header green line bottom border
advanced search

project search results



Dolphin & Whale 911 Smartphone App

The Dolphin & Whale 911 app will enhance accurate and timely reporting of stranded marine mammals in the Southeastern U.S.
NOAA Fisheries is faced with numerous challenges to enhance the protection, conservation, and management of marine mammals. One of the main challenges is the lack of public awareness about how to report stranded marine mammals. When the public is unaware of how to contact their local Stranding Network, response can be delayed, compromising the animal’s chance of survival and/or limiting the amount of valuable data collected from dead animals. By providing valuable information on smartphones, including a colorful species identification guide, the public will know who to call and what to do when they find a sick, injured or dead marine mammal, thus contributing to marine mammal conservation.




Cloudy with a Chance of Pain

Cloudy with a Chance of Pain is a national smart phone study that seeks to address the age-old question of whether the weather influences pain symptoms. It is open to people who live in the UK, are aged 17 or over, own a smart phone and have experienced pain for at least the last three months.
The citizen science project invites people from all over the world to analyse our participants data and submit their own hypotheses on whether they can see any correlation between pain and weather.




Mosquito Byte!

A very simple smart phone app (for Android or iPhone) that allows a user to report a mosquito bite. The user is rewarded with a fact about mosquitoes, and the bite report is displayed in (almost) real time on a map of the world. The more people use it, the more we know about when and where there are biting mosquitoes.




WildObs

WildObs (from "wildlife observations") participants capture memorable wildlife encounters and put them to work. Record your encounters for your own studies, or enjoyment. Use these records to develop your own wildlife calendar for the year. Maintain and grow your life-list, learn about new species and connect with nature.

Join the WildObs community via your Android or iPhone and use technology to help you connect with nature.

As a wildlife community, WilObs participants help each other find the nature (for a photograph or close encounter) and we learn about the species in our neighborhoods. WildObs is collaborative wildlife enjoyment. It can help connect each other to wildlife.

Additionally, WildObs is a proud partner of the National Wildlife Federation's Wildlife Watch, and works with a number of other scientific studies to extract citizen science from recorded encounters.




Monitor Change

Monitor Change is a simple and elegant visual citizen science concept developed by USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center scientist, Sam Droege, to monitor environmental and social change using iPhones, photo-stitching, and time lapse. Droege's idea has lots of applications to the type of work that ecologists, foresters, land managers, and environmental citizen groups do and provides an easy (and actually information dense) way of tracking long-term changes using volunteers using the smart phone that many carry in their pocket. The concept is broad and is meant to be applicable to any location you would like to create uniform documentation of change over long or short periods of time without having to install a permanent camera.




iPlover

Quantifying coastal habitat utilization with smartphones! Understanding and managing dynamic coastal landscapes for beach-dependent species requires biological and geological data across the range of relevant environments and habitats. It is difficult to acquire such data; many data collections focus on either the biology or the geology, are collected by non-specialists, and lack observational uniformity. iPlover is an app that addresses these difficulties, and simplifies and facilitates consistent data collection, management, and enables direct data input into research models of habitat utilization. iPlover was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center and the USGS Center for Integrated Data Analytics. It is used by trained and vetted personnel to record information about habitats on coastal beaches and the environment surrounding them. iPlover uses the sensors on the smartphone to simplify and facilitate consistent data collection and data management. iPlover supports a long-established network of partners working to address ongoing impacts on plover populations, such as habitat gain or loss due to storms.




NYU Baby Sleep Study

This study is looking at sleeping and digestion in babies to characterize normal development, so that parents have better (scientifically-informed) advice about how to manage their baby’s sleep and eating. We also hope to discover early signs of developmental disorders that could help other babies in the future. So far, there are over 850 babies enrolled with 1.2 million sleep events, 2.1 million feedings, and 1.3 million diaper changes logged.

Parents, after signing up and consenting to the study on the project website, record their baby's sleeping and eating activity plus other observations through the phone app, Baby Connect. Parents can contribute their baby's data for any length of time, although more data are better; several weeks or two years, it's helpful either way.

The goal is to create an extensive data base to learn about sleep and neurological development. When data come from a very large number of participants, in some cases, scientists can find patterns that would otherwise be undetectable. Every parent's data contribution will be valuable, when combined.




100 For Parkinsons

Can a smartphone unlock new discoveries in Parkinson’s?

