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Health & Medicine


American Gut

The Human Microbiome Project and other microbiome projects worldwide have laid an important foundation for understanding the trillions of microbes that inhabits each of our bodies-and how they affect human health. We know that things like diet affect the microbiome, or that obesity is linked to the microbes that live in your gut. Research suggests that microbes may even be associated with autism! However, we need more samples to fully understand how our microbes are linked to health and disease. American Gut gives you the opportunity to participate in the discovery of new scientific knowledge about the microbiome by comparing the microbes in your gut (or in your mouth or on your skin) to those of thousands of participants in the US and elsewhere around the world. American Gut is a project built on open-source, open-access principles. Our data are for the good of scientific understanding and will be shared both with participants and with other scientists.




Surfrider Foundation's Blue Water Task Force Eastern Long Island

The Blue Water Task Force (BWTF) is the Surfrider Foundation’s citizen science program which provides valuable water quality information to beach communities, raises awareness of local water pollution problems and works collaboratively with local stakeholders to implement solutions.

Surfrider’s network of 30+ volunteer-run BWTF labs measure bacteria levels at ocean and bay beaches and in freshwater sources, and compare them to the national water quality standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency to protect public health in recreational waters.

Surfrider began monitoring water quality on Eastern Long Island in 2013 in partnership with the Concerned Citizens of Montauk, another local environmental NGO. Testing is performed weekly at ocean and bay beaches, freshwater ponds and creeks during the summer beach season and monthly during the colder winter months at over 30 sampling sites.

This joint water testing program augments the seasonal beach water quality monitoring program conducted by the Suffolk County Department of Health, providing Enterococcus bacteria results at recreational beaches and coastal waterways year-round. All BWTF water quality data are posted online and available to the public at www.surfrider.org/blue-water-task-force/chapter/37

Water quality updates are also shared with the local community through social media, weekly press releases, and public presentations and educational talks. As a community-fueled program, the Blue Water Task Force strives to identify problems with beach and coastal water pollution and work towards solutions.




Cloudy with a Chance of Pain

Cloudy with a Chance of Pain is a national smart phone study that seeks to address the age-old question of whether the weather influences pain symptoms. It is open to people who live in the UK, are aged 17 or over, own a smart phone and have experienced pain for at least the last three months.
The citizen science project invites people from all over the world to analyse our participants data and submit their own hypotheses on whether they can see any correlation between pain and weather.




Mosquito Byte!

A very simple smart phone app (for Android or iPhone) that allows a user to report a mosquito bite. The user is rewarded with a fact about mosquitoes, and the bite report is displayed in (almost) real time on a map of the world. The more people use it, the more we know about when and where there are biting mosquitoes.




Mission: Starlight (UV protection)

Your mission is to protect astronauts from the effects of harmful UV light. Experiment with different materials to discover which blocks UV light the best. Tell us about your results to receive a mission completion certificates and to unlock a secret video featuring British astronaut Tim Peake.
This global experiment will remain open so you can take part anytime.




Invasive Mosquito Project

The Invasive Mosquito Project (IMP) is a public education and national mosquito monitoring program at the USDA that partners local professionals with high school teachers and community educators (summer camps, naturalists, gardeners, scouts, etc.) to teach about mosquito-borne disease and public health, provide teachers with educational materials that meet Next Generation Science Standards, and create community outreach opportunities that benefit mosquito control/public health agencies. The IMP website (www.citizenscience.us) provides connections, resources, and information. Partnered citizen science is different than the typical crowd sourced citizen science because the expertise, experience, and enthusiasm of a professional or expert in the field supports the educator. The yearly mosquito species collection data will be used to generate mosquito species distribution maps for each year and cumulative distributions for each species.




Eterna

Eterna invites contributors to become RNA scientists. Contributors solve puzzles to design specialized RNA-based medicines and sensors, receive feedback after their designs are built and tested in a lab at Stanford, and work together to build knowledge about how RNA works.




RNA World

RNA World is a distributed supercomputer that uses Internet-connected computers to advance RNA research. This system is dedicated to identify, analyze, structurally predict, and design RNA molecules on the basis of established bioinformatics software in a high-performance, high-throughput fashion.

The RNA World project is based at the Rechenkraft research facility located in Germany.




Save the Tasmanian Devil

The Roadkill Project was launched in 2009 to help determine how significant the threat of roadkill mortality is to Tasmanian devil populations, particularly those populations already decimated by Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD). The Roadkill Project aims to continue to monitor the threat of roadkill mortality and the spread of DFTD and to try to reduce Tasmanian devil roadkill. Involving the public helps to greatly extend our limited resources.

Anyone who is using Tasmanian roads can help by reporting any Tasmanian devil roadkill they see.




Independent Generation of Research

IGoR facilitates scientific research by amateur scientists and science enthusiasts. Anyone (not just professional scientists) can propose their own research questions on the IGoR site. Then, other interested people can share ideas, skills, or time to address the question. In addition, a growing number of professional scientists have agreed to help answer users' questions about the users' research projects.

Some people may have science questions that they cannot answer on their own. Other people may have technical skills (e.g. electronics or microscopy, gardening or photography, and many others) that would be useful for addressing those questions. Still others may have the scientific training to design a sound study.

By working together and pooling skills and ideas, people of any experience level could carry out original, independent research. For example, do you want to decipher what scallops see with their bright-blue eyes? Do you wonder how mushrooms take shape? Or are you curious about how the plants in your garden behave? What do you want to discover?




Autoimmune Citizen Science

Our goal is to bring the autoimmune community together in a scientific way, such that it will change the way that autoimmune disease is treated in healthcare today. The massive online community that has formed around chronic illness is ample evidence that something is wrong. Forums and Facebook groups provide immense value in that they connect people with autoimmune disease together and allow them to provide support and share information, but we want to go one step further and organize it all. Right now, everyone is on their own journey, communicating only bits and pieces of it in small posts here and there, which quickly disappear in the noise.

Data aggregation for autoimmune diseases has never been done at this scale and we’re excited to provide a resource to facilitate that. Users will record symptoms, treatments, and results using the Autoimmune Citizen Science mobile application. We plan to then aggregate that data and share it with our users so that they can see (anonymously) what is working for other people with similar symptoms.




AirVisual: The Air Pollution Monitoring Project

Unhealthy, polluted air is a ubiquitous, invisible threat that is responsible for 200,000 premature deaths every year in America alone. The NRDC estimates that about 81 million Americans live in areas that fail to meet national air quality standards for particulate pollution (PM2.5).

Particulate matter, abbreviated as PM2.5, is a term used for particles found in the air; including dust, soot, dirt, smoke and liquid droplets that are 2.5 micrometers in size, or less. These particles are so small that they can be absorbed into the bloodstream upon inhalation and cause a variety of adverse health effects.

We tend to assume the air we breathe indoors is safe, yet indoor air quality is frequently worse than outdoors due to high confinement and a variety of indoor sources.

We are calling on interested participants to help determine sources of air pollution both indoors and out. Use the AirVisual Node to discover factors that influence air quality and then download the data from the device to validate your conclusions.

