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Birds


Natural North Carolina

North Carolina is a beautiful place! With the huge variation in habitat types - from the mountains to the piedmont to the coastal plain - our state boasts a grand diversity of plants, animals, and fungi. Just look around. You likely encounter hundreds of species in your daily life, and many just beyond your front door!

Scientists at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences document the species in our great state and share the things we learn with you in our Museum exhibits. But, we can't be everywhere at once! We need YOUR help. By photographing and reporting the wildlife you see in your everyday life to Natural North Carolina, you can help us learn more about the species that call North Carolina home. You will also help us create an atlas of North Carolina's flora and fauna that you can use to identify the natural things you see in your local area. And all you have to do to help is snap a photo of something in nature and tell us where and when you took it. Easy!

So, get outside! Snap a few photos. Become a citizen scientist by submitting your photos to Natural North Carolina. Together, we can discover the wonders of North Carolina and learn more about our amazing state.




A.T. Seasons

Tracking the Seasons

The A.T. Seasons project brings together different parks and organizations that are actively monitoring seasonal changes in plants and animals (phenology) along the Appalachian Trail. Using Nature’s Notebook or our customized mobile app observers at all levels will be contributing to a comprehensive dataset with the goal of understanding the relationship between phenology and climate change along the Appalachian Trail. Get Involved today!

A.T. Seasons is your opportunity to help track the unfolding of important life cycle events each year along the iconic Appalachian Trail, linking your observations with others from Georgia to Maine. By observing and reporting seasonal changes of plants and animals you will help build the foundation to understanding and protecting the scenic & natural beauty of the trail corridor.




L.A. Nature Map

The L.A. Nature Map hosted by the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles is an interactive map that displays local plant and wildlife observations.

Our Southern California region is a hotspot for urban biodiversity. With your help, we can show Angelenos and the world the diversity of nature all around us. You can contribute to this citizen science project by sending photos of plants and animals.

The L.A. Nature Map is created in collaboration with iNaturalist.




Birdeez

Birdeez is the easiest way to identify, collect and share bird sightings. The goal of this project is to educate you about the birds in your area while you contribute sightings that will be used for scientific understanding of bird migration, bird populations and climate change.

Currently Birdeez is available as an iPhone application at www.GetBirdeez.com/ but soon we we will be online and on different phone platforms as well.

Every bird counts, so help us help them by collecting and sharing sightings.




Independent Generation of Research

IGoR facilitates scientific research by amateur scientists and science enthusiasts. Anyone (not just professional scientists) can propose their own research questions on the IGoR site. Then, other interested people can share ideas, skills, or time to address the question. In addition, a growing number of professional scientists have agreed to help answer users' questions about the users' research projects.

Some people may have science questions that they cannot answer on their own. Other people may have technical skills (e.g. electronics or microscopy, gardening or photography, and many others) that would be useful for addressing those questions. Still others may have the scientific training to design a sound study.

By working together and pooling skills and ideas, people of any experience level could carry out original, independent research. For example, do you want to decipher what scallops see with their bright-blue eyes? Do you wonder how mushrooms take shape? Or are you curious about how the plants in your garden behave? What do you want to discover?




OSF SciNet

Problem: Scientific citations are frequently constrained by terms-of-use or within proprietary systems making it difficult to see connections in the literature.

Solution: OSF SciNet uses the open source Citelet extension to crowdsource a free, open, and comprehensive metadata dataset of scientific citations and corresponding references to unlock the citation network.

Impact: The dataset generated through this project will make it easier to see the connections in the scientific literature and to promote open science.




Birds and Windows Project

Birds face many threats when they come into contact with urban populations. One of the leading causes of avian mortality in cities is window collisions. In Canada it is estimated 25 million birds are killed each year as a result of bird window collisions.

For my master’s thesis I have developed the University of Alberta Birds and Windows Project to use citizen science and active participation to continue to identify the factors that affect collision risk at residential homes.

In late September, Environment Canada released a report on the leading causes of bird deaths, with collisions with houses or buildings tied for second spot with power lines, collisions and electrocutions, behind domestic and feral cats. Most studies on window collisions have focus on tall skyscrapers but based on the sheer number of houses compared to tall skyscrapers, houses represent 90 % of the mortality. More work is needed; only four studies in the past have focused on bird window collision mortality at houses.

To better understand what can be done to reduce bird window collisions at your home, the University of Alberta has developed this project to actively involve YOU in data collection. We are asking you to think about bird window collisions you have observed in the past and would like you to regularly search around your residence for evidence of bird window collisions in the future.Ideally you will search your residence daily for a period of at least one month. There is no limit to the number of months you can be involved in the project however, if a daily search does not suit your lifestyle we still want you to participate. We simply need you to keep track of which days you searched for evidence of a collision. To effectively monitor bird window collisions we need to know when people find evidence of a collision BUT it is equally important that we also know when no evidence is found.




SENSR

SENSR is a tool to create, share and manage a citizen science project running on mobile devices to harness the power of citizen scientists.

SENSR provides a simple and easy way to obtain a custom data collection application running on mobile devices for your project.

If you are running a grassroots project for science, education, environmental conservation, community monitoring, or other reason, and are seeking ways to expand citizen scientists' participation in contributing data, SENR can help you create a mobile data collection tool for your project.

It is part of a research project at Carnegie Mellon University. Please try out if you are seeking ways to harness citizens' power of data collection.




Field Photo Library

A photo taken in the field helps scientists and citizens to document changes in landscape, wildlife habitats, impacts of drought and flood and fire, and so on. This Geo-referenced Field Photo Library is a citizen science and community remote sensing data portal, where people can share, visualize and archive field photos in the world. Users can upload, edit, query and download geo-referenced field photos in the library. All photos are also linked with satellite image series images (MODIS), so that people can see the changes over time.




Comparing the Behaviors of Wild and Captive Native Songbirds

This project gives participants a chance to observe bird behaviors of wild birds and compare with behaviors of birds in captive settings. Participants of this project will observe native songbirds at bird feeders. They will fill out an ethogram provided with the observations they have made. The next time the participant visits a zoo or nature center with native captive birds, they will fill out another ethogram. The directions on how to use each ethogram will be provided with it.

This project was designed with educators in mind as an assignment to go along with zoo field trips. T

It was also designed based off the native songbird aviary of the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium. However, it can be adapted for other facilities with captive songbirds.




Darwin for a Day

Darwin for a Day is a web application that allows you to explore the Galapagos Islands through Google Street View and document its unique plants and animals. When you see an animal or plant you’d like to catalogue, you can describe it by creating an observation. You can just enter your best guess at what it is (i.e. “bird”) or enter in the scientific name, if you know it!

All of your observations will be shared with the iNaturalist community & the Charles Darwin Foundation, and will contribute to research of the Galapagos Islands.




Penguins Marching Into Your Classroom

Be a field biologist by following daily pictures and collecting your own data!

Follow Adélie Penguins as they raise their chicks live from Antarctica! Starting around Nov 11 every season we follow 8 new penguin families during the breeding season at Cape Royds. Penguin Science is an NSF funded project engaging and educating classrooms and the public with Antarctic penguins as they raise their families and cope with global climate change. Adopt a penguin family, keep a field notebook recording foraging trips, egg hatching and chick rearing data.

Combine science, art and geography as students track their postcards mailed back to them from Antarctica.

Design and make a flag to fly at our research station.

Something for everyone about Antarctic!




NatureWatch NZ

NatureWatch NZ is a citizen science project dedicated to exploring and discovery New Zealand's biodiversity. If you see an unusual or interesting bug, plant, or any other species, take a photo of it, upload the photo to NatureWatch NZ, and learn all about it. The NatureWatch NZ online community will ID your species for you. You can also help others to ID their photos, and you can join (or create!) projects about the species and places you're most interested in.

Together, we're documenting what's living in NZ so we can understand NZ nature better, and have fun while we do it.

(NatureWatch NZ is a website and online community of New Zealand nature watchers powered by the international iNaturalist.org system. Thanks iNat!)




Study Adélie Penguin breeding

From November to January, classrooms take part in a virtual field study of Adélie Penguins as they breed, brood and rear their chicks in Antarctica. Photos of selected penguin families from Cape Royds Antarctica are posted to the website for students to follow on a daily basis. Weather data, event journal and background information about penguins is also provided. Students keep a field notebook gathering and analyzing their own data about each penguin family using the same process of the field biologist. This real time, long term activity provides students a window into the harshness of Adélie penguin life and the work of field scientists. Predation, competition and environmental challenges all affect the penguin’s ability to raise chicks. Witnessing these events themselves helps students begin to understand the world around them and the remote location of Antarctica. This project offers a real time daily field experience with outcomes we cannot predict.




Pathways: Wildlife Corridors of NM

Pathways: Wildlife Corridors of NM runs a wildlife track and sign monitoring program, documenting "common" species before they become "uncommon". 6 Focal Species include, Black Bear, Elk, Mule Deer, Bobcat, Pronghorn, and Mountain Lion. We monitor transects between the mountain ranges of New Mexico, documenting the movements of these large mammals between the mountains and the river valleys.




Dark Sky Meter

The Dark Sky Meter (available for iPhones) allows citizen scientists to contribute to a global map of nighttime light pollution.
Light pollution is a growing problem in urban environments, but now you can help scientists better understand its effects on the environment. The map is also a great help for (amateur) astronomers looking for dark skies.
By utilizing the camera built in to your iPhone, the Dark Sky Meter actually measures ‘skyglow’ and updates the data in real time.

The lite version is free and gives you a rough estimate of the night sky brightness.

The Pro version of the app also charts weather conditions and cloud cover so you can take readings at optimal times. The app is as easy to use as taking a picture, and is a fun way to learn about your night sky.

The Results are live and visible for everyone on a global light pollution map generated by the app users. Visit darkskymeter.com to see the map.




CyberTracker

CyberTracker Conservation is a non-profit organisation that promotes the vision of a Worldwide Environmental Monitoring Network. Our ultimate vision is that smart phone users worldwide will use CyberTracker to capture observations on a daily basis.

CyberTracker is the most efficient method of gps field data collection. You can use CyberTracker on a Smartphone or handheld computer to record any type of observation. CyberTracker, which requires no programming skills, allows you to customize an Application for your own data collection needs.