You can join a global movement to learn more about your health, support people living with Parkinson’s and help change healthcare.

You’re invited to become a citizen scientist, tracking ten aspects of your health that are important to you for 100 days using the uMotif platform on your smartphone or tablet. Everyone will track their sleep quality, mood, exercise, diet and stress levels. Then it’s up to you to choose another 5 aspects of your health that are most important to you.

In return, you can share your experiences and see how everyone else taking part in the study is benefitting on the 100 For Parkinson’s website. The data you’re donating will contribute to academic research approved by a committee led by the Cure Parkinson’s Trust, helping to unlock new discoveries in Parkinson’s.

This is a world-first people-centred project of this size and scale in healthcare and open to everyone, whether you have Parkinson’s or not.

You can be a part of it!
Simply visit www.100forparkinsons.com, download the uMotif app from the Apple App Store or Google Play, choose “I would like to register” and enter code 100FP.




FeralScan

FeralScan (www.feralscan.org.au) is a community website that allows you to map sightings of pest animals and record the problems they are causing in your local area. FeralScan will have direct benefits to farmers, community groups and individuals managing pest animals and their impacts.

Laptop and iphone FeralScan views
FeralScan is freely available and can be used by farmers, local communities, Landcare groups, local government, pest controllers, schools and individuals anywhere in Australia. Data entered into FeralScan can be used to help coordinate on ground control to address the problems pest animals are causing in your local area and across the country. FeralScan provides lots of useful resources.




American Meteor Society - Meteor observing

Join the American Meteor Society community and contribute valuable and precise data relating to meteor shower and fireball observations. The AMS App allows witnesses of fireball meteors to log details about their observation using the mobile device. Sensors in the phone provide an accurate means to record the location of the observation as well as the azimuth and elevation values for the start and end points of the meteor. Using this data the AMS can accurately triangulate fireball meteors and plot their orbits to determine their celestial origins. The APP also provides a means to log observations from meteor showers. Simply start your observing session and then each time you see a meteor point to that place in the sky and swipe your finger on the screen in the direction the meteor traveled. Observation data is uploaded to the AMS website, available under your profile there and shared with the scientific community. The AMS App also provides a useful meteor shower calendar with star charts and moon conditions for all major and minor showers throughout the year.




Birdeez

Birdeez is the easiest way to identify, collect and share bird sightings. The goal of this project is to educate you about the birds in your area while you contribute sightings that will be used for scientific understanding of bird migration, bird populations and climate change.

Currently Birdeez is available as an iPhone application at www.GetBirdeez.com/ but soon we we will be online and on different phone platforms as well.

Every bird counts, so help us help them by collecting and sharing sightings.




WildlifeBlitzGarneau

This smartphone app will help you explore habitats in your area and easily monitor wildlife populations by logging locations, photos, and responding to form questions all with the ease of your smartphone.




OpenSignalMaps

With your help, OpenSignalMaps is creating a comprehensive database of cell phone towers, cell phone signal strength readings, and Wi-Fi access points around the world. This data is collected via an Android application and uploaded to the project's servers, taking care to use as little processing power and battery life as possible.

You can use the project website to browse the data they've collected, including heat maps that show exactly how strong signal is in any particular area, as well as all the nearby towers for your carrier. And don't worry -- the data is stripped of any identifying information and available on a graphical interface to enable you to make sense of the raw data.




The WildLab

The WildLab engages citizen scientists in bird and other wildlife identification, using mobile phones as tools of scientific discovery. Along with associated curricula and educational activities found on its website, the WildLab is a powerful new way to see the environment.

The WildLab Bird iPhone app includes photographs, audio, and range maps for more than 200 common bird species. The app helps users make correct identifications by leading them through a process of elimination. The application saves each sighting with location and other data, and sightings are logged in the user’s online WildLab account. Files based on a user's sightings can be easily loaded into Cornell Lab of Ornithology's eBird database.

In a pilot program developed with funding from the MacArthur Foundation, more than 500 New York City 5th- through 12th-grade students used iPhones to log thousands of bird sightings from nearby parks and green spaces. Participants in the project increased their knowledge as well as their interest in science careers. All educators involved in the project said they would participate again if it was offered in the future.

The WildLab has also piloted a program with the Cornell Cooperative Extension for horseshoe crab monitoring; this app will be available soon in the app store. Through collaborations with science education institutions around the country, the WildLab continues to develop new apps and will run its in-school bird program this fall.




