouraging more international records. The Trust is currently collaborating with the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) to establish the project in the USA, and will be developing identification resources for species found along the New York coastline.

The Great Eggcase Hunt ID guide is now also available at your fingertips as a smartphone app has been launched for Apple devices and is available in the app store now! This dedicated app offers tips on how to hunt, an encyclopedia of British egglaying sharks, skates and rays, full ID guide entries, a step-by-step identification tool, and a recording form with the capacity to upload photos and record the exact GPS location. An Android version is coming soon!

Quake-Catcher Network

The Quake-Catcher Network provides software so that individuals can join together to improve earthquake monitoring, earthquake awareness, and the science of earthquakes.

The Quake-Catcher Network links existing networked laptops and desktops in hopes to form the world’s largest and densest earthquake monitoring system. With your help, the Quake-Catcher Network can provide better understanding of earthquakes, give early warning to schools, emergency response systems, and others.

The Quake-Catcher Network also provides a natural way to engage students and the public in earthquake detection and research. This project places USB-connectable sensors in K-12 classrooms as an educational tool for teaching science and a scientific tool for studying and monitoring earthquakes. Through a variety of interactive experiments students can learn about earthquakes and the hazards that earthquakes pose.

Earthquake safety is a responsibility shared by billions worldwide. Let's get to work!

Celebrate Urban Birds

Celebrate Urban Birds provides an opportunity for everyone across the country to watch birds and participate in activities focused on birds and neighborhood habitat improvement.

Participants learn about 16 species of birds and watch an area about the size of half a basketball court for 10 minutes to see if they can find any of those birds. Celebrate Urban Birds provides all of the necessary materials to get you started.

An important part of the celebration is to help scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology collect information about the 16 key species of urban birds and the habitats they use. The scientists have created a project that will use data collected from participants to study these resident and migratory birds and their interaction with the urban habitat.

Participants can observe birds and collect data from urban, suburban, and rural locations.

Project FeederWatch

Project FeederWatch is a winter-long survey of birds that visit feeders at backyards, nature centers, community areas, and other locales in North America. FeederWatchers periodically count the birds they see at their feeders from November through early April and send their counts to Project FeederWatch.

Anyone with an interest in birds can participate! FeederWatch is conducted by people of all skill levels and backgrounds, including children, families, individuals, classrooms, retired persons, youth groups, nature centers, and bird clubs.

FeederWatch data help scientists track broadscale movements of winter bird populations and long-term trends in bird distribution and abundance. FeederWatch results are regularly published in scientific journals and are shared with ornithologists and bird lovers nationwide. The counts you submit will make sure that your birds (or lack of birds) are represented in papers and in the results found in the Explore Data section of the FeederWatch website.

Evolution Megalab

Evolution Megalab asks volunteers to survey banded snail populations in Europe to help map climate change effects.

Did you know that thanks to a common little snail you can find in your garden, in the park or under a hedge, you can see evolution in your own back yard?

Evolution is a very slow process. Life on Earth started about three-and-a-half billion years ago! It's the tiny changes accumulating over a long, long time that got us here. And you can see some of those tiny steps by joining the Evolution MegaLab.

It may look like banded snails are dressed-to-kill, but really they are dressed not to be killed. Banded snails are a favorite food of the song thrush, and their various shell colors and patterns camouflage them against different backgrounds. But, in some places there are fewer thrushes than there used to be.

Help us find out

* Have shell colors and bands changed where there are fewer thrushes?

Shell color also affects how sensitive a snail is to temperature.

* Have shell colors changed with our warming climate?

Urban Forest Map

The Urban Forest Map is a collaborative effort to map every tree in the city of San Francisco. As a citizen forester, you can get involved by searching for trees, verifying records, and by adding the trees in your neighborhood!

Along the way, researchers will use this data to calculate the environmental benefits that the trees are providing -- how many gallons of storm water they are helping to filter, how many pounds of air pollutants they are capturing, how many kilowatt-hours of energy they are conserving, and how many tons of carbon dioxide they are removing from the atmosphere. The information we gather will help urban foresters and city planners to better manage trees in specific areas, track and combat tree pests and diseases, and plan future tree plantings. Climatologists can use it to better understand the effects of urban forests on climates, and students and citizen scientists can use it to learn about the role trees play in the urban ecosystem.

The goal of Urban Forest Map is to provide a one-stop repository for tree data, welcoming information from any agency or group and enabling and celebrating citizen participation. Together, we'll work toward building a complete, dynamic picture of the urban forest.

GSWA Stream Team

GSWA's Stream Team monitors the five streams in the Great Swamp watershed, a 55-square-mile region in New Jersey's Morris and Somerset Counties.

Monitoring includes both chemical and visual assessments. The primary goal of the chemical monitoring program is to measure the volume of water, nutrients, and sediments flowing into the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. The main purpose of the visual assessment program is to help gather data for the Watershed Association and the State on water bodies that are not currently being assessed by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. All of this data helps to generate a picture of the overall health of our streams and identify areas where where water quality improvements could be made.

The streams within the watershed are the Upper Passaic River, Black Brook, Great Brook, Loantaka Brook, and Primrose Brook, all of which flow into Great Swamp and exit as the Passaic River via Millington Gorge.

Cape Cod Osprey Project

The Cape Cod Osprey project seeks to map and track all of the Osprey nests on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Since 2008 we have mapped over 220 nest locations, many more than were thought to exist on the Cape. Using our network of volunteers we have collected productivity data (number of chicks fledged/pair) on up to 140 nests. We are looking for volunteers to help monitor nesting behavior of ospreys and help us map new nest locations.