Yelkouan Shearwater Project - Turkey

Yelkouan Shearwater Project aims at determining the seasonal changes in the movements and numbers of globally threatened Puffinus yelkouan in the Marmara Sea.

It is the first research project focusing on the populations of this species passing through two important Turkish straits in the Marmara Sea. The project will provide more accurate information on the knowledge obtained by the previous research in the Bosphorus and the movement patterns of endemic Yelkouan Shearwaters will be identified through the extended study area to better understand the whole picture in the Mediterranean Basin and to take part in the global conservation of this species.

Yelkouan Shearwater Project is funded by Rufford Small Grants.




Hummingbirds @ Home

Starting March 15, 2013, the Audubon Society needs citizen scientists to track, report on, and follow the spring hummingbird migration in real time. A free mobile app makes it easy to report sightings, share photos and learn more about these remarkable birds.

Your participation will help scientists understand how hummingbirds are impacted by climate change, flowering patterns, and feeding by people.

You can participate at any level – from reporting a single sighting to documenting hummingbird activity in your community throughout the life of the project. Help scientists document the hummingbirds journey and direct change in the future to ensure these incredible birds do not disappear.




SeaBC Sea Bird Count

The SeaBC Sea Bird Count is a citizen science project organized by a volunteer group of long-distance birding sailors from around the world. The idea of a “SeaBC” was inspired by popular, long-standing land-based counts such as Audubon’s Christmas Bird Count (CBC) and the Census Bird Count (CBC) in the U.K.

Our mission is to benefit seabird conservation by mobilizing the worldwide boating community to document ocean bird sightings, providing critical and seldom-recorded data on seabird abundance and distribution and on ocean migration routes. SeaBC sea bird count data goes to Cornell University’s eBird database, where boaters’ sightings become a resource for scientists worldwide.

Seabird knowledge is described as a frontier science: Last year a new seabird species was discovered and a species believed to be extinct was sighted. For some species, breeding or wintering areas remain unknown. This lack of knowledge is troubling given that BirdLife International estimates one-third of seabirds are now vulnerable or globally endangered due to threats from predators on nesting grounds, some fisheries, and plastics.




iSeeChange: The Almanac

The iSeeChange Almanac is a socially networked weather Almanac for communities to collectively journal their climate experiences -- their observations, feelings, questions, and decisions --- against near-real time climate information.

Founded in April 2012 in Western Colorado, iSeeChange is a public radio and media experiment that fosters multimedia conversations between citizens and scientists about how seasonal weather and climate extremes affect daily American life. From the earliest spring recorded in the history of the United States, a landmark wildfire season, nationwide droughts, and weather records breaking everyday, climate affects every citizen and binds communities together.

iSeeChange is produced by Julia Kumari Drapkin in Western Colorado at KVNF Mountain Grown Community Radio as a part of Localore, a nationwide production of AIR in collaboration with Zeega, with principal funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.




Landmark Trees of India

Landmark Trees of India is a documentation, geography, and monitoring project with a focus on famous, remarkable, and heritage trees of India.
India is a country of superlative population, superlative biodiversity, and superlative environmental variety. These landmark trees can teach us about the landscapes, biodiversity, and people of India and the other nations of the world.




Magpie Mapper

Magpie Mapper is a smartphone app for recording observations of Magpies, one of the most fascinating and striking birds in the United Kindgom. When you see a magpie, simply log it on the app and your data will be used in our research into how birds are distributed throughout our towns cities and countryside.

With their long tails and impressive black and white plumage, magpies are unmistakable. Magpies are so ingrained in our folklorethat people often greet them with "Hello Mr Magpie!".

Now you can digitally salute a magpie with the Magpie Mapper app!




Project Nighthawk

Most active at dusk and dawn, the “peent” call of the Common Nighthawk (Chordeiles minor) was once a familiar sound in cities and towns throughout New Hampshire, where they nest on flat, peastone gravel roofs and feed on insects attracted to city lights. In recent years, rubber and PVC have largely replaced peastone roofing, and nesting nighthawks have disappeared from many New Hampshire towns; in the few towns where they remain (including Keene!), their numbers have dramatically declined.

In partnership with New Hampshire Audubon and in efforts to conserve this state-threatened species, AVEO coordinates volunteer nighthawk surveys on summer evenings in Keene.




Community of Observers

Get to know the nature of YOUR world! The Fairbanks Community of Observers is to encourage greater public clarity around environmental indicators of climate change in Vermont and northern New Hampshire. Using the website developed by the Fairbanks Museum, we'll collect your quantitative data focused on the life cycles of specific birds, butterflies and wildflowers that are sensitive to environmental change as well as seasonal weather data that is characteristic to our region.

The Community of Observers is for individuals, families, clubs, groups and schools. It is designed to encourage citizen scientists to gain a deeper understanding of the cycles and patterns that characterize our region through the seasons, and how the habitats that depend on these cycles might be affected by global climate shifts.




Owl Citizen Science Project

The Owl Citizen Science Project is a great opportunity to better understand the owls of Tryon Creek and improve your knowledge of these amazing creatures. The Friends of Tryon Creek will host a lively kick-off lunch and information session for an exciting citizen science project dedicated to the owls of Tryon Creek. This lunch is intended for adults interested in participating in this year’s monitoring effort twice monthly, December through April, as we attempt to discover where Tryon’s owl species are nesting. This is a great opportunity to better understand the owls of Tryon Creek and improve your knowledge of these amazing creatures. Join us for lunch and learn more. Free. Preregistration required. On October 27th, Citizen Science Project – Owls of Tryon Creek Kick-off Lunch, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. –




WildlifeBlitzGarneau

This smartphone app will help you explore habitats in your area and easily monitor wildlife populations by logging locations, photos, and responding to form questions all with the ease of your smartphone.




BioBlitz 2012

The National Park Service and National Geographic Society will hold their sixth annual BioBlitz species count from August 24-25 in Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado. Thousands of students, teachers, parents, and other citizen scientists will join about 200 scientists, naturalists, and explorers from around the country to count, collect and analyze important wildlife data to evaluate the biodiversity of the park.




Tracking ring-billed gulls

More than 8,000 ring-billed gulls have been marked near Montreal, Quebec with individually coded bands to track their movements throughout their annual cycle. We are more specifically interested by their post-breeding dispersal and their fidelity to their colony. Repeated observations of individuals also allow us to estimate annual survival. This is part of a larger study that aimed at understanding the behavior and population dynamics of these birds within an integrated management framework.




The Biodiversity Group

We are currently seeking research assistants to join our field team in Ecuador studying the conservation ecology of reptiles and amphibians.

While Ecuador is a relatively small country—it’s roughly the size of Arizona—it stands as the third most diverse country in the world for amphibians (510 species) and is seventh for reptiles (430 species), making it a herpetologically mega-diverse region. Due to the severe deforestation taking place in addition to many other pressures on Ecuador’s fauna, TBG research program aims to study, document, and preserve these rich and unique communities of reptiles and amphibians found within the country’s diverse array of ecosystems.

As we are now in our 8th year working in Ecuador, we have study sites encompassing both the coastal forests in western Ecuador and the Amazon rainforest on the eastern side of the Andes Mountains. The work that research participants will be involved with will primarily consist of conducting night surveys for reptiles and amphibians (however other taxa such as invertebrates are also of interest), animal data collection, and lab work. Lab work consists of more detailed information such as scale counts (for reptiles) and other morphological information, animal measurements, screening for chytrid disease (amphibians), preservation (only when necessary), and acquisition of DNA samples. Diagnostic photographs of all animals will be taken. Other tasks include animal handling and general note taking and data organization

Volunteer participants will gain valuable research experience, contribute towards our mission in conservation ecology, and will have an unforgettable experience that provides the opportunity to study the most biologically diverse region of reptiles and amphibians in the world. For 2013 we now have expeditions scheduled in Western Ecuador for February 2-13 and FeBruary 16-27 and in Amazonian Ecuador for June 2-13.




SEANET

Our volunteers monitor Atlantic coast beaches from Maine to Florida documenting seabird mortality events on any scale, from a single dead gull, to a mass die-off of shearwaters.
The data collected serves as baseline for comparison after oil spills or major disease outbreaks, and as a baseline resource on the impacts of offshore development projects (e.g. oil drilling or wind) on seabird populations.




Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation

Adventurers and Scientist for Conservation is a unique initiative that helps create working reationships between scientists and adventure athletes to perform some truly unique research. Projects have been created all over the world and by groups of all kinds. The project even provides training for adventurers to become adventure-scientists.

The exciting benefits from these projects are numerous. Adventurers benefit by contributing to meaningful conservation research in areas that they visit. Additionally, scientists benefit from attaining inexpensive data that would have been previously hard or impossible to acquire. By no means, however are these adventure research projects limited to avid adventurers and professional scientists. Programs can be created anywhere for any age group. The goal of the project is to train and inspire the next generation of citizen scientists. In short, Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation will help you create a project, recruit participants, and start an Adventure Science project near you!




Tucson Bird Count

The Tucson Bird Count is an annual project in which volunteers collect data on the abundances and distributions of bird species from hundreds of sites in the Tucson area.

Volunteers can participate in two programs: 1) The annual Route Program, in which participants count individuals of all bird species, and 2) the quarterly Park Monitoring Program, in which groups adopt an area and spend four mornings a year counting birds at that area.

The data collected will help researchers monitor the status of the Tucson area bird community over time, identify land use practices that are succeeding at sustaining native birds, and investigate the ecology of birds in human-inhabited landscapes. Data and analyses, including distribution maps for most species counted in the Tucson Bird Count, are publicly available on the project web site.

The Tucson Bird Count (TBC) is a cooperative project begun by members of Tucson's science, conservation, and birding communities.




OspreyWatch

Osprey Watch is a project of the Center for Conservation Biology for birdwatchers across the nation to help identify osprey nests and observe osprey behavior. The project hopes to acquire data across a large enough spatial scale in order to address three pressing issues associated with aquatic ecosystems: climate change, depletion of fish stocks, and environmental contaminants. Ospreys are great indicators of the health of aquatic ecosystems as they are sensitive to small changes in fish populations and water quality.

OspreyWatch has almost 500 Osprey Watchers monitoring almost 800 nests across North America, Europe, and Australia. Ospreys are incredible birds of prey and viewing them in the wild can be an amazing experience. And it may be easier than you think. Many osprey nest in man made objects and might even be right outside your backdoor. There are also many nests viewable online through web cameras.

