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North American Bird Phenology Program

Main Project Information
Presented By USGS
Goal Curate 6mil migratory bird observations; make them public.
Task Transcribe records and add to database for analysis.
Where Online only
Description

The North American Bird Phenology Program, part of the USA-National Phenology Network, was a network of volunteer observers who recorded information on first arrival dates, maximum abundance, and departure dates of migratory birds across North America. Active between 1880 and 1970, the program was coordinated by the Federal government and sponsored by the American Ornithologists' Union. It exists now as a historic collection of six million migration card observations, illuminating almost a century of migration patterns and population status of birds. Today, in an innovative project to curate the data and make them publicly available, the records are being scanned and placed on the internet, where volunteers worldwide transcribe these records and add them into a database for analysis.

How to Join Click the "Request to join" button on this page to instantly notify the project leader of your interest!
or

Migration cards are currently available on the BPP website which need to be transcribed. You can become one of the many volunteers from around the world to sign into our site and transcribe these files for our database. This will allow the migration records to become accessible to the public and to scientists for analysis. To become a program participant, go to: https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/bpp/Register2.cfm

Project Timing all year round, flexible
Website http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/bpp/
Social Media
Special Skills Helpful to know how to read cursive/messy handwriting
Ideal Age Group Elementary school (6 - 10 years), Middle school (11 - 13 years), High school (14 - 17 years), College, Graduate students, Adults, Families, Seniors
Ideal Frequency Just once
Average Time Less than an hour
Spend the Time indoors
Type of Activity Exclusively online, At school, At home
Media Mentions
and Publications
Tags birds, climate change, fws, migration, npn, phenology
Project Updated 08/07/2016