Join us in the search for interstellar dust! On January 15, 2006, the Stardust spacecraft's sample return capsule parachuted gently onto the Utah desert. Nestled within the capsule were precious particles collected during Stardust's dramatic encounter with comet Wild 2 in January of 2004; and something else, even rarer and no less precious: tiny particles of interstellar dust that originated in distant stars, light-years away. They are the first such pristine particles ever collected in space, and scientists are eagerly waiting for their chance to "get their hands" on them.

Before they can be studied, though, these tiny interstellar grains will have to be found. This will not be easy. Unlike the thousand of particles of varying sizes collected from the comet, scientists estimate that Stardust collected only around 45 interstellar dust particles. They are tiny - only about a micron (a millionth of a meter) in size! These miniscule particles are embedded in an aerogel collector 1,000 square centimeters in size. To make things worse, the collector plates are interspersed with flaws, cracks, and an uneven surface. All this makes the interstellar dust particles extremely difficult to locate.

This is where you come in!

By asking for help from talented volunteers like you from all over the world, we can do this project in months instead of years. Of course, we can't invite hundreds of people to our lab to do this search-we only have two microscopes! To find the elusive particles , therefore, we are using an automated scanning microscope to automatically collect images of the entire Stardust interstellar collector at the Curatorial Facility at Johnson Space Center in Houston. We call these stacks of images focus movies. All in all there will be nearly a million such focus movies. These are available to Stardust@home users like you around the world. You can then view them with the aid of a special Virtual Microscope (VM) that works in your web browser.

Together, you and thousands of other Stardust@home participants will find the first pristine interstellar dust particles ever brought to Earth!

In recognition of the critical importance of the Stardust@home volunteers, the discoverer of an interstellar dust particle will appear as a co-author on any scientific paper by the Stardust@home team announcing the discovery of the particle. The discoverer will also have the privilege of naming the particle!

Calico Early Man Site Archaeological Dig

Archeology Dig started by Louis Leakey to study the origins of Early Man in the Americas. Volunteer on site in the California high desert or process artifacts in the San Bernardino County Museum under the direction of Dr. Dee Schroth, SBCM Curator of Anthropology, and Calico Project Archaeologist.

Central Wisconsin Riverkeepers

Monitor the waters of six counties in Central Wisconsin: Fond du Lac, Green Lake, Marquette, Waushara, Waupaca, and Winnebago. We are a waders on, in-the-muck environmental group.

Performed monthly on local waters within these six counties, we test for dissolved oxygen, turbidity, temperature, and stream flow. At the beginning of summer we also perform a Biotic Index and habitat assessment. Information is entered into a state database for tracking purposes.


Have you seen a jellyfish on the beach? Report it to Jellywatch -- a global public database documenting ocean conditions. We are especially interested in jellyfish washing up, but we also track red tides, squid and mammal strandings, and other indicators of ocean health.

All the data and images that are submitted are freely and instantly available for bulk download, so students, teachers, and scientists can conduct their own research using information gathered from around the globe.

Contra Costa Volunteer Creek Monitoring

Volunteers wade through creeks in Contra Costa County (California), using the latest technology and scientific protocols to collect baseline data on our local watersheds. Our two primary programs are Bioassessment sampling and GPS Creek Surveys.

Bioassessment - Using aquatic insects as indicators of water quality, volunteers learn more about the health of their neighborhood creeks and identify potential problem areas. While water samples yield a detailed identification of the water at the time of sampling, the density and diversity of bugs in our creeks yield a watershed-level perspective of water quality and habitat viability over time.

GPS Creek Surveys - Using Global Positioning System (GPS) technology, volunteers map the physical attributes of the stream channel (substrate, canopy cover, bank characteristics, etc.), extent and type of native and invasive vegetation, and human influences (outfalls, dams, etc.).

Joining a data collection event is a fun way to explore parts of your urban environment most people never see, but they are more than just fun ... they’re science!

Lakes of Missouri Volunteer Program

Volunteers are provided with equipment and training to collect and process lake water quality samples 8 times each season. Volunteers also take temperature and water clarity measurements in the field at each sampling event. The sampling and processing takes about an hour.

Processed samples are stored by the volunteer until LMVP staff collect them for analysis at the University of Missouri's Limnology Laboratory. At the lab, samples are analyzed for total phosphorus, total nitrogen (plant nutrients), chlorophyll concentration (an estimate of algal biomass) and inorganic suspended solids (sediments).

Yreka Creek Citizen Monitoring Project

Klamath Riverkeeper is excited to bring citizen monitoring to the Shasta watershed in 2010 with our first citizen water quality monitoring initiative. We’ll start by training citizens to collect water quality data at points on Yreka Creek and the Shasta River this spring & summer.

The goals of the program are to:
1) Fill a recognized scientific monitoring gap in the Klamath and Shasta River watersheds,
2) Add monitoring capacity to existing and future restoration and stream assessment projects,
3) Provide an educational outreach opportunity to the public in the City of Yreka.

WV Save Our Streams Program

WV Save Our Streams trains citizen scientists in West Virginia how to monitor and become watchdogs over their local wadeable streams and rivers. The program focuses on a biological approach to stream study, which includes the collection and evaluation of the benthic macroinvertebrate community and an assessment of the stream’s basic physiochemical conditions.