Project NOAH

Noah is a mobile phone app that allows nature lovers to document local wildlife and add their observations to a growing database for use by ongoing citizen-science projects.

Using the Noah mobile application, users take a photograph of an interesting organism, select the appropriate category, add descriptive tags, and click submit. The application captures the location details along with the submitted information and stores all of it in the species database for use by efforts such as Project Squirrel and the Lost Ladybug Project.

In addition, users can see what kinds of organisms are nearby by searching through a list or exploring a map of their area, all on a mobile phone.

Noah is all about discovering and documenting local wildlife. We work with research groups and organizations to help gather important data and we want you to help by logging recent spottings on your mobile phone. Missions can range from photographing specific frogs or flowers to tracking migrating birds or invasive species or logging the effects of the oil spill.




MoGO

Collect Gulf Oil Spill data using your iPhone. MoGO (Mobile Gulf Observatory) is an app that turns you and your iPhone into a "citizen scientist" helping wildlife experts find and rescue oiled birds, sea turtles, and dolphins.

The MoGO app allows you to take and submit photos of oiled, injured, and dead marine and coastal wildlife; tar balls on beaches; oil slicks on water; and oiled coastal habitats.




Killer Whale Tracker

The Salish Sea Hydrophone Network needs volunteers to help monitor the critical habitat of endangered Pacific Northwest killer whales by detecting orca sounds and measuring ambient noise levels. Volunteers are especially needed to help notify researchers when orcas are in the Salish Sea, which encompasses the waters of Puget Sound and the surrounding area.

Sponsored by a coalition of organizations, including the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Whale Museum, and Beam Reach Marine Science, the network consists of five hydrophones, each hooked up to a computer to analyze the signal and stream it via the internet.

Even though software is used to distinguish animal from other underwater sound, human ears do a better job of detecting unusual sounds. So volunteers monitor the network from their home computers anywhere in the world, and alert the rest of the network when they hear whale sounds. Sometimes boats or onshore monitors are deployed to study the whales in other ways. Researchers hope to learn more about the uses of orca communications and whale migration patterns.




What's Invasive

Use your mobile phone to help us locate invasive plants!

Invasive weeds are a significant threat to native plants and animals. Although most non-natives are not considered "invasive", those that crowd out food sources for wild animals, create erosion, or act as a significant fire hazard can be considered a threat and need to be identified and located for removal. You can help!

Then, using your Android mobile phone, help us locate invasive plants in an expanding number of locations across the US, or you can create your own list of plants that you want help in locating.

Our iPhone app currently works only in the Santa Monica National Recreation Area but is being updated soon.

The plants you identify will be placed on public map and alert park rangers of the spread of these habitat-destroying plants.

You can also participate using any mobile phone with text or picture messaging, email, or our web forms and a digital camera.




Nature's Notebook

Pay attention to the plants and animals in your yard, and you can contribute to scientific discovery! Observing life cycles of plants and animals with Nature's Notebook is easy and fun, and you will discover so much more about the plants and animals you see everyday.

Sign up to observe one or more species in your yard or another place that you frequent. Use the Nature's Notebook smartphone app to send your observations directly to the National Phenology Database, or fill out paper datasheets and submit them online.




AppEAR

This project involves the use of smartphones to evaluate the aquatic habitat quality, including the river banks, riparian zone and the main channel itself. The used is required to answer a short questionnaire based on the site they want to evaluate (rivers, streams, lakes or estuaries), and to take up to four photographs of the site with the smartphone's camera. The data is sent to the scientists throught via web, directly from the phone. The user wins points and awards for their help!




CrowdMag

In CrowdMag project, NOAA explore whether digital magnetometers built in modern mobile smartphones can be used as scientific instruments. With CrowdMag mobile apps, phones all around the world send magnetometer data to NOAA. At NOAA, we check quality of the magnetic data and make data available to the public as aggregate maps and charts. We have two long-term goals: 1) Create near-real-time models of Earth's time changing magnetic field by combining crowdsourced magnetic data with real-time solar wind data. and 2) Map local magnetic noise sources (for e.g. power transformer and iron pipes) to improve accuracy of the magnetic navigation systems.




PressureNet

PressureNet is a network of crowdsourced weather sensors. We automatically collect atmospheric pressure measurements using barometers in new Android devices. We're sharing this live data with scientists and researchers to improve weather forecasting. Soon we'll provide you with a weather forecast based on everyone's live, shared data!

