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Insects & Pollinators


Mosquito Byte!

A very simple smart phone app (for Android or iPhone) that allows a user to report a mosquito bite. The user is rewarded with a fact about mosquitoes, and the bite report is displayed in (almost) real time on a map of the world. The more people use it, the more we know about when and where there are biting mosquitoes.




National Moth Week 2016

National Moth Week (NMW) shines a much-needed spotlight on moths and their ecological importance, as well as their incredible biodiversity. While moths often have taken a back seat to their more admired Lepidoptera kin – butterflies – there is growing interest in their role as pollinators and as a food source for other animals. Scientists also look for the impact of climate change on their numbers and distribution.
During National Moth Week moth-ers will be looking for moth species at hundreds of private and public mothing events.
Anyone can register event or find one to attend in their area by checking nationalmothweek.org for public events. Registration is free to individuals, groups and organizations. Last year, more than 400 events were registered in the U.S. and nearly 40 other countries.
Studying moths can be as easy as turning on a porch light and waiting for them to come, or shining a light on a white sheet in a backyard or park. Ambitious moth-ers also coat tree trunks with a sticky, sweet mixture of fruit and stale beer. Searching for caterpillars and day-flying moths is a good activity for daytime. The NMW website offers tips on attracting moths.
This year’s spotlighted moths, commonly known as underwings, comprise the genus Catocala, which is part of the large Erebidae family. There are more than 250 known species of Catocala, with about half found in North America, while the rest are in Europe, Asia and the tropics. Their dull-colored forewings, serve as camouflage while at rest. However, when they spread their wings, they reveal strikingly colorful hindwings with orange, red, white or blue markings.




Invasive Mosquito Project

The Invasive Mosquito Project (IMP) is a public education and national mosquito monitoring program at the USDA that partners local professionals with high school teachers and community educators (summer camps, naturalists, gardeners, scouts, etc.) to teach about mosquito-borne disease and public health, provide teachers with educational materials that meet Next Generation Science Standards, and create community outreach opportunities that benefit mosquito control/public health agencies. The IMP website (www.citizenscience.us) provides connections, resources, and information. Partnered citizen science is different than the typical crowd sourced citizen science because the expertise, experience, and enthusiasm of a professional or expert in the field supports the educator. The yearly mosquito species collection data will be used to generate mosquito species distribution maps for each year and cumulative distributions for each species.




Backyard Bark Beetles

Backyard Bark Beetles is a citizen science initiative, aimed at producing and maintaining a large-scale, long-term bark beetle monitoring program. With this, we can learn where populations have become established and track newly invasive species, all while engaging the public in real-world scientific research. Help us understand what kinds of bark beetles are in YOUR backyard!




The Great Sunflower Project

The Great Sunflower Project has three programs. The Safe Gardens for Pollinators program which uses data collected on Lemon Queen sunflowers to examine the effects of pesticides on pollinators. The Pollinator Friendly Plants program which is designed to identify the key plants to support healthy pollinator communities. And, the Great Pollinator Habitat Challenge which allows citizen scientists to evaluate and improve gardens, parks and other green spaces for pollinators.

Some bee populations have experienced severe declines that may affect food production. However, nobody has ever measured how much pollination is happening over a region, much less a continent, so there is little information about how a decline in the bee population can influence gardens.

The Great Sunflower Project makes it easy to gather this information. Find a plant you know (or a Lemon Queen Sunflower), observe it for 5 or more minutes and record all pollinators that visit, and contribute data online. You can make as many observations as you want while your flowers are in bloom. Plant, Watch, Enter. Repeat. That's it. And, who doesn't like sunflowers?!




OdonataCentral

OdonataCentral is a website designed to make available what we know about the distribution, biogeography, biodiversity, and identification of Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) worldwide. The photographic records submitted by amateur natural historians and citizen scientists help generate a large database of distributional records. OdonataCentral makes its database available to researchers to dynamically generate maps, checklists, and accompanying data.




Lepidoptera of North America Network (LepNet)

The Lepidoptera of North America Thematic Collections Network (LepNet TCN) will serves as a hub for integrating millions of occurrence records for Lepidoptera. The project is funded by the NSF-ADBC program ($3.2 million, 2016-2020) and includes 27 core museums distributed across the United States. We will accomplish the following goals:
- Digitize 1.7 million adult specimens and 58,524 larval vial records while integrating >1 million existing lepidopteran records, for a total of at least 2.7 million occurrence records.
- Produce high-resolution species exemplar images of 81,000 adult museum specimens representing at least 60% of the 14,300+ North American Lepidoptera species to enhance remote identifications and promote systematic and ecological research.
- Implement computer identification workflow (LepSnap) to exponentially increase capacity for identification of museum specimens and consequently promote imaging additional specimens.
- Develop smartphone applications via LepSnap for student researchers and volunteers to image cataloged specimens and add >160,000 images beyond the high-resolution species exemplars.
- Catalyse novel, data- and hypothesis-driven research advancing our understanding of the wide-ranging factors that influence the evolution and ecology of Lepidoptera and plant-herbivore interactions; within and across taxonomic and functional groups and spatial scales.
- Disseminate rich education-outreach content to students and the public through LepXPLOR.




Caterpillars Count!

Caterpillars Count! is a project that relies on citizen scientists (you!) to help understand some of the most important organisms in our ecosystems—caterpillars and other insects—by conducting surveys of the plants and trees around them. These insects are an important food source for birds and other wildlife, and they have economic and environmental impacts on our forests and crops. You can help us understand how the abundance of these bugs varies from rural countrysides to major urban areas, and from coast to coast.

Your observations can also help us track how the abundance of caterpillars and other insects varies over the seasons. The seasonal timing of caterpillar availability is especially important for birds which try to time their spring migration so that there will be lots of insect food around (caterpillars are an especially tasty treat!) to successfully raise their young.

Finally, you can visually explore the data collected by yourself or others to reveal patterns that scientists haven't even yet discovered!




Urban Buzz

At any given moment we’ve got animals living under our feet – some of them for 17 years at a time. An underground universe populated by mysterious creatures, digging… feeding… emerging.

Sometimes their underground homes get paved over, or flooded, or have a bucket of bright green toxic sludge poured on them. Scientists want to learn more about what happens to cicadas when they’re down there for so long – so they need your help. Go out with your students, parents, kids, grandparents, friends, dogs, friend’s dogs and collect some dead bugs and send them to us! (Yes, you heard that right.)

Cicadas are sensitive to changes in their environment, especially temperature and the availability of trees.

As more people populate the planet… we build cities and homes and those come with roads and sidewalks and pollution. Have you ever noticed that the sidewalk is hotter than the grass? The cicadas noticed that, too. These rising temperatures are sometimes called an “urban heat island” – which sounds like a lovely place to visit, right?

Researchers are studying how cicadas are responding to environmental changes associated with urbanization (humans building more buildings and paving more land) by measuring the wonkiness (“abnormalities and asymmetry”) in cicada wings and legs.




Phenology Monitoring at Tremont Institute

Phenology is the study of the timing of natural events – in particular, life cycle events such as leaf out, migration, flowering, or mating. Since many of these events are tied to temperature, phenology can be a powerful way to study the effects of climate change. While we expect to observe changes in the phenology of the trees, wildflowers and birds over time, we are specifically interested to see how these changes affect species interactions. We have 8 phenology plots that are visited weekly by citizen scientists. Volunteers and participants become deeply connected to these small plots of land and become conservation advocates, invested in the future of the project.




AnimalsandEarth

Explore, share, and contribute photos of animals around the world. Animals and Earth is a resource for photos of all species, their behavior, habitats, and conservation efforts.

There are several ways you can participate.

Option A: Find photos or issues you care about by browsing our photo collection of animals and earth photos. Gather a photo collection, create a blog, and start your own conservation effort using our content

Option B: Grab your camera and help document the flora and fauna of your place on earth.

Option C: Help identify animals and places on our site by adding photo locations and Latin names for animals photos that are not identified yet. Post photos to websites, blogs and social networks promotes awareness and conservation.




Wildlife Sightings - Citizen Science

Wildlife Sightings is a free service that enables projects leaders to publish, organize, and manage their own wildlife sightings data.

Wildlife Sightings helps eliminate the technical barriers and costs to non-profit organizations and educators wishing to conduct their own wildlife surveys. That way, nature lovers, conservation groups, eco-tourism business, and educators can focus their energy on what they love most -- citizen science!

Educators and non profit groups can create and manage their own citizen science class activity or projects with easy to use free online tools. Create a citizen science project in minutes and avoid costly development costs.

Documenting wildlife sightings contributes to science, engages community participants/students and strengthens environmental community efforts.




Journey North

Journey North invites you to join in a global study of wildlife migration and seasonal change. Share your local observations with people across North America. Track the coming of spring through the migrations of monarch butterflies, robins and hummingbirds, the budding of plants, changing day length and other natural events. Predict when plants will emerge and bloom with Journey North Tulip Test Gardens. Track changes in day length to find ten Mystery Classes hidden around the globe. Explore weekly news updates, migration maps, photos, video clips, live cams, lessons, and other resources. Journey North exemplifies best-practice instruction and is one of the nation's premiere citizen science projects.




Pollinators.info Bumble Bee Photo Group

Bumble bees are important pollinators, and science needs YOUR help to conserve them. You can contribute to our knowledge of bumble bees and their lives all over the world. Your contribution will tell us about which bumble bees live where, the flowers they visit, and when they're active during the year.

The photo group is administered by Athena Rayne Anderson, a doctoral candidate in Ecology at the University of Georgia, and author of the website.




Citizen Sort

Video games have the potential to do more than entertain. Citizen Sort is taking advantage of this potential by designing video games that make doing science fun.

Citizen Sort is a research project at the School of Information Studies at Syracuse University in New York. Students from Syracuse University drew, colored, programmed and coded three unique citizen science games. They are Forgotten Island, Happy Match, and Living Links.

Happy Match is a twist on the classic matching game. Players will classify photos of animal, plant and insect species that scientists took live in the field. Each round of the game has a different question and players will drag the animal, plant or insect photo into one of the photo answers along the bottom. Scientists wrote the questions in Happy Match based on information they want to know. By classifying the photos, you'll these help scientists as they study the natural world.