Whether in a shrub, a tree, or a nest box, bird nests are everywhere. Find one, and you can help scientists study the biology and monitor populations of North America’s birds by joining the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s NestWatch program. Every year, volunteers from across the country visit nests once or twice each week and monitor their progression from incubating eggs to fuzzy chicks to fully fledged young. They then submit this data to NestWatch where it is compiled and analyzed.

NestWatch helps people of all ages and backgrounds connect with nature. The information that NestWatchers collect allows us to understand the impact that various threats, such as environmental change and habitat destruction, have on breeding birds. Armed with this knowledge, we can take the necessary steps to help birds survive in this changing world.

Texas Bee Watchers: 52 Gardens, 52 Weeks

Texas Bee Watchers aims to increase awareness and knowledge of native bees in Texas. This year, the Bee Watchers are challenging Texans to plant 52 Bee Gardens in 52 Weeks.

Willamette Riverkeeper Volunteer Water Quality Monitoring

Our volunteer monitors help to track the health of the Willamette River in northwestern Oregon. By describing current conditions and identifying trends, we can detect and document changes in water quality and work toward a cleaner river.

The data we collect can be used to protect the health of those who depend on the river, be they human, plant, or animal. The data is also made available to the community, and can also be used to address problems in water quality by indicating when water-related regulations are not being met. Water Quality Monitoring is one step in the process of encouraging community growth that is compatible with the surrounding environment. Our monitoring program’s existence depends on dedicated volunteers who collect quality data each month.

Snow Tweets

How much snow is on the ground where you are? Cryosphere researchers at the University of Waterloo want to know!

The Snowtweets Project provides a way for people interested in snow measurements to quickly broadcast their own snow depth measurements to the web. These data are then picked up by our database and mapped in near real time. We are especially interested in using web-based digital technologies to map snow data; currently, the project uses the micro-blogging site Twitter as its data broadcasting scheme.

To view the snow depth measurements (or Tweets), we have developed a data visualization tool called Snowbird that lets you explore the reported snow depths around the globe. The viewer shows where the reports are located and how much snow there is at each reported site.

The Snowtweets Project is in early stages of development and we plan to update and improve it as we go along. We rely on user participation to measure snow depth (including zero snow depth) and then send the measurements in.

Physics Songs

Physics Songs aims to be the world's premier website devoted to collecting and organizing all songs about physics. It is managed by Walter F. Smith, Professor of Physics at Haverford College.

Songs about physics can help students to remember critical concepts and formulas, but perhaps more importantly they communicate the lesson that physics can be fun. They certainly help to establish an informal classroom atmosphere, in which even shy students are willing to ask questions.

The songs may also activate a different part of the students' brains.

Volunteer Water Quality Monitoring Program

All Missourians rely on streams in one way or another and many of our streams could use a little help. They need teams of people who love clean water, good fishing and health habitat to take care of them, year after year. That's why the Missouri Department of Conservation, the Department of Natural Resources and the Conservation Federation of Missouri joined to develop the Stream Team Program in 1989.

Promoting citizen awareness and involvement, Stream Teams is a fun, hands-on program for people who want to learn about, care for and protect local waterways. If you are ready to tackle the fun of protecting Missouri's streams start a Stream Team.

Anyone can start a Stream Team:

Individuals and Families: If there is a stream in your community that you and your neighbors are concerned about, you can form a Stream Team to adopt it.

Schools and youth groups: Stream Team is a great way for schools, colleges and universities to teach students about stream ecology while restoring and protecting a local stream.

Community, church of service groups: What better way to serve your community than by adopting, cleaning up and maintaining the health and beauty of a neighborhood waterway?


RiverSweep is an annual event. Fish for shopping carts or gather trash from shore: Do your part to keep Vermont's Black River clean!

You can help in Springfield, Ludlow, Plymouth, Cavendish or any other point on the Black River in Windsor County, Vermont. Work can be done from a kayak or canoe if you have one or from shore (watch for poison ivy!). Stay for an hour, or the whole morning! We'll provide trash bags, snacks, work gloves, a free lunch and a complimentary "thank you" tee shirt.

The Open Dinosaur Project

The Open Dinosaur Project was founded to involve scientists and the public alike in developing a comprehensive database of dinosaur limb bone measurements, to investigate questions of dinosaur function and evolution.

We have three major goals:1) do good science; 2) do this science in the most open way possible; and 3) allow anyone who is interested to participate. And by anyone, we mean anyone! We do not care about your education, geographic location, age, or previous background with paleontology. The only requirement for joining us is that you share the goals of our project and are willing to help out in the efforts.

Globe at Night

Six out of 10 people in the US have never seen our Milky Way Galaxy arch across their night sky from where they live. And the problem of light pollution is quickly getting worse. Within a couple of generations in the U.S., only the national parks will have dark enough skies to see the Milky Way.

Too much outdoor lighting not only affects being able to see the stars, but also wastes energy and money, about 2 to 10 billion dollars a year. And it has been shown to cause sleep disorders in people and to disrupt the habits of animals like newly hatched sea turtles that try to find their way back into the ocean but are disoriented by streetlights.

Light pollution may be a global problem, but the solutions are local. To help people “see the light”, an international star-hunting program for students, teachers, and the general public was created called GLOBE at Night. GLOBE at Night is now in its 6th year and is hosted by the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory.

For 2016 we are collecting your observations during all 12 months of the year! See the dates below and plan to get involved.