So grab a camera, some binoculars, and locate a nest near you to add photos and descriptions to OspreyWatch’s interactive map. You can even find other nests in your area and help monitor and add updates to nesting activity.




North American Bird Phenology Program

The North American Bird Phenology Program, part of the USA-National Phenology Network, was a network of volunteer observers who recorded information on first arrival dates, maximum abundance, and departure dates of migratory birds across North America. Active between 1880 and 1970, the program was coordinated by the Federal government and sponsored by the American Ornithologists' Union. It exists now as a historic collection of six million migration card observations, illuminating almost a century of migration patterns and population status of birds. Today, in an innovative project to curate the data and make them publicly available, the records are being scanned and placed on the internet, where volunteers worldwide transcribe these records and add them into a database for analysis.




PHOWN, Photos of Weaver Nests

The aim of PHOWN is to study variation of colony sizes of weavers, to map their breeding distribution, and to study these aspects in relation to climate change. This is achieved with the help of citizen scientists submitting photos of weaver nests or colonies.

Some feral populations exist throughout the world, and may be included in PHOWN. Species include the true weavers, bishops and widows, queleas, social weavers, sparrow weavers, buffalo weavers, malimbes and fodies. Sparrows are not included.

Weavers are often common species, and often found near human habitation. This makes them easy to study. Some species are of conservation concern and for some the nest has not even been described yet!




Journey North

Journey North engages students in a global study of wildlife migration and seasonal change. K-12 students share their own field observations with classmates across North America. They track the coming of spring through the migration patterns of monarch butterflies, robins, hummingbirds, whooping cranes, gray whales, bald eagles— and other birds and mammals; the budding of plants; changing sunlight; and other natural events. Find migration maps, pictures, standards-based lesson plans, activities and information to help students make local observations and fit them into a global context. Widely considered a best-practices model for education, Journey North is the nation's premiere "citizen science" project for children. The general public is welcome to participate.




British Trust for Ornithology

The BTO's Nest Record Scheme (NRS) gathers vital information on the breeding success of Britain's birds by asking volunteers to find and follow the progress of individual birds' nests.

The data collected are used to produce trends in breeding performance, which help us to identify species that may be declining because of problems at the nesting stage. These trends are published on the BTO website and are updated every year. NRS data also allow us to measure the impacts of pressures such as climate change on bird productivity.

Anyone can be a nest recorder. Some people watch a single nest box in their back garden while others spend hundreds of hours finding and monitoring nests in the wider countryside.




American Kestrel Partnership

Now's the time to set up your American Kestrel nest box! This bird's population is experiencing long-term declines in North America, and existing data are insufficient for understanding the causes. The American Kestrel Partnership is an international research network designed to generate data, models, and conservation plans for kestrel habitat and populations at large spatial scales. The Partnership unites the data-generating capacity of citizen scientists with the data-analysis expertise of professional scientists by promoting research collaboration among citizen scientists, universities, government agencies, conservation organizations, schools, and businesses. The Partnership also fosters long-term conservation values and appreciation of science by engaging the public with hands-on research experiences.




Summer Wild Turkey Sighting Survey

Partner with New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) to monitor turkeys in the wild. The DEC seeks wildlife lovers in every county to help them observe and count young male and female turkeys (also known as Jakes and Jennies) in August. This survey sheds light on the interaction between weather, environment and flock vitality. It also helps determine fall hunting potential.




Thanksgiving Day Western Bird Count

Count birds within a 15-foot area, anywhere in the Western states, for one hour on Thanksgiving Day; you decide the hour and the location.
Last year 431 counters in the eleven Western States and Alaska made 440 counts. They tallied 161 species of birds (plus a lot of mammals and other things, too). The top five species counted in these states were House Sparrow (1), Dark-eyed Junco (2), House Finch (3), Black-capped Chickadee (4) and European Starling (5). As predicted, the Pine Siskin dropped out of the top five last season, but should be more numerous this year. Participants should send in a report even if no birds were seen during the hour.




Winter Wild Turkey Flock Survey

Harsh winter conditions significantly affect young turkeys. New York State Department of Environmental Conservation seeks wildlife lovers in every county to help them observe and count young male and female turkeys (also known as Jakes and Jennies), from January 2012 through March 2012.




New Hampshire Turkey Observers

N.H. Fish and Game's winter wild turkey flock survey invites you to help record sightings of wild turkey flocks in New Hampshire from January to mid-March each year. This effort helps biologists assess the impact of winter weather on our turkey population!




Golden Eagle Survey Project

Help survey golden eagles in the wild in the blufflands region of southeast Minneosta, western Wisconsin and northeast Iowa during our Annual Wintering Golden Eagle Survey held each January. We are conducting the survey as a part of a project investigating golden eagles that winter in this region. Little is known about their breeding origins, migration and habitat use. Your participation in this project will enhance our understanding of one of North America's largest birds of prey.




My Invasive

My Invasive allows the public to report sightings of invasive species. You can take a picture of the animal or plant and upload it along with details about the location of your sighting. Sightings are plotted on a map to help scientists track the geographical distributions of invasive species like Giant African Snails, weeds, and insects.




Science Hack Day

Science Hack Day is a 48-hour-all-night event that brings together designers, developers, scientists and other geeks in the same physical space for a brief but intense period of collaboration, hacking, and building 'cool stuff'. By collaborating on focused tasks during this short period, small groups of hackers are capable of producing remarkable results. Some Hack Days have a specific focus. There have already been very successful Music Hack Days and Government Hack Days. It's time for a Hack Day focused on science!




Maine Audubon Wildlife Road Watch

The Maine Audubon Wildlife Road Watch is a web-based map and database designed to record your observations of road-side and road-killed wildlife.

There are two ways to participate in the project:

1. Entering random wildlife observations from around the state.

2. Regular route surveying for "Adopt A Road".

Information about where wildlife attempt to cross roads, what animals are involved, on what kinds of roads are collisions frequent, and other data can help inform policy, management, and financial investment in reducing road-kill and habitat fragmentation. Maine Audubon scientists will use the data to improve our collective understanding of where wildlife attempt to cross roads and what we can do to reduce road-kill and increase safety for people and wildlife.

Start contributing your own observations today!




MySwan

MySwan is a citizen science project for people who love swans. Just record your black swan sighting on the interactive map, and you can make a valuable contribution to research on the behavior and movement of swans.

After you submit your sighting, you'll get an instant report about the swan, with interesting information about its history and recent movements.




Encyclopedia of Life

The Encyclopedia of Life is an online, collaborative project where you can learn about any species on Earth, as well as contribute information and submit photos. This global initiative seeks to create an "infinitely expandable" resource for all of our planet’s 1.9 million known species.

The Encyclopedia of Life draws from existing databases, such as AmphibiaWeb and Mushroom Observer, and sponsorship from a number of leading scientific organizations. The scientific community and general public can contribute to this growing body of knowledge by posting images to the Flikr group and adding tags and text comments to any species page. In addition, citizen naturalists with a demonstrated commitment to quality science can apply to become curators who are responsible for maintaining the project's vetted content.




American Oystercatcher Banding

The American Oystercatcher Banding project needs citizen scientists to report the location, color, and type of bands observed on American Oystercatchers.

American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) are striking black and white shorebirds with large reddish-orange bills. Oystercatchers breed on coastal beaches from Baja California to Nova Scotia. Recent evidence of population declines, particularly in the Southeastern U.S., has prompted research aimed at understanding the bird's biology and conservation needs.

Color banding individual birds helps researchers learn about movement, habitat requirements, and survival, but only if people observe and report the locations of banded birds.

You can help!




West Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas II

The West Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas Project needs volunteer surveyors to document the breeding status of bird species. Surveyors register for atlas blocks and agree to provide adequate survey coverage either in the form of hours spent atlasing or number of species encountered – or both. Surveying a block involves documenting all bird species encountered. Their breeding status is recorded based on a series of codes which categorizes them as possible, probable or confirmed.

Anyone can participate! The success of the West Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas II depends on the active participation of a variety of outdoor enthusiasts; birders, hikers, hunters and anglers, backyard feeder watchers, farmers and the list goes on.

Please note that the most important way in which you can contribute to the atlas is by volunteering to survey atlas blocks and submitting as many observations as possible. However, there are many additional ways in which you can contribute to the success of the West Virginia Breeding Bird Atlas II.




The Wildlife Health Event Reporter

Wildlife Health Event Reporter (WHER) at www.wher.org is publicly available to anyone to use to report their sightings of sick or dead wildlife.

Individual reports viewed together can lead to the detection and containment of wildlife disease outbreaks that may pose a health risk to people, domestic animals and other wildlife. WHER hopes to harness the power of the many eyes of the public to better detect wildlife disease phenomenon.

Additionally, WHER was developed by the Wildlife Data Integration Network (WDIN), a program of the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.




iSpot - your place to share nature

iSpot is a unique website where you can get the help of a friendly community to identify anything living that you have seen in nature. We are based in the UK, but observations from elsewhere are welcome.

You can add an observation to the website, suggest an identification, or see if anyone else can identify an observation for you.

Help others by adding an identification to an existing observation. Your reputation on the site will grow as others with knowledge agree with you identifications.

Ultimately, the data collected on iSpot are added to a central depository of biodiversity data held by the National Biodiversity Network

We have online keys (also available via web browsers on cell phones) that are designed to help you identify certain groups of species.

What are you waiting for? Get outside and make some observations. :)




Wildlife Sightings - Citizen Science

Wildlife Sightings is a free service that enables projects leaders to publish, organize, and manage their own wildlife sightings data.

Wildlife Sightings helps eliminate the technical barriers and costs to non-profit organizations and educators wishing to conduct their own wildlife surveys. That way, nature lovers, conservation groups, eco-tourism business, and educators can focus their energy on what they love most -- citizen science!

Educators and non profit groups can create and manage their own citizen science class activity or projects with easy to use free online tools. Create a citizen science project in minutes and avoid costly development costs.

Documenting wildlife sightings contributes to science, engages community participants/students and strengthens environmental community efforts.




Juniper Pollen Project

**This project is no longer active**

You can contribute to a nation-wide effort this spring to provide more accurate juniper pollen forecasts! Juniper pollen causes severe allergic reactions in many people. The Juniper Pollen Project is a NASA-funded collaborative effort between the USA National Phenology Network and several universities in Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas to improve predictions of pollen release and allergy and asthma warnings.