Scientific findings will be posted on our website, airvisual.com, (with credit to you) in order to grow awareness of air pollution sources in the home, office and classroom.

You can also make your air quality monitor a public outdoor station, connected to our monitoring platform (airvisual.com) and crowd-sourced air pollution map (airvisual.com/world) to fill in gaps in government air quality data.

Have an interesting idea for using the device that would contribute to our understanding of air pollution? We want to hear from you!




NYU Baby Sleep Study

This study will look at sleeping, eating, and digestion in healthy babies and babies who may later be diagnosed with developmental disorders. Parents, after signing up and consenting to the study on the project website, will record their baby's sleeping and eating activity plus other observations through the phone app, Baby Connect.

The goal is to gather a very large data base to learn about sleep and neurological development. We will characterize normal development so that parents will have better (scientifically-informed) advice about how to manage their baby’s sleeping and eating and we hope to discover early signs of developmental disorders that could help other babies in the future. When data come from a very large number of participants, in some cases, scientists can find patterns that would otherwise be undetectable. This is why we would like for many parents to join this study.




100 For Parkinsons

Can a smartphone unlock new discoveries in Parkinson’s?

You can join a global movement to learn more about your health, support people living with Parkinson’s and help change healthcare.

You’re invited to become a citizen scientist, tracking ten aspects of your health that are important to you for 100 days using the uMotif platform on your smartphone or tablet. Everyone will track their sleep quality, mood, exercise, diet and stress levels. Then it’s up to you to choose another 5 aspects of your health that are most important to you.

In return, you can share your experiences and see how everyone else taking part in the study is benefitting on the 100 For Parkinson’s website. The data you’re donating will contribute to academic research approved by a committee led by the Cure Parkinson’s Trust, helping to unlock new discoveries in Parkinson’s.

This is a world-first people-centred project of this size and scale in healthcare and open to everyone, whether you have Parkinson’s or not.

You can be a part of it!
Simply visit www.100forparkinsons.com, download the uMotif app from the Apple App Store or Google Play, choose “I would like to register” and enter code 100FP.




Baby.CROINC.org

Most Early Childhood Development (ECD) assessment tools start by filling a questionnaire designed by ECD experts. Call this the "external expert driven" approach: an external expert --- the questionnaire designer --- is assumed to know best what and how to measure ECD.

Baby CROINC (CROwd INteractive Clustering) takes a different, citizen science oriented, approach which is based on these assumptions:

1) Each parent is an expert on the ECD of her/his child(ren)

2) ECD is too complex to be captured by any single questionnaire

3) Algorithms can help parent explain and understand ECD differently




Open Insulin Project

A team of biohackers is developing the first open source protocol to produce insulin simply and economically. Our work may serve as a basis for generic production of this life-saving drug and provide a firmer foundation for continued research into improved versions of insulin.

Some of the articles about us:

Popular Science - www.popsci.com/these-biohackers-are-making-open-source-insulin

Vice - motherboard.vice.com/en_ca/read/after-92-years-biohackers-want-to-finally-make-cheap-and-generic-insulin




"Stick Out Your Tongue" - Saca La Lengua

‘Stick Out Your Tongue’ (‘Saca la Lengua’) is a citizen’s science project that aims to study the mouth’s microbiome and its possible relationship with our environmental characteristics and lifestyle.
This project has involved the public at different levels. Stay in touch with the project, train yourself in bioinformatics... our next project participation phase will be released soon.




The Online Wisdom Lab (OWL)

OWL is a fun app that is helping researchers understand how thinking and decision making change as we go through our adult lives. By playing the games and completing the quizzes, you will be contributing to an amazing citizen science programme that could revolutionize psychological research.




moo-Q

moo-Q is a scientific iPhone application designed by the Hungry Mind Lab team at Goldsmiths, University of London with the aim of measuring mood and brain power. It allows users to see at what time of day their brain works best, and whether being in a good or a bad mood has an effect on brain power. This data is also securely and confidentially gathered by the researchers at Goldsmiths in order to assess whether there is a correlation between mood and cognitive performance.

Users will complete a set of exercises, lasting no longer than a few minutes, several times over the course of a few days. Doing so unlocks their moo-Q performance chart.

moo-Q is free for users across the world to download. For more information, please visit our website at www.hungrymindlab.com .




Investigating Indoor Air Quality in Northeast Denver

The harmful effects of indoor air contaminants, such as perchloroethylene (PERC), are clear. Knowing how to assess our own risk is less clear. We will assemble and distribute air quality test kits to homes in Northeast Denver in order to collect data on two pollutants: PERC and radon. Our goals are simple, help a local community understand if they are at risk, raise awareness of air quality issues, and test a low-cost method for PERC detection that could allow anyone to screen their home.




NASA's SMAP Satellite Mission

NASA recently launched the SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) satellite which is orbiting the globe every three days to measure soil moisture levels. This data will be used to improve weather forecasts, detail water/energy/carbon cycles, monitor droughts, predict floods, and assist crop productivity.

How accurate is the big data from the satellite? There's only one way to find out and it depends on you to report local data! SciStarter's citizen science community has been called on to help calibrate the accuracy of NASA's satellite mission and to learn more about your soil quality in the process.

Participants from every state will collect and analyze soil samples from September through June.
In this project, you will:

-register your location(s)
-receive alerts when the SMAP satellite is scheduled to fly over you
-scoop a handful of soil, a few times a month (when the satellite is flying over), weigh it, dry it for a day or two, and weigh it again. After some simple conversions, you'll send the data to NASA and be able to compare it to what NASA's SMAP satellite is reporting.

Sign up as an individual or team.




Counter Culture Labs

Come help us build a new community lab for the East Bay, focused on DIY biology and citizen science. A place to explore, learn, work on fun projects, tinker with biology and other sciences. Open to biotech professionals, scientists, and citizen scientists of all stripes. Be part of our community of creative thinkers, hackers and mad scientists!




The Microbiome and Oral Health

Help researchers learn more about the normal bacteria in the mouth!

You may Qualify if you:
• Are able to collect samples from yourself
• Have NO active dental disease
• Have NO chronic medical conditions

What is the Time Commitment?
• Six 2.5 hour office visits at UCSF
• Daily sample collection by you at your home (~30 minutes per day) for 28 days
Benefits?
• A free dental examination (no xrays) and a free dental cleaning
• A maximum of $245




The Dental Arcade Game

Are you fascinated by forensic science? This project is run by a real life forensic anthropologist, and is about teeth. It is designed to gather information about your age, ethnicity and the teeth you have in your mouth, to see if what we think we know about when teeth erupt is accurate.

At the moment, if an unknown body is found, forensic scientists (forensic anthropologists and forensic odontologists) examine the teeth and work out how old the person was when s/he died by noting which teeth have erupted, and comparing this to reference data. This data then gives the scientist an age range, which can help the police narrow down the list of possible people that the body could be. The problem is that this data is out of date, and there is lots of variation between populations.