January 1-10
February 1-10
March 1-10

March 30- April 8
April 29- May 8
May 29-June 7

June 27-July 6
July 28-August 6
August 25-Sept 2

October 21-31
November 20-30
December 20-30

Through this program, children and adults are encouraged to reconnect with the night sky and learn about light pollution and in doing so, become citizen scientists inspired to protect this natural resource. Teachers like the GLOBE at Night program, because it lends itself to cross-curricular learning: astronomy, geography, history, literature, and writing. The possibilities are great.

Global Garlic Mustard Field Survey

Help scientists gather much-needed data on the abundance and distribution of an invasive plant called 'garlic mustard' (scientific name: Alliaria petiolata).

Many invasive species, like garlic mustard, are quickly changing North America's ecosystems, but scientists still don't understand why or how this happens. Maybe it's an escape from enemies, maybe it's an increase in size or seed production, or maybe it's a misperception.

To figure this out we need sample data from all over the world, but that requires a large group effort. Fortunately, it does not require specialized training because plant performance can be reliably quantified with simple measurements such as height and seed production of individuals, as well as area of coverage and density of plants.

By spending as little as a single day on this project, you could help scientists to come to a new understanding about invasive species. This in turn could ultimately lead to important new management strategies.

NASA Top Stars

Are you interested in bringing Hubble Space Telescope data into your classroom? Then check out NASA Top Stars!

U.S. formal (K-12 and college) and informal educators were invited to submit their best examples of using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope for science, technology, engineering or mathematics education. Those selected as Top Stars received national recognition and awards. Winning entries are published online for other educators to use to inspire their students.

The deadline to enter was Feb. 28, 2010. While the contest has ended, the Top Stars website provides access to a showcase of Top Stars winners and other resources for the classroom.

Top Stars is an IGES initiative, through funding from NASA, and in cooperation with the Space Telescope Science Institute.

Curating Public Chemistry on ChemSpider

Participate in the validation of chemistry on the internet. Chemistry on the internet needs to be curated as there are so many errors.

ChemSpider is a public resource for chemists of over 20 million compounds from over 300 different data sources. Chemical names, properties and data need validating. The database can be expanded with your own data so if you are a chemist and your own data to the database for the community to access.


Herbaria@home is a ground-breaking new approach to digitizing and documenting the archives of the United Kingdom's herbaria. This site provides a web-based method for documenting herbarium sheets. This is important work that will help make the collections accessible to researchers and the public.

With your help and expertise and the support of 1000's of other like-minded volunteers we can realistically document the entire herbarium collections of even major institutions.

Through the efforts of a small army of amateur botanists the plant biodiversity of the UK is the most studied and recorded in the world. This project aims to apply some of that effort to making the wealth of information from historical collections widely accessible and available.

This project is open to everyone. You do not need any particular botanical knowledge or experience to take part.

What's Invasive

Use your mobile phone to help us locate invasive plants!

Invasive weeds are a significant threat to native plants and animals. Although most non-natives are not considered "invasive", those that crowd out food sources for wild animals, create erosion, or act as a significant fire hazard can be considered a threat and need to be identified and located for removal. You can help!

Then, using your Android mobile phone, help us locate invasive plants in an expanding number of locations across the US, or you can create your own list of plants that you want help in locating.

Our iPhone app currently works only in the Santa Monica National Recreation Area but is being updated soon.

The plants you identify will be placed on public map and alert park rangers of the spread of these habitat-destroying plants.

You can also participate using any mobile phone with text or picture messaging, email, or our web forms and a digital camera.

REEF Volunteer Fish Survey Project

The Reef Volunteer Fish Survey Project allows volunteer SCUBA divers and snorkelers to collect and report information on marine fish populations. Keep track of the fish you see while scuba diving or snorkeling. Submit those to an online database.

REEF surveys can be done anywhere along coastal areas of North and Central America, Bahamas and Caribbean, tropical eastern Pacific islands, Hawaii, the South Pacific, Central Indo-Pacific, and Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean.

Nature's Notebook

Pay attention to the plants and animals in your yard, and you can contribute to scientific discovery! Observing life cycles of plants and animals with Nature's Notebook is easy and fun, and you will discover so much more about the plants and animals you see everyday.

Sign up to observe one or more species in your yard or another place that you frequent. Use the Nature's Notebook smartphone app to send your observations directly to the National Phenology Database, or fill out paper datasheets and submit them online.

Laser Harp: Build It Yourself

A recent issue of Make magazine (http://makezine.com/15/) was devoted to build-them-yourself, high-tech musical instruments. Among the most impressive is a laser harp invented by tech musician Stephen Hobley.

You coax out the computer-generated sounds by waving your hands to break the light beams and change their lengths.

To build a laser harp, you’ll need to be comfortable with such things as MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) technology, circuit boards, photo cells, voltage regulators, and computers. If you’re not a serious amateur music technologist who’s been tinkering for years in the garage, you’ll need to buy or collect a significant amount of hardware and software.

Stephen’s article in Make does include a simpler project—a single-beam “laser theremin,” as opposed to the six-beam laser harp. But even that’s a pretty complex gizmo. (Note: We received an email from Geoffrey Rose notifying us that he invented the Laser Harp.)