We're going to make new weather models using the data that PressureNet automatically collects - these models should produce forecasts that are significantly more accurate than any other method! Since the data is collected using smartphones, we can gather way more data about the atmosphere than ever before.

Until we make forecasts, PressureNet shows you the raw data. The pressure data is displayed in graphs so that you can see both your own data as well as other regions' graphed over time. We've just added animations as well, so you can watch storms moving across a region. Furthermore, you can now report what the weather is where you are! Current weather conditions automatically refresh every twenty minutes to keep it accurate.

PressureNet has been featured on BBC World Service, Wired Science, and MIT Technology Review.




Dark Sky Meter

The Dark Sky Meter (available for iPhones) allows citizen scientists to contribute to a global map of nighttime light pollution.
Light pollution is a growing problem in urban environments, but now you can help scientists better understand its effects on the environment. The map is also a great help for (amateur) astronomers looking for dark skies.
By utilizing the camera built in to your iPhone, the Dark Sky Meter actually measures ‘skyglow’ and updates the data in real time.

The app also charts weather conditions and cloud cover so you can take readings at optimal times. The app is as easy to use as taking a picture, and is a fun way to learn about your night sky.

The Results are live and visible for everyone on a global light pollution map generated by the app users. Visit darkskymeter.com to see the map. Since this project has no funding or grants the app costs $1 to cover the hosting costs (which is a steal compared to commercially available light pollution meters).




BirdTrack

BirdTrack is a free, online and smartphone-based recording tool for birdwatchers to store and manage their own records from anywhere in the world. Everyone with an interest in birds can get involved by recording when and where they watched birds then completing a list of the species seen and heard during the trip.

Exciting real-time outputs are generated by BirdTrack, including species reporting rate graphs and animated maps of sightings, all freely-available online. The data collected are used by researchers to investigate migration movements and distributions of birds and to support species conservation at local, national and international scales.

BirdTrack is year-round and ongoing, making it an ideal project for getting children enthused about birds and migration. Teachers are encouraged to add their school grounds as a BirdTrack site then help their students to record the birds they see and hear.

The success of BirdTrack relies on YOU. Get started today!




White-throat Song

We’ve been studying changes in the song structure of white-throated sparrows since 2002 and have found several interesting patterns. Now, we’re trying to measure how these patterns change over time and space.

Here's where you come in! Recording sparrows over a broad geographical area is extremely time consuming and expensive. We’re hoping to recruit participants to help us collect recordings of male white-throated sparrows.

Volunteers can be from anywhere within the range of the species, but we are especially interested in recordings from Eastern Ontario eastward to the Atlantic provinces, and across the northern tier of states in the US from Wisconsin to Maine.

We're happy to get recordings from all regions at all times of year (pre-migration, migration, and breeding are all fine).

For more information about our project or how to get involved, please see our website.




Whale mAPP

Whale mAPP is a collection of GIS-based web and mobile tools used by researchers and citizen scientists to contribute observations for scientists studying and mapping human impact on marine mammals.

Record and visualize ocean-based trips.

Track marine mammal sightings.

Choose from a list of species in your region and submit photos of your observations.

Visualize and explore your contributions through Whale mAPP web.

Manage and visualize your collected data.

Explore what other citizen scientists have contributed.
Download your data – for research or for fun!




iNaturalist

iNaturalist.org is a place where you can record what you see in nature, meet other nature lovers, and learn about the natural world. It is also a crowdsourced species identification system and an organism occurrence recording tool. You can use it to record your own observations, get help with identifications, collaborate with others to collect this kind of information for a common purpose, or access the observational data collected by iNaturalist users.

From hikers to hunters, birders to beach-combers, the world is filled with naturalists, and many of us record what we find. What if all those observations could be shared online? You might discover someone who finds beautiful wildflowers at your favorite birding spot, or learn about the birds you see on the way to work. If enough people recorded their observations, it would be like a living record of life on Earth that scientists and land managers could use to monitor changes in biodiversity, and that anyone could use to learn more about nature.

That's the vision behind iNaturalist.org. So if you like recording your findings from the outdoors, or if you just like learning about life, join us!