Forgotten Island is a point and click adventure game. Players take on the role of a lost adventurer with a secret past. As the player explores the island they meet a suspicious robot spouting orders to re-classify the falling photographs of plant, animal or insect species. The player will also solve puzzles and explore diverse locations from icy peaks to fiery volcanoes.The more classifications a player does, the more money they earn buy items and solve the mystery of Forgotten Island.

Living Links is a fast-paced image classification game between deep learning-based AI and human.

Citizen Sort was partially supported by the US National Science Foundation under grant SOCS 09-68470.




Independent Generation of Research

IGoR facilitates scientific research by amateur scientists and science enthusiasts. Anyone (not just professional scientists) can propose their own research questions on the IGoR site. Then, other interested people can share ideas, skills, or time to address the question. In addition, a growing number of professional scientists have agreed to help answer users' questions about the users' research projects.

Some people may have science questions that they cannot answer on their own. Other people may have technical skills (e.g. electronics or microscopy, gardening or photography, and many others) that would be useful for addressing those questions. Still others may have the scientific training to design a sound study.

By working together and pooling skills and ideas, people of any experience level could carry out original, independent research. For example, do you want to decipher what scallops see with their bright-blue eyes? Do you wonder how mushrooms take shape? Or are you curious about how the plants in your garden behave? What do you want to discover?




Smithsonian Transcription Center

The Smithsonian Transcription Center engages the public in making our priceless collections more accessible. We work hand-in-hand with Digital Volunteers to transcribe historic documents and collection records to facilitate research and excite learning in audiences everywhere. Participants have the chance to transcribe a diverse array of collection materials drawn from Smithsonian holdings in science, history, art, and culture.




Biodiversity of Alabama

This project serves to record observations of all organisms found in Alabama, one of the most biologically diverse states in the United States. This diversity is a product of Alabama's warm, moist climate, its great geologic diversity, and its rich evolutionary past. With more than 4,533 documented species, Alabama ranks fifth among states in terms of overall species diversity, and is first among states east of the Mississippi River. The large western states of California, Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico lead the nation, and fellow southeastern states Georgia (sixth) and Florida (seventh) trail Alabama. Alabama harbors 64 types of terrestrial ecosystems, including 25 forests and woodlands, 11 wetlands, and 7 glades and prairies. The state also supports 77,000 miles of rivers and streams and several dozen marine ecosystems.




The Biodiversity Group

We are currently seeking research assistants to join our field team in Ecuador studying the conservation ecology of reptiles and amphibians.

While Ecuador is a relatively small country—it’s roughly the size of Arizona—it stands as the third most diverse country in the world for amphibians (510 species) and is seventh for reptiles (430 species), making it a herpetologically mega-diverse region. Due to the severe deforestation taking place in addition to many other pressures on Ecuador’s fauna, TBG research program aims to study, document, and preserve these rich and unique communities of reptiles and amphibians found within the country’s diverse array of ecosystems.

As we are now in our 8th year working in Ecuador, we have study sites encompassing both the coastal forests in western Ecuador and the Amazon rainforest on the eastern side of the Andes Mountains. The work that research participants will be involved with will primarily consist of conducting night surveys for reptiles and amphibians (however other taxa such as invertebrates are also of interest), animal data collection, and lab work. Lab work consists of more detailed information such as scale counts (for reptiles) and other morphological information, animal measurements, screening for chytrid disease (amphibians), preservation (only when necessary), and acquisition of DNA samples. Diagnostic photographs of all animals will be taken. Other tasks include animal handling and general note taking and data organization

Volunteer participants will gain valuable research experience, contribute towards our mission in conservation ecology, and will have an unforgettable experience that provides the opportunity to study the most biologically diverse region of reptiles and amphibians in the world. For 2013 we now have expeditions scheduled in Western Ecuador for February 2-13 and FeBruary 16-27 and in Amazonian Ecuador for June 2-13.




Spot A Ladybug

Did you ever wonder how ladybugs got their spots?

I am working with a extremely interesting type of ladybug called the Harlequin ladybug, or Harmonia axyridis. This ladybug can vary in the way they look with respect to both color (they can be red, orange, yellow, and black) and spot number (they can have anywhere from zero spots to twenty-two spots).

This projects uses citizens to understand what these ladybugs look like across continents! Knowing how the Harlequin ladybug's look varies will help determine, genetically, how so much variation exists.




Where is the Elaphrus Beetle?

Dan Duran, assistant professor in Drexel University’s Department of Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science, has just embarked on a search for the marsh ground beetle, which also goes by the Latin name for its genus, Elaphrus.

It is found along muddy stream banks in temperate regions like ours. It's an effective "indicator species" because it's adversely affected by run-off, like road salts and agricultural chemicals--that make it into a stream without being visible.




School of Ants

School of Ants Australia aims to document the diversity, distribution and diet preferences of Australia?s dominant ground foraging ants; those ubiquitous little black ants that infiltrate homes, backyards, parks and schools.

Uncover a world of ants at your own feet, in your backyard, school or park. By becoming a citizen scientist you can help us locate damaging invasive species, compare and contrast species of common little black ants across the country, and add important records to our understanding of ant biodiversity. Records like this are crucial in our understanding of how the ranges of organisms change with our changing climate and landscapes.

Ants are ubiquitous in Australia. They occupy every habitat and landscape across all States and Territories (excluding Antarctica). Their sensitivity to disturbances of many sorts means they can be used as bioindicators of landscape health, reforestation and mine site recovery. They are important predators, pest controllers and soil engineers, but can also become pests themselves.

Ants also move around with humans all the time, so finding out what ants are where can help us pinpoint problem ants before they cause problems for humans, our environment or agriculture in Australia. The Red Imported Fire Ant, the Yellow Crazy Ant, Electric Ant and the Argentine Ant are examples of introduced ants that have become problematic.




Queen Quest

Queen Quest is a bumble bee queen phenology project. It is a joint effort between UNL’s Bumble Boosters team, University of Minnesota’s Bee Squad, and citizen scientists to track first instances of bumble bee queen sightings in the spring. Little is known about the long-term and cyclical effects of climate on bumble bee populations. A key project objective is to determine the relationship and long-term impacts of climate on bumble bees.

The scientific objectives of the Queen Quest program are to:
1) Determine the phenology of spring bumble bee queen emergence.
2) Determine which flowers bumble bee queens visit in the early spring.
3) Determine long-term climate impacts on bumble bee populations and distribution in North America.




Butterflies of Kyrgyzstan

Kyrgyzstan’s Butterflies at Your Fingertips!

Central Asia is internationally known as a biodiversity hotspot, and perhaps no other country here symbolises that more than Kyrgyzstan. This application has been designed to introduce you to the world of butterflies while encouraging you to submit new information through citizen science. Every identification you make gives local scientists in Kyrgyzstan more data that helps them make informed decisions about conservation measures.

Features:

▪ Photographs of more than 60 species of butterflies. This number continues to climb as users submit new information!

▪ A section on the natural history of each species will give you information on when and where you might find them, as well as a better understanding of their life cycle.

▪ The “My Collections” feature allows you to build a virtual collection of the butterflies you have seen.

▪ The “Citizen Science” feature lets you help scientists determine if identifications by other users are accurate.

▪ An included map gives accurate location data for each species and is searchable by species and date.

▪ Frequent app updates add user submitted content like new images, map locations, and new species.




Biological Records Centre

The BRC helps the recording community to publish atlases, data and other online resources to provide essential information which informs research, policy and the conservation of our heritage of wildlife.




Biodiversity PEEK

The Biodiversity PEEK (Photography Engaging and Educating Kids) program is a citizen science program designed to actively engage local, disadvantaged, public school children with their local overlooked habitats and wildlife through site-adaptable, hands-on, outdoor exploration, digital photography, and the contribution of real scientific data on an online database. Biodiversity PEEK is inquiry-based and project based learning designed to meet national science standards.




Seeking All Southern California Stinkbugs!

Help create a portrait of California stinkbug diversity and distribution by submitting your observations. Get help using a field guide to some of the stink bug taxa found in Southern California available at http://www.inaturalist.org/guides/887. Smartphone users can use iNaturalist apps, or use the Riverside NatureSpotter app (available free online for iPhone and Android devices); or upload data and image files directly to the project site. Hosted by the City of Riverside's Metropolitan Museum, verification of observations will be carried out by Museum staff, UC-Riverside Entomology personnel, plus other entomologists and iNaturalist users.

Most stink bugs are large, easy to photograph, and their egg masses are conspicuous. As observations accumulate, iNaturalist creates a checklist of observed species for the project. These observations may also provide early detection of the spread of introduced pest species, such as the Brown Marmorated Stinkbug (Halyomorpha halys).




Monarch SOS

Monarch SOS is a field guide created by Naturedigger, LLC in cooperation with the Monarch Joint Venture. It is the first monarch app developed by scientists which covers monarch identification in all life cycle stages, confusing look-alikes and numerous milkweed species (monarch's larval host plants), frequently encountered in North America.

The public can now use the app to participate in data collection for monarch research projects, like the Southwest Monarch Study and the Monarch Larva Monitoring Project, and do their part to conserve this iconic species.

Veterans of monarch research and conservation have contributed their expertise to Monarch SOS to make it a useful tool for monarch conservation. With guidance from the MJV and their citizen science partners, Monarch SOS is a valuable tool for collecting accurate data, which will increase the understanding of monarch butterflies with the help of citizen scientists.




DigiVol

DigiVol is an online citizen science project which allows people all over the world to participate in unlocking biodiversity data from a wide range of historic and contemporary museum, herbaria and research collections. Different types of data resources include: museum and herbarium collection labels; the field notebooks of explorers, ecologists and surveyors; hard copy field data sheets; camera trap images; and more. Many people find the digitisation process to be fun, interesting and educational. Have a go and join an expedition today!

Data transcribed in DigiVol has many uses, including:
* understanding the relationships between species (important in determining potential agricultural pests or potential medical applications);
* the distribution of species (for understanding how best to conserve individual species or ecosystems);
* identification of species from morphological or genetic characters (for example being able to identify birds involved in aircraft incidents).

By helping us capture this information into digital form you are helping scientists and planners better understand, utilise, manage and conserve our precious biodiversity.

This data, once captured, becomes available through a broad range of mechanisms that make it accessible to the scientific and broader communities. These mechanisms include websites such as :
* Individual institutions collections and associated databases
* The Atlas of Living Australia
* The Global Biodiversity Information Facility




Orchid Observers

During 2015 citizen scientists photographed and identified flowering wild orchids in the UK. Now we need your help to extract flowering date information from over 10,000 images of orchid specimens in the Natural History Museum's collections. Collected over three centuries, they can tell us about flowering times in the past. Together, these datasets will enable Natural History Museum researchers to examine the impact climate change may be having on the flowering time of the UK’s orchids.