Related Material:
* To see and hear Stephen playing his harp, go to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hCgMsrSaYwY&feature=player_embedded.
* Build a Laser Harp, Make Music With Light (Science Cheerleader): http://www.sciencecheerleader.com/2008/10/build_a_laser_harp_make_music_with_light/

White Squirrel Mapping

Have you seen a white squirrel? Join this community of white squirrel enthusiasts to help scientists locate and study these rare animals!

Most squirrels are gray or red, an adaptation that allows them to blend in to the surrounding vegetation. This is a case of classic natural selection, the driving force behind evolutionary change. The trait for being white is a genetic anomaly that is usually weeded out because they are so quickly seen by predators. However, some places have seen a growing population of white squirrels.

Keep your eyes open because there are lots of places where you can find this rare squirrel variety. Scientists have created a map where visitors that have seen a white squirrel can map it.


Volunteers-In-Parks participants work side-by-side with National Park Service employees to preserve the United States' natural and cultural legacy and to help visitors discover the resources, meanings, and values found in its national parks.

Anyone can be a "VIP": individuals, couples, families, students, and organized groups from all over the United States and the world. Become a VIP and put yourself at the heart of the park experience!

Volunteers-In-Parks participants play an ever-increasing role in national parks through a variety of jobs, including answering visitor questions at an information desk, presenting living history demonstrations in period costumes, building fences, painting buildings, making cabinets, giving guided nature walks and evening campfire programs, assisting with preservation of museum artifacts, maintaining trails, building boardwalks, designing computer programs or park websites, and serving on a bike, horseback, or beach patrol.

Internships at the National Park Service

National Park Service internships provide learning opportunities through activities such as wilderness re-vegetation, assistance with preservation and restoration projects, water quality monitoring, surveying, educational cave tours, or assisting resource management staff.

Internships offer an interesting and educational experience in some of the most beautiful areas of the country. This is your chance to get actively involved in the stewardship of the United States' national and natural treasures.


The Geoscientists-in-the-Parks Program hires geoscience and other natural resource science students and recent graduates for 3 months to one year to conduct scientific research, inventorying and monitoring, and education and outreach projects in national parks. This important work helps the National Park Service better understand and manage its natural resources and communicate science to park visitors.

Participants may assist with research, synthesis of scientific literature, geologic mapping, geographic information system analysis, site evaluations, resource inventorying and monitoring, impact mitigation, curation of natural resources, developing brochures and media presentations, and educating park staff and park visitors.

Individuals selected for the program have a unique opportunity to contribute to a variety of important natural resource science projects. Parks benefit from a participant’s knowledge and skills in geological or other natural resource sciences, while each participant gains valuable experience by working with the National Park Service. Each participant receives a weekly stipend, housing or a housing allowance, and a small travel allowance. Participants with all levels of experience are encouraged to apply.

Students’ Cloud Observations On-Line (S’COOL)

Students’ Cloud Observations On-Line (S’COOL) is a citizen science project in which volunteers make and report cloud observations from sites of their choosing, such as a field trip, vacation, or even a backyard. The project aims to collect data on cloud type, height, cover, and related conditions from all over the world. Observations are sent to NASA for comparison to similar information obtained from satellite.

Many people take for granted how powerful clouds are in our atmosphere. It is clouds, in part, that affect the overall temperature and energy balance of the Earth. The more that scientists know about clouds, the more they will know about our Earth as a system. The S'COOL observations help validate satellite data and give a more complete picture of clouds in the atmosphere and their interactions with other parts of the integrated global Earth system. Citizens benefit from their participation in a real-world science experiment and from their access to a variety of background material. Educational materials for teachers are also available.

Citizens and Remote Sensing Observational Network

The Citizens and Remote Sensing Observational Network is a central network of citizen scientists who share and communicate data. Environmental groups, science-focused institutions, and any individuals who are interested in environmental observations can participate.

Participants make important observations of their local environment based on their personal interest. In many cases, these observations may be helpful in improving a participant's community and quality of life. The network also gives citizen scientists a place to share and discuss their observations and ideas. Participants may also attend monthly meetings to share ideas, hear speakers, and network with other citizen scientists and professionals.

Open Street Map

Open Street Map is a free, interactive map that allows anyone to view, edit, and use geographical data in a collaborative way from anywhere on Earth. The project was started because many maps available online have legal or technical restrictions on their use, holding back people from using them in creative, productive, or unexpected ways.

Contributors to Open Street Map take handheld global positioning system (GPS) devices with them on journeys or go out specially to record GPS tracks. They record street names, village names, and other features using notebooks, digital cameras, and voice-recorders. Back at the computer, contributors upload those GPS logs showing where they traveled and trace out the roads on Open Street Map's collaborative database. Using their notes, contributors add the street names, connections between roads, and other information such as the type of road or path. That data is then processed to produce detailed street-level maps, which can be published freely on sites such as Wikipedia, used to create handheld or in-car navigation devices, or printed and copied without restriction.

Perfect Pitch Test

The Perfect Pitch Test is a study to determine whether absolute pitch differs systematically for different timbres. Your participation involves a brief survey and a pitch-naming test and will make an important contribution to auditory research.

Do you have absolute pitch, the ability to identify or recreate a musical note without any reference? If so, researchers at the Perfect Pitch Test need your help.

Shermans Creek Watershed Monitoring Program

The Shermans Creek Watershed Monitoring Program calls on citizen scientists to conduct water quality sampling and to measure biological factors that indicate the health of the Pennsylvania creek and its response to pollution.