Einstein@Home

Einstein@Home uses your computer's idle time to search for weak astrophysical signals from spinning neutron stars (also called pulsars) using data from the LIGO gravitational-wave detectors, the Arecibo and Parkes radio telescopes, and the Fermi gamma-ray satellite.

Einstein@Home is a World Year of Physics 2005 and an International Year of Astronomy 2009 project supported by the American Physical Society (APS) and by a number of international organizations.

Einstein@Home volunteers have already discovered more than 70 new neutron stars, and we hope to find many more in the future.

Our long-term goal is to make the first direct detections of gravitational-wave emission from spinning neutron stars. Gravitational waves were predicted by Albert Einstein in 1916, which have been directly detected in September 2015. This observations opened up a new window on the universe, and ushered in a new era in astronomy.




Mourning Warbler Song Mapper

The Mourning Warbler Song Mapper is a citizen science project that will map the songs of males during spring migration.




Play to Cure: Genes in Space

Help researchers cure cancer.

The problem:

We know that faults in our genes can lead to cancer cells forming. This can be linked to the amount of genes in our cells - sometimes we have more and sometimes we have less.

It can take years for scientists to analyze all of their genetic data, but with thousands of citizen scientists playing Genes in Space, the process is greatly accelerated.

How it works:

First, you plot a galactic route. In the context of the game, you're choosing your flight path, but these “space coordinates” are actually a visualization of DNA data, and you're showing our scientists where the genetic variations are which may lead to cancer.

Then you collect Element Alpha, a mist like substance that can be traded for ship upgrades. It actually represents the same DNA data that has just been mapped – which means our scientists have two perspectives on the same sample, from one player.

And we’ve added an asteroid field. This makes the gameplay more engaging and challenging. You need to dodge or shoot a multitude of asteroids to complete a stage.

Each data sample is analyzed multiple times for accuracy. Don’t worry about making mistakes - the more people who use Genes in Space, the more accurate the results will be and the faster data can be translated into new ways to beat cancer.




Poo Power! Global Challenge

The entire planet is poo-luted. Dog waste in our cities is a problem for the environment, particularly our waterways. People are also part of the environment and by not picking up after our dogs, we are potentially polluting ourselves. That’s crazy!

Around the world, different countries have varying success in encouraging dog owners to ‘scoop the poop’ and use a combination of awareness campaigns and fines.

Where are the dogs going in your local area? Are there ‘hotspots’ where dogs like to poo in the same place? Are they near environmentally sensitive areas like rivers and creeks? Maybe these hotspots could be useful as sources of biogas energy using Poo Power!?

Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to map dog poo ‘hotspots’ at your local parks and public spaces. Once uploaded onto the Global Poo Map (allow between 24-48 hours), as a class/group discuss the scientific, social and environmental issues and compile some recommendations into a letter to your local Government representative.

Woof!




Cyber Citizen

Cyber Citizen is a research initiative at Michigan Tech University aimed at creating mobile and web-based tools to facilitate scientists and citizen participation in scientist-led environmental and social research projects.

The project has two apps available:

Lichen AQ - uses lichen to track air pollution which helps federal land managers.

Mushroom Mapper - records and analyzes mushroom habitats.

More apps on the way...

App users either upload their data to a publicly accessible database or directly to the researchers' project website.




Astro Drone

The Astro Drone game is part of a scientific crowdsourcing project. People who possess a Parrot AR drone can play the game, in which they are challenged to perform different space missions in an augmented reality. Contribute to future space exploration by playing the free Astro Drone game!

The app is more than a game. Players can choose to contribute to a scientific crowdsourcing experiment that aims to improve autonomous capabilities of space probes, such as landing, obstacle avoidance, and docking. The app processes the images made by the AR drone's camera, extracting abstract mathematical image features. These features can neither be interpreted by humans, nor can the original image be reconstructed. However, the features can be used by robots to learn how to navigate in their environment. Players can join the experiment by going to the high score table. If they agree, the feature data is sent over the Internet.

The latest release contains two levels. In the first players learn to dock as well as possible to the International Space Station. In the second level players enact the Rosetta mission from ESA, by avoiding space debris and releasing the Philae lander onto a comet's surface. New levels will be added incrementally with new releases.

Astro Drone is a project performed by the Advanced Concepts Team of the European Space Agency.




Precipitation ID Near the Ground (PING)

The National Severe Storms Laboratory needs YOUR help with a research project!