You can join this effort by periodically checking individual juniper trees in your area for pollen cone development and reporting your observations via the USA National Phenology Network web page. Just choose one or more of our four species of juniper: Pinchot's juniper (Juniperus pinchotii), Rocky Mountain juniper (Juniperus scopulorum), oneseed juniper (Juniperus monosperma), or Ashe's juniper (Juniperus ashei), make observations of your juniper, and report your findings via the USA-NPN’s online system, Nature’s Notebook.




Rusty Blackbird

The Rusty Blackbird project needs volunteers to help researchers study the distribution and abundance of rusty blackbirds.

The rusty blackbird is a widespread North American species that has shown chronic long-term and acute short-term population declines, based both on breeding season and wintering ground surveys. The decline, although one of the most profound for any North American species, is poorly understood. Moreover, no conservation or monitoring programs exist for this species.

There are two ways you can help:

1. Submit rusty blackbird observations, particularly information related to breeding sites
and concentrations of birds during winter (Dec-Mar).

2. Join the rusty blackbird feather and blood donor project. If you regularly band rusty blackbirds, researchers could use feathers for isotope analysis and blood for genetic research, contaminant studies, and disease screening.




California Roadkill Observation System

Citizen scientist report their observations of roadkill (animals killed after collision with a vehicle) with an easy-to-use form. Roadkill data can be analyzed by observers and will be used to understand where roadkill occurs and the severity of the impact to wildlife species.




Beaver Creek Reserve BioBlitzes

A BioBlitz is a rapid biological survey of a property in which as many species from as many taxonomic groups as possible are counted during a 24-hour period. It is used to provide a snapshot of wildlife in an area, and to identify any rare or endangered species there. As a volunteer, you would participate in training to learn how to collect data during the BioBlitz, and on the day of the event you work with experts to identify species. By participating in the BioBlitz, you get the opportunity to meet and spend time with people who are interested in the environment, and learn about critters in Wisconsin!




Jay Watch: Monitoring Florida's Only Endemic Bird

Jay Watch needs volunteers in Florida to conduct surveys of the charismatic scrub-jay, the only Florida bird species that lives nowhere else on earth. Volunteers play recorded, territorial scrub-jay calls to attract the birds, then observe and record the number of family groups, adults and juveniles. Volunteers note any band color combinations, helping track individual birds. Information is
recorded on aerial maps by volunteers in the field and is then computerized.

During spring workshops, volunteers learn about Florida scrub-jay identification and biology, the scrub ecosystem and survey protocols. Permanent survey locations are established and each site is surveyed three times—before noon on separate days—to ensure all scrub-jays are observed. Jay Watch surveys are conducted from mid-June through July.

The scrub-jay is considered the indicator species of Florida’s oldest wild lands – the ancient islands that make up today’s scrub. When the scrub-jay does not thrive, something is wrong with its habitat.Today, degradation of scrub habitat pushes the scrub-jay toward extinction; they are listed as a threatened species by state and federal governments.

Unless people act, the Florida scrub-jay may blink right out of existence. The Conservancy and our Jay Watch partners know what the scrub-jay needs and how to provide it. The time to act is now. Will you help?




Common Loon Project

The Common Loon Citizen Science Project needs volunteers to conduct surveys at 45 high priority lakes in Glacier National Park to document presence of common loons and observations of breeding and nesting behaviors.

Common Loons are a Montana Species of Special Concern, and Glacier National Park harbors about 20 percent of Montana’s breeding pairs. Since 1988, data has been collected once every year during Loon Days. Analysis of these data indicate lower reproductive rates for pairs in the park compared to the rest of Montana. Finally, there is evidence that loons are adversely impacted by human disturbance at nest and nursery sites.

The Common Loon Citizen Science Project educates park staff and volunteers on successful identification and observation techniques when surveying for loons in hopes of increasing our understanding of this species. By improving accuracy of sightings and surveys and increasing coverage of lakes with loons throughout the nesting season, the project aims to gather season-long information to gain a better estimate of the health of Glacier National Park's loon population. The project will also use the data to begin to identify factors affecting nesting success.

Since 2005 the Glacier National Park Citizen Science program has enlisted trained park visitors, staff and volunteers to collect scientific information that would otherwise be unavailable to resource managers and researchers due to lack of personnel or funding. For citizen scientists, the rewards are a sense of stewardship and a greater awareness and understanding of the park’s resource issues. For the park, it provides a wealth of data which can be used to increase understanding of our natural resources, offering an opportunity to get much-needed baseline information about key plant and animal species.




The WildLab

The WildLab engages citizen scientists in bird and other wildlife identification, using mobile phones as tools of scientific discovery. Along with associated curricula and educational activities found on its website, the WildLab is a powerful new way to see the environment.

The WildLab Bird iPhone app includes photographs, audio, and range maps for more than 200 common bird species. The app helps users make correct identifications by leading them through a process of elimination. The application saves each sighting with location and other data, and sightings are logged in the user’s online WildLab account. Files based on a user's sightings can be easily loaded into Cornell Lab of Ornithology's eBird database.

In a pilot program developed with funding from the MacArthur Foundation, more than 500 New York City 5th- through 12th-grade students used iPhones to log thousands of bird sightings from nearby parks and green spaces. Participants in the project increased their knowledge as well as their interest in science careers. All educators involved in the project said they would participate again if it was offered in the future.

The WildLab has also piloted a program with the Cornell Cooperative Extension for horseshoe crab monitoring; this app will be available soon in the app store. Through collaborations with science education institutions around the country, the WildLab continues to develop new apps and will run its in-school bird program this fall.




citsci.org

CitSci.org is a platform that supports a variety of citizen science programs using a centralized database to store and deliver science data, with a focus on community based monitoring programs. This platform allows program coordinators to create their own projects and datasheets, manage members, define measurements, create analyses, and even write feedback forms.




South Asian Bat Monitoring Program

The South Asian Bat Monitoring Program relies on volunteers who identify Indian flying fox bats and commit to studying them and obtaining population information on a regular basis. It consists entirely of volunteers and is the first such network to monitor the population of a species in South Asia. The information from all these sites will be compiled and analyzed for trends in the population of Indian flying fox (Pteropus giganteus), identify key threats to roosts and provide recommendations for their conservation.

The program aims to create awareness about bat conservation issues, involve and educate biologists and nature-lovers in studies about the biology of bats, and establish a conservation action plan. The Program will initially focus on one species, Pteropus giganteus, as it is the most known and recognizable bat species in South Asia.

Although there are anecdotal accounts that indicate that populations and roosts of many bat species are decreasing, there is no hard evidence. There is thus an urgent need to assess the populations of bats and to monitor them on a regular basis to determine population trends.




World Birds

World Birds is a volunteer network that collects and makes available bird observations from around the world.

Developed as a global "family" of databases, each country has its own system linked to the map portal. This portal allows you to choose a country and submit your bird observations, thus making a valuable contribution to bird conservation on a local, national, and international scale.

Broadly accessible and with a strong community structure, this global initiative will establish a vast source of bird and environmental information generated by general birdwatchers and professionals alike.

Over time, more countries will be brought online as BirdLife partners implement new systems, leading to better coverage. Some of these databases will be developed independently, but many will be based on a core system, developed with the intention of bringing online as many countries as possible quickly and with minimal expense.




MigrantWatch: Tracking Bird Migration Across India

MigrantWatch needs volunteers in India to watch for one or more migratory bird species in places where the volunteers live, work, or visit regularly, and to note the dates of first and last sighting during the migration season. Information collected in MigrantWatch will add to the global understanding of the effects of climate change on phenology (the timing of natural events).

Long distance migration of birds, like other natural seasonal phenomena, is affected by environmental factors such as temperature and length of day. Significant changes in migratory patterns have been documented for many bird species in various parts of the world and these have often been attributed to climate change. Documenting and understanding such changes is important because these may have implications for the survival of migratory species. Unfortunately, hardly any detailed information is available on the timing of bird migration in India and how this might be changing.

When do these birds come to India and how do they spread across the country? As the global climate changes, is the timing of migration changing too? Information is scarce and your help is needed to answer these questions.

Join by contributing your sightings of migrants!




Seabird Ecological Assessment Network (SEANET)

Seabird Ecological Assessment Network (SEANET) volunteers conduct beached bird surveys along the east coast of the United States in order to identify and record information about bird mortality. Volunteers examine the spatial pattern of bird carcass deposition and how it varies across time.

The project brings together interdisciplinary researchers and citizen scientists in a long-term collaborative effort to identify and mitigate threats to marine birds.

These surveys provide baseline information about bird mortality and help to detect mass mortality events such as oil spills, algal toxins, and disease outbreaks. Marine birds can serve as indicators of ecosystem and human health; monitoring the threats they face and their mortality patterns can teach us about the health of the marine environment.

This project relies heavily on a working partnership between concerned citizens with an incomparable understanding of local ecosystems and natural phenomena, and scientists with the training and knowledge to synthesize and verify the data generated by local residents. Through this synergistic relationship, scientists exponentially increase the amount and range of data they can access, and residents come to see the larger patterns and trends of which their local ecosystem is a part.




New Jersey Audubon Grassland Bird Survey

New Jersey Audubon Grassland Bird Survey needs volunteers to undertake surveys for grassland birds, such as the Bobolink, Northern Bobwhite, and Eastern Meadowlark, along established routes and in managed grasslands, and to collect data on bird abundance and habitat characteristics.

Participants should have some familiarity with grassland birds and be willing to improve their skills. Additional training in identification and counting methodology will be provided by New Jersey Audubon.

Grassland habitat in the Northeast has been disappearing rapidly due to urban sprawl, and grassland bird declines have been documented in Breeding Bird Surveys from New Jersey.

The purpose of this project is to:

- assess changes in abundance and distribution of grasslands bird

- determine how habitat and landscape characteristics influence grassland birds so that we can implement sound management strategies

New Jersey residents: don't miss this chance to make a difference!




New Jersey Audubon Shorebird Survey

New Jersey Audubon Shorebird Survey needs volunteers to count shorebirds and record information about their behavior in the New Jersey meadowlands.

