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Crowd Funding


Community air quality monitoring

Community Air Quality Monitoring support communities with accessing the materials and support required to collect evidence on the streets where they live work and play. You can find instruction on how to get diffusion tubes, and use an app and community maps to find out the level of pollution in their area.




American Gut

The Human Microbiome Project and other microbiome projects worldwide have laid an important foundation for understanding the trillions of microbes that inhabits each of our bodies-and how they affect human health. We know that things like diet affect the microbiome, or that obesity is linked to the microbes that live in your gut. Research suggests that microbes may even be associated with autism! However, we need more samples to fully understand how our microbes are linked to health and disease. American Gut gives you the opportunity to participate in the discovery of new scientific knowledge about the microbiome by comparing the microbes in your gut (or in your mouth or on your skin) to those of thousands of participants in the US and elsewhere around the world. American Gut is a project built on open-source, open-access principles. Our data are for the good of scientific understanding and will be shared both with participants and with other scientists.




What happens to your packages during shipping?

Did you ever wonder what happens to your packages when the travel through the mail? We're going to find out! We have hundreds of Kickstarter backers who will be shipped live sensors collecting data every 10 minutes while shipping from our site in San Jose, CA, to destinations around the globe.
Participants can either be part of the data collection by ordering a PocketLab sensor on Kickstarter, or just download and analyze the data when the project starts shipping in May 2017.
We are collecting temperature, humidity, pressure, and orientation data every 10 minutes for the duration of the shipping, and all this data will be uploaded anonymously and open source. Citizen scientists will be able to add meta data, like tracking info and images, and then download and analyze any way they want.




AirVisual: The Air Pollution Monitoring Project

Unhealthy, polluted air is a ubiquitous, invisible threat that is responsible for 200,000 premature deaths every year in America alone. The NRDC estimates that about 81 million Americans live in areas that fail to meet national air quality standards for particulate pollution (PM2.5).

Particulate matter, abbreviated as PM2.5, is a term used for particles found in the air; including dust, soot, dirt, smoke and liquid droplets that are 2.5 micrometers in size, or less. These particles are so small that they can be absorbed into the bloodstream upon inhalation and cause a variety of adverse health effects.

We tend to assume the air we breathe indoors is safe, yet indoor air quality is frequently worse than outdoors due to high confinement and a variety of indoor sources.

We are calling on interested participants to help determine sources of air pollution both indoors and out. Use the AirVisual Node to discover factors that influence air quality and then download the data from the device to validate your conclusions.

Scientific findings will be posted on our website, airvisual.com, (with credit to you) in order to grow awareness of air pollution sources in the home, office and classroom.

You can also make your air quality monitor a public outdoor station, connected to our monitoring platform (airvisual.com) and crowd-sourced air pollution map (airvisual.com/world) to fill in gaps in government air quality data.

Have an interesting idea for using the device that would contribute to our understanding of air pollution? We want to hear from you!




Open Insulin Project

A team of biohackers is developing the first open source protocol to produce insulin simply and economically. Our work may serve as a basis for generic production of this life-saving drug and provide a firmer foundation for continued research into improved versions of insulin.

Some of the articles about us:

Popular Science - www.popsci.com/these-biohackers-are-making-open-source-insulin

Vice - motherboard.vice.com/en_ca/read/after-92-years-biohackers-want-to-finally-make-cheap-and-generic-insulin




Volunteer Science

Volunteer Science allows people from all over the world to play online games, take surveys, and donate their data to social scientists. By participating, you give scientific researchers the data they need to answer today's most important research questions.

Each game takes two to five minutes and you don't have to sign up to play. A short game can have a lasting impact.




Investigating Indoor Air Quality in Northeast Denver

The harmful effects of indoor air contaminants, such as perchloroethylene (PERC), are clear. Knowing how to assess our own risk is less clear. We will assemble and distribute air quality test kits to homes in Northeast Denver in order to collect data on two pollutants: PERC and radon. Our goals are simple, help a local community understand if they are at risk, raise awareness of air quality issues, and test a low-cost method for PERC detection that could allow anyone to screen their home.




