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Mourning Warbler Song Mapper

The Mourning Warbler Song Mapper is a citizen science project that will map the songs of males during spring migration.




LabintheWild

LabintheWild tests your abilities and preferences. At the end of each experiment, you will see a page with your personalized feedback, which lets you compare yourself and your performance to other people around the world.

By participating, you contribute to research on people's similarities and differences and help improve users' experience when interacting with technology. We believe that research should be done in collaboration with people—people like you from all over the world who are interested in learning about themselves and helping research. With your help, we can, for example, compare the website preferences of people from different countries, or analyze what user interfaces should look like if optimized for the most interaction abilities of certain age groups.




Habitat Restoration Bird Monitoring

MUVE (Museum Volunteers for the Environment) is Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science's volunteer-led coastal habitat restoration project. Because habitat restoration creates considerable ecological change, we are monitoring the ecosystem responses to that change using bird habitat use as an indicator. Citizen scientists complete a weekly or monthly transect walk of the site and note the category of birds they observe, so species identification skills are not necessary.




Counter Culture Labs

Come help us build a new community lab for the East Bay, focused on DIY biology and citizen science. A place to explore, learn, work on fun projects, tinker with biology and other sciences. Open to biotech professionals, scientists, and citizen scientists of all stripes. Be part of our community of creative thinkers, hackers and mad scientists!




Connecticut Turtle Atlas

With approximately 58 percent of the world’s 335 turtle species threatened with extinction, turtles are the most endangered vertebrate group in the world. The Bruce Museum in Greenwich invites people to help turtles with the launch of the Connecticut Turtle Atlas Citizen Science project.

The unassuming turtle is seldom on the mind of most people, but they are a top priority for many conservation biologists. Turtles can play key ecological roles, serving as both predators and prey, contributing to the cycling of nutrients, and acting as seed dispersers.

Anyone interested in turtles or the outdoors can participate, including families, children, individuals, and classrooms. Participants in this new Bruce Museum Citizen Science initiative will collect data on all turtle species found throughout the state as they help scientists track turtle distribution and abundance. The project runs from April through November and will continue on an annual basis.

The state of Connecticut is home to twelve native turtle species that inhabit our woodlands, wetlands, and even the waters of Long Island Sound. The primary threats to turtles in the state include habitat loss and traffic-related highway mortality. Worldwide, turtles are negatively affected by threats such as collection for food and pets, disease, and changing climates, as well as habitat loss and fragmentation.

The goals of the Bruce Museum’s Connecticut Turtle Atlas include developing a public understanding of turtle ecology, promoting ways in which people can help turtles, and gathering research-quality data for use in publication and sharing with scientists.

Participants will learn about the wonderful diversity of turtles and their benefits to the ecology. No experience is required, all that is needed is access to a smart phone, camera, or a computer with the iNaturalist.org platform. Using the iNaturalist smartphone app, volunteer scientists can gather information that will be used to map distributions, identify important habitats, locate areas of nesting abundance, and detect roadways with high traffic-related mortality. In addition, the Bruce Museum will provide opportunities to assist with other aspects of turtle research and fieldwork.

Citizen Science harnesses the passion of the public to become amateur researchers, which helps not only with the gathering of important data on a wide scale but also with inspiring a new generation of future scientists. Citizen Science provides fun and interesting projects with real-world implications, breaks down barriers between society and scientist, opens discussion on STEM subjects and current events, shares research outcomes, and acknowledges participants’ important contributions.




Beats Per Life

What is the secret to a long life? The heartbeat of some animals may hold a clue. We are consolidating reports of the heart rate and lifespan of as many vertebrate species as possible. Our goal is to integrate the data from various sources into a single database, where they can be more readily accessible.





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