The survey is aimed at assessing status and changes in populations of shorebirds. The data collected by volunteers will be incorporated into the national database of the Program for Regional and International Shorebird Monitoring, whose overall goal is to monitor trends in shorebird populations.

In addition, the information will help identify areas important to southbound shorebirds, and define shorebird management goals for New Jersey.

New Jersey residents: don't miss this chance to make a difference!




Audubon of Florida EagleWatch

Audubon of Florida's EagleWatch Program seeks volunteers to monitor active Bald Eagle nest sites and help identify potential threats to nesting success.

As a result of Florida’s rapidly changing environment, Bald Eagles currently nest successfully in urban areas. This increased exposure to human activity and the pressure that exposure can put on the eagle population prompted the EagleWatch Program.

EagleWatch seeks information about Bald Eagles, active nest locations, and possible disturbances or threats to nesting activities. The program is designed to educate volunteers in general eagle nesting biology, applicable laws, the identification of nest threats, monitoring techniques, and the verification of previously unrecorded active eagle nests.

This data is compiled and used to assist Florida's Mid-winter Annual Bald Eagle Nesting Survey by documenting both urban and rural eagle nesting activity, successes, and failures. The U.S Fish and Wildlife Service also utilizes EagleWatch data to enhance their conservation and law enforcement efforts.




Osprey NestWatch - Volunteer Monitoring Program

Osprey NestWatch is a Volunteer Program in Washington state developed by the Upper Columbia Basin Network Inventory and Monitoring Program in collaboration with Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area. This program seeks to monitor osprey nest use and nesting success, and to inform park staff and the public about the status and trend of the osprey populations at Lake Roosevelt.

We need volunteers who can adopt one or more osprey nests at Lake Roosevelt, monitor nest activity throughout the breeding season, and report their observations online. This program is web-based and free of charge.

Data collected by volunteers will provide important information about the status and trends of osprey nest occupancy and reproductive success, and will help guide park management decisions. Join us and help provide valuable information about the osprey population at Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area!




Birds in Forested Landscapes

Volunteers with the Birds in Forested Landscapes project observe and record forest-dwelling birds in North America to help scientists better understand the birds' habitat and conservation needs. As a volunteer, you will help answer the following questions:

1. How much habitat do different forest-dwelling bird species require for successful breeding?

2. How are habitat requirements affected by land uses, such as human development, forestry, and agriculture?

3. How do the habitat requirements of a species vary across its range?

Anyone who can or would like to learn to identify forest birds by sight and sound can become a volunteer. Birds in Forested Landscapes is an excellent project for birding groups, such as bird clubs and Audubon chapters, and works well with high school or college curricula.

After identifying a target species and an appropriate forest area to survey, you will conduct two visits, two weeks apart, to determine if the target species is present and to record any signs of breeding activity by playing recordings of bird songs and listening for responses from birds in your survey area.

The project runs from January to September every year.




YardMap

Map habitat in backyards, parks, and schools. Work towards more sustainable landscapes. The YardMap network lets you draw your landscapes with a beautiful online mapping tool and helps you learn about how to use your outdoor spaces (big or small) to aid birds and other wildlife. Connect to other citizen scientists, solve problems, share your maps and good ideas all while helping to build an invaluable database of habitat data for Cornell Lab of Ornithology Scientists.




Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project

Volunteers for Operation RubyThroat observe hummingbird migration and/or nesting behavior and share information with peers across North and Central America. The resulting data on hummingbird behavior and distribution are submitted to a central clearing house, analyzed, and then disseminated to scientists through the Operation RubyThroat website.

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds (Archilochus colubris) are the most widely distributed of the 339 species of hummingbirds, occurring in all ten countries of North and Central America. They come frequently to nectar plants and backyard sugar water feeders and are easily observed. Nonetheless, many aspects of the birds’ natural history are not well understood.

Through EarthTrek, Operation RubyThroat seeks data about two aspects of Ruby-throated Hummingbird behavior: 1) timing of migration; and 2) nesting. In addition to providing much-needed baseline information, your data may help show whether these birds’ behaviors are changing, perhaps due to external factors such as climate change, alteration of habitat, and other factors.




Sound Around You Project

I am building a sound map of the world as part of a study into how sounds in our everyday environment make us feel. We need your help!

We’re asking people across the world to use our new iOS app on their iPhones or iPads (or any recorder) to record short clips from different sound environments, or "soundscapes"--anything from the inside of a family car to a busy shopping centre. Then we ask volunteers to comment on their soundscapes and upload them to our virtual soundscape map.

Recordings and responses will be analyzed by acoustic scientists, and significant findings will be reported on this website.

Sound Around You aims to raise awareness of how our soundscape influences us, and could have far reaching implications for professions and social groups ranging from urban planners to house buyers.




Project NOAH

Noah is a mobile phone app that allows nature lovers to document local wildlife and add their observations to a growing database for use by ongoing citizen-science projects.

Using the Noah mobile application, users take a photograph of an interesting organism, select the appropriate category, add descriptive tags, and click submit. The application captures the location details along with the submitted information and stores all of it in the species database for use by efforts such as Project Squirrel and the Lost Ladybug Project.

In addition, users can see what kinds of organisms are nearby by searching through a list or exploring a map of their area, all on a mobile phone.

Noah is all about discovering and documenting local wildlife. We work with research groups and organizations to help gather important data and we want you to help by logging recent spottings on your mobile phone. Missions can range from photographing specific frogs or flowers to tracking migrating birds or invasive species or logging the effects of the oil spill.




AnimalsandEarth

Explore, share, and contribute photos of animals around the world. Animals and Earth is a resource for photos of all species, their behavior, habitats, and conservation efforts.

There are several ways you can participate.

Option A: Find photos or issues you care about by browsing our photo collection of animals and earth photos. Gather a photo collection, create a blog, and start your own conservation effort using our content

Option B: Grab your camera and help document the flora and fauna of your place on earth.

Option C: Help identify animals and places on our site by adding photo locations and Latin names for animals photos that are not identified yet. Post photos to websites, blogs and social networks promotes awareness and conservation.




Bird Conservation Network Survey

The Bird Conservation Network Survey needs citizen scientists to record bird distribution and abundance information for birds in the Greater Chicago region.

Bird monitors can participate at different levels:

- If you have a special interest in a particular site, you can become a regular monitor at that site and keep a year-round watch on the birds that nest, winter, or migrate through that site.

- You may help track changes in nesting populations by conducting point count surveys during the breeding season.

- You may visit a site during the nesting season and record numbers and species of birds just as you would on a Christmas Count.

- If you do not have the time to become a regular site monitor, you can still contribute your sightings.

The Bird Conservation Network has created a set of standardized methods for studying the birds of the Chicago Wilderness region. These methods can serve a variety of research purposes while also allowing birders to participate at different levels of intensity. Participants commit to making five or more visits to the site each year with at least two of those visits coming during breeding season (June). Also, participants should be able to recognize Illinois birds by sight and sound. By general rule, a birder should have about at least three years of experience with field identification of birds in the Illinois area.

The goals of this study are to generate a general picture of bird distribution in the region, to collect data to assist land managers and conservation planners in decision making, and to create a database compatible with other types of habitat data being gathered in the region which can be used by researchers investigating specific ecosystem questions.




Wisconsin NatureMapping

Wisconsin NatureMapping is the place for citizens, students, and professionals to map their observations of Wisconsin wildlife.

As you know, wildlife knows no property boundaries. A robin will flit from tree to tree with no regard to whether that tree is in a state park or in your backyard. But what if that robin builds a nest in the tree outside your window? Who monitors that nest? What about the deer that come into your yard and eat your vegetables? Who is monitoring them?

The answer is: YOU are! You know your backyard and your neighborhood better than most natural resource professionals do simply because YOU live there and YOU see the critters that live there every day!

To best manage wildlife populations, Wisconsin state biologists need to have as much information as possible about where a species lives. That means they need to know just as much about where species are when they are NOT on public land as when they are. And YOU are the critical link to making sure they get that information.

Another very important reason you should NatureMap is because the wildlife observations you submit to Wisconsin NatureMapping are used to better inform the Wisconsin State Wildlife Action Plan. This is a federally mandated plan in which the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources must describe how they will manage all of the species of Wisconsin wildlife. Map your wildlife observations today!




MoGO

Collect Gulf Oil Spill data using your iPhone. MoGO (Mobile Gulf Observatory) is an app that turns you and your iPhone into a "citizen scientist" helping wildlife experts find and rescue oiled birds, sea turtles, and dolphins.

The MoGO app allows you to take and submit photos of oiled, injured, and dead marine and coastal wildlife; tar balls on beaches; oil slicks on water; and oiled coastal habitats.




Massachusetts Audubon American Kestrel Monitoring Project

Massachusetts Audubon's American Kestrel Monitoring Project needs citizen scientists to record kestral sightings and breeding data in Massachusetts.

There are two ways to get involved:

1. Reporting: Seen a kestrel? You can report it online using the project's map tool. American Kestrels in Massachusetts breed between roughly May 10 to July 20. Simply record when and where you saw the bird, along with a brief note as to what it was doing. This information will help us choose good sites for new nest boxes!

2. Monitoring: If you've got a lot of time and enthusiasm, the project might be able to use your help as a volunteer Kestrel Box Monitor. Monitors will be assigned to check boxes frequently during the breeding season and to record important breeding data for use in evaluating the effectiveness of the program.

The American Kestrel is facing some serious challenges. Massachusetts Audubon would like to be prepared to meet those challenges for years to come, but they can't do it without your help!




Massachusetts Audubon Whip-poor-will Project

Massachusetts Audubon's Whip-poor-will Project is an opportunity for state residents to contribute their observations to a database that will track Whip-poor-wills.

Once common and widespread, Whip-poor-wills have undergone a steady decline that has seemed especially steep to many observers during the last 30 years. In Massachusetts, these birds continue to be common in undisturbed pine-oak barrens on the South Shore, Cape Cod, and the Islands, but are few and far between elsewhere. Like many aspects of Whip-poor-will life, there is little certainty about the causes.

Participants use an online map tool to pinpoint where they have heard a Whip-poor-will. The project has also established a number of "listening routes" statewide. Participants drive these routes under certain prescribed conditions, stopping at regular intervals to listen for three minutes and record any Whip-poor-wills they hear.