Volunteers measure nitrate, temperature, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, pH, and turbidity, and conduct regular bacteria monitoring and macroinvertebrate sampling at sites throughout the watershed. The data will be used to provide public education, target areas for restoration and protection projects, and help the county and municipalities with land development plans that protect Shermans Creek.


LHC@Home is a volunteer computing platform where you donate idle time on your computer to help physicists compare theory with experiment, in the search for new fundamental particles and answers to questions about the Universe.

LHC@home is made up of several "@home" projects, each one with its own scope; ATLAS@home, Beauty, Sixtrack, Test4Theory and CMS@home.

Whether it's calibrating searches for particles, fine-tuning the machines and beam dynamics, contributing to building new theories on dark matter, or creating simulations of antimatter and new phenonema never-before seen in the LHC's giant detectors...

Whether you choose one or several projects to participate in, your contribution will have a very real impact on which will help us make monumental discoveries about the Universe we live in.

The Smell Experience Project

The Smell Experience Project is collecting stories from people who have experienced a significant change in their sense of smell.

Changes in odor perception can be a symptom of a condition, such as depression, head injury, dementia, or allergies, or a side effect of medication. Because the changes are subjective and difficult to measure, medical professionals often do not ask patients about changes in their sense of smell. As a result, there is little documented information about these changes. Smell Experience Researchers need your help to better understand changes in our sense of smell.

The National Science Digital Library

The National Science Digital Library encourages citizens to help enlarge and strengthen their library of high quality resources and tools that support science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education.

Developers of content in these subject areas, National Science Foundation grantees, educators and learners, and all other members of the community are welcome to recommend digital resources for the library. These resources include activities, lesson plans, Web sites, simulations, or any materials that help educators meet the demands of an increasingly complex technology-based world.

As a national network of learning environments, resources, and partnerships, the National Science Digital Library seeks to serve a vital role in educational cyberlearning for the nation, meeting the informational and technological needs of educators and learners at all levels.

The Juvenile Lobster Monitoring Program

The Juvenile Lobster Monitoring Program is a community-based research program that aims to measure the health and productivity of lobster nursery habitats over space and time. The project measures the abundance and distribution of juvenile lobsters and uses marking and recapture techniques to investigate growth rates and survival.

Program scientists have developed a set of rigorous training tools to teach volunteers how to census lobsters at nursery grounds in the lower intertidal zone. The census data collected by volunteers are extremely valuable as indicators of lobster fishery health because the juvenile lobsters of today represent the catches of tomorrow.

Anyone with the time and inclination (and a good pair of boots!) can participate in this program. It's easy and it's fun. Involving volunteers of different age groups and backgrounds aids in community building and provides public access to scientific research and knowledge. This project can thereby help to bridge the gap between science and the public through hands-on training and accessible learning.

Habitat Ambassador

Habitat Ambassadors are volunteers trained by the National Wildlife Federation to educate their community about the importance of wildlife habitat. Ambassadors show homeowners small changes they can make to benefit local wildlife and interact with the community at events. If you enjoy gardening, talking to people, and helping others learn how to make a difference, this opportunity is for you!

Habitat Ambassadors commit to a minimum of 10 hours of service in the first three months after training. Their work will help the National Wildlife Federation educate, inspire, and assist individuals and organizations of diverse cultures in conserving wildlife and other natural resources.

Volunteer at The Marine Mammal Center

At The Marine Mammal Center, we are guided and inspired by a shared vision of a healthy ocean for marine mammals and humans alike. Our mission is to advance global ocean conservation through marine mammal rescue and rehabilitation, scientific research, and education. The Center relies heavily on a dynamic volunteer work force comprised of more than 1200 individuals from Mendocino to San Luis Obispo counties. Volunteers handle everything from rescuing ill and injured marine mammals to cleaning pens, preparing food, updating medical charts and administering basic medications and educating the public about ocean conservation and our work.

Volunteering at The Marine Mammal Center is fun and a great way to meet others who share a concern for wildlife and the ocean environment. Your special talents can make an important contribution!

Volunteers help in a variety of different areas including Animal Care, Rescue and Education. We ask for a minimum commitment of one day a week for a minimum of six months. To learn more and get involved, visit our website to sign up for an upcoming Volunteer Introduction Meeting.

The Living Roof Project

The Living Roof Project is a citizen science program that gives community members an opportunity to learn about the California Academy of Science's unique roof ecosystem and to contribute to important baseline data regarding the many plants, birds, and arthropods that inhabit and utilize the Living Roof’s 2.5 acres of green space.

The data collected by citizen scientists are shared with researchers from the California Academy of Sciences and San Francisco State University. In addition, the bird observations are submitted to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s international eBird project. These data serve as a baseline to which future changes in plant and animal diversity on the Academy’s Living Roof can be compared.

Bay Area Ant Survey

The Bay Area Ant Survey is a citizen science program that gives the public a chance to participate in research by obtaining baseline data for ants living in local counties. The major goals of this scientific survey are to identify local species, chart native ant distributions, and provide baseline data to monitor the distribution of the invasive Argentine ant.

Participants collect ants and send their ant-filled vial and corresponding data sheet back to the Naturalist Center at the California Academy of Sciences. All specimens will be identified and entered in a database by an Academy entomologist. All results are then uploaded to AntWeb where the location and identification of the ants are made public. Your contribution becomes part of the scientific record!