Urban Slender Loris Project

The slender loris is a small nocturnal primate that is endemic to southern India and Sri Lanka. They once lived in remnant forest patches, in lakeside woods, as well as on large trees in the neighborhoods within the city of Bangalore. However with the rapid urban development and growth of the city, loris population are now restricted to few pockets of Bangalore. There are regular reports of injured animals being rescued by the rehabilitation centers of the city. Illegal pet trades and black magic are also occasionally reported. Currently, there is no baseline information on the status of this species, availability of habitats or any hunting pressures for black magic.. The Urban Slender Loris Project aims at documenting the past and present distribution of slender lorises in the landscapes of urban Bangalore. Our team of citizen scientists are currently conducting nocturnal census and habitat survey to quantify the pressures on lorises and threats on the population within the city through habitat loss, hunting, or the illegal pet trade. This multidisciplinary, citizen science project is currently developing partnerships with environmental nonprofits, IT industry, educational institutes and government organizations to develop a better plan for managing the city’s urban green space to accommodate wildlife coexisting with a growing human population.




ClimateWatch

ClimateWatch was developed by Earthwatch Institute with the Bureau of Meteorology and the University of Melbourne to understand how changes in temperature and rainfall are affecting the seasonal behaviour of Australia's plants and animals. The first continental phenology project in the Southern Hemisphere, ClimateWatch enables every Australian to become a citizen scientist, collecting and recording data that will help shape the country's scientific response to climate change. You can record anywhere, anytime - from a jog around the block all the way to a camping trip.

Earthwatch has established almost 60 ClimateWatch trails in partnership with local governments, botanical gardens, environmental education centres and universities across the country. Walking a trail is a great way to involve your family, friends, students or colleagues in discovering your local environment while contributing to important research.

ClimateWatch is an authentic learning experience that can be incorporated into school excursions, corporate CSR strategies or local events.

The ClimateWatch system provides:
* An opportunity for educators to introduce their students to phenology, biodiversity, and climate change.
* A greater understanding, while raising public awareness, of the response of Australia's biodiversity to climate change;
* An online system for collecting, storing, interpreting and reporting indicators of biological responses to climate; and
* The ability to predict and monitor changes in native and pest species distributions and to test their sensitivity to climate.




Counter Culture Labs

Come help us build a new community lab for the East Bay, focused on DIY biology and citizen science. A place to explore, learn, work on fun projects, tinker with biology and other sciences. Open to biotech professionals, scientists, and citizen scientists of all stripes. Be part of our community of creative thinkers, hackers and mad scientists!




BioCurious

Our Mission:
We believe that innovations in biology should be accessible, affordable, and open to everyone.
We’re building a community biology lab for amateurs, inventors, entrepreneurs, and anyone who wants to
experiment with friends.

What We Are:

- a complete working laboratory and technical library for entrepreneurs to cheaply access equipment, materials, and co-working space,

- a training center for biotechniques, with an emphasis on safety

- a meeting place for citizen scientists, hobbyists, activists, and students




Endeaovirst

Endeavorist is a growing network of likeminded and forward thinking individuals with a passion for curiosity. Our goal is to facilitate research, from citizen science to the world's next breakthrough. Build a community, fund ideas, seek help, and get the money and attention you need, in one place.




Experiment

Experiment is a crowdfunding platform for scientific research. We want to allow anyone with a credit card to be a modern day patron of science.




Pieris Project

The Pieris Project is a citizen science initiative designed to collect morphology and genetic data on a single species - the cabbage white butterfly (Pieris rapae) - from across its entire range, including your backyard! The small cabbage white butterfly is a great species to study how organisms adapt to new environments, because this butterfly has invaded many parts of the world within the last two centuries and is now found on nearly every continent. With your help, and only with your help, we can create the world's most comprehensive butterfly collection that will allow us to learn how the cabbage white has adapted to new environments as it expanded across the globe. This type of data will be critical to understanding how species may respond to environmental changes, such as climate change and habitat destruction.




Our Radioactive Ocean

It has now been 5 years since the release of radioactive contaminants from Fukushima and we are now seeing the evidence on the west coast of North America. Help scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution reveal the ongoing spread of radiation across the Pacific and its evolving impacts on the ocean.

Clarification for fundraising costs: shipping is about 20% of the cost, the other majority is for the cesium extraction steps in the lab, radioactivity detection and data processing, along with managing the web site and database.