The purpose of the Whip-poor-will project is to study the distribution, populations, and breeding activities of Whip-poor-wills in Massachusetts. The data we collect will be the basis for future conservation efforts to ensure that this remarkable night bird will continue to be a part of the Commonwealth's natural heritage.




Massachusetts Audubon Oriole Project

The Oriole Project is an opportunity for Massachusetts residents to observe and help track the health of Baltimore Oriole populations.

While Baltimore Orioles are still relatively common in Massachusetts, scientists have detected local population declines and have proposed that the species be monitored. This on-going pilot project aims to study the distribution, populations, and breeding activities of Baltimore Orioles in the Massachusetts area.

The project's new online mapping tool allows participants to enter as many oriole sightings as they want with only a single sign-on. The tool also allows volunteers to pinpoint the exact locality of a bird without having to give an address or written description.

The goal of the Massachusetts Audubon Oriole Project is to enlist as many citizen scientists as possible in building a database about the breeding status of these magnificent birds. The data collected now will form the foundation for future conservation efforts to ensure that this beautiful vocalist will be a permanent part of the New England landscape.




Massachusetts Audubon Owls Project

This project needs citizen scientists to report any owls they see or hear in Massachusetts.

Participants can easily report their discoveries on the project's online Owl Reporter form. This online mapping tool allows volunteers to enter as many owl sightings as they want through a single sign-in. The tool also allows citizen scientists to pinpoint the exact locality of an owl without having to give an address or written description.

These reports provide valuable information about the owl population in Massachusetts. Your contributions will even help out other citizen science projects, such as the Breeding Bird Atlas project and Snowy owl research.

Whoooo knew citizen science could be so awesome!?




Bird Atlas 2007-11: Mapping Britain and Ireland's Birds

Bird Atlas 2007-11 needs volunteers in the United Kingdom to help produce maps of distribution and relative abundance for all bird species that breed and winter in the area.

Bird atlases provide a fascinating periodic insight into the status of all of the bird species of an area. This project will allow researchers to assess changes in bird distributions since previous breeding atlases in 1970 and 1990, and since the last winter atlas of the early 1980s. Atlases have been immensely important for furthering bird knowledge and conservation, and Bird Atlas 2007-11 is destined to set the agenda for the next decades of ornithology in Britain and Ireland.

Fieldwork will span four winters and four breeding seasons, starting November 1, 2007, and concluding in 2011. There are two ways in which you can help:

1. Timed Tetrad Visits - record all the birds you see and hear in a 2km x 2km square. Visit for an hour or more in the winter and breeding season.

2. Roving Records - any bird, anytime, anywhere. If you see it, record it, and, the project coordinators will map it.

The Bird Atlas is a huge project that will synthesize millions of individual bird records. Don't miss this chance to make an important contribution.




Bird Ringing at the British Trust for Ornithology

Bird Ringing at the British Trust for Ornithology is a network of more than 2,500 trained and licensed volunteers in the United Kingdom that ring--or tag--more than 900,000 birds every year.

Bird ringing involves the fitting of small, uniquely numbered metal rings on the legs of birds. By identifying these birds as individuals, researchers can start to understand changes in the survival and movements of bird populations.

Bird ringers come in many types, from individuals working in urban areas to large groups working in a wide geographic area, and can start at any age. Though you definitely don’t need to be a bird expert to ring, it does help if you have some prior bird knowledge. Anyone who wants to participate in the project will need to gain field experience with a qualified trainer.

You’ll no doubt find that ringing is a very satisfying activity. Not only will you be adding to 100 years of data used directly by conservationists, but you will also enjoy the experience of seeing birds close up. Whether you want to train to ring birds in nest boxes, gardens, or a local gravel pit, your contribution is vital to the project's success.




Nest Box Challenge

Nest Box Challenge gives anyone in the United Kingdom the opportunity to monitor the breeding success of birds in Britain's green spaces. Participants register the nest boxes in their gardens or local areas and record what's inside at regular intervals during the breeding season.

Britain's gardens play an increasingly important role in supporting British bird populations and providing food, shelter, and nesting sites. It is therefore vital to keep a close eye on bird populations in rural, suburban, and urban areas.

The information collected can be used to understand more about why some species are increasing while others are declining, and to help researchers find out whether warmer weather and the provision of food can make a difference in the number of chicks that birds are able to raise.

Just a few well-planned visits to the nest can provide useful information. Are you up to the challenge?




Nest Record Scheme

Nest Record Scheme volunteers gather vital information on the productivity of the United Kingdom's birds, using simple, standardized techniques. Participants provide the evidence needed to confirm whether a species in decline is encountering problems at the nesting stage.

Nest recording is one of the simplest citizen science projects at the British Trust for Ornithology in which to participate. Data are analyzed annually, and the results are published in the
"Breeding Birds in the Wider Countryside" report along with information on species’ abundance obtained through other British Trust for Ornithology monitoring schemes. Nest record data are also used to investigate the causes of species-specific trends in breeding success.

The project provides an ideal opportunity to participate in the conservation of Britain’s birds. Whether you can monitor a single garden nestbox or carry out a larger study, your records make a valuable contribution to the project.




Wetland Bird Survey

The Wetland Bird Survey (WeBS) needs volunteer birdwatchers to monitor non-breeding waterbirds in the United Kingdom. The principal aims of the project are to measure population sizes, determine trends in numbers and distribution, and to identify important sites for waterbirds.

Counts are made at around 2,000 wetland sites, of all habitat types. Volunteers make monthly coordinated counts. The principal months of data collection are from September to March, though observations are increasingly submitting data throughout the year.

Volunteers use the so-called "look-see" methodology, whereby the observer, familiar with the species involved, surveys the whole of a predefined area. Data are widely used for a variety of purposes and are presented in the annual WeBS Report.

The Wetland Bird Survey is dependent upon the enthusiasm and dedication of the several thousand volunteer counters throughout the UK. New counters are always needed to cover new sites, particularly habitats such as rivers which are monitored less comprehensively, as well as to replace counters who retire.




Breeding Bird Survey

This project needs volunteers to survey breeding bird populations in the United Kingdom. Join more than 3,000 participants who now survey more than 3,200 sites across the region and monitor the population changes of more than 100 bird species!

Breeding Bird Survey is the main source of population trend information about the United Kingdom’s common and widespread birds. Knowing to what extent bird populations are increasing or decreasing is fundamental to bird conservation, and the status of these populations is an important indicator of the health of the countryside.

Breeding Bird Survey is designed to be a quick, simple, and enjoyable birdwatching experience. Survey sites are randomly selected, 1-km (.6-mile) squares of land. Participants make just three visits to specially selected squares, the first to record habitat and to set up a suitable survey route and the second and third to record birds that are seen or heard while walking along the route. Participants do not need to be world-class birders to take part, but they should be able to identify common birds by sight and sound.

Join today -- all new volunteers receive a free CD of the songs and calls of more than 70 British bird species.




BirdTrack

BirdTrack is a free, online bird recording system for birdwatchers to store and manage their own records from anywhere in Britain and Ireland. Everyone with an interest in birds can get involved by recording when and where they watched birds then completing a list of the species seen and heard during the trip.

Exciting real-time outputs are generated by BirdTrack, including species reporting rate graphs and animated maps of sightings, all freely-available online. The data collected are used by researchers to investigate migration movements and distributions of birds and to support species conservation at local, national and international scales.

BirdTrack is year-round and ongoing, making it an ideal project for getting children enthused about birds and migration. Teachers are encouraged to add their school grounds as a BirdTrack site then help their students to record the birds they see and hear.

The success of BirdTrack relies on YOU. Get started today!




Garden BirdWatch

Garden BirdWatch needs citizen scientists in the United Kingdom to gather information on how different species of birds use gardens and how this use changes over time. Gardens are an important habitat for many wild birds and provide a useful refuge for those affected by changes in the management of the countryside. The data gathered in this project enables researchers at the British Trust for Ornithology to monitor the changing fortunes of garden birds.

Some 16,000 participants currently take part in Garden BirdWatch. Participants send in simple, weekly records of bird species that they see in their gardens. This information is either submitted on paper count forms or by using Garden BirdWatch Online. Each participant also supports the project financially through an annual contribution of £15 (approximately $22). In return, participants receive the quarterly color magazine, Bird Table, count forms, and access to advice on feeding and attracting garden birds.

All new joiners will receive a free copy of an exclusive paperback version of the acclaimed "Garden Birds and Wildlife" (normally £14.99).




Puget Sound Seabird Survey

Volunteer birdwatchers with the Puget Sound Seabird Survey gather valuable data on wintering seabird populations in the Puget Sound. The project is organized by the Seattle Audubon Society.

During monthly winter surveys from October to April, volunteers identify and count birds from the Puget Sound shoreline using a protocol designed by leading seabird researchers. Volunteers count all species of coastal seabirds including geese, ducks, swans, loons, grebes, cormorants, gulls, terns, and alcids. These data will be used to create a snapshot of seabird density on more than three square miles of nearshore saltwater habitat.

Puget Sound Seabird Survey is the only land-based, multi-month survey in the central or south Puget Sound.




Smithsonian's Neighborhood Nestwatch

Volunteers for the Smithsonian Institution's Neighborhood Nestwatch in the Washington, DC, area team with scientists to find and monitor bird nests and to record and report their observations.

Participants help capture, measure, and band backyard birds as well as track their presence from year to year. Through annual summer visits to urban, suburban, and rural backyards, participants and their families receive coaching on how to monitor and report data on nests of common backyard birds.

Volunteers also become an important part of a study seeking to determine the effectiveness of informal education experiences.

If you live within 60 miles of Washington, DC, take a naturalist’s journey into the mysterious lives of neighborhood birds, and join more than 200 citizen scientists making significant contributions to our knowledge of backyard wildlife.




Bald Eagle Watch

Bald Eagle Watch volunteers monitor various eagle nests across the Colorado Front Range to provide information to biologists on the nesting success of the Colorado Bald Eagle population.

From January to July, Bald Eagle Watch volunteers collect nesting data and record many aspects of the breeding cycle, including courtship, incubation, feeding of nestlings, and fledging of the juveniles.

Colorado is home to many resident and migrant Bald Eagles. This is a fantastic opportunity to continue monitoring the eagle population to ensure it remains viable.