Extracting data from so many specimens is a huge task, so we need your help. Get involved at www.orchidobservers.org

Background:
Fifty-six native species of orchid grow wild in the UK, flowering from April to September.

Recent research indicated that climate change is affecting the flowering time of the early spider orchid, Ophrys sphegodes. We want to find out if this is true for other wild orchids and whether all species are responding in the same way, starting with 29 species.




iNaturalist

iNaturalist.org is a place where you can record what you see in nature, meet other nature lovers, and learn about the natural world. It is also a crowdsourced species identification system and an organism occurrence recording tool. You can use it to record your own observations, get help with identifications, collaborate with others to collect this kind of information for a common purpose, or access the observational data collected by iNaturalist users.

From hikers to hunters, birders to beach-combers, the world is filled with naturalists, and many of us record what we find. What if all those observations could be shared online? You might discover someone who finds beautiful wildflowers at your favorite birding spot, or learn about the birds you see on the way to work. If enough people recorded their observations, it would be like a living record of life on Earth that scientists and land managers could use to monitor changes in biodiversity, and that anyone could use to learn more about nature.

That's the vision behind iNaturalist.org. So if you like recording your findings from the outdoors, or if you just like learning about life, join us!




National Moth Week 2015

National Moth Week celebrates the beauty, life cycles, and habitats of moths. “Moth-ers” of all ages and abilities are encouraged to learn about, observe, and document moths in their backyards, parks, and Jacob3neighborhoods. National Moth Week is being held, worldwide, during the last full week of July. National Moth Week offers everyone, everywhere a unique opportunity to become a Citizen Scientist and contribute scientific data about moths. Through partnerships with major online biological data depositories, National Moth Week participants can help map moth distribution and provide needed information on other life history aspects around the globe.
This year, National Moth Week will spotlight the Sphingidae family of moths found throughout the world commonly called hawk moths, sphinx moths and hornworms.




What Do Birds Eat?

We (Douglas Tallamy's lab in the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware) are collecting photo contributions to an ongoing research project about avian diets-- in a nutshell, we are trying to figure out "what birds eat"!

If you have any photos of birds holding insects or other arthropods (spiders, etc.) in their bills, please consider submitting them on our site. Thanks to everyone who has already contributed!




Bugs In Our Backyard

Bugs In Our Backyard is an educational outreach and collaborative research program, providing project-based learning opportunities for K-12 students-- or anyone! The core activity for Bugs In Our Backyard takes advantage of the bugs in your own backyard, schoolyard or neighborhood. Students become citizen-scientists by surveying this diversity of insects and plants. How much insect diversity can you find? How does insect diversity vary over time? How does insect diversity vary across geographic and urban scales? These are some of the questions that can be asked. The survey targets are “true bugs” (what entomologists call Heteroptera) in the eastern US, but activities are designed to be open-ended. Everyone is welcome to get involved. Let’s expand what we know about about insect diversity across rural and urban landscapes!

BioB is part of an NSF-funded research program at Colby College, which will also provide students with insight into the practice of science. Our goal is to engage students with biology by making them citizen scientists. Get involved in ecological surveys of local bugs and their host plants! Produce data to contribute to a growing community database. Connect to the biological diversity in your own backyard!

A series of modular activities on different life science topics, such as biodiversity, growth and development, invasive species, genetics, insects, evolution, urban ecology and statistical analysis, are also being produced. These modules can be scaled to the needs of different classes and grade-levels or used over multiple grade-levels. For older students, survey data are available to be used in hypothesis-testing or exploratory analyses. Teachers are encouraged to modify the activities to their own needs and share success stories.




Truckee River Guide

Truckee River Guide is an interactive field guide to the plants and wildlife of the Truckee River, and a community wildlife mapping project.

Did you know that there is no complete species list for the Truckee River region of California and Nevada? The Truckee River is an important resource for the people that live in our community, and also an important resource for wildlife. With an ongoing drought and a changing climate, it is important to keep records of the species that live in our region, so that we can recognize and monitor change as it happens. You can help, by taking photos and submitting observations of plants and wildlife to Truckee River Guide.

The Truckee River Guide website is a free community resource intended to provide information to the public about the species that live in the Truckee River region of California and Nevada.




NOVA Evolution Lab

In NOVA’s Evolution Lab (pbs.org/nova/labs), phylogenetics—the study of the evolutionary relationships between species—is explored in depth as players evaluate similarities in the traits and
DNA of species and conduct their own investigations in a virtual tree of life. Along the way, players can watch short animated videos that explain the evidence of evolution and illustrate it with specific examples.

The Evolution Lab contains two interactives, Build A Tree and Deep Tree, that were developed by the Life on Earth project based at Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Life on Earth is a NSF-funded project led by principal investigator Chia Shen, director of the Scientists’ Discovery Room (SDR) Lab. Shen’s team, including lead developer Florian Block and collaborators around the country, worked for several years to find the most effective ways to make the tree an open-ended space to explore how life formed and continues to evolve.




The Banished Beetle Project

The Banished Beetle Project is a citizen science initiative designed to increase awareness of burying beetles and their importance to the environment. Collecting data on burying beetle species is beneficial in order to determine the presence of the endangered American burying beetle (ABB). The American burying beetle only occurs in six states, including Oklahoma. There has never before been a chance to involve citizen scientists in this research effort until now! I have developed methods that enable teachers and young children to go outside and perform experiments that will add to larger pool of data that will significantly improve research efforts towards the conservation of this troubled species.




Counter Culture Labs

Come help us build a new community lab for the East Bay, focused on DIY biology and citizen science. A place to explore, learn, work on fun projects, tinker with biology and other sciences. Open to biotech professionals, scientists, and citizen scientists of all stripes. Be part of our community of creative thinkers, hackers and mad scientists!




UK Ladybird Survey

The Ladybird Survey aims to facilitate the recording of all the UK's ladybirds. Help us understand the ecology of native UK ladybirds by sending in your observations.

The invasion of the harlequin ladybird (Harmonia axyridis) threatens Britain's native populations. If you want to know more about this species in particular, or want to record sightings, please have a look at the Harlequin Ladybird Survey website.




Southwest Monarch Study

The Southwest Monarch Study is a citizens science research project dedicated to learning about monarch butterflies in the Southwestern United States including Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, western Colorado and the California deserts. We provide education and conservation programs as well as training to help citizen scientists tag and monitor monarch butterflies and their immatures.




Nina Valley EcoBlitz

High school students, scientists, teachers, and support crew working together to discover and document the biological diversity of the Nina Valley




2015 Big Garden Milkweed Butterfly Count

Our gardens, backyards, parks, and meadows could be magical places filled with life if we could only slow down and pay attention for a while. This summer, you’re invited to go out to your garden or backyard, or else to a local park, forest, or meadow, to count milkweed butterflies for one hour. This project seeks to establish a tradition of bringing people together, relaying important information, and teaching the appreciation of nature that will continue for years to come.

Milkweed is a unique plant group that serves as a host to four butterflies species: the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), the queen butterfly (Danaus gilippus), the tropical milkweed butterfly (Lycorea cleobaea),and the soldier butterfly (Danaus eresimus). However, as milkweed slowly disappears, so do these butterflies. Currently, the monarch butterfly count is at a second-year low, indicating the threats that it and other similar species face.

By counting butterflies, we can survey their numbers in the United States and Canada, while having fun outside and learning more about butterflies and other wildlife. The event promises to be a fun, educational activity for children and families.

What is the 2015 Big Garden Milkweed Butterfly Count?

This year’s Big Garden Milkweed Butterfly Count is a fun, educational project with far-reaching implications. People will be invited to go outside for one hour during the weekend of July 25–26 to count the number of milkweed butterflies seen at one time. That way, we will avoid counting the same butterflies over and over again.

This project will have a specially designed website accessible via laptops, desktops, tablets, and smartphones.

The materials and website will include identifying information and illustrations that will help people to learn what milkweed butterfly species look like.

Participants can also use the website for counting that will have a 60-minute timer and where information can be entered right away. The website will also have a pop-up quiz with butterfly trivia questions and a list of games and fun activities for children.




SCARAB (Scientific Collaboration for Accessible Research About Borers)

This is a citizen science project to help track the spread of invasive beetles, such as the polyphagus shothole borer (PSHB), to better understand factors leading to their spread and how to manage them.




Experiment

Experiment is a crowdfunding platform for scientific research. We want to allow anyone with a credit card to be a modern day patron of science.




IDAH2O Master Water Stewards

The IDAH2O Master Water Steward program participants attend an 8-hour workshop which combines classroom instruction and hands-on field work.

A certified Master Water Steward then can adopt a stream location to conduct regular monitoring of habitat, biological, chemical and physical assessments. Stewards upload all data collected to an interactive HIS website that is publicly available. Another focus of the program is to educate citizens on the science behind water quality and to help them understand streams, rivers and lakes systems. Youth involvement and K-12 participation (formal and after-school enrichment) is also strongly supported.




Natural North Carolina

North Carolina is a beautiful place! With the huge variation in habitat types - from the mountains to the piedmont to the coastal plain - our state boasts a grand diversity of plants, animals, and fungi. Just look around. You likely encounter hundreds of species in your daily life, and many just beyond your front door!

Scientists at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences document the species in our great state and share the things we learn with you in our Museum exhibits. But, we can't be everywhere at once! We need YOUR help. By photographing and reporting the wildlife you see in your everyday life to Natural North Carolina, you can help us learn more about the species that call North Carolina home. You will also help us create an atlas of North Carolina's flora and fauna that you can use to identify the natural things you see in your local area. And all you have to do to help is snap a photo of something in nature and tell us where and when you took it. Easy!

So, get outside! Snap a few photos. Become a citizen scientist by submitting your photos to Natural North Carolina. Together, we can discover the wonders of North Carolina and learn more about our amazing state.




Pieris Project

The Pieris Project is a citizen science initiative designed to collect morphology and genetic data on a single species - the cabbage white butterfly (Pieris rapae) - from across its entire range, including your backyard! The small cabbage white butterfly is a great species to study how organisms adapt to new environments, because this butterfly has invaded many parts of the world within the last two centuries and is now found on nearly every continent. With your help, and only with your help, we can create the world's most comprehensive butterfly collection that will allow us to learn how the cabbage white has adapted to new environments as it expanded across the globe. This type of data will be critical to understanding how species may respond to environmental changes, such as climate change and habitat destruction.