If you live in the area shown on the map, the Precipitation Identification Near the Ground project (PING) wants YOU to watch and report on precipitation type.

PING is looking for young, old, and in-between volunteers to make observations—teachers, classes and families too! We have collected tens of thousands of observations since 2006, already making PING successful because of your help.

PING volunteers can spend a little or a lot of time making observations. The basic idea is simple: the National Severe Storms Laboratory will collect radar data from NEXRAD radars in your area during storm events, and compare that data with YOUR observations.

Why? Because the radars cannot see close to the ground, we need YOU to tell us what is happening. Scientists will compare your report with what the radar has detected, and develop new radar technologies and techniques to determine what kind of precipitation—such as snow, soft hail, hard hail, or rain—is falling where.




PlantTracker

Help tackle invasive plant species!

The Environment Agency, the Nature Locator team at the University of Bristol and the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology have joined forces to help combat the spread of the UK’s most problematic invasive, non-native plant species.

We need your help to find them and record them.




Leafsnap

Leafsnap is a series of electronic field guides developed by researchers from Columbia University, the University of Maryland, and the Smithsonian Institution. The free mobile apps use visual recognition software to help identify tree species from photographs of their leaves, and contain beautiful high-resolution images of leaves, flowers, fruits, petioles, seeds and bark. Leafsnap turns app-users into citizen scientists, automatically sharing images, species identifications, and geo-coded stamps of species locations with a community of scientists who will use the stream of data to map and monitor the ebb and flow of flora. The Leafsnap family of electronic field guides aims to leverage digital applications and mobile devices to build an ever-greater awareness of and appreciation for biodiversity.




New York Horseshoe Crab Monitoring Network

The New York Horseshoe Crab Monitoring Network encourage participants to get involved with the annual horseshoe crab monitoring program on various reference beaches throughout New York’s Marine District. Participants assist with the collection of scientific data that is used to assess the status of horseshoe crabs in NY State, and will help determine the management and conservation of this important species throughout the region.

This data will be used by the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation to assess the status of horseshoe crabs in New York’s Marine District, and to assist with the regional management and conservation of this species through the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission.

If you participate in this educational survey you will be helping to collect data on horseshoe crab spawning abundance, size, sex and tag returns around full and new moon evenings from May to July.

Cornell University Cooperative Extension’s Marine Program is working with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation to develop and organize this project.




OPAL Bugs Count

Do you know what bugs are living near you? Take part in OPAL Bugs Count and discover the incredible variety of invertebrates that make their home around us.

Bugs, or invertebrates, are a vital part of our environment. They can pollinate plants, recycle nutrients, and they provide an important food source for birds and mammals.

Find as many bugs as you can in our timed challenges and keep a special eye out for the six Species Quest bugs.

Your findings will help scientists learn more about the distribution of invertebrates across the country and how the urban environment may be affecting them.




PhillyTreeMap

Help identify and catalog the trees in Philadelphia's urban forest! PhillyTreeMap is an open-source, web-based map database of trees in the greater 13-county 3-state Philadelphia region. The wiki-style database enables non-profits, government, volunteer organizations, and the general public to collaboratively create an accurate and informative inventory of the trees in their communities. The project was funded by a USDA Small Business Innovation Research Grant and is in support of the Philadelphia Parks & Recreation's 30% tree canopy goal and the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's "Plant One Million" campaign. As more trees are added to the database, PhillyTreeMap uses the iTree software from the USDA Forest Service to calculate the environmental impact of the region's urban forest. So get outside and add some trees!




DIYgenomics

Donate your DNA to science! If you have used genetic testing services such as 23andMe or Navigenics, you can offer your genetic data to DIYgenomics for a variety of medical studies.

DIYgenomics is now recruiting participants for its first study, which will examine the effect of a common mutation on vitamin B metabolism.

In a gene called the MTHFR gene, two small mutations prevent vitamin B9 (or folic acid) from being metabolized into its active form (folate). People who lack this form of vitamin B may develop nutritional deficiencies and symptoms associated with diabetes complications, including damage to blood vessels and nerves. Up to 60% of people may have some form of MTHFR mutation.

DIYgenomics aims to:
--Find people with MTHFR mutations by collecting data from volunteers who have used genetic testing services.
--Ask them to try simple interventions, such as taking over-the-counter vitamin B supplements.
--Ask participants to share results from blood tests performed at commercial labs.





footer border shadow line