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URI Watershed Watch

The URI Watershed Watch (URIWW) is a volunteer water quality monitoring program that works with local communities to assess water quality, identify sources of pollution in water and provide information about water leading to more effective management of critical water resources. Led by trained scientists, URI Watershed Watch helps citizen scientists gather detailed, quality assured monitoring data. We focus on long-term monitoring of RI's fresh and salt water resources including lakes, ponds, streams and coastal waters. We provide training, equipment, supplies and analytical services tailored to organizational needs to help communities use information locally.

Boise Watershed Watch

Get a snapshot of the health of the Boise River watershed by monitoring water quality! Citizen groups, schools, families, and individuals are invited to participate in this fun event which takes place at numerous sites along the Boise River and tributaries from Lucky Peak to Star. No experience necessary! A knowledgeable trainer will meet you at your assigned location to assist with monitoring.

Master Watershed Steward

The Master Watershed Steward program trains citizens across the state of Arizona to serve as volunteers in the protection, restoration, monitoring, and conservation of their water and watersheds.

We all live in a watershed, also known as a drainage basin or catchment. Each watershed is defined by an area of land that drains water downhill into a common water body. The health of watersheds is especially impacted as our growing population, and thus our demand for natural resources, increases. Learning to look past political boundaries and view land as divided by natural boundaries helps us better manage resources as a complete, more sustainable system.

As a Master Watershed Steward you can help to improve the health of your watershed. The project's informative, research-based training will give you the knowledge to make better, more informed decisions related to your own land, community and watershed. Master Watershed Stewards are highly trained volunteers working closely with the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension and the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality. Stewards may come from a variety of backgrounds, but all have a passion for our environment! To become certified, Master Watershed Stewards participate in over 40 hours of course and field work to learn the basics of watershed science.

You work with community organizations including watershed partnerships and various state agencies to implement projects throughout Arizona to monitor, maintain and restore the health of our watersheds. Ongoing volunteer projects include: photopoint monitoring in the Tonto National Forest and Saguaro National Park, riparian assessments along urban and preserved corridors, outreach at Arizona Project WET Water Festivals, free private well testing and collaboration with NEMO to develop Watershed Based Plans.

The Master Watershed Steward Program is a partnership of the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension and the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality. Funding provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Clean Water Act and the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality's Water Quality Division.

River Source Watershed Monitoring

Watershed Watch increases the understanding of New Mexico's water quality, river ecology and fisheries health through hands-on science in a real-world context. Students gather data on biological, chemical and physical indicators and make presentations to local data users including acequias (irrigation canals), school boards, federal agencies and watershed groups. Students become engaged in environmental studies of issues beyond the classroom to that address critical water issues in local regions.

Shermans Creek Watershed Monitoring Program

The Shermans Creek Watershed Monitoring Program calls on citizen scientists to conduct water quality sampling and to measure biological factors that indicate the health of the Pennsylvania creek and its response to pollution.

Volunteers measure nitrate, temperature, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, pH, and turbidity, and conduct regular bacteria monitoring and macroinvertebrate sampling at sites throughout the watershed. The data will be used to provide public education, target areas for restoration and protection projects, and help the county and municipalities with land development plans that protect Shermans Creek.

Great Swamp Watershed Association World Water Monitoring Day

This is a local, month-long extension of World Water Monitoring Day, during which volunteers in New Jersey's Morris and Somerset Counties will collect basic water quality data from the streams and lakes in the Great Swamp Watershed. The project runs from September 18, the official date of the international water monitoring day, through October 18. The organizers plan to repeat it in the same time frame every year.

World Water Monitoring Day (WWMD) is a worldwide education and outreach program that builds public awareness and involvement in protecting water resources by engaging citizens to conduct basic monitoring of their local water bodies.