A.T. Seasons

The A.T. Seasons project brings together different parks and organizations that are actively monitoring seasonal changes in plants and animals (phenology) along the Appalachian Trail. Using Nature’s Notebook or our customized mobile app observers at all levels will be contributing to a comprehensive dataset with the goal of understanding the relationship between phenology and climate change along the Appalachian Trail. Get Involved today!

A.T. Seasons is your opportunity to help track the unfolding of important life cycle events each year along the iconic Appalachian Trail, linking your observations with others from Georgia to Maine. By observing and reporting seasonal changes of plants and animals you will help build the foundation to understanding and protecting the scenic & natural beauty of the trail corridor.




L.A. Nature Map

The L.A. Nature Map hosted by the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles is an interactive map that displays local plant and wildlife observations.

Our Southern California region is a hotspot for urban biodiversity. With your help, we can show Angelenos and the world the diversity of nature all around us. You can contribute to this citizen science project by sending photos of plants and animals.

The L.A. Nature Map is created in collaboration with iNaturalist.




OSF SciNet

Problem: Scientific citations are frequently constrained by terms-of-use or within proprietary systems making it difficult to see connections in the literature.

Solution: OSF SciNet uses the open source Citelet extension to crowdsource a free, open, and comprehensive metadata dataset of scientific citations and corresponding references to unlock the citation network.

Impact: The dataset generated through this project will make it easier to see the connections in the scientific literature and to promote open science.




SENSR

SENSR is a tool to create, share and manage a citizen science project running on mobile devices to harness the power of citizen scientists.

SENSR provides a simple and easy way to obtain a custom data collection application running on mobile devices for your project.

If you are running a grassroots project for science, education, environmental conservation, community monitoring, or other reason, and are seeking ways to expand citizen scientists' participation in contributing data, SENR can help you create a mobile data collection tool for your project.

It is part of a research project at Carnegie Mellon University. Please try out if you are seeking ways to harness citizens' power of data collection.




NatureWatch NZ

NatureWatch NZ is a citizen science project dedicated to exploring and discovery New Zealand's biodiversity. If you see an unusual or interesting bug, plant, or any other species, take a photo of it, upload the photo to NatureWatch NZ, and learn all about it. The NatureWatch NZ online community will ID your species for you. You can also help others to ID their photos, and you can join (or create!) projects about the species and places you're most interested in.

Together, we're documenting what's living in NZ so we can understand NZ nature better, and have fun while we do it.

NatureWatch NZ is the New Zealand part of the amazing global iNaturalist network. Thanks iNat!




Mothing

Moths are incredibly diverse, are ecologically important as plant eaters, pollinators, and food for songbirds. How will climate and other large-scale ecological factors affect moths?

Three components - choose any or all:

1) Moth Math - analyze over five years of moth phenology data, correlate with weather, find patterns. (Best for high school AP Bio or undergraduate intro bio, high school and undergraduate math).

2) Take photographs of moths at your porch light and upload to Discover Life, either our pre-selected "Dark Dozen" http://www.discoverlife.org/darkdozen and upload to Twitter or Instagram @darkdozenmoths (or if eager, photograph any other moths you find at your site and upload to an album on www.DiscoverLife.org).

3) Help us identify moths that you and others have uploaded, so that photographs become data. Participants can compare moths at their own site with moths from other sites, to answer their own original questions and do real science.




Notes from Nature

Most natural history collections are housed in museum cabinets, where they are not easily available to citizens and researchers. The Notes from Nature transcription project addresses this problem by digitizing biological collections one record at a time! Help museum staff and scientists by transcribing the labels and ledgers that have been meticulously recorded and stored over the past century. In many cases these are the only historical records of species distribution available. Join us in unlocking this important information - take some notes from nature!




Pathways: Wildlife Corridors of NM

Pathways: Wildlife Corridors of NM runs a wildlife track and sign monitoring program, documenting "common" species before they become "uncommon". 6 Focal Species include, Black Bear, Elk, Mule Deer, Bobcat, Pronghorn, and Mountain Lion. We monitor transects between the mountain ranges of New Mexico, documenting the movements of these large mammals between the mountains and the river valleys.




Michigan Butterfly Network

The Michigan Butterfly Network (MiBN) is a citizen-science project that seeks to assess the changing population status of our state’s butterfly species, evaluate the quality of Michigan ecosystems, and engage the Michigan public in significant citizen science research. The project was started in 2011 by the Kalamazoo Nature Center, and has grown to include several collaborating institutions and over 30 monitoring sites across the state.

We are actively looking for new partnerships and volunteers across the state in order to expand and grow the network. We welcome engagement in the project - Please contact us!




Where's the Elderberry Longhorn Beetle?

Hi, my name is Dr. Dan Duran and I'm an evolutionary biologist and entomologist at Drexel University (Philadelphia, PA) and I need your help finding "Desmond," an Elderberry Longhorn Beetle, formally known as *Desmocerus palliatus!*

This *beautiful* beetle species used to live throughout a large part of eastern North America but in recent decades it appears as if it has declined in numbers. We need your help to figure out if and why this might be true and how we can help them move back into areas they once lived.

The Elderberry Longhorn Beetle is easy to spot with its bold patterns of blue and gold and long antennae. It's so attractive, in fact, that it was chosen for a USPS stamp design in 1999! I can't promise you'll find one, but if you keep an eye out, you might have a chance at seeing one of these impressive creatures. They come out at different times in different places, but June is often a good time to see them.




Atlas of Living Australia

The Atlas of Living Australia (Atlas) contains information on all the known species in Australia aggregated from a wide range of data providers: museums, herbaria, community groups, government departments, individuals and universities.

The Atlas was initiated by a group of 14 (now 17) organisations—our partners. The intent was to create a national database of all of Australia’s flora and fauna that could be accessed through a single, easy to use web site. Information on the site would be used to: improve our understanding of Australian biodiversity assist researchers to build a more detailed picture of Australia’s biodiversity assist environmental managers and policy makers develop more effective means of managing and sustaining Australia’s biodiversity.

You can participate by submitting a species record, joining an existing citizen science project, digitizing specimen labels, or starting your own citizen science endeavour!




Vital Signs Maine

Where are the invasive species in Maine? Where aren’t they? Students, educators, citizens, and scientists are working together to find out.

As part of the Vital Signs community you can help steward the 32,000 miles of rivers and streams, 6,000 lakes and ponds, 5,000 miles of coastline, and 17 million acres of forest that are threatened by invasive species.

Together we are using scientific tools and habits of mind to look for native and invasive species in local habitats. We are sharing what we find and do not find online. We are contributing to a greater understanding of our shared environment.




Where is my spider?

By just taking photos and observing spiders, you can help the Explorit Science Center learn about which climates certain spiders live in and track the distribution of spiders over time.

Join the Explorit’s Community Science Project by finding and recording spiders in your home or neighborhood (as many as you can!). Use your camera or smart phone to take a photo of the spider and submit it online to add to our geographical database.

Spiders have long been thought of a useful natural method of pest control, but how will expected temperature changes or other environmental changes affect the spider’s usefulness as pest-killers and their distribution?

We don't yet know how climate change will impact spiders, and in turn impact agriculture such as crops and farms- but when we understand where spiders are living today, we will be better able to predict what may happen to spiders and agriculture in the future.




iSeeChange

The iSeeChange Almanac is a socially networked weather Almanac for communities to collectively journal their climate experiences -- their observations, feelings, questions, and decisions --- against near-real time climate information.

This groundbreaking environmental reporting project combines citizen science, participatory public media, and cutting-edge satellite monitoring of environmental conditions.

Incubated in 2012 by producer Julia Kumari Drapkin at Colorado public station KVNF Mountain Grown Community Radio via AIR’s Localore project, iSeeChange is poised to expand in 2015. The team will work with media and scientific partners across the country to help audiences document environmental shifts in their backyards and connect to the bigger-picture climate changes transforming all of our lives and livelihoods.

The project’s growing list of collaborators includes NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Berkeley BEACO2N project, Yale Climate Connections, the Allegheny Front in the Western Pennsylvania, KPCC in Pasadena, WWOZ in New Orleans, Delaware Public Media, KSJD and KVNF in Colorado, Developing Radio Partners, and more.

This spring, the iSeeChange team is expanding its crowdsourced reporting platform, the iSeeChange Almanac, coast to coast. In the coming months, the team will also develop a related app to help synchronize local citizen climate reports with satellite data on regional carbon levels. Combining these two perspectives—a global view of the earth from space and a granular view from individuals on the ground—offers an unprecedented opportunity to match big science with daily life, and surface hidden patterns and stories.

Stay tuned! iseechange.org.





Librería Metagenómica del Ecuador

We are a group of scientists interested in exploring the potential applications of Ecuador’s unique biodiversity. As a first step, we are working to assemble and apply gene libraries collected from around the country.
You can join field trips in Ecuador to collect samples, work in a lab extracting and sequencing nucleic acids, or from home assembling and curating the electronic database.




Wading for Water Sticks

Prepare to get wet and muddy for science! We're looking for citizen scientists in North Carolina to help us learn more about the large, charismatic aquatic insects known as water sticks.

Simply find a body of water in your area, follow the protocol, and submit your data! We'll teach you how to identify the water sticks you find and how to cheaply build any equipment you don't already have (you'll have most of it). And if you don't find anything in the body of water you choose, no problem! Every bit of information helps and anything you can share is useful. With YOUR help, we can discover more about the seasonality, habitat preferences, and distribution of water sticks - together!




Los Angeles Butterfly Survey

The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County is partnering with Butterflies and Moths of North America (BAMONA) to share data and learn more about L.A. butterflies and moths. Help us find and photograph them in Los Angeles.

We know there are 237 species recorded for L.A, County, but how many can you find?




Community of Observers

Get to know the nature of YOUR world! The Fairbanks Community of Observers is to encourage greater public clarity around environmental indicators of climate change in Vermont and northern New Hampshire. Using the website developed by the Fairbanks Museum, we'll collect your quantitative data focused on the life cycles of specific birds, butterflies and wildflowers that are sensitive to environmental change as well as seasonal weather data that is characteristic to our region.