That's where YOU come in. We can improve this data set by getting as many people as possible to complete our survey. That way, we can build up a mega-database of ages and tooth eruption and ethnicities, and build up a really useful bank of data for scientists to use in the future.




Drug discovery from your soil

Creating a new medicine is a team effort involving scientist and medical professionals from a wide variety of fields. In 2010, researchers with the University of Oklahoma’s Natural Products Discovery Group redefined the notion of what “team” meant when they launched their popular Citizen Science Soil Collection Program. Through this program, volunteers from across the United States have helped by donating soil samples from their own backyards, which OU investigators are using to obtain fungi that make special compounds known as natural products. Natural products are the source of many lifesaving drugs that are used today by doctors around the world.




FaceTopo Beta

Help scientists build a taxonomy of the world's faces!

Our goal is 10K faces. You can use your iphone or ipad to create a 3D selfie and send your facial data to the Facetopo database.

Facetopo is for adults faces. Users must be age 14+. Under age 18 must get parental approval to create a user account.




Reverse The Odds

In Reverse The Odds, you help the Odds – colorful creatures whose world is falling into decline. By completing mini puzzle games and upgrading their land, you can restore the Odds back to their lively selves.

But it’s not just the Odds you’re helping. We've incorporated the analysis tumour image analysis into the game. So as you play, you're helping to analyse important data for a huge bladder cancer study.

You’re analysing in the same way researchers do, but because there are a lot more of you, we can get through data much more quickly, freeing up more of our researchers valuable time and unveiling clues about cancer sooner.




Mark2Cure

Mark2Cure allows anyone that can read English, regardless of background, to help in the process of biomedical discovery. Scientific literature is growing at a rate of more than 2 new articles every single minute. It is hard for scientists to know what to read and to read everything that is relevant. Mark2Cure works by teaching citizen scientists to precisely identify concepts and concept relationships in biomedical text. This is a task that anyone can learn to do and can perform better than any known computer program. Once these tasks are completed, advanced statistical algorithms take the data provided by the volunteers and use it to provide scientists with new tools for finding the information that they require within the sea of biomedical knowledge.




Experiment

Experiment is a crowdfunding platform for scientific research. We want to allow anyone with a credit card to be a modern day patron of science.




Play to Cure: Genes in Space

Help researchers cure cancer.

The problem:

We know that faults in our genes can lead to cancer cells forming. This can be linked to the amount of genes in our cells - sometimes we have more and sometimes we have less.

It can take years for scientists to analyze all of their genetic data, but with thousands of citizen scientists playing Genes in Space, the process is greatly accelerated.

How it works:

First, you plot a galactic route. In the context of the game, you're choosing your flight path, but these “space coordinates” are actually a visualization of DNA data, and you're showing our scientists where the genetic variations are which may lead to cancer.

Then you collect Element Alpha, a mist like substance that can be traded for ship upgrades. It actually represents the same DNA data that has just been mapped – which means our scientists have two perspectives on the same sample, from one player.

And we’ve added an asteroid field. This makes the gameplay more engaging and challenging. You need to dodge or shoot a multitude of asteroids to complete a stage.

Each data sample is analyzed multiple times for accuracy. Don’t worry about making mistakes - the more people who use Genes in Space, the more accurate the results will be and the faster data can be translated into new ways to beat cancer.




Transparency Life Sciences

Transparency Life Sciences is an open innovation drug company that crowd sources improvements to clinical trial protocols. Join TLS's network and improve drug development research by contributing your expertise or experience. Researchers, clinicians can help by making recommendations to clinical trial protocols or suggesting alternate uses for pharmaceuticals. Patients and families can help by making recommendations for protocols that fit their needs.

Featured tools:

1) The Protocol Builder is a crowdsourcing survey tool. By answering a few questions you can help improve clinical trial protocols.

2) Indication Finder for researchers only, users can help identify potential new applications for stalled pharmaceuticals.




Health Data Exploration Project

Individuals are tracking a variety of health-related data via a growing number of wearable devices and smartphone apps. More and more data relevant to health are also being captured passively as people communicate with one another on social networks, shop, work, or do any number of activities that leave “digital footprints.” Self-tracking data can provide better measures of everyday behavior and lifestyle and can fill in gaps in more traditional clinical or public health data collection, giving us a more complete picture of health.

We at the Health Data Exploration project are creating a Network of innovators in PHD to catalyze the use of personal data for the public good. This Network will bring together companies, researchers, and strategic partners to strategize, coordinate, and experiment with using PHD to understand health.

We need the help of citizen scientists to take this project forward. How do you think personal health data can provide insights into health? What would make you more willing or less willing to share your own data? What concerns or suggestions do you have?




The NOVA RNA Lab

Nature’s best kept secret is a wonder molecule called RNA. It is central to the origin of life, evolution, and the cellular machinery that keeps us alive.

In this Lab you’ll play the role of a molecular engineer by solving RNA folding puzzles. Then take your skills to Eterna, where you can design RNAs that could be at the heart of future life-saving therapies.

This project is part of the NOVA Labs platform




WeCureALZ

One symptom of Alzheimer’s that has been known since the discovery of the disease is reduced blood flow to the brain, but until now, nobody knew why. That is why this aspect of the disease, which likely contributes to cognitive problems and accelerates injury to brain cells, has remained untreated.

New specialized imaging techniques have allowed Cornell University researchers to discover a potential cause of the reduced blood flow. This suggests new treatment approaches that could slow progression of the disease to delay, or even prevent, the onset of symptoms, and possibly restore some cognitive function when symptoms are present.

However, understanding the molecular basis of the process, and homing in on the specific pharmaceutical targets using current methods could take decades, limited primarily by the need for extensive manual image analysis. Crowdsourcing this analysis to citizen scientists could reduce that time to just a few years.




Personal Genome Project

The Personal Health Genome is a global community interested in creating an open access database for genomic, trait and health data. In addition to genomic data, the project is interested in studying genome and environment interactions as well as other aspects of the human experience.




Visualizing Health

When it comes to our bodies, data abounds. We all have a blood pressure, weight, cholesterol levels, A1c, BMI, and more. We have risks, too. We might have or be at risk for cancer, or heart disease, or have a higher risk of experiencing a side effect of a medication or treatment than someone else.

In theory, this data can help us make better decisions about our health. Should I take this pill? Will it help me more than it hurts me? How can I reduce my risk? And so on.

But for individuals, it’s not always easy to understand what the numbers are telling us. And for those communicating the information – doctors, hospitals, researchers, public health professionals — it’s not always clear what sort of presentation will make the most sense to the most people.

That problem is the inspiration behind Visualizing Health, a project of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Michigan Center for Health Communications Research. This site contains 54 examples of tested visualizations – that is, graphic displays of health information that we’ve evaluated through research among the general public. Our objective was to create a gallery of beautiful and easy-to-make-sense-of graphs, charts, and images that effectively communicate risk information. Health data that makes sense.




Exploring a Culture of Health:Signal Detection

How can we harness data signals generated by our technology to improve health? US Davis in partnership with Ginger.io is tracking how smartphone apps might help patients with mental health disorders. LinkAges Connect is using smart meters to help seniors live interdependently, safely.