The Genographic Project

The Genographic Project is a ten-year old anthropological study that uses DNA voluntarily contributed by hundreds of thousands of people to answer the oldest questions we have about ourselves: Who are we and where did we come from? In doing so, the project has created the world's largest survey of DNA samples to map how humankind populated the planet. Today, this database serve as an invaluable scientific resource for the research community and may ultimately underscore how closely related we are to one another as part of the extended human family. The Genographic Project uses sophisticated computer analysis of DNA voluntarily contributed by people—including indigenous and traditional populations and the general public—to reveal our migratory history and to better understand the connections and differences that make up humankind. Members of the general public can being to take part in the project by purchasing a Genographic Project Public Participation Kit and submitting their own cheek-swab sample.

In 2015 alone we launched four projects across the world (Palau, Aleutian Islands, Chile, and the Dominican Republic), and published six new papers, including populations studies on the Lesser Antilles, the European Roma, and Australian Aboriginal groups. This past year we also launched our new participation kit called Geno 2.0 Next Generation, and we opened up the Genographic Project database to researchers

Project Implicit

Project Implicit is an opportunity for citizens to assist psychological research on thoughts and feelings that exist either outside of conscious awareness or outside of conscious control. Participants assess their conscious and unconscious preferences for more than 90 different topics ranging from pets to political issues, ethnic groups to sports teams, and entertainers to styles of music. Participants report attitudes toward or beliefs about these topics and provide general information about themselves.

The primary goals of Project Implicit are to provide a safe, secure, and well-designed virtual environment to investigate psychological issues and, at the same time, provide visitors and participants with an experience that is both educational and engaging.

The Twitter Earthquake Detection Program

The US Geological Survey's Twitter Earthquake Detection Program gathers real-time, earthquake-related messages from Twitter and applies place, time, and keyword filtering to gather geo-located accounts of shaking.

This approach provides rapid first-impression narratives and, potentially, photos from citizens at the hazard’s location. The potential for earthquake detection in regions that are populated but where seismic instruments are sparse is also being investigated.

Data from the project will support other earthquake projects that rapidly detect and report earthquake locations and magnitudes in the United States and globally. The Program will also determine the best way to broadcast scientifically confirmed earthquake alerts via Twitter.

Nebraska Master Naturalist Program

The Nebraska Master Naturalist Program is a volunteer program designed to train participants to conduct scientific research, conservation education, outreach, and service in their communities. Volunteers learn about Nebraska’s ecosystems and biodiversity, acquire new skills, and network with others who share a passion for the conservation of natural resources.

Beginning with 40 hours of primary training, participants get instruction both formally and in the field. Participants will learn from and work alongside professionals, land managers, and faculty to complete an in-depth training in the natural resources. This primary training is followed with 20 hours of specialized training in a preferred subject area, including citizen science, resource management, interpretation, and outdoor skills training.

Lunar Impact Monitoring

NASA needs your help to monitor the rates and sizes of large meteoroids striking the moon's dark side. By monitoring the moon for impacts, NASA can define the meteoroid environment and identify the risks that meteors pose to future lunar exploration. This data will help engineers design lunar spacecraft, habitats, vehicles, and extra-vehicular activity suits to protect human explorers from the stresses of the lunar environment.


BOINC is a program that lets you volunteer your idle computer time to science. BOINC uses the idle time on your computer (Windows, Mac, or Linux) to cure diseases, study global warming, discover pulsars, and do many other types of scientific research. It's safe, secure, and easy!

Volunteer computing supplies more computing power to science than does any other type of computing. This computing power enables scientific research that could not be done otherwise. Volunteer computing also encourages public interest in science, and provides the public with a voice in determining the directions of scientific research.

World Water Monitoring Challenge

World Water Monitoring Challenge is an international program that encourages citizen volunteers to monitor their local water bodies. An easy-to-use test kit enables everyone from children to adults to sample local water bodies for basic water quality parameters: temperature, acidity (pH), clarity (turbidity), and dissolved oxygen.

The results of current and past studies are shared with participating communities around the globe through the organization's online Data & Reports page.

Cricket Crawl DC/Baltimore

Discover Life is calling all citizen scientists in the DC/Baltimore area to help them map out the occurence of crickets and katydids through the city and suburbs of Baltimore, Maryland, Washington, DC and Northern Virginia. Participants can track the sounds of these insects during the annual Cricket Crawl event held on the evening of Friday, August 26th 2016.

This project is a collaborative venture between Discover Life, The Audubon Naturalist Society, The Natural History Society of Maryland and the USGS

The Lost Ladybug Project

Find and photograph ladybugs! Join us in finding out where all the ladybugs have gone, so we can try to prevent more native species from becoming so rare. NEW - Email us and check our website or Facebook page for new opportunities to help restore native ladybug species.

Across North America, ladybug species distribution is changing. Over the past twenty years, several native ladybugs that were once very common have become extremely rare. During this same time, ladybugs from other places have greatly increased both their numbers and range. Some ladybugs are simply found in new places.

This is happening very quickly and we don’t know how, or why, or what impact it will have on ladybug diversity or the role that ladybugs play in keeping plant-feeding insect populations low.

Free downloadable educational materials and activities. Ladybug song!

View 37,000+ ladybug photos submitted so far. See what species of ladybugs have been found near you!

The Lost Ladybug Project database of 37,000 plus ladybug (Coccinellid) photos and locations is located on our website and is open to the public for mapping, graphing, searching, downloading.