The Community of Observers is for individuals, families, clubs, groups and schools. It is designed to encourage citizen scientists to gain a deeper understanding of the cycles and patterns that characterize our region through the seasons, and how the habitats that depend on these cycles might be affected by global climate shifts.




Bat Detective

Bat Detective is an online citizen science project which allows visitors to the website to take part in wildlife conservation by listening out for bat calls in recordings collected all over the world.

By sorting the sounds in the recordings into insect and bat calls, bat detectives will help biologists learn how to reliably distinguish bat 'tweets' to develop new automatic identification tools.

Bats use lots of different types of sounds, from singing to each other to find a mate, to using the echoes from their tweets to find their way around. Usually bat sounds are inaudible to humans as they are too high for us to hear, but special 'time expansion' ultrasonic detectors convert these sounds to a lower frequency, and visitors to the Bat Detective website can listen to these unique recordings and help distinguish different sounds.

One out of every five species of bats is threatened with extinction and better automatic identification tools are desperately needed to quickly process vast amounts of sound data collected by volunteers from the bat monitoring programme iBats who survey bat populations each year.

Bats are found all over the world from local parks to pristine rainforests and monitoring their population trends provides an important indicator of healthy ecosystems. Developing new tools that allow biologists to interpret population trends from sound will allow bats' tweets to act as a way to track environmental change.

Bat Detective was developed at University College London, Bat Conservation Trust, Bat Life Europe with the Citizen Science Alliance.




Brown marmorated stink bug locations

The brown marmorated stink bug is an invasive insect species that has become an damaging pest of a wide variety of fruit, vegetable, grain, and ornamental crops. This stink bug species also enters homes and can be a nuisance pest. Our webpage allows citizens to report the presence and severity of this stink bug species in their home, yard, farm, or commercial nursery.




WildlifeBlitzGarneau

This smartphone app will help you explore habitats in your area and easily monitor wildlife populations by logging locations, photos, and responding to form questions all with the ease of your smartphone.




ZomBeeWatch

ZomBee Watch is a citizen science project sponsored by the San Francisco State University Department of Biology, the San Francisco State University Center for Computing for Life Sciences and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. ZomBee Watch was initiated as a follow-up to the discovery that the Zombie Fly Apocephalus borealis is parasitizing honey bees in California and possibly other areas of North America.

ZomBee Watch has three main goals.

1. To determine where in North America the Zombie Fly Apocephalus borealis is parasitizing honey bees.

2. To determine how often honey bees leave their hives at night, even if they are not parasitized by the Zombie Fly.

3. To engage citizen scientists in making a significant contribution to knowledge about honey bees and to become better observers of nature.

You can help in finding out where honey bees are being parasitized by the Zombie Fly and how big a threat the fly is to honey bees. So far, the Zombie Fly has been found parasitizing honey bees in California, Oregon, South Dakota, Vermont and Washington. We are teaming up with citizen scientists (like you!) to determine if the fly has spread to honey bees across all of North America.




Dragonfly Migration

We need your help to better understand dragonfly migration in North America. Although it spans three countries and has been documented since the 1880s, North American dragonfly migration is still poorly understood, and much remains to be learned about migratory cues, flight pathways, and the southern limits of overwintering grounds. Become part of an international network of citizen scientists and help monitor the spring and fall movements of the 5 main migratory species in North America, or report on these species throughout the year at a pond or wetland of your choice.




Big Butterfly Count

Counting butterflies for just fifteen minutes could help scientists better understand the environment. The Big Butterfly Count is a recently started national survey that hopes to engage citizen scientists by creating easy and engaging survey methods. Started by the charity group Butterfly Conservation in 2010, the program has grown to over 34,000 participants!

The big butterfly count takes place this year from Saturday 17th July - Sunday 9th August 2015. All you have to do is submit your butterfly counts for just fifteen minutes of observation. A colorful identification poster is available online and submission on the project website couldn’t be easier.

Butterflies are quite sensitive to changes in the environment and are excellent indicators of potential issues with other wildlife. By studying the trends in butterfly counts, scientists can better understand the relationships between wildlife and the environment.

This is an easy, fun, and meaningful way to engage in science. Print out an identification poster, get outside, and start counting!




Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation

Adventurers and Scientist for Conservation is a unique initiative that helps create working reationships between scientists and adventure athletes to perform some truly unique research. Projects have been created all over the world and by groups of all kinds. The project even provides training for adventurers to become adventure-scientists.

The exciting benefits from these projects are numerous. Adventurers benefit by contributing to meaningful conservation research in areas that they visit. Additionally, scientists benefit from attaining inexpensive data that would have been previously hard or impossible to acquire. By no means, however are these adventure research projects limited to avid adventurers and professional scientists. Programs can be created anywhere for any age group. The goal of the project is to train and inspire the next generation of citizen scientists. In short, Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation will help you create a project, recruit participants, and start an Adventure Science project near you!




Illinois RiverWatch

The Illinois RiverWatch program engages citizen science volunteers in stewardship, education, and science for Illinois rivers. By becoming a trained volunteer, you can help collect a variety of quality ensured data and help contribute to statewide biological monitoring efforts. There are over 1,500 volunteers already monitoring streams in the state, but there are still more streams waiting to be claimed!

The training process involves attending a workshop that will help train volunteers in data collection and give you all the tools you need to monitor a stream of your choice. Soon, you will be a true citizen scientist and take part in collaborative efforts to keep Illinois’ streams clean and beautiful, sharing your data with other organizations, state agencies, and private interests.




eButterfly

eButterfly is a citizen science project that helps document butterflies in Canada. By creating a user profile and documenting observed butterflies, citizens can help scientists better understand butterfly distribution in Canada. Users can also track which butterflies they have observed on a dynamic map application, and share photos with the eButterfly community.

The 2,045 eButterfly records of over 170 species help the Canadian Facility for Ecoinformatics Research at the University of Ottawa's Department of Biology better understand how butterflies adapt to environmental change. Eventually, the data you collect will help contribute to the preservation of Canada’s great biodiversity.




UF Native Buzz

Solitary bees and wasps in your own backyard!!!

Native Buzz is a citizen science project created by the University of Florida (UF) Honey Bee Research and Extension Lab. Our goal is to learn more about the nesting preferences, diversity and distribution of our native solitary bees and wasps, share the information gained and provide a forum for those interested in participating in the science and art of native beekeeping (and wasp-keeping!).

Here at University of Florida Native Buzz you can keep track of your own native buzz nest site and see the results of other participant’s nest sites.




Bumble Bee Watch

Bumble Bee Watch (www.BumbleBeeWatch.org) is a collaborative effort to track and conserve North America’s bumble bees. This citizen science project allows individuals or groups to: 1) Upload photos of bumble bees to start a virtual bumble bee collection; 2) Identify the bumble bees in your photos and have your identifications verified by experts; 3) Help researchers determine the status and conservation needs of bumble bees; 4) Help locate rare or endangered populations of bumble bees; 5) Learn about bumble bees, their ecology, and ongoing conservation efforts; and 6) Connect with other citizen scientists.

Find out more at http://www.bumblebeewatch.org/contents/about/




Camel Cricket Census

The Your Wild Life team needs citizen scientists to share observations and photos of camel crickets in your home!

To date, their network of keen citizen observers has reported a preponderance of camel crickets in their basements, garages and garden sheds. Some interesting patterns in cricket distribution have emerged, and the researchers have learned that a Japanese camel cricket is way more common in the US than previously thought.

Have you seen one of these leggy beasts? Submit your observations today!




Western Monarch Thanksgiving Count

The Western Monarch Thanksgiving Count (WMTC) is a citizen-science project designed to census the size of overwintering monarch colonies. As the name implies, it is conducted over a three-week period around the (American) Thanksgiving holiday in November and December by a large number of volunteers. The project is currently coordinated by Mia Monroe and Emma Pelton with the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation.




Spotted Wing Drosophila*Volunteer Monitoring Network

The goal of the Spotted Wing Drosophila*Volunteer Monitoring Network (SWD*VMN) is to the track the movement and seasonal biology of the spotted wing drosophila (SWD, Drosophila suzukii).

SWD is a recently detected invasive species in the United States and is a potentially significant pest of berries (strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries) and other crops. SWD has rapidly spread throughout the US, and we want to help farmers and gardeners understand WHERE and WHEN this new insect is active.

We are developing classroom tools to use SWD in teaching exercises and are seeking




Science Hack Day

Science Hack Day is a 48-hour-all-night event that brings together designers, developers, scientists and other geeks in the same physical space for a brief but intense period of collaboration, hacking, and building 'cool stuff'. By collaborating on focused tasks during this short period, small groups of hackers are capable of producing remarkable results. Some Hack Days have a specific focus. There have already been very successful Music Hack Days and Government Hack Days. It's time for a Hack Day focused on science!




OPAL Bugs Count

Do you know what bugs are living near you? Take part in OPAL Bugs Count and discover the incredible variety of invertebrates that make their home around us.

Bugs, or invertebrates, are a vital part of our environment. They can pollinate plants, recycle nutrients, and they provide an important food source for birds and mammals.

Find as many bugs as you can in our timed challenges and keep a special eye out for the six Species Quest bugs.

Your findings will help scientists learn more about the distribution of invertebrates across the country and how the urban environment may be affecting them.




Project MonarchHealth

MonarchHealth is a citizen science project in which volunteers sample wild monarch butterflies to help track the spread of a protozoan parasite across North America.

The project's mission is to achieve a broader understanding of host-parasite interactions in monarch butterflies and to enhance awareness of monarch biology and conservation through the coupling of citizens and scientists.

Participants either capture monarch butterflies as adults or raise the caterpillars in separate containers until they become adult butterflies. In either case, you will gently tape each butterfly’s abdomen with a sticker to collect the OE spores (helpful instructional videos). Next, you will send the sample, along with a simple data sheet for each butterfly, back to the scientists at the Altizer lab where they will analyze the sample. After the data are compiled, project coordinators will send you the results of your sampling contribution as well as post them on the project results page for the public to see.

Anyone interested in monarch butterflies can participate. MonarchHealth is conducted by people of all skills, ages, and backgrounds including families, retired persons, classrooms, monarch organizations, nature centers, and individuals.




Changing Currents

EcoSpark's Changing Currents program introduces grade 8-12 students from across the Greater Toronto Area (Toronto, Peel, Durham, and York school boards) to their area's watersheds. Students get outside, put on hip waders, explore a local river stream, and learn about its importance and quality.