ColonyWatch: Monitoring Colorado Waterbirds

ColonyWatch volunteers monitor colonial waterbirds in Colorado, and resource managers use this information to effect long-term conservation. Anyone who enjoys birds and is concerned with their conservation can be an effective ColonyWatcher.

ColonyWatchers devote anywhere from an hour to several days monitoring a colony. A large colony containing several species may require a number of visits, each of several hours duration. Most of the colonies are small and many can be surveyed in a single visit. Most ColonyWatchers take responsibility for a single colony, but some have adopted up to a dozen.

Anyone who has an interest can acquire the necessary skills, and technical support is always available from the project coordinator and Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory. Become a ColonyWatcher today!




Seward Park Phenology

Seward Park in Seattle, Washington, needs volunteers to record the plants and animals that they see during visits to the park.

Phenology is the study of the natural events of plants and animals. By recording the days, times, and locations of plants and animal sightings, researchers can learn about the various Seward Park ecosystems.

It's easy to participate -- just post any of your observations at the park to the online guest book.




Seward Park Eagle and Raptor DNA Fingerprinting

Seward Park in Seattle, Washington, needs volunteers to create a library of the DNA fingerprints of all the eagles who live in or visit the park.

You can help with this project in two ways:

1. Collect the eagle feathers you find at Seward Park.

2. Spool the DNA (prepare samples for testing) from eagle feathers and run the gel electrophoresis. Gels are run on Saturdays every 6 to 8 weeks or whenever project organizers get enough feathers.

Join in! It's like CSI for animals!




COASST

COASST (Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team) is a network of citizen scientists that monitor marine resources and ecosystem health at 450 beaches across northern California, Oregon, Washington, and Alaska.

Team volunteers pledge to survey their beach every month. In return, the COASST office pledges to put all of the data together, decipher the patterns across the entire survey range, and give that information back out to volunteers and the communities.

COASST believes that the citizens of coastal communities are essential scientific partners in monitoring marine ecosystem health. By collaborating with citizens, natural resource management agencies, and environmental organizations, COASST works to translate long-term monitoring into effective marine conservation solutions.




BeakGeek

BeakGeek allows citizen scientists to share information about birds and bird sightings using freely available and simple social networking tools such as Twitter. BeakGeek adds value to the data created with these tools by providing map based visualizations and monitoring for terms such as "Rare Bird Alert".




Find the Swallow-tailed Kite

The Center for Birds of Prey needs your help identifying Swallow-tailed Kites.

You can help researchers determine the birds' distribution, monitor population trends, and locate important nesting and foraging sites.

Swallow-tailed Kites have striking black and white plumage with a long, scissor-like tail. They are primarily located in bottomland forests and open habitat.

If you see one, all you need to do is report when and where you saw the bird, as well as any other observation details.




Nature's Calendar Survey

Nature's Calendar is a survey conducted by thousands of volunteers who record the signs of the seasons in the United Kingdom.

This could mean noting the first ladybird or swallow seen in your garden in spring, or the first blackberry in your local wood in autumn.

If you live in the UK, you don’t have to be an expert to take part, and lots of help is given, including a nature identification booklet that you receive when you register.

This kind of recording has moved from being a harmless hobby to a crucial source of evidence as to how our wildlife is responding to climate change.




Loudoun Bird Atlas

The Loudoun Bird Atlas is a citizen science project to establish a comprehensive list of birds in Loudoun County, VA, including their dates of occurrence and distribution. The atlas is unique in that it is county-wide and will collect data year-round for both breeding and non-breeding birds.

Volunteers will use a field card to collect data on the occurrence and distribution of birds throughout Loudoun County. Field data will be collected from spring 2009 through spring 2013. Our goal is to publish a Birds of Loudoun booklet in 2014 with the atlas results and information on Loudoun County’s important bird areas.

Birds play a key role in our ecosystem and are important indicators of the overall health of our environment. Loudoun’s diverse habitats, ranging from forests and wetlands to suburban parks, make this county an important breeding and wintering site for many birds. This atlas project will create a baseline of information that can be used to indicate areas in need of conservation and measure the success of future conservation activities.




Loudoun Bluebird Nestbox Monitoring

Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy needs citizen volunteers to set up and monitor bluebird nest box trails across Loudoun County, Virginia.

Participants can monitor at one of the Loudoun County public trails or at their own home trail. In addition, participants can help build new trails and repair existing ones.

By monitoring the boxes, the Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy can collect information on its native cavity nesters, learn about their lives first hand, and track population trends.




ClimateWatch

The first continental phenology project in the southern hemisphere, ClimateWatch allows every Australian the opportunity of becoming a citizen scientist by observing and recording data on a number of plant and animal species.

Climate change is affecting rainfall and temperature across Australia. As a consequence, flowering times, breeding cycles and migration movements are likely to change as a result of also changing. However, scientists have very little data available to understand the impacts of this. You can help.

By observing the timing of natural events (the study of phenology), such as the budding of flowers, falling of leaves and the appearance of migratory birds, the data you collect and record will help shape the country's scientific response to climate change.

Become a regular ClimateWatcher by recording what you see in your backyard home, on the move, or on one of over 40 ClimateWatch trails in gardens and parks across Australia.

Record sightings online, or through the free ClimateWatch smartphone app.




Celebrate Urban Birds

Celebrate Urban Birds provides an opportunity for everyone across the country to watch birds and participate in activities focused on birds and neighborhood habitat improvement.

Participants learn about 16 species of birds and watch an area about the size of half a basketball court for 10 minutes to see if they can find any of those birds. Celebrate Urban Birds provides all of the necessary materials to get you started.

An important part of the celebration is to help scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology collect information about the 16 key species of urban birds and the habitats they use. The scientists have created a project that will use data collected from participants to study these resident and migratory birds and their interaction with the urban habitat.

Participants can observe birds and collect data from urban, suburban, and rural locations.




Project Feeder Watch

Project FeederWatch is a winter-long survey of birds that visit feeders at backyards, nature centers, community areas, and other locales in North America. FeederWatchers periodically count the birds they see at their feeders from November through early April and send their counts to Project FeederWatch. Counts can be submitted online or on paper forms.

Anyone with an interest in birds can participate! FeederWatch is conducted by people of all skill levels and backgrounds, including children, families, individuals, classrooms, retired persons, youth groups, nature centers, and bird clubs.

FeederWatch data help scientists track broadscale movements of winter bird populations and long-term trends in bird distribution and abundance. FeederWatch results are regularly published in scientific journals and are shared with ornithologists and bird lovers nationwide. The counts you submit will make sure that your birds (or lack of birds) are represented in papers and in the results found in the Explore Data section of the FeederWatch website.

In addition to instructional materials, registered participants receive a subscription to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's quarterly newsletter, BirdScope as well as a summary of results from the prior season each fall.




eBird

eBird is a free, real-time, online program that enlists birdwatchers to record the presence or absence of different bird species.

Participants record when, where, and how they went birding, then fill out a checklist of all the birds seen and heard during the outing. eBird shares the observations of birders with a global community of educators, land managers, ornithologists, and conservation biologists.

eBird has revolutionized the way that the birding community reports and accesses information about birds. eBird provides rich data sources for basic information on bird abundance and distribution at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Importantly, it helps to increase our understanding of birds and our appreciation for the uniqueness of our planet's biodiversity.




Cape Cod Osprey Project

The Cape Cod Osprey project seeks to map and track all of the Osprey nests on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Since 2008 we have mapped over 220 nest locations, many more than were thought to exist on the Cape. Using our network of volunteers we have collected productivity data (number of chicks fledged/pair) on up to 140 nests. We are looking for volunteers to help monitor nesting behavior of ospreys and help us map new nest locations.




Who's Whoo-ing: Study Suburban Owls

We know that owls live in nature preserves, but do they live in residential areas (like your backyard) in-between? Join researchers from the Mianus River Gorge Preserve (Bedford, N.Y.), in a study to map owl habitat in our suburban environment.

We are enlisting residents from New York's Westchester, Putnam, and Fairfield Counties as “citizen scientists” to collect data on screech and barred owls in their backyard using “call playback surveys.” This data will be used to find out where these owls live, if they co-occur, and what habitats and areas they tend to live in or avoid.




NestWatch

Whether in a shrub, a tree, or a nest box, bird nests are everywhere. Find one, and you can help scientists study the biology and monitor populations of North America’s birds by joining the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s NestWatch program. Every year, volunteers from across the country visit nests once or twice each week and monitor their progression from incubating eggs to fuzzy chicks to fully feathered adults. They then submit this data to NestWatch where it is compiled and analyzed.

NestWatch helps people of all ages and backgrounds connect with nature. The information that NestWatchers collect allows us to understand the impact that various threats, such as environmental change and habitat destruction, have on breeding birds. Armed with this knowledge, we can take the necessary steps to help birds survive in this changing world.




What on Earth

Armed with your camera, rediscover your natural surroundings; you might be surprised what you find!

British biodiversity is currently under threat, with thousands of our plants and animals facing habitat destruction and homelessness. What on Earth is a call-to-action to identify as many plants and animals as possible in UK parks, gardens, and hedgerows.

Go outside and reconnect with all the weird and wonderful flora and fauna that inhabit our small but diverse land.

Upload a photo of anything you don't recognise and in return we'll send you a free packet of seeds designed to encourage more creatures to inhabit your local space (subject to availability), in addition to a Biodiversity Information and Activity Pack.




Nature's Notebook

Observe seasonal changes in plants and animals to improve our understanding of climate change impacts.

Changes in climate are affecting plant and animal activity across the nation. These modifications impact our economy, human health, natural resources and agriculture. Join us-help document how things are changing!




Volunteers-In-Parks

Volunteers-In-Parks participants work side-by-side with National Park Service employees to preserve the United States' natural and cultural legacy and to help visitors discover the resources, meanings, and values found in its national parks.

Anyone can be a "VIP": individuals, couples, families, students, and organized groups from all over the United States and the world. Become a VIP and put yourself at the heart of the park experience!

Volunteers-In-Parks participants play an ever-increasing role in national parks through a variety of jobs, including answering visitor questions at an information desk, presenting living history demonstrations in period costumes, building fences, painting buildings, making cabinets, giving guided nature walks and evening campfire programs, assisting with preservation of museum artifacts, maintaining trails, building boardwalks, designing computer programs or park websites, and serving on a bike, horseback, or beach patrol.