What are some ways you track your health? Does it affect your day to day choices? Do you have ideas for using existing technology or infrastructure to monitor or measure health? Leave a comment below.




Exploring a Culture of Health: Building Resilience

Traumatic early life experiences can alter brain development and increase the risk for psychological and physical health issues. Two independent organizations are developing innovative ways to help offset adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and build resilience in these at risk populations.

How do you think your experiences have affected your health and development? What has helped you build resilience? Do you have other ideas about how the community can help prevent or address ACEs? Leave a comment below and help get the conversation flowing.




Exploring a Culture of Health: Visualizing Health

Health data can be confusing. Designing visuals for health data and risk information is a useful tool for communicating this information. But how best to design these visuals? Visualizing Health examines different ways to visualize data.




Infinome

Infinome studies the complex relationship between your genes and lifestyle to discover the balance between nature and nurture. Anyone can participate by linking their wearable activity tracker and/or 23andMe account. The Infinome website links to millions of biomedical research papers to help users understand their genome, and provides visualizations of their exercise data.

Infinome has also launched a mobile app to help users log their diets. The app uses artificial intelligence to identify the food on their plate, and log calories.




Flip the Clinic

The traditional doctor’s visit is ripe for reinvention—both because it is such a valuable interaction, and because we know there are ways to make it better.

We believe that new tools, technologies, and strategies can empower people to be more informed and more engaged when they walk into the doctor’s office and better equipped to improve their health when they walk out the door. And we believe that doctors, nurses, and other care providers can improve the ways they communicate and engage with patients during visits. We believe they can take advantage of new tools for monitoring, supporting, and connecting with their patients outside of the office, too.

We think that by tapping into these strategies, we could to turn the provider-patient interaction on its head—and promote better, more meaningful relationships while doing so.

Our goal is not only to create a specific set of practices that will improve the medical encounter, but also to inspire others to invent new ways to get more out of the clinic visit, too.




FightMalaria@Home

Malaria is a prevalent disease in poorer countries, where it infects 216 million people and kills 650,000 each year, mostly African children under 5 years old [WHO]. Plasmodium falciparum is the parasite responsible for malaria and it continues to evolve resistance to available medication.

We urgently need to discover new drugs which target NEW proteins in the parasite. The FightMalaria@Home project is aimed at finding these new targets.

Donate your computer power to aid in antimalarial drug research. Run through the BOINC platform.




Patients Like Me

Patients Like Me is an opportunity for patients and medical experts to communication and improve healthcare. Individuals and experts can share and compare experiences such as treatments or symptoms. Individuals track their health, learn more about different treatments, or connect with individuals with similar conditions.




Health eHeart Study

The Health eHeart Study is the first of its kind - an electronic clinical research study that will gather long-term information about participants' health and behaviors with the latest technologies.

The goal of this study is to hone in on more specific predictors of heart disease by taking into account each person's unique profile in relation to our constantly evolving world.

We need people of all ages and from all backgrounds to tease out the reasons behind heart disease. The only criteria is that the participants are 18 years and older. We are looking to enroll up to 1 million participants worldwide.




The Winnower

The Winnower is a scholarly publishing platform that provides traditional scholarly publishing tools (DOI, typesetting, archival, and Altmetrics) to traditional and non-traditional media including blogposts, reddit AMAs, class essays, grants, theses, reviews, responses to RFIs, lay summaries, journal clubs, citizen science projects and other new media so that it counts for the scholarly record and the scholar’s career. We’ve been live for ~2 years and have 1220+ publications from universities and individuals around the world.




PressureNet

PressureNet is a network of crowdsourced weather sensors. We automatically collect atmospheric pressure measurements using barometers in new Android devices. We're sharing this live data with scientists and researchers to improve weather forecasting. Soon we'll provide you with a weather forecast based on everyone's live, shared data!

We're going to make new weather models using the data that PressureNet automatically collects - these models should produce forecasts that are significantly more accurate than any other method! Since the data is collected using smartphones, we can gather way more data about the atmosphere than ever before.

Until we make forecasts, PressureNet shows you the raw data. The pressure data is displayed in graphs so that you can see both your own data as well as other regions' graphed over time. We've just added animations as well, so you can watch storms moving across a region. Furthermore, you can now report what the weather is where you are! Current weather conditions automatically refresh every twenty minutes to keep it accurate.

PressureNet has been featured on BBC World Service, Wired Science, and MIT Technology Review.




Our Radioactive Ocean

It has now been 5 years since the release of radioactive contaminants from Fukushima and we are now seeing the evidence on the west coast of North America. Help scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution reveal the ongoing spread of radiation across the Pacific and its evolving impacts on the ocean.

Clarification for fundraising costs: shipping is about 20% of the cost, the other majority is for the cesium extraction steps in the lab, radioactivity detection and data processing, along with managing the web site and database.

There are 3 ways to support us:

1) Help us reach our goal by donating to sample an existing site. Simply click on "HELP FUND A LOCATION" and choose to support one of the many sites that are underway

2) Someone can propose a new sampling site. Click on "PROPOSE A LOCATION" and see what is involved. We are trying to get spread of locations up/down coast. With a donation or fundraising of $100 we'll set up a fundraising webpage, add that page to our website, and send you a sampling kit once your goal has been reached. Fundraising amounts are generally between $550 (WA, OR, CA) and $600 (BC, AK, HI). Differences reflect increased shipping charges to some areas.

3) We also seek funds for general capacity building and public education activities at CMER: http://ourradioactiveocean.org/support ($20 minimum donation)




GoViral

GoViral is a free and real-time online Cold & Flu surveillance system administered by researchers at New York University. Participants will get a Do-It-Yourself flu saliva collection system that they can keep and use at home if they are feeling sick. All samples will be analyzed at a central laboratory that checks for 20 different viral infections. GoViral participants will get their own laboratory results (not including NY state participants) and, through the aggregate data, be able to see what infections and symptoms are going around near them so they can take appropriate public health measures and understand when something might be abnormal. The data will be used for research purposes only.




OSF SciNet

Problem: Scientific citations are frequently constrained by terms-of-use or within proprietary systems making it difficult to see connections in the literature.

Solution: OSF SciNet uses the open source Citelet extension to crowdsource a free, open, and comprehensive metadata dataset of scientific citations and corresponding references to unlock the citation network.

Impact: The dataset generated through this project will make it easier to see the connections in the scientific literature and to promote open science.




Field Photo Library

A photo taken in the field helps scientists and citizens to document changes in landscape, wildlife habitats, impacts of drought and flood and fire, and so on. This Geo-referenced Field Photo Library is a citizen science and community remote sensing data portal, where people can share, visualize and archive field photos in the world. Users can upload, edit, query and download geo-referenced field photos in the library. All photos are also linked with satellite image series images (MODIS), so that people can see the changes over time.




Folding@home

Help Stanford University scientists studying Alzheimer's, Huntington's, Parkinson's, and many cancers by simply running a piece of software on your computer.