Christmas Bird Count

Known as the first and oldest Citizen Science project, at over 115 years, Audubon’s Christmas Bird Count is also one of the largest, with 70,000+ person-days of efforts and more than 64 million birds counted each year. The CBC has contributed greatly to the science of bird conservation with hundreds of publications, including many in important scientific journals. From December 14 through January 5 each year, tens of thousands of volunteers throughout the Americas take part in an adventure that has become a family tradition through the generations.

Count volunteers follow specified routes within a designated 15-mile diameter circle, counting every bird they see or hear all day, and submit data to each circle compiler. It’s not just a species tally—all birds are counted all day, giving an indication of the total number of birds in the circle that day. If observers live within a CBC circle, they may arrange in advance to count the birds at their feeders and submit those data to their compiler. All individual CBCs are conducted in the period from December 14 to January 5 (inclusive dates) each season, and each count is conducted in one calendar day (24-hour period).

Citizen Sky

Help solve the mystery of epsilon Aurigae, a star that has baffled scientists since 1821. You don’t need any prior scientific training to observe and record the changing brightness of this star this site provides all of the tools you need to become a citizen scientist, including a training program that begins with stars that are easy to find and observe. Slowly the stars become more challenging as you go down the list. By the time you reach epsilon Aurigae at the bottom of the list, you’ll be an expert variable star observer contributing real data to professional scientists.

Did You Feel It?

The Did You Feel It? (DYFI) project is designed to gather information available about earthquakes from the people who experience them. By tapping the immense number of users online, DYFI can get a detailed characterization of what people were experiencing, the impacts of the earthquake, and the amount of damage it incurred, beyond the scope traditional information gathering techniques. Data input from users is immediately available on the website, and its interactive platform encourages users to gain a deeper understanding of earth sciences while they participate.

Project BudBurst

Project BudBurst is a national network of citizen scientists monitoring plants as the seasons change. It was created in 2007 as a community engagement effort to bring about a better understanding of how plants respond to changes in climate locally, regionally, and nationally. Instructional materials are available to support implementation in a variety of educational settings.

Stellar Classification Online Public Exploration (SCOPE)

Stellar Classification Online Public Exploration needs the help of citizen scientists to observe and classify stars never before classified. The goal is to mine data from photographic images of star spectra, which result from light absorption in the outer surface of a star. Star spectra are made available online where citizen scientists can compare them to stars with known spectra.

Don't wait--be the first to classify one of hundreds of thousands of stars that have never been seen before!

Project Squirrel

Project Squirrel is calling all citizen scientists to count the number of squirrels in their neighborhoods and report their findings. The goal is to understand urban squirrel biology, including everything from squirrels to migratory birds, nocturnal mammals, and secretive reptiles and amphibians. To gain data on squirrel populations across the United States, citizen scientists will also be asked, when possible, to distinguish between two different types of tree squirrels - gray and fox.

Anyone can participate in Project Squirrel. No matter where you live, city or suburb, from the Midwest to the East Coast, Canada to California, if squirrels live in your neighborhood, you are encouraged to become a squirrel monitor.

The scientists at Project Squirrel will also use this project to understand the effect that participation in citizen science has on participants. By contributing to Project Squirrel and documenting your experience, you can provide valuable information that will eventually be used to recruit other citizen scientists.

Santa Fe National Forest Site Stewards

The Santa Fe National Forest Site Stewards are volunteers who monitor archaeological and historical sites for evidence of deterioration due to natural causes or vandalism. They also serve as spokespersons to the general public by fostering awareness of the importance of preserving these sites.

Site Stewards are selected in part for their commitment to preserving the cultural heritage of the Santa Fe National Forest through their actions as the "eyes" and "legs" of the Heritage Resources staff. Site Stewards are also committed to educating the public and supporting the efforts of others who share these goals. Other skills such as archaeological experience, photography, and leadership are also taken into consideration.

Citizen Weather Observer Program

The Citizen Weather Observer Program is a group of ham radio operators and other private citizens around the country who have volunteered the use of their weather data for education, research, and use by interested parties. There are currently over 12,000 registered members worldwide and over 900 different user organizations. Their weather data are used by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and distributed to user organizations.

The Citizen Weather Observer Program is a public-private partnership with three main goals:

1. Collect weather data contributed by citizens
2. Make these data available for weather services and homeland security
3. Provide feedback to the data contributors so that they have the tools to check and improve their data quality.

Portable Antiquities Scheme

The Portable Antiquities Scheme is a voluntary scheme for the recording of archaeological objects found by members of the public. Archaeological objects discovered by the public are commonly referred to as "finds", "small finds" or "portable antiquities." The Scheme was established to promote the recording of chance finds and broaden public awareness of the importance of such objects for understanding our past.

The heart of the organization is its network of "Finds Liaison Officers," who have a role in recording and publishing reported finds, giving advice on finds recording and conservation, giving talks and lectures, and encouraging liaison between members of the public, metal detector users, archaeologists, and museums.

Volunteers record details of their discoveries, including description, weight, relevant measurements, and where and how the objects were found. The Scheme website provides a searchable database with details of over 140,000 finds recorded by volunteers. You can also view some of the many interesting and unusual find that have been recorded so far.


ReefBase gathers available knowledge about coral reefs into one information repository. It is intended to facilitate analysis and monitoring of coral reef health and the quality of life of reef-dependent people, and to support informed decisions about coral reef use and management.

A great part of the coral reef resources in the world are in danger of destruction due to over exploitation, degradation of habitat, and changes in global climate. Globally, the resulting loss of income from fisheries is estimated to be billions of dollars a year and affects many