Internships at the National Park Service

National Park Service internships provide learning opportunities through activities such as wilderness re-vegetation, assistance with preservation and restoration projects, water quality monitoring, surveying, educational cave tours, or assisting resource management staff.

Internships offer an interesting and educational experience in some of the most beautiful areas of the country. This is your chance to get actively involved in the stewardship of the United States' national and natural treasures.




Geoscientists-in-the-Parks

Geoscientists-in-the-Parks partners geoscience students and experts with volunteers to conduct scientific research that helps the National Park Service better understand and manage its natural resources.

Participants may assist with research, synthesis of scientific literature, geologic mapping, geographic information system analysis, site evaluations, resource inventorying and monitoring, impact mitigation, developing brochures and informative media presentations, and educating park staff as well as park visitors.

Volunteers selected for the program have a unique opportunity to contribute to a variety of important research, resource management, interpretation and education projects. Parks benefit from a participant’s knowledge and skills in geological or physical sciences, while each participant gains valuable experience by working with the National Park Service. Volunteers with all levels of experience are encouraged to apply.




Project Pigeon Watch

Project Pigeon Watch is a citizen science project in which volunteers count pigeons and record the colors of courting pigeons.

Pigeon watching can take place anywhere in the world where pigeons gather in flocks, are accustomed to being fed, and have close contact with people. The data reported back to scientists are crucial for this ongoing research, and pigeon watchers, in turn, learn about birds and how science and scientists work. Anyone can be a pigeon watcher, including kids in urban youth groups, rural after-school groups, science classes, and home schools.

Project Pigeon Watch aims to teach people how to conduct a scientific study and to show them that research can be fun! The project helps people learn about the coloration and courtship behaviors of pigeons and tries to understand why pigeons exist in so many colors.




The National Science Digital Library

The National Science Digital Library encourages citizens to help enlarge and strengthen their library of high quality resources and tools that support science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education.

Developers of content in these subject areas, National Science Foundation grantees, educators and learners, and all other members of the community are welcome to recommend digital resources for the library. These resources include activities, lesson plans, Web sites, simulations, or any materials that help educators meet the demands of an increasingly complex technology-based world.

As a national network of learning environments, resources, and partnerships, the National Science Digital Library seeks to serve a vital role in educational cyberlearning for the nation, meeting the informational and technological needs of educators and learners at all levels.




Behavior Watch

Behavior Watch volunteers collect observational data on a wide variety of species that live at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C. In addition to playing a vital role in behavioral research, volunteers also experience the joy of being in a wonderful place with dedicated people and learning about and helping extraordinary animals.




Maine Owl Monitoring Program

The Maine Owl Monitoring Program is a citizen science project investigating the effects of different survey protocols on owl detections.

The program aims to document the distribution and abundance of Maine’s owls, including both common and rare species; examine habitat, weather, and other variables that may relate to owl distribution and abundance; and engage citizen scientists in a unique research opportunity.




Global Warming Ambassador

Global Warming Ambassadors are volunteers trained by the National Wildlife Federation to conduct outreach to the general public through presentations and community events. Ambassadors will describe global warming concepts, how climate change affects wildlife habitat in our country as well as your state, and what people can do on an individual level to confront global warming.

This work will help the National Wildlife Federation educate, inspire, and assist individuals and organizations of diverse cultures in conserving wildlife and other natural resources.




Habitat Steward

Habitat Stewards are volunteers trained by the National Wildlife Federation to help people create and restore wildlife habitat in their communities. Stewards lead efforts to build wildlife habitats, provide information about conservation and environment initiatives, and organize landscapes in public places and home settings.

Habitat Stewards take intensive, hands-on training facilitated by the National Wildlife Federation. Stewards are asked to volunteer for 30 hours of service within a year of completing their training. Their work will play an important role in the National Wildlife Federation's mission to educate, inspire, and assist individuals and organizations of diverse cultures in conserving wildlife and other natural resources.




Habitat Ambassador

Habitat Ambassadors are volunteers trained by the National Wildlife Federation to educate their community about the importance of wildlife habitat. Ambassadors show homeowners small changes they can make to benefit local wildlife and interact with the community at events. If you enjoy gardening, talking to people, and helping others learn how to make a difference, this opportunity is for you!

Habitat Ambassadors commit to a minimum of 10 hours of service in the first three months after training. Their work will help the National Wildlife Federation educate, inspire, and assist individuals and organizations of diverse cultures in conserving wildlife and other natural resources.




The Living Roof Project

The Living Roof Project is a citizen science program that gives community members an opportunity to learn about the California Academy of Science's unique roof ecosystem and to contribute to important baseline data regarding the many plants, birds, and arthropods that inhabit and utilize the Living Roof’s 2.5 acres of green space.

The data collected by citizen scientists are shared with researchers from the California Academy of Sciences and San Francisco State University. In addition, the bird observations are submitted to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s international eBird project. These data serve as a baseline to which future changes in plant and animal diversity on the Academy’s Living Roof can be compared.




Nebraska Master Naturalist Program

The Nebraska Master Naturalist Program is a volunteer program designed to train participants to conduct scientific research, conservation education, outreach, and service in their communities. Volunteers learn about Nebraska’s ecosystems and biodiversity, acquire new skills, and network with others who share a passion for the conservation of natural resources.

Beginning with 40 hours of primary training, participants get instruction both formally and in the field. Participants will learn from and work alongside professionals, land managers, and faculty to complete an in-depth training in the natural resources. This primary training is followed with 20 hours of specialized training in a preferred subject area, including citizen science, resource management, interpretation, and outdoor skills training.




CONE-Welder

CONE-Welder is an online game in which participants use a robotic web camera to help Smithsonian Institution researchers document the presence of subtropical birds that may be affected by global warming.

CONE-Welder is part of a larger project, Collaborative Observatories for Natural Environments, which provides an opportunity for groups of citizens, via the internet, to remotely observe, record, and index detailed animal activity. The goal is to advance the fundamental understanding of automated and collaborative systems and to observe and record detailed natural behavior in remote settings.




Christmas Bird Count

Known as the first and oldest Citizen Science project, at over 113 years, Audubon’s Christmas Bird Count is also one of the largest, with 70,000+ person-days of efforts and more than 64 million birds counted each year. The CBC has contributed greatly to the science of bird conservation with hundreds of publications, including many in important scientific journals. From December 14 through January 5 each year, tens of thousands of volunteers throughout the Americas take part in an adventure that has become a family tradition through the generations.

Count volunteers follow specified routes within a designated 15-mile diameter circle, counting every bird they see or hear all day, and submit data to each circle compiler. It’s not just a species tally—all birds are counted all day, giving an indication of the total number of birds in the circle that day. If observers live within a CBC circle, they may arrange in advance to count the birds at their feeders and submit those data to their compiler. All individual CBCs are conducted in the period from December 14 to January 5 (inclusive dates) each season, and each count is conducted in one calendar day (24-hour period).




The Great Sunflower Project

The Great Sunflower Project has three programs. The Safe Gardens for Pollinators program which uses data collected on Lemon Queen sunflowers to examine the effects of pesticides on pollinators. The Pollinator Friendly Plants program which is designed to identify the key plants to support healthy pollinator communities. And, the Great Pollinator Habitat Challenge which allows citizen scientists to evaluate and improve gardens, parks and other green spaces for pollinators.

Some bee populations have experienced severe declines that may affect food production. However, nobody has ever measured how much pollination is happening over a region, much less a continent, so there is little information about how a decline in the bee population can influence gardens.

The Great Sunflower Project makes it easy to gather this information. Find a plant you know (or a Lemon Queen Sunflower), observe it for 5 or more minutes and record all pollinators that visit, and contribute data online. You can make as many observations as you want while your flowers are in bloom. Plant, Watch, Enter. Repeat. That's it. And, who doesn't like sunflowers?!




The Great Backyard Bird Count

The Great Backyard Bird Count is an annual four-day event during which bird watchers count birds to create a real-time snapshot of where birds are located across the continent.

Scientists and bird enthusiasts can learn a lot by knowing where birds are. Unfortunately, no single scientist or team of scientists could hope to document the complex distribution and movements of so many species in such a short time.

Anyone, from beginning bird watchers to experts, can participate in the The Great Backyard Bird Count. It takes as little as 15 minutes on one day, or you can count for as long as you like during each day of the event. It’s free, fun, and easy, and it helps the birds. In addition, yearly data collection makes the information more meaningful and allows scientists to investigate far-reaching questions.




CamClickr

CamClickr is a year-round citizen science project in which viewers "tag" and classify breeding behaviors from more than 8 million images of birds courting, mating, laying eggs, and raising young. CamClickr will help answer questions that can only be answered using webcams while providing scientists with a tool to search and sort images once they are tagged.

It's fun, easy, and promises to change the way you think about breeding behavior. The Top CamClickrs are rewarded for their efforts - one point is awarded for every successful classification, and those points can add up to prizes!




Wildlife Watch

Wildlife Watch is a national, nature-watching program created for people of all ages. When you record your observations, National Wildlife Federation and Wildlife Watch partners collect and review your findings to track the health and behavior of wildlife and plant species. In return, the Wildlife Watch website keeps you up-to-date on wildlife news and facts, and they provide new ideas for attracting wildlife to your backyard and community.

Wildlife’s ability to survive the challenges of the 21st century is becoming outpaced by the events that are transforming our world. Global warming, the loss of habitat, and people becoming more disconnected from nature than past generations are converging on a dangerous path for our planet. The work of the National Wildlife Foundation provides answers to these challenges and will help ensure America's wildlife legacy continues for future generations.




Roadkill Project

The RoadKill project is designed to involve students and teachers in scientific monitoring of an environmental parameter using telecommunications and to increase participant awareness of motor vehicle hazards with wildlife. Participants collect roadkill data in their community for analysis and compare their data to other areas participating in the project.

Roadkills vary depending on the population of the community, the amount of traffic, and the type of roads. Migratory patterns of animals and habitat of the local area will also affect the number of roadkills.

The purpose of Project Roadkill is to give students an awareness and understanding of the natural world around them. By participating in Project Roadkill, students and teachers will:
- understand the reciprocal effects between humans and wildlife
- predict which type of animal will be most and least killed by motor vehicles
- compare the relationship between geography and topography and the types and number of roadkill in different locales and states
- understand the habitats and ecological importance of small and large mammals, reptiles, and birds





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