The problems we are trying to solve require so many calculations, we ask people to donate their unused computer power to crunch some of the numbers.




MyEnvironment

The MyEnvironment mapping tools provides immediate access to a cross-section of environmental data for any geographical location in the U.S. Users of the official site can choose the location and environmental issue to examine.




Kinsey Reporter

Kinsey Reporter is a global mobile survey platform to share, explore, and visualize anonymous data about sex.

Reports are submitted via smartphone, then explored at http://KinseyReporter.org or downloaded for off-line analysis.

The Kinsey Institute is exploring new ways to record and describe people's sexual experiences worldwide. We are also exploring new ways for people to be connected while protecting their privacy. We hope to reach people with all kinds of different ideas, beliefs, and experiences, and who might be willing to report on sexual behaviors, regardless of who is involved and where it is observed. By using Kinsey Reporter, you contribute to research on human sexual behavior. We ask you to act ethically, in the role of a good journalist or "citizen scientist." Submit what is true and accurate to the best of your ability.

Ideally, you would submit a report within 24 hours of the event you are reporting. The report can be about yourself or someone else. It is all anonymous. Kinsey Reporter includes surveys about various sexual activities and other intimate behaviors. These surveys cover sexual behaviors and events, sexual health issues, violence reports, public displays of affection, and other unique behaviors and experience. A 'survey' in this case is a report of information shared by many individuals on a topic of interest; it is not based on a random or representative sample of a community or population.

To ensure that reported data is strictly anonymous, you can only select among the provided tags when answering a question. However, contact us to suggest new surveys, questions, or tags.

To protect the anonymity of the reports even in sparsely populated areas, we aggregate reports over time. A report is not published until a sufficient number of reports have been received from the same location, and then all of those reports are recorded with a randomized timestamp. The more sparsely populated your area and/or the higher the geographic resolution you select, the longer the delay until your report appears. Therefore, in a sparsely populated area, you might want to select a lower resolution (e.g., state/region or country), to minimize the delay until your report becomes public.

Interactive visualizations of the data are available on the KinseyReporter.org website. The anonymous data we collect is also publicly available to the community via an Application Programming Interface (API), documented on the KinseyReporter.org website. We welcome your feedback.

Kinsey Reporter is a joint project of the world-famous Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction (KI) and the Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research (CNetS), both at Indiana University, Bloomington.




Dark Sky Meter

The Dark Sky Meter (available for iPhones) allows citizen scientists to contribute to a global map of nighttime light pollution.
Light pollution is a growing problem in urban environments, but now you can help scientists better understand its effects on the environment. The map is also a great help for (amateur) astronomers looking for dark skies.
By utilizing the camera built in to your iPhone, the Dark Sky Meter actually measures ‘skyglow’ and updates the data in real time.

The app also charts weather conditions and cloud cover so you can take readings at optimal times. The app is as easy to use as taking a picture, and is a fun way to learn about your night sky.

The Results are live and visible for everyone on a global light pollution map generated by the app users. Visit darkskymeter.com to see the map. Since this project has no funding or grants the app costs $1 to cover the hosting costs (which is a steal compared to commercially available light pollution meters).




The Human Memome Project

We want to be able to find correlations between people's ideas, behaviours and aspirations (all of which we are calling memes) and their health, wellbeing and lifespan.

If we can find ideas, memes, behaviours and aspirations that could potentially increase health, wellbeing and lifespan we use this data to create an academic dataset, educational tools and further citizen science and quantified self practices.

We are not just interested in finding associations with increasing average lifespan, or reaching the current maximum lifespan, but finding ideas and behaviours that may be correlated with increasing maximum lifespan as well as maintaining mutual health and wellbeing.

The dataset will be analysed using inter-disciplinary methods including linguistics, bioinformatics, omics, statistics, machine learning, computational modelling, memetics.

We would like to get at least 1000 participants, and many ideas, behaviours and aspirations per person.

I am a PhD student who has so far funded this project personally to following my passions (longevity science, science outreach and empowering people to be healthy, happy and long lived). I would really appreciate if you could take part and share this project with your friends and family.

What we think and do effects how long we will live and could potentially live - let us work together to find the best thoughts and actions to create a better world!




DIY BioPrinter

Come join our ongoing BioPrinter community project!

Did you know you can print live cells from an inkjet printer? Companies like Organovo are developing ways to 3D print human tissues and organs. But the basic technologies are so accessible that we wanted to play around with them ourselves.

We've built our own functioning bioprinter from a couple of old CD drives, an inkjet cartridge, and an Arduino. We probably won't be printing human organs any time soon, but how about printing a leaf from plant cells? Or add a BlueRay laser to turn it into a miniature laser cutter to print "lab-on-a-chip" microfluidic devices. The possibilities are endless - it all depends where *you* want to take it!

Our community projects are open to anyone, and are driven entirely by whoever wants to show up and participate. This is a great opportunity to come check out BioCurious, and jump into some of the projects going on.

This project has something for everyone, whether it's hardware hacking. programming, Arduinos, microfluidics, synthetic biology, plant biology, cell culturing, tissue engineering - you name it! Everyone has something to learn, or something to teach.




iSeeChange

The iSeeChange Almanac is a socially networked weather Almanac for communities to collectively journal their climate experiences -- their observations, feelings, questions, and decisions --- against near-real time climate information.

This groundbreaking environmental reporting project combines citizen science, participatory public media, and cutting-edge satellite monitoring of environmental conditions.

Incubated in 2012 by producer Julia Kumari Drapkin at Colorado public station KVNF Mountain Grown Community Radio via AIR’s Localore project, iSeeChange is poised to expand in 2015. The team will work with media and scientific partners across the country to help audiences document environmental shifts in their backyards and connect to the bigger-picture climate changes transforming all of our lives and livelihoods.

The project’s growing list of collaborators includes NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Berkeley BEACO2N project, Yale Climate Connections, the Allegheny Front in the Western Pennsylvania, KPCC in Pasadena, WWOZ in New Orleans, Delaware Public Media, KSJD and KVNF in Colorado, Developing Radio Partners, and more.

This spring, the iSeeChange team is expanding its crowdsourced reporting platform, the iSeeChange Almanac, coast to coast. In the coming months, the team will also develop a related app to help synchronize local citizen climate reports with satellite data on regional carbon levels. Combining these two perspectives—a global view of the earth from space and a granular view from individuals on the ground—offers an unprecedented opportunity to match big science with daily life, and surface hidden patterns and stories.

Stay tuned! iseechange.org.





Librería Metagenómica del Ecuador

We are a group of scientists interested in exploring the potential applications of Ecuador’s unique biodiversity. As a first step, we are working to assemble and apply gene libraries collected from around the country.
You can join field trips in Ecuador to collect samples, work in a lab extracting and sequencing nucleic acids, or from home assembling and curating the electronic database.




uBiome

uBiome is the world's first effort to map the human microbiome through citizen science.

