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World Community Grid

Main Project Information
Presented By IBM
Goal Support scientific research in health, poverty & sustainability.
Task Donate your device's unused computing power to research.
Where Online only
Description

World Community Grid, an IBM philanthropic initiative, was created in 2004 to support humanitarian research on health, poverty, and sustainability. Through World Community Grid, hundreds of thousands of volunteers from around the globe have donated unused computing power from their computers and Android devices to help scientists make discover important advances to fighting cancer, AIDS and malaria; and developed novel solutions to environmental challenges, including new materials for affordable solar energy and more efficient water filtration.
As a volunteer, you simply install a non-invasive application on your device and get on with your day. When your device has spare power, it connects to World Community Grid and requests a virtual experiment to work on. And scientists gets several steps closer to life-changing solutions.

How to Join

Go to http://www.worldcommunitygrid.org/ to register and download the World Community Grid app on your computer or Android device.

Project Timing Ongoing
Website http://www.worldcommunitygrid.org/
Social Media
Participation Fee $0
Expenses $0
Ideal Age Group Elementary school (6 - 10 years), Middle school (11 - 13 years), High school (14 - 17 years), College, Graduate students, Adults, Families, Seniors
Ideal Frequency Other
Average Time Less than an hour
Spend the Time indoors
Type of Activity At school, Exclusively online, At night, At home
Training Materials http://discover.worldcommunitygrid.org/
Media Mentions
and Publications
Tags aids, cancer, childhood cancer, citizen science, clean energy, clean water, dengue, distributed computing, ebola, genomics, health, hiv, malaria, neglected disease, neuroblastoma, open data, poverty, research, scientific research, solar energy, sustainability, tropical disease, tuberculosis, volunteer computing, zika
Project Updated 08/07/2016