Tookany Creek Streamkeepers

TTF Streamkeepers are volunteers who monitor a creek near them each month to collect data about changes in water quality, erosion, and creekside vegetation. This citizen science effort is funded by the William Penn Foundation‘s Delaware River Watershed Initiative, which supports organizations implementing stream restoration and green infrastructure projects, and informs municipal stormwater permits and public investments, using monitoring data gathered through aligned, science-based efforts.
The Academy of Natural Sciences and Stroud Water Research Center lead this watershed effort and guide us as we train and mobilize citizen scientists.

Part of an initiative across the Delaware!

Georgia Adopt-a-Stream

Georgia's Environmental Protection Division has 4 programs engaging citizens in watershed work and education: Rivers Alive, Adopt-A-Stream, Project WET and River of Words. The Adopt-A-Stream program organizes and provides resources to trainers, volunteer citizen scientists and state organizations helping them perform water quality monitoring around the state.

Madison Stream Team

Since 2010, the Madison Stream Team has been collecting water quality data in the Madison Watershed to gain a better understanding of resource conditions, and to help direct future management decisions. To prepare for data collection, Stream Team members go through a one day technical training in early summer. Then, each member dedicates one day in July, August, and September to conduct monitoring on one of their assigned streams.

In all, the Madison Stream Team is responsible for collecting data on 7 streams in the Madison Watershed. This data is then used to inform the Madison Conservation District, and other local organizations, about the condition of the streams in the Madison. This helps these organizations to determine areas that may have room for improvement, and can help identify potential project sites for the future.

The Secchi Dip-In

The Secchi Dip-In is a program of the North American Lake Management Society (NALMS). The purpose of the society is to foster the management and protection of lakes and reservoirs for today and tomorrow.

The Secchi Dip-In was created to enable volunteers to submit water clarity measurements to an online database and see how their data compare on a variety of scales- regional to international. The program has also been utilized for volunteers to begin monitoring efforts and to increase monitoring efforts within their communities.

The Dip-In is an ongoing experiment in using trained volunteers to gather data every year. Secchi Dip-In participants include trained monitoring volunteers and individuals who are interested in citizen science or enthusiastic about lakes. We encourage anyone interested in the health of their lake or watershed to get involved with the Secchi Dip-In.

Colorado River Watch Network

The Colorado River Watch Network supports volunteers who monitor the water quality at strategically located sites across the Colorado River watershed from West Texas to the coast. The network serves as an early warning system that alerts the Lower Colorado River Authority to potential water quality threats.

The network's mission is to encourage and support community-based environmental stewardship by providing citizens, teachers, and students with the information, resources, and training necessary to monitor and protect the waterways of the lower Colorado River watershed.

Volunteer monitors submit data for approximately 120 sites each year, with an average annual total of roughly 1,000 monitoring events reported.

GSWA Stream Team

GSWA's Stream Team monitors the five streams in the Great Swamp watershed, a 55-square-mile region in New Jersey's Morris and Somerset Counties.

Monitoring includes both chemical and visual assessments. The primary goal of the chemical monitoring program is to measure the volume of water, nutrients, and sediments flowing into the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. The main purpose of the visual assessment program is to help gather data for the Watershed Association and the State on water bodies that are not currently being assessed by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. All of this data helps to generate a picture of the overall health of our streams and identify areas where where water quality improvements could be made.

The streams within the watershed are the Upper Passaic River, Black Brook, Great Brook, Loantaka Brook, and Primrose Brook, all of which flow into Great Swamp and exit as the Passaic River via Millington Gorge.

Changing Currents

EcoSpark's Changing Currents program introduces grade 8-12 students from across the Greater Toronto Area (Toronto, Peel, Durham, and York school boards) to their area's watersheds. Students get outside, put on hip waders, explore a local river stream, and learn about its importance and quality.

By participating in the program students will:

Use benthic macro-invertebrate bio-monitoring to examine the health of their local river or stream (it's easy!),
Contribute to a GTA-wide study of watersheds, and
Have the chance to take action around what they discover


Participants will engage in community-based water quality reporting, data sharing, and analysis. Get involved in water quality issues in Toronto, Canada.