By participating in the program students will:

Use benthic macro-invertebrate bio-monitoring to examine the health of their local river or stream (it's easy!),
Contribute to a GTA-wide study of watersheds, and
Have the chance to take action around what they discover




BeeSpotter

BeeSpotter needs volunteers to go outside with a camera and capture quality photos of bees! Researchers at the University of Illinois are trying to better understand bee demographics in the states of Illinois, Missouri, and Ohio (added during the 2015 spotting season!) and they can't do it without your help. Your data will become part of a nationwide effort to gather baseline information on the population status of these insects.

BeeSpotter is a partnership between citizen scientists and the professional science community. The project is designed to educate the public about pollinators by engaging them in a data collection effort of importance to the nation.




Boise Watershed Watch

Get a snapshot of the health of the Boise River watershed by monitoring water quality! Citizen groups, schools, families, and individuals are invited to participate in this fun event which takes place at numerous sites along the Boise River and tributaries from Lucky Peak to Star. No experience necessary! A knowledgeable trainer will meet you at your assigned location to assist with monitoring.




OPAL Water Survey

The OPAL Water Survey needs citizen scientists in England to record what life they see in local ponds and to conduct simple tests for water clarity and pH. By contributing, you'll help scientists learn more about how polluted lakes and ponds in England actually are.

Animals living in the water can tell us a great deal about how polluted the water may be. Some species struggle to survive in polluted waters, while others are more tolerant. By telling us what life you see in your local pond you’ll discover more about the water's health and contribute to valuable scientific research.

This is one of five OPAL surveys across England to learn more about the state of the environment. Anyone can get involved. The studies are open to all ages and abilities, and your contribution will be important in helping scientists build up a picture of England's natural environment.




Encyclopedia of Life

The Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) provides free, open, multilingual, digital access to trusted information on all known species through its website at http://eol.org. EOL is an international collaboration led by the Smithsonian that works to raise awareness and understanding of living nature.
Citizen Scientists can participate in many ways, from contributing articles, photos, videos and sounds, to creating and using collections, to annotating and curating biodiversity content.




Urban Garden Plant Identification

For my Senior Thesis I am researching economic disparity in community gardens. However, I am not a expert on plants. I need some help identifying common garden plants from photos I took of gardens in Atlanta, GA. The photos are only available on Facebook unfortunately, so you need a Facebook account.




iSpot - your place to share nature

iSpot is a unique website where you can get the help of a friendly community to identify anything living that you have seen in nature. We are based in the UK, but observations from elsewhere are welcome.

You can add an observation to the website, suggest an identification, or see if anyone else can identify an observation for you.

Help others by adding an identification to an existing observation. Your reputation on the site will grow as others with knowledge agree with you identifications.

Ultimately, the data collected on iSpot are added to a central depository of biodiversity data held by the National Biodiversity Network

We have online keys (also available via web browsers on cell phones) that are designed to help you identify certain groups of species.

What are you waiting for? Get outside and make some observations. :)




Wasp Watcher

Monitoring wasp colonies for invasive beetles that kill trees...WaspWatchers is a citizen scientist program which began in Maine and has now spread throughout Ontario, New England, the Eastern Seaboard and parts of the Midwest (Wisconsin, Ohio and Michigan). Across this broad area, the program’s goal is to… Engage and support the general public and government agencies with discovery and monitoring of their natural Cerceris fumipennis colonies; monitoring for both native and introduced species of Buprestidae beetles including the Emerald Ash Borer. Who are WaspWatchers? They are a combination of enthusiastic government staff, students and public volunteers. An efficient alliance is to utilize professional staff/students to search for colonies and then enlist the public volunteers to ‘adopt’ and monitor the colonies.




Dragonfly Swarm Project

The Dragonfly Swarm Project uses the power of the internet to allow everyone to participate in a large-scale study of dragonfly swarming behavior. Participants observe dragonfly swarms wherever they occur, make observations of the composition and behavior of the swarm, then submit a report online.

Data is compiled from the reports by an aquatic entomologist with a passion for dragonflies. Her goal is to use the data collected from participants for two purposes: 1) to publish data from a massive number of dragonfly swarms in the scientific literature, making this information available to scientists, and 2) to provide information about this behavior to the public. Many people see dragonfly swarms and are curious about what they see. The creator of this project hopes to provide answers to the curious while simultaneously collecting information from eye-witnesses to improve our overall knowledge of this fascinating behavior.

Because any given person has to be in the right place at the right time to see a dragonfly swarm, this project isn't possible for a single scientist to do alone. Collecting data from a large network of people is thus the best way to study dragonfly swarming behavior. Participation requires only curiosity and a few minutes of your time, so keep an eye out for dragonfly swarms in your area this summer and send in your reports!

Thanks in advance for your participation!




Colorado Spider Survey

The Colorado Spider Survey (CSS) is a means of gathering critical information about the ecology and distribution of this understudied taxonomic group. Researchers have documented the distribution and species diversity of several groups of insects in the Rocky Mountain region such as ants, grasshoppers, and butterflies. However, information about the distribution and diversity of other arthropod groups in this region is lacking. One group that is particularly understudied is the Order Araneae, or the spiders. Little is known about either the biodiversity of spiders in Colorado or the impact urbanization is having on species distribution in the state. No formal spider surveys have ever been conducted in Colorado.

The survey will be carried out through a series of Spider Identification and Collection Workshops that will be held throughout the state, but particularly in cooperation with the State Park system. These workshops, led by a team of professional and amateur arachnologists (or spider biologists), will train members of local communities in spider biology, morphology, taxonomy, and collection techniques. The specimens will be collected during the next several years by team leaders as well as workshop participants and will be sent to the Denver Museum of Nature & Science for identification and storage. Data from these specimens and from Colorado specimens housed at other collections throughout the country will be compiled and published in an electronic database.




Illinois RiverWatch Network - Stream Sampling

RiverWatch is the only Illinois-wide biological monitoring program that educates and trains volunteers to collect high quality data on streams. Since the program was established in 1995, more than 1,500 individuals have received RiverWatch certification in stream monitoring and have collected an unprecedented amount of information for evaluating Illinois streams. Data collected by volunteers over multiple years allows us to gauge the health and integrity of our streams and helps professionals make informed decisions about water resources, in general.

The program is available to all citizens throughout the state, regardless of level of experience. New volunteers receive training during one of several workshops offered in the spring, while previously trained volunteers are encouraged to attend a review workshop prior to the monitoring season. RiverWatch certification workshops typically last 6-8 hours and consist of a laboratory and field component. During the lab session, a certified RiverWatch Trainer provides an overview of the program and teaches identification of benthic macroinvertebrates. During the field training session, participants visit a local stream where the Trainer demonstrates proper monitoring techniques and explains how to complete the data sheets.

Once training is completed, volunteers may monitor a stream site that they select or that is assigned to them. Citizen Scientists monitor their adopted stream site (a 200-foot stretch of stream) once annually between May 1 and June 30. The final step is to attend a RiverWatch open lab to identify the preserved organisms with a microscope. Labs are hosted throughout the state in July and August, and a Trainer is always present to assist volunteers with identification.




River Source Watershed Monitoring

Watershed Watch increases the understanding of New Mexico's water quality, river ecology and fisheries health through hands-on science in a real-world context. Students gather data on biological, chemical and physical indicators and make presentations to local data users including acequias (irrigation canals), school boards, federal agencies and watershed groups. Students become engaged in environmental studies of issues beyond the classroom to that address critical water issues in local regions.




Ohio Odonata Society Dragonfly Monitoring

The Ohio Odonata Society needs you to send in photos and specimens of dragonflies and damselflies in Ohio to help advance our understanding of these beautiful creatures.

Volunteers can submit photographs documenting new county or state records of dragonflies and damselflies in Ohio. Once accepted, the photographs will be listed in the project database of nearly 28,000 specimens, published literature citations, and photos.

Many dragonfly and damselfly species simply cannot be identified without placing them under a microscope where detailed examinations can be performed. You can help by collecting and sending in your specimens. The physical collection of living insects is not for everyone, but it is a viable and biologically sound practice if done according to sound scientific principles. Furthermore, some species are very, very, hard to confidently identify from a photo and thus require microscopic examinations. Finally, genetic review in some cases is teaching us that some species are actually two different species!

This is your chance to help promote knowledge and appreciation of dragonflies and damselflies in Ohio!




citsci.org

CitSci.org is a platform that supports a variety of citizen science programs using a centralized database to store and deliver science data, with a focus on community based monitoring programs. This platform allows program coordinators to create their own projects and datasheets, manage members, define measurements, create analyses, and even write feedback forms.




Butterflies & Moths of North America

Butterflies and Moths of North America (BAMONA) is seeking individuals to submit their sightings of butterflies, moths, and caterpillars. BAMONA is a user-friendly web site and database that shares butterfly and moth species information with the public via dynamic maps, checklists, and species pages. Data are updated in real time and come from a variety of sources, including citizen scientists. Individuals can get involved by documenting butterflies and moths in their neighborhoods and submitting photographs for review. Collaborating lepidopterists serve as coordinators and oversee quality control. Submitted data are verified, added to the database, and then made available through the web site.

BAMONA also provides free support to partners. Partner with BAMONA to build local or regional species checklists, to get secure data storage, or to set up a project-specific submission and review process. Or, let us know how we can work with you to create a customized solutions for browsing, searching, and visualizing your data. See http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/partner for details and links to partners.




Wider Countryside Butterfly Survey

Wider Countryside Butterfly Survey volunteers collect data and support studies on the abundance of butterfly species in the United Kingdom countryside.

Butterflies are unique indicators of the state of the environment because of their rapid lifecycles and high sensitivity to environmental conditions. The volunteer networks and datasets created by this project enable accurate assessment of butterfly trends, allowing researchers to assess the impacts of climate change.

This pioneering study aims to get a representative picture of the status of butterflies in widespread
habitats such as lowland intensive farmland and upland grassland and moorland. Strong emphasis has been placed on making sure that the Wider Countryside Butterfly Survey is both scientifically sound (by using random sampling) and efficient (a scheme with fewer visits to account for the fact that butterfly species are now uncommon across much of the general countryside).

This new scheme runs in parallel with United Kingdom Butterfly Monitoring Scheme, which is very effective at monitoring habitat-specialist butterflies and lowland semi-natural habitats, and the Butterflies for the New Millennium project, which acts as the main source of information on where butterflies live.