What's the microbiome? The microbiome are the bacteria that live on and within us. It sounds kind of funny, but all of us are actually covered in helpful germs. Many conditions – from diabetes to depression, asthma to autism -- have been found to relate to the microbiome.

uBiome brings this cutting edge technology directly to consumers for the first time. The more data we collect, the more we can learn about this important area of research. We've been featured so far in Wired, Venture Beat, the Los Angeles Times, Scientific American, BoingBoing, and more.




AirCasting

AirCasting is an open-source, end-to-end solution for collecting, displaying, and sharing health and environmental data using your smartphone. The platform consists of wearable sensors that detect changes in your environment and physiology, including a palm-sized air quality monitor called the AirBeam, the AirCasting Android app, the AirCasting website, and wearable LED accessories. By documenting and leveraging health and environmental data to inform personal decision-making and public policy, the AirCasting platform empowers citizen scientists and changemakers.




Marblar

Marblar is unique and fun way to engage in citizen science and exchange ideas across disciplines. Marblar posts research projects in need of creative, real-world applications and they ask YOU to come up with those applications.

Singing up is easy and free and there are new projects added regularly. Projects are posted for three weeks. Through online collaboration, the final solutions are posted for users to vote on and further discuss. Top solutions are even awarded cash prizes!




The National Map Corps

The National Map Corps enlists volunteers to collect and edit data about human made structures in an effort to provide accurate and authoritative map data for the USGS National Map and US Topo Maps. Using aerial imagery and base layers from The National Map, volunteers are editing 10 different structure types including schools, hospitals, post offices, police stations, and other important public buildings in all 50 States as well as Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.




AgeGuess

AgeGuess is a simple on-line citizen science project and game where people can guess your age based on the face photos you link/upload. You will also be guessing other people’s age and comparing your results with others. By participating in AgeGuess you will create a first of its kind research data set for the study of human aging.

AgeGuess investigates the differences between perceived age (how old you look to other people) and chronological age (how old you actually are) and their potential power as an aging biomarker. Some of the specific topic we would like to address include: 


- Perceived age as predictor (biomarker) for age at death. Are people who look older than they are more likely to die early?

- Is 60 the new 50? We know that nowadays the average 60 year old is capable of doing things that fewer people of the same age where able to do 50 years ago. Is this difference also reflected in how old they look?

Please visit the intro page of our website for more information about these and other topics, such as: are there times when one ages faster, is perceived age heritable, and at what age are you best at guessing. Don’t hesitate to contact us if you have other ideas that you would like to help us explore.




Clumpy

The chloroplasts inside plant cells appear to "clump" together during bacterial infection; this can be devastating for plants and seriously compromise crop yields. We need your help to classify plant cell images by their "clumpiness" in order to further this research.

Helping us to classify the images will give insights into the progression of bacterial infection in plant cells.




World Community Grid

World Community Grid, an IBM philanthropic initiative, was created in 2004 to support humanitarian research on health, poverty, and sustainability. Through World Community Grid, hundreds of thousands of volunteers from around the globe have donated unused computing power from their computers and Android devices to help scientists make discover important advances to fighting cancer, AIDS and malaria; and developed novel solutions to environmental challenges, including new materials for affordable solar energy and more efficient water filtration.
As a volunteer, you simply install a non-invasive application on your device and get on with your day. When your device has spare power, it connects to World Community Grid and requests a virtual experiment to work on. And scientists gets several steps closer to life-changing solutions.




Citizens in Space

Citizens in Space, a project of the United States Rocket Academy, plans to fly citizen-science experiments on fully reusable suborbital spacecraft that are now being developed by US companies.

Citizens in Space has acquired an initial contract for 10 flights with XCOR Aerospace, the Mojave, California-based company that is developing the Lynx spacecraft. It expects to acquire additional flights from XCOR and other companies in the future.

Citizens in Space is currently training three astronaut candidates to fly as operators. It will select and train seven additional astronaut candidates over the next 12 to 24 months. Citizens in Space is also inviting citizen scientists to build 100 experiments to fly on those flights, which are expected to begin in late 2013 or early 2014.

In addition to the general call for experiments, Citizens in Space will offer a cash prize for certain experiments deemed to be of special importance.




MammalMAP

THE BROAD PICTURE: The aim of MammalMAP is to update the distribution records of all African mammal species. Through collaborations with professional scientists, conservation organisations, wildlife authorities and citizen scientists across Africa, we consolidate all reliable and identifiable evidence (camera trap records, photographs) of current mammal locations into an open-access digital database. The database software automatically generates online distribution maps of all recorded species which are instantly visible and searchable. The information consolidated within MammalMAP will not only yield crucial information for species conservation policies and landscape conservation policies, but provides an excellent platform for educating the public about African mammals and their conservation challenges.

WHY MAMMALMAP IS NECESSARY: In Africa, our knowledge of mammal distribution patterns is based largely on historical records. However, the last three centuries have seen extensive human-modification of African landscapes with the associated conversion, compression and fragmentation of natural land. With further land development presenting a likely reality for the future, the effectiveness of mammal conservation efforts depends on ecological records being updated so that they accurately reflect mammal distribution patterns in the 21st Century. With MammalMAP we plan to conduct these ecological updates over the coming years, by mapping the current distribution of mammal species (including marine mammals and small mammals) across Africa.

HOW MAMMALMAP CONTRIBUTES TO CONSERVATION: The conservation benefits of this research are multiple. First, the comparison of these updated distribution records with both historical and future records will enable the detection of species’ distribution changes in response to human-related and climate-related habitat changes. These change detections will assist the guidance of continent-wide conservation policies and decision making processes. Second, the research will promote and facilitate interdisciplinary and international collaboration amongst scientists and conservation practitioners, with potential benefits to the advancement of conservation science. Finally, both the project input stage (data collection) and output stage (data dissemination) will offer interactive, dynamic and widely applicable education tools suitable for both formal and informal education sectors.

THE WHERE AND THE HOW OF MAMMALMAP: The area of interest for MammalMAP is the whole of Africa. To achieve this we collaborate with scientists, conservation organisations, wildlife authorities and citizen scientists across the continent. Our methods involve consolidating evidence of mammal occurrence in a given location (camera trap records, photographs and other reliable records) into a digital database hosted by the Animal Demography Unit (ADU) at the University of Cape Town. In time, we will use the records in the database to generate distribution maps for all recorded species, in the same way that the ADU has done for birds, reptiles, frogs and butterflies.




Genetics of Taste Lab

Do mouth bacteria affect the way we taste sweetness?

Research suggests that humans range in their sensitivity to and liking of sweet-tasting molecules in our food. The Genetics of Taste Lab will take a novel look at genetics, both of the people who enroll and of the bacteria communities in their mouths (microbiome), to determine if the sensitivity and liking differences observed are due to both changes in the sweet genes AND the types of bacteria in our mouths.

Community Participation: Research & Educational Goals: The Genetics of Taste Lab is a unique venue for both citizen science AND crowdsourcing health data
-We connect our community to research that is relevant to their lives.
-We conduct research to answer real public health questions and publish in peer-reviewed scientific journals.