"Juturna" is a web-based geographic information system that supports the collection, analysis, data sharing and reporting of community collected water quality data. It is currently implemented to support EcoSpark's "Changing Currents" program that links water quality monitoring to environmental and science curriculum in schools. This project addresses requirements of data sharing and monitoring specified in Annex 4 of the Canada-Ontario Agreement. It provides a collaborative mechanism among researchers at York University, the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority and the civil society organization EcoSpark (formerly Citizens Environment Watch) to monitor environmental conditions of local watersheds.

Contra Costa Volunteer Creek Monitoring

Volunteers wade through creeks in Contra Costa County (California), using the latest technology and scientific protocols to collect baseline data on our local watersheds. Our two primary programs are Bioassessment sampling and GPS Creek Surveys.

Bioassessment - Using aquatic insects as indicators of water quality, volunteers learn more about the health of their neighborhood creeks and identify potential problem areas. While water samples yield a detailed identification of the water at the time of sampling, the density and diversity of bugs in our creeks yield a watershed-level perspective of water quality and habitat viability over time.

GPS Creek Surveys - Using Global Positioning System (GPS) technology, volunteers map the physical attributes of the stream channel (substrate, canopy cover, bank characteristics, etc.), extent and type of native and invasive vegetation, and human influences (outfalls, dams, etc.).

Joining a data collection event is a fun way to explore parts of your urban environment most people never see, but they are more than just fun ... they’re science!


Help bring the Georgia Adopt-A-Stream program to the South Carolina Midlands and keep our waterways clean by volunteering to be community coordinator. Volunteers will be trained to collect chemical, biological, and bacterial data that will create a baseline for our streams' health and serve as an indicator for pollution hotspots. Participate as a individual, or lead a class or community group!

Earth Force’s Keep It Clean – Neighborhood Environmental Trios (KIC-NET)

KIC-NET (Keep It Clean – Neighborhood Environmental Trios) engages youth in improving urban waterways. Through partnerships with government agencies, businesses, schools, and local parks, students explore stormwater runoff in their neighborhoods and take action to improve stormwater management.
Students participating in KIC-NET use science, technology, engineering, and math skills to solve real-world environmental challenges.

Using monitoring tools and processes, students test local water quality to gather data. They are testing factors like dissolved oxygen, pH and phosphate levels, temperature, and turbidity. They then work with city engineers and STEM professionals to learn what their data indicates, how stormwater management works, and how human activity contributes to runoff.

From this investigation, students assess the most pressing environmental issue affecting their community’s resiliency, research that issue, and engineer and execute a sustainable plan.

Volunteer Monthly Monitoring

At 6 am on the third Tuesday of the month, volunteers meet their partners at their assigned sampling locations along the Charles River. Volunteers collect a water sample in the sterile bottle provided and measure the water temperature and depth. Volunteers then deliver their sample and data sheet to the assigned drop-off location and collect materials for the next month's sampling event.

Check out the list and map of our sampling sites: http://www.crwa.org/field-science/monthly-monitoring/sampling-sites

Georgia Adopt-A-Stream

Georgia Adopt-A-Stream needs citizens to monitor and improve the state's streams, wetlands, lakes, and estuaries.

The project goals are to increase public awareness of Georgia's water pollution and water quality issues, provide citizens with the tools and training to evaluate and protect their local waterways, encourage partnerships between citizens and their local government, and collect baseline water quality data.

Georgia Adopt-A-Stream has teamed up with government and non-government groups to provide access to technical information and assistance for citizens interested in preserving and restoring the banks and vegetation along their waterways. This network will help local governments, educate citizens about the importance of protecting riparian corridors, and provide landowners with the information they need to reduce erosion, improve water quality, and provide wildlife habitat with native plantings.

World Water Monitoring Challenge

World Water Monitoring Challenge is an international program that encourages citizen volunteers to monitor their local water bodies. An easy-to-use test kit enables everyone from children to adults to sample local water bodies for basic water quality parameters: temperature, acidity (pH), clarity (turbidity), and dissolved oxygen.

The results of current and past studies are shared with participating communities around the globe through the organization's online Data & Reports page.

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