Habitat Network

Map habitat in backyards, parks, and schools. Work towards more sustainable landscapes. The Habitat Network lets you draw your landscapes with a beautiful online mapping tool and helps you learn about how to use your outdoor spaces (big or small) to aid birds and other wildlife. Connect to other citizen scientists, solve problems, share your maps and good ideas all while helping to build an invaluable database of habitat data for the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and The Nature Conservancy.




Bee Hunt

Bee Hunt participants use digital photography to record and study the interactions between plants and pollinators, following rigorous protocols to ensure high-quality data. The data collected will help provide a better understanding of pollinators' importance in growing food and maintaining healthy natural ecosystems. Bee Hunt is open to anyone, anywhere, whenever pollinators are flying. In North America, depending upon your location, you can start as early as March and go as late as November.

There are four ways to participate in Bee Hunt:

1. Inventory pollinators at your site with photographs
2. Compare species in two patches
3. Provide nesting sites for mason bees and study when they are active
4. Use bowls and soapy water to collect insects for a more complete inventory of species

Bee Hunt is a great way to teach and learn about pollination ecology and other aspects of natural history. Bee Hunt is a participatory science project. It's your research. You are the scientists. By following the project’s methods, you will collect and contribute high-quality data.




Sound Around You Project

I am building a sound map of the world as part of a study into how sounds in our everyday environment make us feel. We need your help!

We’re asking people across the world to use our new iOS app on their iPhones or iPads (or any recorder) to record short clips from different sound environments, or "soundscapes"--anything from the inside of a family car to a busy shopping centre. Then we ask volunteers to comment on their soundscapes and upload them to our virtual soundscape map.

Recordings and responses will be analyzed by acoustic scientists, and significant findings will be reported on this website.

Sound Around You aims to raise awareness of how our soundscape influences us, and could have far reaching implications for professions and social groups ranging from urban planners to house buyers.




Project NOAH

Noah is a mobile phone app that allows nature lovers to document local wildlife and add their observations to a growing database for use by ongoing citizen-science projects.

Using the Noah mobile application, users take a photograph of an interesting organism, select the appropriate category, add descriptive tags, and click submit. The application captures the location details along with the submitted information and stores all of it in the species database for use by efforts such as Project Squirrel and the Lost Ladybug Project.

In addition, users can see what kinds of organisms are nearby by searching through a list or exploring a map of their area, all on a mobile phone.

Noah is all about discovering and documenting local wildlife. We work with research groups and organizations to help gather important data and we want you to help by logging recent spottings on your mobile phone. Missions can range from photographing specific frogs or flowers to tracking migrating birds or invasive species or logging the effects of the oil spill.




United Kingdom Butterfly Monitoring Scheme

The United Kingdom Butterfly Monitoring Scheme needs citizen scientists to monitor and record data about butterflies at specific sites in the United Kingdom. The project's mission is to assess the status and trends of United Kingdom butterfly populations for conservation, research, and quality of life.

Butterflies are unique indicators of the state of the environment because of their rapid lifecycles and high sensitivity to environmental conditions. The volunteer networks and datasets created by this project enable accurate assessment of butterfly trends, allowing researchers to assess the impacts of climate change.

The project is based on a well-established and enjoyable recording scheme. Participants walk a fixed route at a specific site, and record the butterflies they see along the route on a weekly basis under reasonable weather conditions. For data to be most useful, participants will need to walk their routes regularly with very few missed weeks each year and continue this for at least five consecutive years. This effective methodology has produced important insights into almost all aspects of butterfly ecology.

The United Kingdom Butterfly Monitoring Scheme has monitored changes in the abundance of butterflies throughout the United Kingdom since 1976. Over the 32 years of the scheme, recorders have made more than 170,000 weekly visits to 1500 separate sites, walking more than 375,000 km (225,000 miles) and counting more than 12.5 million butterflies! Join the fun!




Dragonfly Monitoring Network

The Dragonfly Monitoring Network is a citizen-scientist program that monitors the health of dragonfly populations throughout the Chicago area. This program represents an important step in collecting data on insect populations and their response to land management techniques.

Volunteers will be trained to collect and submit data each summer from an assigned site. They commit to:

- attendance of one Spring Workshop a year

- learning to identify key dragonfly and damselfly species

Contact information: Craig Stettner email: cstettne@harpercollege.edu

- conducting at least six site visits between late May and late September

- spending one to two hours walking the route during each visit

- submitting data sheets at the end of the season, which are then added to the project database

With your help, the Dragonfly Monitoring Network hopes to gain a greater knowledge of the distribution and abundance of dragonfly and damselfly species in the Chicago region and eventually to expand the network across Illinois and beyond.




Illinois Butterfly Monitoring Network

The Illinois Butterfly Monitoring Network is a citizen-scientist program that monitors the health of butterfly populations throughout northeastern and central Illinois.

Each summer, trained volunteers collect and submit butterfly data from an assigned site. Volunteers commit to conducting at least six site visits between June 1 and August 7, completing four of them before July 20. During the first year they volunteers, participants learn to identify 25 different butterfly species, and they learn another 25 species the second year.

Through analysis of the extensive database generated by citizen scientists, populations trends of species throughout the Chicagoland area are starting to emerge. These results will assist land managers in more effective conservation of the state's butterflies.

Many important sites do not yet have butterfly monitors, and project coordinators continue to look for more volunteers. Join the fun!




Jug Bay Macroinvertebrate Sampling

Maryland's Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary needs volunteers to collect, count, and identify macroinvertebrates (small animals without backbones) in its streams. The sanctuary is in southern Anne Arundel County, 20 miles east Washington, D.C., and 18 miles south of Annapolis, Maryland.

One indicator of good water quality is a diverse and abundant population of macroinvertebrates. A dip in oxygen levels or a plume of pesticide can make a stream inhospitable to more sensitive animals.

Benthic macroinvertebrates--ones that dwell on the bottom of streams--can reveal much about the health of their watery environment. Since these animals more or less stay put, they are reliable indicators of water quality at each sampling site.

If you like to hike and wade in shallow streams, this project is for you! Monitoring takes place several times a year, and each sampling takes about two hours in the field and another two hours of processing in the lab.




Yuba River Water Quality Monitoring

Volunteers are needed to help the South Yuba River Citizens League, based in Nevada City, California, collect monthly water quality data at 45 different sites in the Yuba Watershed.

We are the leading regional advocates for creating resilient human and natural communities throughout the greater Yuba River basin by restoring creeks and rivers, regenerating wild salmon populations, and inspiring and organizing people—from the Yuba’s source to the sea—to join in our movement for a more wild and scenic Yuba River.

We train participants to use pH and conductivity meters and to conduct dissolved oxygen titrations in the field in order to collect information on the health of their rivers and streams. We also offer volunteers the opportunity to be involved in other monitoring activities, including health assessments of meadows, sampling of benthic macroinvertebrate and algae, surveys of river vegetation, and temperature logging.




River Bug Hunts

Since 2000, volunteers with Vermont's Black River Action Team have helped to clean up and take care of the Black River and its tributaries.

Among our activities are the very popular River Bug Hunts: Throughout the year, as a way of assessing the overall health and condition of the water, we explore what lives beneath the surface of the river. Larvae of caddisflies, stoneflies, and mayflies are the most commonly used critters for this purpose. We’ll gather aquatic insects from the bottom of the river, sort them by body type, then identify and count them. Over time, we’ll start to get a good picture of the quality of the river.

So grab some simple equipment and your sense of adventure: We're going on a Bug Hunt!

Needed: a wadeable stream with a shallow, fast-moving reach called a "riffle," where the water ripples up and over a rocky bottom. The current should not be too strong to wade, and the rocks should be small enough to pick up and rub off into a plastic dish pan or other small tub. A white dish pan or tub, ice cube trays for sorting, and small scoops such as you'll find in baby formula or powdered drink mixes.




Monarch Larva Monitoring Project

The Monarch Larva Monitoring Project enlists citizen scientists to collect long-term data on larval monarch populations and milkweed habitat.

Developed by researchers at the University of Minnesota, the project aims to better understand how and why monarch populations vary in time and space, with a focus on monarch distribution and abundance during the breeding season in North America.

As a volunteer, you can participate in two ways: You can commit to regularly monitoring a specific patch of milkweed or you can submit anecdotal observations. If you commit to regular monitoring, you'll conduct weekly monarch and milkweed surveys, measuring per plant densities of monarch eggs and larvae. You'll also be able to participate in more detailed optional activities, such as measuring parasitism rates and milkweed quality. Your contributions will aid in conserving monarchs and their threatened migratory phenomenon, and will advance our understanding of butterfly ecology in general.

In addition to contributing to an understanding of monarch biology, you'll gain hands-on experience in scientific research. Through this experience, we hope that your appreciation and understanding of monarchs, monarch habitat, and the scientific process are enhanced.




Georgia Adopt-A-Stream

Georgia Adopt-A-Stream needs citizens to monitor and improve the state's streams, wetlands, lakes, and estuaries.

The project goals are to increase public awareness of Georgia's water pollution and water quality issues, provide citizens with the tools and training to evaluate and protect their local waterways, encourage partnerships between citizens and their local government, and collect baseline water quality data.

Georgia Adopt-A-Stream has teamed up with government and non-government groups to provide access to technical information and assistance for citizens interested in preserving and restoring the banks and vegetation along their waterways. This network will help local governments, educate citizens about the importance of protecting riparian corridors, and provide landowners with the information they need to reduce erosion, improve water quality, and provide wildlife habitat with native plantings.




Nature's Calendar Survey

Nature's Calendar is a survey conducted by thousands of volunteers who record the signs of the seasons in the United Kingdom.

This could mean noting the first ladybird or swallow seen in your garden in spring, or the first blackberry in your local wood in autumn.

If you live in the UK, you don’t have to be an expert to take part, and lots of help is given, including a recording guide which is available to download for free.

This kind of recording has moved from being a harmless hobby to a crucial source of evidence as to how our wildlife is responding to climate change.




Loudoun Butterfly Count

The Loudoun Butterfly Count is a one-day event that pairs citizen volunteers with experts to learn about, identify, and count as many butterflies as possible.

In the weeks following the count, the Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy posts the results on its website and sends it to the North American Butterfly Association to be analyzed at regional and national levels.