This study is led by Nicole Garneau, PhD (ngarneau@dmns.org) and Robin Tucker, PhD, RD (rtucker@bgsu.edu), and made possible by a partnership between the Health Science and Visitor Programs Departments at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science and the Department of Public and Allied Health at Bowling Green State University. To become a citizen scientist, contact our volunteer services office at 303.370.6419 or visit www.dmns.org/join/volunteering.




EyeWire

Based in the Seung Computational Neuroscience Lab at Princeton University, EyeWire investigators are solving the mysteries of the brain with the help of the public.  Over 150,000 people around the world have played what has been called a “3D neuroscience coloring book” — a puzzle game anyone can play without having any knowledge or experience in the field of neuroscience.  EyeWire researchers aim to eventually map the human brain, but for now they are starting with the retina.  Players are mapping the connections between retinal neurons, helping researchers understand how neurons process information.  Players have already helped researchers understand how a mammal can detect motion, which has remained a mystery — until now.  EyeWire researchers hope their work can lead to advances in blindness therapies, the development of retinal prosthestics, and other benefits.




Flusurvey

The Flusurvey is an online system for measuring influenza trends in the UK.

In contrast to traditional surveillance methods, the Flusurvey collects data directly from the general public, rather than via hospitals or GPs. This is particularly important because many people with flu don't visit a doctor so don't feature in traditional flu surveillance.

Each week, participants report any flu-like symptoms they have experienced since their last visit. If you have no symptoms, this only takes a few seconds. We provide participants with regular updates on the epidemic, all the latest news and advice about flu.

This year, for the first time, we are coordinating with similar surveys in 9 other European countries, letting us monitor flu as it spreads across the continent. You can find out more on the "Join in" tab.




Research Assistant in Tropical Herpetology and Conservation Ecology

We are currently seeking research assistants to join our field team in Ecuador studying the conservation ecology of reptiles and amphibians.

While Ecuador is a relatively small country—it’s roughly the size of Arizona—it stands as the third most diverse country in the world for amphibians (510 species) and is seventh for reptiles (430 species), making it a herpetologically mega-diverse region. Due to the severe deforestation taking place in addition to many other pressures on Ecuador’s fauna, RAEI’s research program aims to study, document, and preserve these rich and unique communities of reptiles and amphibians found within the country’s diverse array of ecosystems.

As we are now in our 8th year working in Ecuador, we have study sites encompassing both the coastal forests in western Ecuador and the Amazon rainforest on the eastern side of the Andes Mountains. The work that research participants will be involved with will primarily consist of conducting night surveys for reptiles and amphibians (however other taxa such as invertebrates are also of interest), animal data collection, and lab work. Lab work consists of more detailed information such as scale counts (for reptiles) and other morphological information, animal measurements, screening for chytrid desease (amphibians), preservation (only when necessary), and acquisition of DNA samples. Diagnostic photographs of all animals are taken. Other tasks include animal handling and general note taking and data organization.




Science Hack Day

Science Hack Day is a 48-hour-all-night event that brings together designers, developers, scientists and other geeks in the same physical space for a brief but intense period of collaboration, hacking, and building 'cool stuff'. By collaborating on focused tasks during this short period, small groups of hackers are capable of producing remarkable results. Some Hack Days have a specific focus. There have already been very successful Music Hack Days and Government Hack Days. It's time for a Hack Day focused on science!




OPAL Biodiversity Survey

The OPAL Biodiversity Survey needs citizen scientists in England to help uncover the diverse range of wildlife in hedges. By contributing, you'll help researchers learn more about the importance of hedges and how we can improve them.

Hedges support many animals by providing them with food and shelter. Berries and seeds are food for birds, while holes beneath the hedge are often home to small mammals. You’ll also discover caterpillars, shieldbugs and many other invertebrates living among the leaves.

By sharing your observations with the project, reseachers can instantly rate the condition of your hedge and offer suggestions on how to improve it.

This is one of five OPAL surveys across England to learn more about the state of the environment. Anyone can get involved. The studies are open to all ages and abilities, and your contribution will be important in helping scientists build up a picture of England's natural environment.




The Wildlife Health Event Reporter

Wildlife Health Event Reporter (WHER) is publicly available to anyone to use to report their sightings of sick or dead wildlife.

Individual reports viewed together can lead to the detection and containment of wildlife disease outbreaks that may pose a health risk to people, domestic animals and other wildlife. WHER hopes to harness the power of the many eyes of the public to better detect wildlife disease phenomenon.

Additionally, WHER was developed by the Wildlife Data Integration Network (WDIN), a program of the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.




Master Watershed Steward

The Master Watershed Steward program trains citizens across the state of Arizona to serve as volunteers in the protection, restoration, monitoring, and conservation of their water and watersheds.

We all live in a watershed, also known as a drainage basin or catchment. Each watershed is defined by an area of land that drains water downhill into a common water body. The health of watersheds is especially impacted as our growing population, and thus our demand for natural resources, increases. Learning to look past political boundaries and view land as divided by natural boundaries helps us better manage resources as a complete, more sustainable system.

As a Master Watershed Steward you can help to improve the health of your watershed. The project's informative, research-based training will give you the knowledge to make better, more informed decisions related to your own land, community and watershed. Master Watershed Stewards are highly trained volunteers working closely with the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension and the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality. Stewards may come from a variety of backgrounds, but all have a passion for our environment! To become certified, Master Watershed Stewards participate in over 40 hours of course and field work to learn the basics of watershed science.

You work with community organizations including watershed partnerships and various state agencies to implement projects throughout Arizona to monitor, maintain and restore the health of our watersheds. Ongoing volunteer projects include: photopoint monitoring in the Tonto National Forest and Saguaro National Park, riparian assessments along urban and preserved corridors, outreach at Arizona Project WET Water Festivals, free private well testing and collaboration with NEMO to develop Watershed Based Plans.

The Master Watershed Steward Program is a partnership of the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension and the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality. Funding provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Clean Water Act and the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality's Water Quality Division.




EteRNA

EteRNA is the first-ever global laboratory where scientists, educators, students, online gamers, and any human being with a strong interest in unlocking the mystery of life will collectively help solve world's biggest scientific problems.

RNA, or ribonucleic acid, is a substance that our cells use to translate and express genetic information from our DNA. We now know that folding and shape-shifting allows RNA and its partners to control the cell in a predictable fashion. However, the full biological and medical implications of these discoveries are still being worked out.

By playing EteRNA, you will help extend and curate the first large scale library of synthetic RNA designs. You play by designing RNAs, tiny molecules at the heart of every cell. If you win the weekly competition your RNA is synthesized and scored by how well it folds. Your efforts will help us understand, dissect, and control the functional properties of real and designed RNAs from bacteria, viruses, and our own cells. Join the global laboratory!




North Carolina Sea Turtle Project

The North Carolina Sea Turtle Project trains volunteers to monitor sea turtle activity along the entire coast of North Carolina.

There are a number of ways that your citizen science efforts can help protect sea turtles in North Carolina. Volunteers are needed to:

- walk small sections of beach each morning from May to August to look for turtle tracks and nests
- help guard the nests as they become ready to hatch each evening from July to October
- respond to strandings
- transport injured turtles to rehabilitation centers

All the data collected by the project are organized and disseminated to the state and federal agencies that use the information to make management decisions.