There are 3 ways to support us:

1) Help us reach our goal by donating to sample an existing site. Simply click on "HELP FUND A LOCATION" and choose to support one of the many sites that are underway

2) Someone can propose a new sampling site. Click on "PROPOSE A LOCATION" and see what is involved. We are trying to get spread of locations up/down coast. With a donation or fundraising of $100 we'll set up a fundraising webpage, add that page to our website, and send you a sampling kit once your goal has been reached. Fundraising amounts are generally between $550 (WA, OR, CA) and $600 (BC, AK, HI). Differences reflect increased shipping charges to some areas.

3) We also seek funds for general capacity building and public education activities at CMER: http://ourradioactiveocean.org/support ($20 minimum donation)




Field Photo Library

A photo taken in the field helps scientists and citizens to document changes in landscape, wildlife habitats, impacts of drought and flood and fire, and so on. This Geo-referenced Field Photo Library is a citizen science and community remote sensing data portal, where people can share, visualize and archive field photos in the world. Users can upload, edit, query and download geo-referenced field photos in the library. All photos are also linked with satellite image series images (MODIS), so that people can see the changes over time.




Atlas of Living Australia

The Atlas of Living Australia (Atlas) contains information on all the known species in Australia aggregated from a wide range of data providers: museums, herbaria, community groups, government departments, individuals and universities.

The Atlas was initiated by a group of 14 (now 17) organisations—our partners. The intent was to create a national database of all of Australia’s flora and fauna that could be accessed through a single, easy to use web site. Information on the site would be used to: improve our understanding of Australian biodiversity assist researchers to build a more detailed picture of Australia’s biodiversity assist environmental managers and policy makers develop more effective means of managing and sustaining Australia’s biodiversity.

You can participate by submitting a species record, joining an existing citizen science project, digitizing specimen labels, or starting your own citizen science endeavour!




Librería Metagenómica del Ecuador

We are a group of scientists interested in exploring the potential applications of Ecuador’s unique biodiversity. As a first step, we are working to assemble and apply gene libraries collected from around the country.
You can join field trips in Ecuador to collect samples, work in a lab extracting and sequencing nucleic acids, or from home assembling and curating the electronic database.




uBiome

uBiome is the world's first effort to map the human microbiome through citizen science.

What's the microbiome? The microbiome are the bacteria that live on and within us. It sounds kind of funny, but all of us are actually covered in helpful germs. Many conditions – from diabetes to depression, asthma to autism -- have been found to relate to the microbiome.

uBiome brings this cutting edge technology directly to consumers for the first time. The more data we collect, the more we can learn about this important area of research. We've been featured so far in Wired, Venture Beat, the Los Angeles Times, Scientific American, BoingBoing, and more.




The National Map Corps

The National Map Corps enlists volunteers to collect and edit data about human made structures in an effort to provide accurate and authoritative map data for the USGS National Map and US Topo Maps. Using aerial imagery and base layers from The National Map, volunteers are editing 10 different structure types including schools, hospitals, post offices, police stations, and other important public buildings in all 50 States as well as Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.




World Community Grid

World Community Grid, an IBM philanthropic initiative, was created in 2004 to support humanitarian research on health, poverty, and sustainability. Through World Community Grid, hundreds of thousands of volunteers from around the globe have donated unused computing power from their computers and Android devices to help scientists make discover important advances to fighting cancer, AIDS and malaria; and developed novel solutions to environmental challenges, including new materials for affordable solar energy and more efficient water filtration.
As a volunteer, you simply install a non-invasive application on your device and get on with your day. When your device has spare power, it connects to World Community Grid and requests a virtual experiment to work on. And scientists gets several steps closer to life-changing solutions.




Petridish

Petridish allows citizens to support science by directly funding independent and small -scale research projects. While this is a somewhat non-traditional citizen science project, funding is an important part of science, and Petridish allows science lovers everywhere to truly make a difference and support innovative science.

Similar to other crowd funding style websites, Petridish lets you browse projects and donate online to the research projects of your choice. Each project has a variety of donation levels with enticing rewards for each level. Typical rewards included souvenirs from the field, acknowledgement in journal articles, chances to join researchers in the field, dinner with a famous researcher, and even naming rights to new species!

You can explore projects by both research subject and reward type. After you donate, share your involvement and information about the project through Facebook and Twitter and help projects gain momentum and reach their goals.





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