Butterflies are good indicators of habitat and the health of our environment because they need such a diversity of plants to develop and survive. Areas that are weedy and wild one year will show an abundance of species while a newly planted lawn (a monoculture) or an area sprayed with pesticides will be a wasteland. By participating in the Loudoun Butterfly Count, volunteers not only get to explore the fantastic world of butterflies up close, but they also learn about this amazing web of life in nature.




Loudoun Stream Monitoring

Virginia's Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy needs citizen volunteers to identify aquatic insects in local streams. The type and quantity of these insects, called benthic macroinvertebrates, tell a good story about the quality of water in the stream and its surrounding habitat.

Monitoring is done in teams of three or four experienced and novice monitors who follow the Virginia Save Our Streams monitoring protocol. Team members wade into the stream and use collecting nets to capture live aquatic insects in the riffle and pool portions of the stream.

The data are transcribed to a computer database maintained by Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy and are used to prepare water quality reports. Because the same stream sites are sampled year after year, project coordinators are able to report on trends in the health of the streams and aquatic life.




Central Wisconsin Riverkeepers

Monitor the waters of six counties in Central Wisconsin: Fond du Lac, Green Lake, Marquette, Waushara, Waupaca, and Winnebago. We are a waders on, in-the-muck environmental group.

Performed monthly on local waters within these six counties, we test for dissolved oxygen, turbidity, temperature, and stream flow. At the beginning of summer we also perform a Biotic Index and habitat assessment. Information is entered into a state database for tracking purposes.




Contra Costa Volunteer Creek Monitoring

Volunteers wade through creeks in Contra Costa County (California), using the latest technology and scientific protocols to collect baseline data on our local watersheds. Our two primary programs are Bioassessment sampling and GPS Creek Surveys.

Bioassessment - Using aquatic insects as indicators of water quality, volunteers learn more about the health of their neighborhood creeks and identify potential problem areas. While water samples yield a detailed identification of the water at the time of sampling, the density and diversity of bugs in our creeks yield a watershed-level perspective of water quality and habitat viability over time.

GPS Creek Surveys - Using Global Positioning System (GPS) technology, volunteers map the physical attributes of the stream channel (substrate, canopy cover, bank characteristics, etc.), extent and type of native and invasive vegetation, and human influences (outfalls, dams, etc.).

Joining a data collection event is a fun way to explore parts of your urban environment most people never see, but they are more than just fun ... they’re science!




WV Save Our Streams Program

WV Save Our Streams trains citizen scientists in West Virginia how to monitor and become watchdogs over their local wadeable streams and rivers. The program focuses on a biological approach to stream study, which includes the collection and evaluation of the benthic macroinvertebrate community and an assessment of the stream’s basic physiochemical conditions.




Texas Bee Watchers: 52 Gardens, 52 Weeks

Texas Bee Watchers aims to increase awareness and knowledge of native bees in Texas. This year, the Bee Watchers are challenging Texans to plant 52 Bee Gardens in 52 Weeks.




Nature's Notebook

Pay attention to the plants and animals in your yard, and you can contribute to scientific discovery! Observing life cycles of plants and animals with Nature's Notebook is easy and fun, and you will discover so much more about the plants and animals you see everyday.

Sign up to observe one or more species in your yard or another place that you frequent. Use the Nature's Notebook smartphone app to send your observations directly to the National Phenology Database, or fill out paper datasheets and submit them online.




Volunteers-In-Parks

Volunteers-In-Parks participants work side-by-side with National Park Service employees to preserve the United States' natural and cultural legacy and to help visitors discover the resources, meanings, and values found in its national parks.

Anyone can be a "VIP": individuals, couples, families, students, and organized groups from all over the United States and the world. Become a VIP and put yourself at the heart of the park experience!

Volunteers-In-Parks participants play an ever-increasing role in national parks through a variety of jobs, including answering visitor questions at an information desk, presenting living history demonstrations in period costumes, building fences, painting buildings, making cabinets, giving guided nature walks and evening campfire programs, assisting with preservation of museum artifacts, maintaining trails, building boardwalks, designing computer programs or park websites, and serving on a bike, horseback, or beach patrol.




Internships at the National Park Service

National Park Service internships provide learning opportunities through activities such as wilderness re-vegetation, assistance with preservation and restoration projects, water quality monitoring, surveying, educational cave tours, or assisting resource management staff.

Internships offer an interesting and educational experience in some of the most beautiful areas of the country. This is your chance to get actively involved in the stewardship of the United States' national and natural treasures.




Geoscientists-in-the-Parks

Geoscientists-in-the-Parks partners geoscience students and experts with volunteers to conduct scientific research that helps the National Park Service better understand and manage its natural resources.

Participants may assist with research, synthesis of scientific literature, geologic mapping, geographic information system analysis, site evaluations, resource inventorying and monitoring, impact mitigation, developing brochures and informative media presentations, and educating park staff as well as park visitors.

Volunteers selected for the program have a unique opportunity to contribute to a variety of important research, resource management, interpretation and education projects. Parks benefit from a participant’s knowledge and skills in geological or physical sciences, while each participant gains valuable experience by working with the National Park Service. Volunteers with all levels of experience are encouraged to apply.




The Bay Area’s Most Wanted Spider

Arachnologists at the California Academy of Sciences need your help documenting the presence and distribution of Zoropsis spinimana spiders.

Although harmless to humans, this spider competes with local species and is considered invasive. Participants can use a simple digital camera to document the presence of this spider, and, if comfortable collecting the spider, send in actual spider specimens.

With the help of citizen scientists, researchers can study how the Zoropsis spider population is spreading in the Bay Area.




The National Science Digital Library

The National Science Digital Library encourages citizens to help enlarge and strengthen their library of high quality resources and tools that support science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education.

Developers of content in these subject areas, National Science Foundation grantees, educators and learners, and all other members of the community are welcome to recommend digital resources for the library. These resources include activities, lesson plans, Web sites, simulations, or any materials that help educators meet the demands of an increasingly complex technology-based world.

As a national network of learning environments, resources, and partnerships, the National Science Digital Library seeks to serve a vital role in educational cyberlearning for the nation, meeting the informational and technological needs of educators and learners at all levels.




The Living Roof Project

The Living Roof Project is a citizen science program that gives community members an opportunity to learn about the California Academy of Science's unique roof ecosystem and to contribute to important baseline data regarding the many plants, birds, and arthropods that inhabit and utilize the Living Roof’s 2.5 acres of green space.

The data collected by citizen scientists are shared with researchers from the California Academy of Sciences and San Francisco State University. In addition, the bird observations are submitted to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s international eBird project. These data serve as a baseline to which future changes in plant and animal diversity on the Academy’s Living Roof can be compared.




Bay Area Ant Survey

The Bay Area Ant Survey is a citizen science program that gives the public a chance to participate in research by obtaining baseline data for ants living in local counties. The major goals of this scientific survey are to identify local species, chart native ant distributions, and provide baseline data to monitor the distribution of the invasive Argentine ant.

Participants collect ants and send their ant-filled vial and corresponding data sheet back to the Naturalist Center at the California Academy of Sciences. All specimens will be identified and entered in a database by an Academy entomologist. All results are then uploaded to AntWeb where the location and identification of the ants are made public. Your contribution becomes part of the scientific record!




The Lost Ladybug Project

Find and photograph ladybugs! Join us in finding out where all the ladybugs have gone, so we can try to prevent more native species from becoming so rare. NEW - Email us and check our website or Facebook page for new opportunities to help restore native ladybug species.

Across North America, ladybug species distribution is changing. Over the past twenty years, several native ladybugs that were once very common have become extremely rare. During this same time, ladybugs from other places have greatly increased both their numbers and range. Some ladybugs are simply found in new places.

This is happening very quickly and we don’t know how, or why, or what impact it will have on ladybug diversity or the role that ladybugs play in keeping plant-feeding insect populations low.

Free downloadable educational materials and activities. Ladybug song!

View 37,000+ ladybug photos submitted so far. See what species of ladybugs have been found near you!

The Lost Ladybug Project database of 37,000 plus ladybug (Coccinellid) photos and locations is located on our website and is open to the public for mapping, graphing, searching, downloading.




BioBlitz

BioBlitz is a 24-hour event in which teams of scientists, volunteers, and community members join forces to find, identify, and learn about as many local plant and animal species as possible. National Geographic and the National Park Service launch the program 10 years ago with the goal of conducting a BioBlitz in a different park each year throughout the decade leading up to the U.S. National Park Service Centennial. 2016 is here and BioBlitz is going national to celebrate.

In 2016 National Parks BioBlitz cornerstone event will take place at national parks in and around Washington, D.C. A companion Biodiversity Festival will be help at Constitution Gardens on the National Mall. Additional BioBlitzes will be held at more than 100 national parks across the country. Interested? Find a BioBlitz near you at http://education.nationalgeographic.org/projects/bioblitz/

Project founders organized BioBlitz as a way for communities to learn about the biological diversity of local parks and to better understand how to protect them. BioBlitz events give adults, kids, and teens the opportunity to join biologists in the field, participate in bona fide research expeditions, and learn from the experts about biodiversity—both around the planet and in our own backyards.




Butterflies I've Seen

Butterflies I've Seen allows you to keep track of all of your butterfly sightings.

Once your sightings are logged in the database, you can retrieve them by location, by date, or by species. You can print out a list of all the butterfly species you've ever seen, a "Life List," or you can print out a list of all the butterfly species you've ever seen at a particular location. At the same time, the sightings you enter provide important information that the North American Butterfly Association, the major butterfly conservation organization in North America, will use to help answer scientists' questions about butterfly distributions, abundance, and conservation.

Enjoy the site and the fact that your efforts are increasing our knowledge and helping butterfly conservation!




Firefly Watch

Firefly Watch combines an annual summer evening ritual with scientific research.

Boston's Museum of Science has teamed up with researchers from Tufts University and Fitchburg State College to track the fate of these amazing insects. With your help, we will monitor population numbers of fireflies and determine what might be affecting their numbers. Participating in this project is also a wonderful way to learn more about these most enchanting and fascinating creatures.

- Join a network of volunteers.
- Observe your own backyard.
- Track your progress online and interact with fellow Citizen Scientists.
- Help scientists track firefly populations in North America.
- No specific scientific training required.

It's easy to participate in Firefly Watch. Basically, we want to know if you have fireflies in your backyard (or in a nearby field if you don't have a backyard) and how their numbers are changing over time.





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