The North Carolina Sea Turtle Project, run by the state Wildlife Resources Commission's Division of Wildlife Management, is committed to monitoring North Carolina's sea turtle population. The project would not be possible without the help of hundreds of volunteers!




Seabird Ecological Assessment Network (SEANET)

Seabird Ecological Assessment Network (SEANET) volunteers conduct beached bird surveys along the east coast of the United States in order to identify and record information about bird mortality. Volunteers examine the spatial pattern of bird carcass deposition and how it varies across time.

The project brings together interdisciplinary researchers and citizen scientists in a long-term collaborative effort to identify and mitigate threats to marine birds.

These surveys provide baseline information about bird mortality and help to detect mass mortality events such as oil spills, algal toxins, and disease outbreaks. Marine birds can serve as indicators of ecosystem and human health; monitoring the threats they face and their mortality patterns can teach us about the health of the marine environment.

This project relies heavily on a working partnership between concerned citizens with an incomparable understanding of local ecosystems and natural phenomena, and scientists with the training and knowledge to synthesize and verify the data generated by local residents. Through this synergistic relationship, scientists exponentially increase the amount and range of data they can access, and residents come to see the larger patterns and trends of which their local ecosystem is a part.




Sound Around You Project

I am building a sound map of the world as part of a study into how sounds in our everyday environment make us feel. We need your help!

We’re asking people across the world to use our new iOS app on their iPhones or iPads (or any recorder) to record short clips from different sound environments, or "soundscapes"--anything from the inside of a family car to a busy shopping centre. Then we ask volunteers to comment on their soundscapes and upload them to our virtual soundscape map.

Recordings and responses will be analyzed by acoustic scientists, and significant findings will be reported on this website.

Sound Around You aims to raise awareness of how our soundscape influences us, and could have far reaching implications for professions and social groups ranging from urban planners to house buyers.




DIYgenomics

Donate your DNA to science! If you have used genetic testing services such as 23andMe or Navigenics, you can offer your genetic data to DIYgenomics for a variety of medical studies.

DIYgenomics is now recruiting participants for its first study, which will examine the effect of a common mutation on vitamin B metabolism.

In a gene called the MTHFR gene, two small mutations prevent vitamin B9 (or folic acid) from being metabolized into its active form (folate). People who lack this form of vitamin B may develop nutritional deficiencies and symptoms associated with diabetes complications, including damage to blood vessels and nerves. Up to 60% of people may have some form of MTHFR mutation.

DIYgenomics aims to:
--Find people with MTHFR mutations by collecting data from volunteers who have used genetic testing services.
--Ask them to try simple interventions, such as taking over-the-counter vitamin B supplements.
--Ask participants to share results from blood tests performed at commercial labs.




BEACH

Beach Environmental Assessment, Communication, Health (BEACH) volunteers monitor high-risk Washington state beaches for bacteria. Beaches are considered high-risk when they have a lot of recreational users and are located near potential bacteria sources.

Monitoring can indicate pollution from sewage treatment plant problems, boating waste, malfunctioning septic systems, animal waste, or other sources of fecal pollution. BEACH volunteers monitor for an indicator bacteria called "enterococci." The presence of this bacteria at elevated levels means there is a potential for disease-causing bacteria and viruses to also be present.

BEACH is intended to reduce the risk of disease for people who play in saltwater. The program strives to educate the public about the risks associated with polluted water and what each of us can do to reduce that risk.




State of the Oyster

State of the Oyster Study volunteers help monitor bacterial contamination levels in edible shellfish collected from privately owned Washington state beaches in Hood Canal and throughout Puget Sound

Volunteers collect oyster and clam samples from their beaches at specific times during summer months. Washington Sea Grant arranges for laboratory testing of these samples, which are analyzed for the presence of harmful bacteria or for bacterial indicators of fecal contamination. (Volunteers must cover the lab fees.) Washington Sea Grant then helps participants interpret their test results and, if needed, works closely with them to identify and remedy the sources of observed contamination.

Through the years, State of the Oyster has has helped waterfront residents on more than 300 Washington state beaches learn what makes for safer oysters and clams and how to minimize fecal contamination in their waters.




GLOBE at Night

Six out of 10 people in the US have never seen our Milky Way Galaxy arch across their night sky from where they live. And the problem of light pollution is quickly getting worse. Within a couple of generations in the U.S., only the national parks will have dark enough skies to see the Milky Way.

Too much outdoor lighting not only affects being able to see the stars, but also wastes energy and money, about 2 to 10 billion dollars a year. And it has been shown to cause sleep disorders in people and to disrupt the habits of animals like newly hatched sea turtles that try to find their way back into the ocean but are disoriented by streetlights.

Light pollution may be a global problem, but the solutions are local. To help people “see the light”, an international star-hunting program for students, teachers, and the general public was created called GLOBE at Night. GLOBE at Night is now in its 6th year and is hosted by the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory.

For 2016 we are collecting your observations during all 12 months of the year! See the dates below and plan to get involved.

January 1-10
February 1-10
March 1-10

March 30- April 8
April 29- May 8
May 29-June 7

June 27-July 6
July 28-August 6
August 25-Sept 2

October 21-31
November 20-30
December 20-30

Through this program, children and adults are encouraged to reconnect with the night sky and learn about light pollution and in doing so, become citizen scientists inspired to protect this natural resource. Teachers like the GLOBE at Night program, because it lends itself to cross-curricular learning: astronomy, geography, history, literature, and writing. The possibilities are great.




The Genographic Project

The Genographic Project is a ten-year old anthropological study that uses DNA voluntarily contributed by hundreds of thousands of people to answer the oldest questions we have about ourselves: Who are we and where did we come from? In doing so, the project has created the world's largest survey of DNA samples to map how humankind populated the planet. Today, this database serve as an invaluable scientific resource for the research community and may ultimately underscore how closely related we are to one another as part of the extended human family. The Genographic Project uses sophisticated computer analysis of DNA voluntarily contributed by people—including indigenous and traditional populations and the general public—to reveal our migratory history and to better understand the connections and differences that make up humankind. Members of the general public can being to take part in the project by purchasing a Genographic Project Public Participation Kit and submitting their own cheek-swab sample.

In 2015 alone we launched four projects across the world (Palau, Aleutian Islands, Chile, and the Dominican Republic), and published six new papers, including populations studies on the Lesser Antilles, the European Roma, and Australian Aboriginal groups. This past year we also launched our new participation kit called Geno 2.0 Next Generation, and we opened up the Genographic Project database to researchers




Cure Together

CureTogether is a worldwide health research project that brings patients and researchers together to find cures for some of the most painful, prevalent, and chronic conditions. Users anonymously track their own health care data, including medication schedules, symptoms, and treatment plans, and provide it other participants around the world.

By making aggregate health data available for analysis, CureTogether provides a conduit for citizens to work together to better understand their bodies, make more informed treatment decisions, and influence scientific research.





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